Inspector's email: inspectmorellc@gmail.com
Inspector's phone: (404) 661-9763
PO Box 3755 
Suwanee GA 30024-0995
Inspector: Joe Moore

 

Sample Property Inspection Report
Client(s):  Mr & Mrs Jefferson
Property address:  1234 Island Ave
John's Creek, GA 30097
Inspection date:  Wednesday, August 28, 2013

This report published on Monday, October 14, 2013 1:41:17 PM EDT

View summary

This report is the exclusive property of this inspection company and the client(s) listed in the report title. Use of this report by any unauthorized persons is prohibited.

 
How to Read this Report
This report is organized by the property's functional areas.  Within each functional area, descriptive information is listed first and is shown in bold type.  Items of concern follow descriptive information.
Concerns are shown and sorted according to these types:
SafetyPoses a safety hazard 
Repair/ReplaceRecommend repairing or replacing 
Repair/MaintainRecommend repair and/or maintenance 
Minor DefectCorrection likely involves only a minor expense 
MaintainRecommend ongoing maintenance 
EvaluateRecommend evaluation by a specialist 
MonitorRecommend monitoring in the future 
CommentFor your information 

Wood Destroying Organism Concerns
Concerns relating to wood destroying organisms are shown as follows:
InfestationEvidence of infestation of wood destroying insects or organisms (Live or dead insect bodies, fungal growth, etc.) 
DamageDamage caused by wood destroying insects or organisms (Rot, carpenter ant galleries, etc.) 
Conducive conditionsConditions conducive for wood destroying insects or organisms (Wood-soil contact, shrubs in contact with siding, roof or plumbing leaks, etc.) 

Click here for a glossary of building construction terms.Contact your inspector If there are terms that you do not understand, or visit the glossary of construction terms at http://www.reporthost.com/glossary.asp

Table of Contents
General Information
Grounds
Exterior and Foundation
Basement
Roof
Attic and Roof Structure
Garage or Carport
Electric
Plumbing / Fuel Systems
Water Heater
Heating, Ventilation and Air Condition (HVAC)
Fireplaces, Stoves, Chimneys and Flues
Kitchen
Bathrooms, Laundry and Sinks
Interior, Doors and Windows
Wood Destroying Organism Findings


 
General Information Return to table of contents
Report number: 20131
Start time: 3:00 pm
Present during inspection: Client, Property owner, Realtor
Client present for discussion at end of inspection: Yes
Weather conditions during inspection: Rain, Partly Sunny
Temperature during inspection: Warm
Ground condition: Damp
Inspection Fee: $000.00
Payment method: Check# 1199
Type of building: Single family
Buildings inspected: One house
Total time spent on Inspection & Report Writing: 4
Age of main building: 8
Source for main building age: Realtor
Front of building faces: Northwest
Main entrance faces: Northwest
Occupied: Yes
The following items are excluded from this inspection: Private sewage disposal system, Security system, Irrigation system
1) Some areas and items at this property were obscured by furniture, stored items. This often includes but is not limited to walls, floors, windows, inside and under cabinets, under sinks, on counter tops, in closets, behind window coverings, under rugs or carpets, and under or behind furniture. Areas around the exterior, under the structure, in the garage and in the attic may also be obscured by stored items. The inspector in general does not move personal belongings, furnishings, carpets or appliances. When furnishings, stored items or debris are present, all areas or items that are obscured, concealed or not readily accessible are excluded from the inspection. The client should be aware that when furnishings, stored items or debris are eventually moved, damage or problems that were not noted during the inspection may be found.
 
Grounds Return to table of contents
Site profile: Moderate slope
Condition of driveway: Appeared serviceable
Driveway material: Poured in place concrete
Condition of sidewalks and/or patios: Appeared serviceable
Sidewalk material: Poured in place concrete
Retaining wall material: Wood
Condition of retaining walls: Appeared serviceable
Condition of fences and gates: Appeared serviceable
Fence and gate material: Wood
Condition of decks, porches and/or balconies: Required repairs, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Deck, porch and/or balcony material: Wood
Condition of stairs, handrails and guardrails: Required repairs, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Exterior stair material: Wood
2) Handrails at one or more flights of stairs were not graspable and posed a fall hazard. Handrails should be 1 1/4 - 2 inches in diameter if round, or 2 5/8 inches or less in width if flat. Recommend that a qualified person install graspable handrails or modify existing handrails per standard building practices.

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3) Handrails at one or more flights of stairs were loose, wobbly. This is a safety hazard. Recommend that a qualified person repair as necessary.

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4) Guardrails above retaining walls higher than 30 inches were missing. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of falling. At a minimum, the client should be aware of this hazard, especially when children are present. Recommend that a qualified contractor install or repair guardrails per standard building practices (e.g. minimum 3 feet high, no gaps wider than 4 inches, not climbable). Dense shrubbery or vegetation may be acceptable as a barrier, but only when mature enough to be effective.

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5) One or more deck or porch beams were not positively secured to the support posts below. Deck or porch beams are commonly connected to support posts by "toenailing," which is inadequate. Decks and porches are subject to movement under live loads and require a positive connection between their support posts and beams. Recommend that a qualified contractor repair per standard building practices. For example, by installing metal plates, plywood gussets or dimensional lumber to connect posts and beams.

Examples at the following link; http://www.strongtie.com/deckcenter/index.html

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6) Soil was in contact with or too close to wooden deck or porch substructure components. This is a conducive condition for wood-destroying organisms. Clearances to soil should be as follows:Pressure treated wood is typically rated for 25 year contact with soil, but the cut ends hidden below grade may not have been treated and can rot quickly. Support posts should be elevated above grade on concrete piers or footings, and be separated from the concrete by metal brackets or an impermeable membrane such as shingle scraps. For other components, soil should be graded and/or removed to maintain these clearances if possible. Otherwise, replacing non-treated wood with treated wood, or installing borate-based products such as Impel rods may help to prevent infestation and damage. For more information, visit:
http://www.reporthost.com/?IMPEL

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7) General photos of the grounds of the property.

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Exterior and Foundation Return to table of contents
Limitations: The inspector performs a visual inspection of accessible components or systems at the exterior. Items excluded from this inspection include below-grade foundation walls and footings; foundations, exterior surfaces or components obscured by vegetation, stored items or debris; wall structures obscured by coverings such as siding or trim. Some items such as siding, trim, soffits, vents and windows are often high off the ground, and may be viewed using binoculars from the ground or from a ladder. This may limit a full evaluation. Regarding foundations, some amount of cracking is normal in concrete slabs and foundation walls due to shrinkage and drying. Note that the inspector does not determine the adequacy of seismic reinforcement.
Wall inspection method: Viewed from ground
Condition of wall exterior covering: Required repairs, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Apparent wall structure: Wood frame
Wall covering: Cement fiber, Stone or faux stone veneer
Condition of foundation and footings: Appeared serviceable
Apparent foundation type: Unfinished basement
Foundation/stem wall material: Poured in place concrete
Footing material (under foundation stem wall): Poured in place concrete
8) One or more hornet, bee, and/or wasp nest were found. These can pose a safety hazard. Nest should be removed as necessary.

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9) Some sections of siding and/or trim were damaged. Recommend that a qualified person repair, replace or install siding or trim as necessary.

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10) One or more exhaust duct end caps were loose. Their purpose is to prevent unconditioned air from entering the building, and keep out birds, rodents and bugs. Blocked ducts can cause fan motors and/or clothes dryers to overheat and can pose a fire hazard. Recommend that a qualified person repair or replace caps as necessary.

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11) Soil was in contact with or less than 6 inches from siding or trim. Regardless of what material is used for siding, it should not be in contact with the soil. If made of wood, siding or trim will eventually rot. For other materials, ground or surface water can infiltrate siding or trim and cause damage to the wall structure. Wood-destroying insects are likely to infest and damage the wall structure. This is a conducive condition for wood-destroying organisms. Recommend grading or removing soil as necessary to maintain a 6-inch clearance. Note that damage from fungal rot and/or insects may be found when soil is removed, and repairs may be necessary.

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12) One or more holes or gaps were found in siding or trim. Vermin, insects or water may enter the structure. Recommend that a qualified person repair as necessary.

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13) Vegetation such as trees, shrubs and/or vines was in contact with or close to the building exterior. Vegetation can serve as a pathway for wood-destroying insects and can retain moisture against the exterior after it rains. This is a conducive condition for wood-destroying organisms. Recommend pruning, moving or removing vegetation as necessary to maintain at least 6 inches of space between it and the building exterior. A 1-foot clearance is better.

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14) The paint finish, and/or caulk in some areas was failing (e.g. peeling, faded, worn, thinning). Siding and trim with a failing finish can be damaged by moisture.Recommend that a qualified contractor prep (e.g. clean, scrape, sand, prime, caulk) and repaint or re-stain the building exterior where necessary and per standard building practices. Any repairs needed to the siding or trim should be made prior to this.

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15) General photos of the exterior of the property.

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Basement Return to table of contents
Condition of exterior entry doors: Appeared serviceable
Exterior door material: Metal
Pier or support post material: Bearing wall
Beam material: Built-up wood
Floor structure: Engineered wood joists
Condition of insulation underneath floor above: Appeared serviceable
Insulation material underneath floor above: Fiberglass roll or batt
16) Evidence of prior water intrusion was found in one or more sections of the basement. For example, water stains or rust at support post bases, efflorescence on the foundation, etc. Accumulated water is a conducive condition for wood-destroying organisms and should not be present in the basement. Recommend reviewing any disclosure statements available and ask the property owner about past accumulation of water in the basement. The basement should be monitored in the future for accumulated water, especially after heavy and/or prolonged periods of rain. If water is found to accumulate, then recommend that a qualified contractor who specializes in drainage issues evaluate and repair as necessary. Typical repairs for preventing water from accumulating in basements include:Ideally, water should not enter basements, but if water must be controlled after it enters the basement, then typical repairs include installing a sump pump.

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17) Many areas were not evaluated due to lack of access from stored items. These areas are excluded from the inspection.

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18) Moderate cracks were found in the concrete slab floor. These are common and appeared to be only a cosmetic issue. Recommend consulting with the property owner, reviewing disclosure statements, and/or that a qualified contractor evaluate and repair if necessary.

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19) General photos of the basement area.

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Roof Return to table of contents
Age of roof surface(s): 8
Roof inspection method: Viewed from ground with binoculars
Condition of roof surface material: Appeared serviceable
Roof surface material: Asphalt or fiberglass composition shingles
Roof type: Gable
Apparent number of layers of roof surface material: One
Condition of exposed flashings: Appeared serviceable
Condition of gutters, downspouts and extensions: Appeared serviceable
Gutter and downspout material: Metal
Gutter and downspout installation: Full
20) General photos of the roof surface.

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Attic and Roof Structure Return to table of contents
Limitations: The following items or areas are not included in this inspection: areas that could not be traversed or viewed clearly due to lack of access; areas and components obscured by insulation. Any comments made regarding these items are made as a courtesy only. The inspector does not determine the adequacy of the attic ventilation system. Complete access to all roof and attic spaces during all seasons and during prolonged periods of all types of weather conditions (e.g. high/low temperatures, high/low humidity, high wind and rain, melting snow) would be needed to do so. The inspector is not a licensed engineer and does not determine the adequacy of roof structure components such as trusses, rafters or ceiling beams, or their spacing or sizing.
Attic inspection method: Partially traversed
Location of attic access point: Master bedroom closet
Condition of roof structure: Appeared serviceable
Roof structure type: Trusses
Ceiling structure: Trusses
Condition of insulation in attic (ceiling, skylight chase, etc.): Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Ceiling insulation material: Cellulose loose fill
Approximate attic insulation R value (may vary in areas): R-30
Condition of roof ventilation: Appeared serviceable
Roof ventilation type: Box vents (roof jacks), Enclosed soffit vents
21) The pull-down attic stairs were not insulated. Typically, such stairs that are not insulated also do not have any weatherstripping installed. Recommend that a qualified person install insulation and weatherstripping per standard building practices for better energy efficiency. For more information, visit:
http://www.reporthost.com/?INSATTSTRS

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22) Some areas of the ceiling insulation installed in the attic was substandard and appeared to have an R rating that's significantly less than current standards (R-38). Heating and cooling costs will likely be higher due to poor energy efficiency. Recommend that a qualified contractor install insulation for better energy efficiency and per standard building practices.

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23) Attic insulation at one or more skylight chases or attic walls has fallen down or come loose from the interior wall surface. Heating and cooling costs will likely be higher due to reduced energy efficiency. Recommend that a qualified person repair, re-secure or install insulation as necessary and per standard building practices.

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24) The ceiling insulation in one or more areas of the attic was compacted or uneven. Heating and cooling costs may be higher due to reduced energy efficiency. Recommend that a qualified person repair, replace or install insulation as necessary and per standard building practices (typically R-38).

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25) General photos of the attic area and roof structure.

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26) General photo of the attic light switch and location.

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Garage or Carport Return to table of contents
Limitations: The inspector does not determine the adequacy of firewall ratings. Requirements for ventilation in garages vary between municipalities.
Type: Attached, Garage
Condition of door between garage and house: Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Type of door between garage and house: Solid core
Condition of garage vehicle door(s): Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Type of garage vehicle door: Sectional
Number of vehicle doors: 1
Condition of automatic opener(s): Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Mechanical auto-reverse operable (reverses when meeting reasonable resistance during closing): Yes
Condition of garage interior: Appeared serviceable
27) The door between the garage and the house didn't self-latch when closed via the self-closing device because of damage or deterioration to the . House to garage doors prevent fire and fumes from spreading from the garage to the house. Self-closing devices keep the door closed for this purpose. Recommend that a qualified person repair as necessary.

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28) One or more garage vehicle doors had an automatic opener installed, and the manual lock mechanism on the door hadn't been permanently disabled. The automatic opener can be damaged, or injury can occur if the automatic door opener is operated with the manual lock engaged. A qualified person should disable or remove the lock mechanism per standard building practices.

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29) Significant gaps were found below or around one or more garage vehicle doors. Vermin and insects can enter the garage as a result. Recommend that a qualified person repair as necessary to eliminate or minimize gaps.

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30) Minor cracks were found in the concrete slab floor. These are common and appeared to be only a cosmetic issue.

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31) General photos of the Garage or Carport area.

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Electric Return to table of contents
Primary service type: Underground
Service voltage (volts): 120-240
Estimated service amperage: 200
Primary service overload protection type: Circuit breakers
Service entrance conductor material: Stranded aluminum
Main disconnect rating (amps): 200
System ground: Ground rod(s) in soil
Location of the main service switch: The main service switch is located adjacent to the meter on the left side of the home.
32) Substandard wiring was found at the building exterior. For example, extension or lamp cord used as permanent wiring. This is a safety hazard. Recommend that a qualified electrician evaluate and repair as necessary and per standard building practices.

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33) Smoke alarms were missing from one or more bedrooms. Additional smoke alarms should be installed as necessary so a functioning alarm exists in each hallway leading to bedrooms, in each bedroom, on each level and in any attached garage. For more information, visit:
http://www.reporthost.com/?SMKALRM

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34) Photo of the main service switch and location.

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35) This service panel is equipped with arc fault circuit interrupter (AFCI) breakers to protect certain areas of the home (notably bedroom circuits). These are relatively new devices, and reduce the risk of fire by protecting against overheated or arcing receptacles (outlets) or light fixtures. It is recommended that these breakers be tested on a monthly basis to insure proper operation.

For more information, visit:
http://www.reporthost.com/?AFCI

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36)   Photos of the service panel located in the basement.

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Plumbing / Fuel Systems Return to table of contents
Condition of service and main line: Appeared serviceable
Water service: Public
Water pressure (psi): 57
Location of main water shut-off: Basement
Supply pipe material: PEX plastic
Condition of drain pipes: Appeared serviceable
Drain pipe material: Plastic
Waste pipe material: Plastic
Vent pipe condition: Appeared serviceable
Vent pipe material: Plastic
37) General picture of the water pressure as tested.

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38) Photo of the main water shut-off valve.

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Water Heater Return to table of contents
Type: Tank
Energy source: Electricity
Estimated age: 3
Capacity (in gallons): 50
Temperature-pressure relief valve installed: Yes
Location of water heater: Basement
Hot water temperature tested: Yes
Water temperature (degrees Fahrenheit): 110
Manufacturer: A.O. Smith
Model number: ECT 52 200
39) The water heater was checked and appears to be functional.

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40) General photo of the inspectors test instrument and the water temperature present at the time of the inspection.

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Heating, Ventilation and Air Condition (HVAC) Return to table of contents
General heating system type(s): Heat pump
General heating distribution type(s): Ducts and registers
Condition of furnace filters: Required repair and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Location for forced air filter(s): At base of air handler
Condition of forced air ducts and registers: Appeared serviceable
Condition of cooling system and/or heat pump: Appeared serviceable
Cooling system and/or heat pump fuel type: Electric
Type: Heat pump
Manufacturer: Amana
Heat pump or air conditioner model number: RHA60C2C
Estimated age of Heat pump or air conditioner.: 8
Heat pump or air conditioner model number: ARUF061-00A -1A
Condition of controls: Appeared serviceable
41) The air handler's primary condensate drain line appears to be leaking. Condensate drain water may accumulate, leak and cause water damage to surrounding areas. Recommend that a qualified HVAC contractor repair as necessary.

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42) The covers for one or more heating and/or cooling system air filters were loose. Unfiltered air can enter the return air supply and reduce indoor air quality. Recommend that a qualified person repair as necessary.

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43) Insulation on the heat pump or air conditioning condensing unit's refrigerant lines was deteriorated or missing in some areas. This may result in reduced efficiency and increased energy costs. Recommend that a qualified person replace or install insulation as necessary.

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44) Recommend replacing or washing HVAC filters upon taking occupancy depending on the type of filters installed. Regardless of the type, recommend checking filters monthly in the future and replacing or washing them as necessary. How frequently they need replacing or washing depends on the type and quality of the filter, how the system is configured (e.g. always on vs. "Auto"), and on environmental factors (e.g. pets, smoking, frequency of house cleaning, number of occupants, the season).

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45) The heating and cooling systems were checked and appear to be functional. General pictures of the heating and cooling equipment.

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Fireplaces, Stoves, Chimneys and Flues Return to table of contents
Limitations: The following items are not included in this inspection: coal stoves, gas logs, chimney flues (except where visible). Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not determine the adequacy of drafting or sizing in fireplace and stove flues, and also does not determine if prefabricated or zero-clearance fireplaces are installed in accordance with the manufacturer's specifications. The inspector does not perform any evaluations that require a pilot light to be lit, and does not light fires. The inspector provides a basic visual examination of a chimney and any associated wood burning device. The National Fire Protection Association has stated that an in-depth Level 2 chimney inspection should be part of every sale or transfer of property with a wood-burning device. Such an inspection may reveal defects that are not apparent to the home inspector who is a generalist.
46) One or more refractory panels (the 1-inch thick fireproof panels lining the fireplace) had minor cracks or deterioration. This is common, and is typically not a concern until cracks exceed 1/4 inch in width, or surface pitting becomes extensive and deeper than 3/16 inch, or if any piece of the refractory larger than 2 inches in radius and 3/16 inch deep becomes dislodged. Monitor refractory panels in the future for further deterioration. When necessary, a qualified contractor should repair or replace refractory panels.

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47) General pictures of the fireplace and controls.

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Kitchen Return to table of contents
Condition of counters: Appeared serviceable
Condition of cabinets: Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Condition of sinks and related plumbing: Appeared serviceable
Condition of dishwasher: Appeared serviceable
Condition of range, cooktop or oven: Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Range, cooktop or oven type: Electric
Condition of refrigerator: Appeared serviceable
48) An exhaust hood was installed over the cook top or range, but the fan recirculated the exhaust air back into the kitchen. This may be due to no duct being installed, baffles at the front of the hood not being installed, or a problem with the duct. This can be a nuisance for odor and grease accumulation. Where a gas-fired range or cook top is installed, carbon monoxide and excessive levels of moisture can accumulate in living spaces. Recommend that a qualified contractor evaluate and repair as necessary so exhaust air is ducted outdoors.

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49) The oven door handle was loose or damaged. Consult with the property owner. If necessary, a qualified person should repair by tightening or replacing the handle.

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50) Cabinet molding was loose, missing or damaged on one or more cabinets. Recommend that a qualified person repair as necessary.

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51) The sink faucet and sprayer were checked and appeared to be functional.

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52) The refrigerator was checked and appeared to be functional.

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53) The cooktop was checked and appeared to be functional.

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54) The microwave was checked and appeared to be functional.

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55) General pictures of the kitchen area.

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56)   The dishwasher was checked and appeared to be functional.

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Bathrooms, Laundry and Sinks Return to table of contents
Condition of toilets: Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Condition of bathtubs and related plumbing: Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
57) The toilet at the master bathroom was loose where it attached to the floor. Leaks can occur. Flooring, the sub-floor or areas below may get damaged. Sewer gases can enter living spaces. Recommend that a qualified contractor remove the toilet(s) for further evaluation and repair if necessary. A new wax ring should be installed and toilet(s) should be securely anchored to the floor to prevent movement and leaking.

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58) Gaps, no caulk, or substandard caulking were found between the bathtub and the walls at location(s) #. Water may penetrate these areas and cause damage. Recommend that a qualified person re-caulk or install caulking as necessary.

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59) General photos of the bathrooms.

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60) Neither the clothes washer or dryer were operated or evaluated. These appliances are excluded from this inspection.

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Interior, Doors and Windows Return to table of contents

61) The inspector was unable to verify that the glass used in one or more windows was approved safety glass where required. Window glazing that is not approved safety glass, located in areas subject to human impact, is a safety hazard. Standard building practices generally require that approved safety glass be used in but not limited to the following conditions:Note that "art glass" (leaded, faceted, carved or decorative) may be an acceptable alternative for safety glass due to its visibility. Also, a 1 1/2-inch-wide protective bar on the accessible side of the glass, placed 34-38 inches above the floor, can serve as an acceptable substitute for safety glass. Recommend that a qualified contractor evaluate further to determine if glazing is approved safety glass, and replace glass if necessary, and per standard building practices.

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62) Trim is damaged and/or missing in one or more areas. Recommend having a qualified contractor replace or repair trim as necessary.

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63) Minor cracks, nail pops and/or blemishes were found in walls and/or ceilings in one or more areas. Cracks and nail pops are common, are often caused by lumber shrinkage or minor settlement, and can be more or less noticeable depending on changes in humidity. They did not appear to be a structural concern, but the client may wish to repair these for aesthetic reasons. For recurring cracks, consider using an elastic crack covering product:
http://www.reporthost.com/?ECC

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64) General pictures of the interior areas.

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Wood Destroying Organism Findings Return to table of contents
Limitations: This report only includes findings from accessible and visible areas on the day of the inspection. In addition to the inaccessible areas documented in this report, examples of other inaccessible areas include: sub areas less than 18 inches in height; attic areas less than 5 feet in height, areas blocked by ducts, pipes or insulation; areas where locks or permanently attached covers prevent access; areas where insulation would be damaged if traversed; areas obscured by vegetation. All inaccessible areas are subject to infestation or damage from wood-destroying organisms. The inspector does not move furnishings, stored items, debris, floor or wall coverings, insulation, or other materials as part of the inspection, nor perform destructive testing. Wood-destroying organisms may infest, re-infest or become active at any time. No warranty is provided as part of this inspection. It should be assumed by the client that most homes in Georgia will at some point be infested by termites and/or other wood destroying organisms. Even if no infestation is visible, the client should budget for a termite treatment and ongoing termite coverage in the near future.
Visible evidence of active wood-destroying insects: No
Visible evidence of damage by wood-destroying insects: No
Visible evidence of conditions conducive to wood-destroying organisms: Yes
65) Thank you for the opportunity to prepare your property inspection report. Please contact us if you have any questions or additional concerns.

Phone: 404-661-9763
Email: inspectmorellc@gmail.com

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INSPECTOR INFORMATION:

Joe Moore, Jr.
ASHI Certified Inspector #250189
Cell # 404.661.9763