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http://www.risnewyork.com
dhuhtala56@gmail.com
(518) 399-1891
34 Woodruff Drive 
Scotia, NY 12302
Inspector: David Huhtala NY Lic # 16000012794

Summary

Client(s):  Mike and Cheryl Client
Property address:  123 Yourstreet
Anywhere, NY
Inspection date:  Wednesday, March 3, 2021

This report published on Friday, April 15, 2022 5:04:12 PM EDT

This report is the exclusive property of this inspection company and the client(s) listed in the report title. Use of this report by any unauthorized persons is prohibited.[/b]

Different types of concerns are provided in this report.
Virtually all homes contain defects and/or issues of varying seriousness. This report identifies many issues that we believe a client should be aware of in addition to those with an estimated remediation cost that exceeds the presently accepted real estate contract threshold of 1,500.00.
We identify these lesser issues with the goal of providing our client with a more complete picture of the home overall. The identification of these lesser issues is intended to provide the client with information that he or she can use in formulating future repairs, modifications, or updates.

We report concerns as follows:

Serious or otherwise potentially costly defects with a potential remediation expense in excess of 1,500.00 are noted with a dollar sign.


These are defects that may affect contract due to cost of repairs.

Safety concerns are noted with a red cross.

Defects with an estimated remediation cost of less than 1,500.00 are noted with a hammer.

Upgrade or maintenance issues are noted with a screwdriver or paintbrush.

In some cases, monitoring an area or further evaluation by a specialist is recommended because the evidence on the day of inspection is inconclusive.
It is recommended that this further evaluation take place prior to closing because in some cases a specialist may find a previously unknown or concealed serious defect.

Other comments are as noted.

Concerns are shown and sorted according to these types:
Concern typeSafetyPoses a risk of injury or death
Concern typeMajor DefectCorrection likely involves a significant expense in excess of 1,500.00.
Concern typeRepair/ReplaceRecommend repairing or replacing
Concern typeRepair/MaintainRecommend repair and/or maintenance
Concern typeMinor DefectCorrection likely involves only a minor expense
Concern typeMaintain/UpgradeRecommended future improvements or maintenance
Concern typeEvaluateRecommend evaluation by a qualified person
Concern typeServiceableItem or component is in serviceable condition
Concern typeCommentFor your information
Concern typeConducive conditionsConditions conducive for moisture intrusion and wood destroying insects or organisms (Wood-soil contact, shrubs in contact with siding, roof or plumbing leaks, etc.)


General information
1) One or more leaks were found in gas supply lines, fittings and/or valves. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of explosion. A qualified contractor and/or the gas utility company should evaluate and make repairs as soon as possible.
2) This property has one or more fuel burning appliances, and no carbon monoxide alarms are visible. This is a safety hazard. Recommend installing one or more carbon monoxide alarms as necessary and as per the manufacturer's instructions. For more information, visit http://www.cpsc.gov/CPSCPUB/PREREL/prhtml05/05017.html
3) Evidence of one or more possible abandoned underground oil tanks was found (vent pipe, metal supply lines, etc.). The client(s) should determine if underground oil tank(s) exist on this property, and if tank(s) have been removed or legally decommissioned.

If the tank(s) haven't been decommissioned or removed, then the client(s) may be liable for decommission and/or cleanup of contaminated soil in the future. Recommend the following:
  • Have any non-decommissioned, abandoned underground oil tanks legally decommissioned or removed as necessary.
  • Have the soil tested for oil contamination.
  • Have contaminated soil removed as necessary

Exterior
4) Conducive conditionsOne or more downspouts are missing. This can result in water accumulating around the structure's foundation, or in basements and crawl spaces if they exist. Accumulated water is a conducive condition to wood destroying insects and organisms, and may also cause the foundation to settle over time. A qualified contractor should install downspout(s) where missing. Also recommend installing extensions such as splashblocks or tie-ins to underground drain lines as necessary to carry rainwater away from the house.
5) Conducive conditionsOne or more downspouts are loose or detached. This can result in water accumulating around the structure's foundation, or in basements and crawl spaces if they exist. Accumulated water is a conducive condition to wood destroying insects and organisms, and may also cause the foundation to settle over time. Repairs should be made as necessary so downspouts are securely anchored and functional.
6) Recommend resealing asphalt driveway.
7) Soffit, fascia appear serviceable
8) General condition of siding, trim appears serviceable
9) Minor cracks were found in the driveway. However they don't appear to be a structural concern and no trip hazards were found. No immediate action is recommended, but the client(s) may wish to have repairs made for aesthetic reasons.

Roof
10) The roof surface material appears to be near the end of its service life and will likely need replacing in the near future, even with repairs. The client(s) should budget for a replacement roof surface.
11) Conducive conditionsFlashings at the base of the chimney are substandard. Excessive sealant was observed in areas where flashing should exist. Active leaking is evident in the attic area in this area (refer to attic section). A qualified roofing contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary.
12) This asphalt or fiberglass composition roof surface has two or more layers of roofing materials. When this roof is replaced, recommend a complete "tear off", where all existing layers of roofing are removed before installing new roofing materials.
Removing existing roofing materials will increase the cost of the next roof.

Garage
13) General condition of walls, ceiling, floor appear serviceable.
14) Garage - house door appears serviceable.
15) Vehicle doors, openers operated satisfactorily.
16) Exterior entry door appears serviceable.

Attic
17) Conducive conditionsOne or more areas of the roof structure were wet or had elevated levels of moisture at the time of the inspection. There appears to be an active leak in the roof or structure exterior. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary.
18) Conducive conditionsOne or more exhaust fan ducts terminate in attic because no vent cap is installed at the roof or exterior wall surfaces. This is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects and organisms (mold) due to increased moisture levels in the attic from the exhaust air. A qualified contractor should evaluate and install vent caps where missing and as per standard building practices, so all exhaust air is vented outside.
19) No insulation is installed over the attic access hatch. Recommend installing insulation above hatch for better energy efficiency.

Electric service
20) Electric service appears serviceable.

Water heater
21) A small gas leak exists at a union in the gas supply pipe. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary
22) Water heater appears serviceable.

Heating and cooling
23) What appears to be asbestos is visible on some pipes. It is significantly deteriorated in some areas, and if it is asbestos, it may pose a health hazard and require abatement. Recommend having this material tested at a qualified lab. If the material is found to contain asbestos, recommend consulting with a qualified asbestos abatement contractor or industrial hygienist. For information on asbestos hazards in the home, visit http://www.cpsc.gov/CPSCPUB/PUBS/453.html
24) A small gas leak was detected at a valve in the supply pipe for the boiler. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary.
25) The last service date of this system appears to be more than two years ago, or the inspector was unable to determine the last service date. The client(s) should ask the property owner(s) when it was last serviced. If unable to determine the last service date, or if this system was serviced more than two years ago, a qualified heating and cooling contractor should inspect, clean, and service this system, and make repairs if necessary. This servicing should be performed every few years in the future, or as per the contractor's recommendations.
26) Boiler and controls operated satisfactorily.

Plumbing and laundry
27) The clothes dryer is equipped with a vinyl or foil, accordion-type, flexible exhaust duct. The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission considers these types of ducts to be unsafe, and a fire hazard. These types of ducts can trap lint and are susceptible to kinks or crushing, which can greatly reduce the air flow. This duct should be replaced with a rigid or corrugated semi-rigid metal duct, and by a qualified contractor if necessary. Clothes dryer manufacturers specify the use of a rigid or corrugated semi-rigid metal duct. For more information on dryer safety issues, see https://www.reporthost.com/?DRYER
28) Conducive conditionsThe concrete laundry sink is cracked and leaking. A qualified plumber should replace the sink.
29) Plumbing supply equipment appears serviceable.

Fireplaces, woodstoves and chimneys
30) One or more wood-burning fireplaces or stoves were found at the property. When such devices are used, they should be professionally inspected and cleaned annually to prevent creosote build-up and to determine if repairs are needed. The National Fire Protection Association states that a "Level 2" chimney inspection should be performed with every sale or transfer of property with a wood-burning device. Recommend consulting with the property owner about recent and past servicing and repairs to all wood-burning devices and chimneys or flues at this property. Recommend that a qualified specialist evaluate all wood-burning devices and chimneys, and clean and repair as necessary. Note that if a wood stove insert is installed, it may need to be removed for such an evaluation. For more information, search for "chimney inspection" at:
https://www.reporthost.com/?CSIA
31) The damper in the fireplace is damaged and/or not functional. It appears to be out of position and will not fully close. A qualified chimney service contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary to prevent interior conditioned air from escaping up the chimney.
32) The ash cleanout door in the basement is severely deteriorated. A qualified contractor should repair / replace prior to further use of the fireplace to eliminate the risk of fire due to hot ashes spilling into the basement area.
33) Visible chimney structure appears serviceable. Client should be aware that the interior of the chimney flue and structure are not visible without the use of specialized tools and are not included in a home inspection. If a complete evaluation of the chimney structure is desired, a chimney service contractor should be contacted.

Basement
34) What appears to be mold was observed on some surfaces. Mold should be cleaned with 'Sporicidin' or equivalent disinfectant and affected surfaces should be coated with a mold inhibiting solution such as 'Mold Control' or equivalent. Client should have a qualified mold remediation contractor perform these services.
35) One or more joists are damaged due to non-standard or substandard notching and/or hole boring. Standard building practices specify the following limitations for notching and boring joists:
  • Notches should not be cut in the middle third of any joist
  • Notches should not be deeper than 1/6 of the joist depth
  • Notches should not be deeper than 1/4 of the joist depth at joist ends
  • Bored holes should not be closer than 2 inches to the edges of the joist
  • Bored holes should not be wider than 1/3 of the joist depth

A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary.
36) Wire splices are exposed due to not being contained in a covered junction box. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock and fire. A qualified electrician should evaluate and make repairs as necessary. For example, install securely mounted junction boxes with cover plates where needed to contain wiring splices.
37) One or more flights of stairs with more than two risers have no handrail installed. This is a safety hazard. A qualified contractor should install graspable handrails that your hand can completely encircle at stairs where missing, and as per standard building practices.
38) Cover plate(s) are missing from one or more electric boxes, such as for receptacles, switches and/or junction boxes. They are intended to contain fire and prevent electric shock from exposed wires. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of fire and shock. Cover plates should be installed where missing.
39) Conducive conditionsStanding water and/or wet areas were found in one or more sections of the basement. Accumulated water is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects and organisms and should not be present in the basement. A qualified contractor who specializes in drainage issues should evaluate and repair as necessary. Typical repairs for preventing water from accumulating in the basement include:
  • Repairing, installing or improving rain run-off systems (gutters, downspouts and extensions or drain lines)
  • Improving perimeter grading
  • Repairing, installing or improving underground footing and/or curtain drains

Ideally, water should not enter the basement, but if water must be controlled after it enters the basement, then typical repairs include installing sump pump(s) or interior perimeter drains.
40) The weatherstrip around the exterior entry door is deteriorated. Weatherstrip should be replaced where deteriorated, and by a qualified contractor if necessary.
41) General condition of visible foundation walls, floor, and floor structure above appear serviceable.

Kitchen
42) The range hood fan is inoperable. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair or replace the fan or the range hood as necessary.
43) General condition of the floor, cabinets, countertop appear serviceable.
44) Sink, faucet, plumbing appear serviceable.
45) General condition of stovetop, oven, refrigerator appear serviceable.

Bathrooms
46) One or more electric receptacles that serve countertop surfaces within six feet of a sink appear to have no ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate to determine if GFCI protection exists, and if not, repairs should be made so that all receptacles that serve countertop surfaces within six feet of sinks have GFCI protection. For example, install GFCI receptacles or circuit breaker(s) as needed.
47) One toilet tank lid is cracked. Lid should be repaired or replaced as necessary.
48) Conducive conditionsCaulk is missing or deteriorated above one or more bathtubs, where the tub surround meets the tub. It should be replaced where deteriorated and/or applied where missing to prevent water intrusion and damage to the wall structure.
49) General condition of floor, cabinets, shelving appear serviceable.
50) Sink, plumbing appear serviceable.
51) Ventilation appears serviceable.

Interior rooms
52) One or more open ground, three-pronged grounding type receptacles were found. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate and make repairs as necessary.

Detected receptacles were marked with yellow tape.
53) One or more smoke alarms are damaged or missing from their mounting brackets, and an insufficient number of smoke alarms are installed. Damaged and/or missing smoke alarms should be replaced as necessary so a functioning one exists in each hallway leading to bedrooms, and in each bedroom. For more information, visit http://www.cpsc.gov/cpscpub/pubs/5077.html
54) Cover plate(s) are missing from one or more electric boxes, such as for receptacles, switches and/or junction boxes. They are intended to contain fire and prevent electric shock from exposed wires. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of fire and shock. Cover plates should be installed where missing.
55) The doorbell appears to be inoperable. Recommend having a qualified electrician evaluate and repair as necessary.
56) Seals between double-pane glass in one or more windows appear to have failed based on condensation or stains between the panes of glass. A qualified contractor should evaluate and replace glass where necessary.

The client(s) should be aware that evidence of broken seals may be more or less visible from one day to the next depending on the temperature, humidity, sunlight, etc. Windows or glass doors other than those that the inspector identified may also have failed seals and need glass replaced too.
57) The weatherstrip around one or more exterior entry doors is deteriorated. Weatherstrip should be replaced where deteriorated, and by a qualified contractor if necessary.
58) One or more rooms that are considered living spaces appear to have no visible source of heat. The client(s) should consult with the property owner(s) regarding this, and if necessary, a qualified contractor should evaluate and install heat source(s) as necessary.
59) General condition of walls, ceilings, floors appear serviceable.
60) Other than that noted above, sample of tested windows appear serviceable.
61) Minor cracks were found in ceilings in one or more areas. They do not appear to be a structural concern, but the client(s) may wish to repair these for aesthetic reasons.