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Inspector's email: scout5inspector@gmail.com
19922 Scarth Ln 
Mokena IL 60448-1741
Inspector: Clifford Wilson

 

Summary

Client(s):  John Doe
Property address:  179 Cooper Ln, Mokena, Il, 60448
Inspection date:  Wednesday, March 18, 2015

This report published on Monday, April 20, 2015 7:13:00 PM CDT

This report is the exclusive property of this inspection company and the client(s) listed in the report title. Use of this report by any unauthorized persons is prohibited.

Concerns are shown and sorted according to these types:
Concern typeSafetyPoses a safety hazard
Concern typeMajor DefectCorrection likely involves a significant expense
Concern typeRepair/ReplaceRecommend repairing or replacing
Concern typeRepair/MaintainRecommend repair and/or maintenance
Concern typeMinor DefectCorrection likely involves only a minor expense
Concern typeMaintainRecommend ongoing maintenance
Concern typeEvaluateRecommend evaluation by a specialist
Concern typeMonitorRecommend monitoring in the future
Concern typeServiceableItem or component is in servicable condition
Concern typeCommentFor your information
Attachments
InternationalStandardsOfPractice.pdf


Grounds
2 - Rear deck unstable due to weak or substandard bracing, or lack of solid supporting. This is a safety hazard since severe movement may cause the decks or porches to collapse. A qualified contractor should repair as necessary.
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Photo 2-1
leaning post under deck on poor footing
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Photo 2-2
wood and ground contact
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Photo 2-3
loose ballasters
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Photo 2-4
trip hazard on deck
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Photo 2-5
one of many broken footings under deck
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Photo 2-6
railroad tie retaining wall

3 - Handrails at one or more flights of stairs were loose, wobbly, damaged and/or deteriorated. This is a safety hazard. Recommend that a qualified person repair as necessary.
4 - Patio at rear of house has gap between patio and house, this should be filled in to avoid water seeping back towards house and possibly entering basement.
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Photo 4-1
broken concrete by patio door
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Photo 4-2
under patio door step needs sealing between patio and house to prevent water from possibly entering basement

5 - One or more decking boards were loose. In some cases this may pose a trip hazard. Recommend that a qualified person repair as necessary.
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Photo 5-1
trip hazard on deck
 

Exterior and Foundation
6 - This property was clad with composition wood-fiber siding. Various manufacturers (e.g. Louisiana Pacific, Weyerhaeuser and Masonite) have produced this type of siding, which is made from oriented strand board (OSB) or "hardboard." It is prone to deteriorate and/or fail prematurely due to moisture penetration, especially when the paint coating is substandard or has not been maintained. Failure is typically visible in the form of swelling, cracking, buckling, wafer pops, delamination and fungal growth.

Some areas of siding on this structure showed symptoms described above and need replacement and/or maintenance. Some manufacturers (e.g. Louisiana Pacific) recommend a repair process for this siding where affected areas are sealed with Permanizer Plus, a flexible primer made by Pittsburgh Paint, followed by two coats of 100% acrylic latex paint. This sealant must be applied to the bottom edges using a brush. The face of the siding can be sprayed. The Permanizer Plus sealer isn't required for edges that aren't swollen, cracked or deteriorated, but the acrylic latex should still be brushed on these edges.

Recommend that a qualified contractor evaluate and replace siding as necessary, and/or seal and repaint as necessary. Repairs should be made per the siding and/or sealant manufacturer's installation instructions, and per standard building practices.

For more information, visit:
http://www.reporthost.com/?PERMPLUS
http://www.reporthost.com/?COMPSDNG
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Photo 6-1
Siding in need of caulk, paint and in some places replacing.
 

7 - Some sections of siding and/or trim were deteriorated. Recommend that a qualified person repair, replace or install siding or trim as necessary.
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Photo 7-1
need gutter extension installed (after wall above and below roof are repaired).
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Photo 7-2
siding rot on left side of patio door due to overhead water getting between siding and sheathing (needs to be removed for further evaluation) before installing new siding.

8 - Fungal rot was found at one or more sections of siding or trim, window sills and/or window frames. Conducive conditions for rot should be corrected. Recommend that a qualified person repair as necessary. All rotten wood should be replaced.
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Photo 8-1
window rot
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Photo 8-2
window rot
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Photo 8-3
rot
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Photo 8-4
rot

9 - The masonry (brick or stone) veneer has hairline crack above overhead garage door. Where cracks or openings are exposed, water can enter the wall structure causing mold, fungal growth and structural damage. This is a conducive condition for wood-destroying organisms. Recommend that a qualified contractor repair as necessary. For example, by repointing mortar or replacing broken or missing masonry.
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Photo 9-1
small hairline crack NE garage entrance
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Photo 9-2
hairline crack above overhead garage door

10 - Fungal rot was found at one or more sections of siding or trim, window sills and/or window frames. Conducive conditions for rot should be corrected (e.g. wood-soil contact, reverse perimeter slope). Recommend that a qualified person repair as necessary. All rotten wood should be replaced.
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Photo 10-1
siding rot on left side of patio door due to overhead water getting between siding and sheathing (needs to be removed for further evaluation) before installing new siding.
 

11 - Flashing at one or more locations was or not found on back of house above patio door where the second level wall meets the roof. Water has now worked its way between siding and sheathing causing extensive rot.. Leaks can occur as a result. Recommend that a qualified person repair, replace or install flashing as necessary, and per standard building practices.
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Photo 11-1
need gutter extension installed (after wall above and below roof are repaired).
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Photo 11-2

12 - One or more minor cracks (1/8 inch or less) were found in the foundation floor. These didn't appear to be a structural concern, but recommend sealing them to prevent water infiltration and monitor them in the future. Numerous products exist to seal such cracks including hydraulic cement, non-shrinking grout, resilient caulks and epoxy sealants.
13 - The paint or stain finish over much of the entire structure was failing (e.g. peeling, faded, worn, thinning). Siding and trim with a failing finish can be damaged by moisture. Recommend that a qualified contractor prep (e.g. clean, scrape, sand, prime, caulk) and repaint or restain the entire building exterior per standard building practices. Any repairs needed to the siding or trim should be made prior to this.
14 - Caulk was deteriorated in some areas. For example, around windows and/or around doors. Recommend that a qualified person renew or install caulk as necessary. Where gaps are wider than 1/4 inch, an appropriate material other than caulk should be used. For more information, visit:
http://www.reporthost.com/?CAULK
15 - Trees were in contact with or were close to the building at one or more locations. Damage to the building can occur, especially during high winds, or may have already occurred (see other comments in this report). Recommend that a qualified tree service contractor or certified arborist remove trees as necessary to prevent damage to the building exterior.
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Photo 15-1
one of two trees rubbing against house
 

16 - Caulk was missing and/or deteriorated in some areas. For example, around windows. Recommend that a qualified person renew or install caulk as necessary. Where gaps are wider than 1/4 inch, an appropriate material other than caulk should be used. For more information, visit:
http://www.reporthost.com/?CAULK
Basement
17 - Handrails at basement flight of stairs were missing. This is a potential fall hazard. Handrails should be installed at stairs with four or more risers or where stairs are greater than 30 inches high. Recommend that a qualified contractor install handrails where missing and per standard building practices.
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Photo 17-1
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Photo 17-2

18 - Evidence of prior water intrusion was found in one or more sections of the basement. Owner states that in the spring of 2013 power in the neighborhood was out for 6/7 hours, the last half hour 6" of water enter basement, it recended immediately. He removed carpet two days later, he claims it was the first and last time it happened. For example, water stains or rust at support post bases, efflorescence on the foundation, etc. Accumulated water is a conducive condition for wood-destroying organisms and should not be present in the basement. Recommend reviewing any disclosure statements available and ask the property owner about past accumulation of water in the basement. The basement should be monitored in the future for accumulated water, especially after heavy and/or prolonged periods of rain. If water is found to accumulate, then recommend that a qualified contractor who specializes in drainage issues evaluate and repair as necessary. Typical repairs for preventing water from accumulating in basements include:Ideally, water should not enter basements, but if water must be controlled after it enters the basement, then typical repairs include installing a sump pump.
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Photo 18-1
Where old basement floor carpet met stairs but was removed.
 

Roof
19 - Water damage and/or evidence of past leaks was found at one or more skylights. Consult with the property owner to determine if leaks have occurred, or if repairs have been made. Recommend that a qualified contractor evaluate and repair as necessary.
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Photo 19-1
older skylights still serving there purpose, but did show signs of small previous leaks
 

20 - Some composition shingles were damaged. Leaks can occur as a result. This is a conducive condition for wood-destroying organisms. Recommend that a qualified contractor repair as necessary. For example, by replacing shingles.

One shingle on front ridge of garage was damaged.
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Photo 20-1
very small damaged roof tile by front of garage on ridge
 

21 - Extensions such as splash blocks or drain pipes for one or more downspouts were missing or damaged. Water can accumulate around the building foundation or inside crawl spaces or basements as a result. Recommend that a qualified person install, replace or repair extensions as necessary so rainwater drains away from the structure.
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Photo 21-1
old damaged splash block SE corner by garage
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Photo 21-2

Garage or Carport
22 - The door between the garage and the house did not appear to be fire resistant, or the inspector was unable to verify that it was via a label. This is a potential safety hazard. House to garage doors, to prevent fire and fumes from spreading from the garage into interior living space, should be constructed of fire-resistant materials. Doors, generally considered to be suitable for the purpose, are solid core wood, steel, honeycomb steel or a door that has been factory labeled as fire rated. Recommend that a qualified contractor replace or repair the door and, at that time, make any other corrections that might be required to provide suitable fire resistance between the garage and the dwelling per standard building practices. For more information, visit:
http://www.reporthost.com/?AGFR
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Photo 22-1
garage drywall needs reanchoring
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Photo 22-2
hole next to garage pull down door needs to be closed up, fire hazard
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Photo 22-3
garage to house has no self closure
 

23 - The pull-down attic stairs installed in the attached garage ceiling had no visible fire-resistance rating. Current standard building practices call for wooden-framed ceilings that divide the house and garage to have a fire-resistance rating. Installing pull-down attic stairs intended for interior spaces compromises the ceiling's fire resistance. Recommend that a qualified person repair as necessary to restore the ceiling's fire resistance. For example, by modifying, replacing or removing the stairs. Note that commercially made, fire resistance-rated stairs are available. For more information, visit:
http://www.reporthost.com/?FIREATTSTR
Electric
25 - Front outside outlet was broken. This is a potential shock or fire hazard. Recommend that a qualified electrician replace such receptacles as necessary. The front outside GFCI breaker shows open ground.
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Photo 25-1
front GFCI shows open ground, should have repaired by qualified electrician
 

26 - No carbon monoxide alarms were visible. This is a potential safety hazard. Some states and/or municipalities require CO alarms to be installed for new construction and/or for homes being sold. Recommend installing approved CO alarms outside of each separate sleeping area in the immediate vicinity of the bedrooms on each level and in accordance with the manufacturer's recommendations. For more information, visit:
http://www.reporthost.com/?COALRM
Plumbing / Fuel Systems
27 - The copper water service pipe was embedded in concrete or masonry where it was routed through the foundation, and no protection from damage due to thermal expansion was visible. Copper pipes embedded in concrete or masonry should be wrapped with an approved tape or installed through a sleeve for abrasion protection. Recommend that a qualified contractor repair per standard building practices.
28 - The sump pump was noisy, This may be a sign that the pump is near, at or beyond its service life. It may also be due to the way it's installed or because it is a poor quality pump. Noisy pumps can be an annoyance. The client should at least be aware of this. Recommend that a qualified contractor evaluate and repair or replace if necessary or if the client desires a quieter operation.
29 - Front water spigot does not appear to be frost proof, rear one is frost proof.
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Photo 29-1
front water spigot is not frost proof.
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Photo 29-2
rear spigot is frost proof.
 
Water Heater
32 - The temperature-pressure relief valve drain line was too short it was 7" above floor.This is a potential safety hazard due to the risk of scalding if someone is standing next to the water heater when the valve opens. Recommend that a qualified plumber repair per standard building practices. For example, by extending the drain line to within 6 inches of the floor, or routing it to drain outside. For more information, visit:
http://www.reporthost.com/?TPRVALVE
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Photo 32-1
Hot water heater
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Photo 32-2
7" above floor

33 - The hot water temperature was greater than 120 degrees Fahrenheit. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of scalding. The thermostat should be adjusted so the water temperature doesn't exceed 120 degrees. If the water heater is powered by electricity, a qualified person should perform the adjustment, since covers that expose energized equipment normally need to be removed. For more information on scalding dangers, visit:
http://www.reporthost.com/?SCALD
Heating, Ventilation and Air Condition (HVAC)
34 - Because of the age and/or condition of the forced air furnace, recommend that a qualified HVAC contractor inspect the heat exchanger and perform a carbon monoxide test when it's serviced. Note that these tests are beyond the scope of a standard home inspection.
35 - One or more heating or cooling ducts were damaged. This can result in reduced energy efficiency. Recommend that qualified HVAC contractor repair or replace ducts or components as necessary.

Duct coming out of supply side of furnace in mechcanical room had been open up to what appears to be a louver adjustment, this should be repaired correctly.
36 - The last service date of the forced air heating/cooling system appeared to be more than 1 year ago, or the inspector was unable to determine the last service date. Ask the property owner when it was last serviced. If unable to determine the last service date, or if this system was serviced more than 1 year ago, recommend that a qualified HVAC contractor service this system and make repairs if necessary. Because this system has a compressor and refrigerant system, this servicing should be performed annually in the future. Any needed repairs noted in this report should be brought to the attention of the contractor when it's serviced.
37 - humidifier should have been installed in cold air return and not in supply plenum
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Photo 37-1
humidifier installed on supply plenum above heat exchanger
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Photo 37-2
problem with installing humidifier on supply plenum
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Photo 37-3
trickle humidifier
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Photo 37-4
Lennox furnace
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Photo 37-5
137,000 BTU Furnace