Surety Inspection Service

Website: http://www.suretyinspectionservice.com
Email: jim@suretyinspectionservice.com
Phone: (252) 209-4464
FAX: (252) 544-5179
838 NC Highway 461 
Ahoskie NC 27910
Inspector: James Sullins
North Carolina License #3118

Report Summary

Property Inspection Report
Client(s): John and Mary Doe
Property address: 1110 Neighborhood Drive
Northeast, NC 00000
Inspection date: 10/9/2012

This report summary published on 10/23/2012 11:03:13 AM EDT

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This report is the exclusive property of Surety Inspection Service and the Client(s) listed in the report title. Use of this report by any unauthorized persons is prohibited.

Concerns are shown and sorted according to these types:
SafetySafety issue. Be careful. 
Major DefectCorrection likely involves significant expense 
Minor DefectCorrection likely involves minor expense 
MaintainRecommend maintenance 
RepairSuggest repairing or replacing 
MonitorRecommend monitoring for changes in condition or maintenance needs 
EvaluateSuggest evaluation by a qualified specialist 
ServiceableItem or component is working as intended 
CommentFor your information. 
Hire A ProThis work is best performed by a trained professional. 
 
InfestationEvidence of infestation of wood destroying insects or organisms (Live or dead insect bodies, fungal growth, etc.) 
DamageDamage caused by wood destroying insects or organisms (Rot, carpenter ant galleries, etc.) 
Conducive conditionsConditions conducive for wood destroying insects or organisms (Wood-soil contact, shrubs in contact with siding, roof or plumbing leaks, etc.) 

Introductory Remarks
1) - There are no major defects listed in this report.

Grounds
8) - Handrails at one or more flights of stairs are missing.

Standard building practice requires that handrails be:
a. Installed at stairs with four or more risers;
b. Sized and shaped so a hand can encircle them;
c. Permanently and securely attached and able to withstand a 200-pound force in any direction at any point;
d. Continuous and extend for the entire flight of the stairs; and
e. Installed between 30-38 inches above the leading edge of the stair treads.

Also, missing bricks should be replaced where missing at the ends of the treads.

A qualified person should repair, replace or install per standard building practice.

Exterior / Foundation
9) - The vapor barrier in the crawl space is missing in some areas. This is a conducive condition for wood destroying organisms, due to the likelihood of water evaporating into the structure from the soil. A qualified person should evaluate and replace or repair sections as necessary.

Standard building practice requires:
a. The soil below the vapor barrier should be smooth and free from sharp objects;
b. Seams should overlap a minimum of 12-inches; and
c. The vapor barrier should lap up onto the foundation side walls.

10) - The floor insulation in some areas of the crawl space is falling down. This may result in increased heating or cooling costs, due to decreased energy efficiency. A qualified person should repair, replace or install insulation.

For more information, visit:
http://www.eere.energy.gov/consumer/tips/insulation.html

Roof / Attic
12) - Some composition shingles are lifting in some areas. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair, if needed.

Electric
14) - One circuit breaker in panel A is "double tapped," meaning two or more wires are clamped in a terminal designed for one wire. This is a safety issue, because the bolt or screw may tighten securely against one wire, but leave others loose. Arcing, sparks and fires can result. A qualified electrician should evaluate and repair.

15) - Although not required when this home was built, one or more receptacle cover plates used at the building exterior are not weatherproof. This is a potential safety issue. A qualified electrician should evaluate and repair.

Waterproof covers recommended.

16) - Based on the age of this structure and the appearance of existing smoke detectors, the alarms may have been installed more than ten years ago. According to National Fire Protection Association, aging smoke alarms don't operate as efficiently and often are the source for nuisance alarms. Early smoke alarms are estimated to have a 30% probability of failure within the first ten years. Newer smoke alarms are better, but should be replaced after ten years. Unless you know that the smoke alarms are new, replacing them when moving into a new residence is recommended by NFPA.

For more information, visit:
http://www.google.com/search?q=old+smoke+alarms

17) - Dryer lint were found in panel A. Continued accumulation will result in a fire hazard. The inspector knows of no approved method for cleaning contaminants from panel interiors or components such as bus or terminal bars. Any cleaning should be done by a qualifed person.

18) - Branch circuit wiring installed in buildings built prior to the mid-1980s is usually rated for a maximum temperature of 60 degrees Centigrade. This includes non-metallic sheathed (Romex) wiring, and both BX and AC metal clad flexible wiring. Knob and tube wiring, installed in homes built before 1950, may be rated for even lower maximum temperatures.

Newer electric fixtures, including lighting and fans, usually require wiring rated for 90 degrees Centigrade. Connecting older, 60 degree-rated wiring to newer fixtures is a potential safety hazard, due to the risk of fire.

It is beyond the scope of this inspection to determine if such incompatible components are installed, or to determine the extent to which they're installed. Based on the age of this building, the client should be aware that this safety hazard may be present. Client may want to consider consulting with the property owner to determine if newer fixtures were installed or have a qualified electrician evaluate and repair per standard building practice.

19) - Although not required when this home was built, one or more electric receptacles at the kitchen, bathrooms have no visible ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. Recommend having a qualified electrician evaluate to determine if GFCI protection exists, and if not, install it.

For more information, visit:
http://www.mikeholt.com/documents/nec/pdf/GFCI_requirement_page2.pdf

20) - This light fixture isn't working. It could be only bad bulbs. A qualified person should evaluate and repair or replace.

21) - The cover door to panel A is not installed. A qualified person should re-install it..

Plumbing / Fuel Systems
22) - Insulation on some water supply pipes in the crawl space is missing, although most are insulated. A qualified person should replace or install insulation per standard building practice for better energy efficiency and to prevent water pipes from freezing.

25) - Suggest having the septic tank inspected by a qualified specialist and repaired, if necessary. Suggest having the tank pumped if it was last pumped more than 3-years ago.

Water Heater
26) - Wiring for the water heater's power supply is non-metallic sheathed wiring which is exposed and subject to damage. Standard building practice calls for such wiring to be protected with BX armored conduit. A qualified contractor should repair per standard building practice.

27) - A water heater is installed at the same level as finished living space and has no catch pan and drain. Client may want to consider having a qualified contractor install a catch pan and drain, to prevent water damage to finished interior spaces, in the event the water heater develops a leak or is drained.

Cooling / Heat Pump
29) - The condensate drain line in the crawl space isn't properly supported and has a slight bow in it, where water can accumulate. Equipment damage or water damage to surrounding structures may occur. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair.

30) - Insulation for the outside condensing unit's refrigerant lines is deteriorated in some areas. This will result in reduced efficiency and increased energy costs. A qualified person should replace insulation.

Kitchen
33) - Leaking or dripping was found at the kitchen sink spout. Repair might be as simple as cleaning the spout screen. A qualified person should evaluate and repair.

34) - The flow from the kitchen sink's sprayer water supply is low. A qualified person should evaluate and repair.

35) - This kitchen cabinet drawer is damaged. A qualified person should repair it.

Bathrooms / Laundry / Sinks
36) - Leaking or dripping was found at the bathtub supply valves at location A, B. A qualified plumber should evaluate and repair.

37) - There is low water flow from the hot and cold water faucet in the shower at location A. A qualified person should evaluate and repair.

38) - No exhaust fan is installed in the laundry area. Exhaust fans in wet areas prevent moisture from accumulating, and help prevent mold growth and damage to building components. They are especially important in the relatively airtight houses that are now built. Client may want to consider having a qualified contractor install an exhaust fan per standard building practice. Recommend that a switch with a built-in timer be installed to control it.

39) - Caulk is deteriorated at location A. A qualified person should repair.

Interior Rooms / Areas
43) - The jamb around the front exterior door is damaged. A qualified person should repair.

44) - The sliding screen door at the garage end of the house is loose. A qualified person should evaluate and repair or replace.

45) - The bedroom doors have no air gap at the floor, or have a gap substantially less than 1-inch. The building has a forced air heating system with a centrally located return air duct. When bedroom doors are closed, the only effective path for return air from bedrooms is under the doors. A minimum gap of 1-inch below bedroom doors is recommended to allow adequate flow for return air. Recommend trimming the bottoms of bedroom doors, so each door has a 1-inch gap at its base.

46) - The illustrated section of vinyl flooring has significant deterioration or damage. Loose edges were found. A qualified person should replace or repair flooring.

47) - A bedroom bifold closet door is off its tracks. The kitchen pantry bifold needs adjustment, so both sides will close. A qualified person should repair.

48) - Minor cracks or holes were found in walls. They don't appear to be a structural concern, but may need repair for aesthetic reasons.

49) - Minor cracks or holes were found in ceilings in one or more areas. They don't appear to be a structural concern, but the client may wish to repair these for aesthetic reasons.

50) - Some ceiling areas in this structure have tiles that might have been installed before 1980. This material might contain asbestos, poses a health hazard. Laws were passed in the United States in 1978, prohibiting use of asbestos in residential structures, but stocks of existing materials might have been used thereafter. The client may wish to have the ceiling material tested by a qualified lab to determine if it contains asbestos.

In most cases, when the material is intact and in good condition, keeping it encapsulated with paint and not otherwise disturbing it may reduce or effectively eliminate the health hazard. If the client wishes to remove the material, or plans to disturb it through remodeling, it should be tested by a qualified lab or by consultation with a qualified industrial hygienist or asbestos abatement specialist.

For more information, visit:
http://www.cpsc.gov/CPSCPUB/PUBS/453.html