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NY Home Inspecting Inc


Email: ryan@nyhomeinspecting.com
Phone: (631) 949-0572
37 Lucille Dr 
South Setauket NY 11720-1022
Inspector: Ryan Meinsen

 

Summary

Client(s):  sample
Property address:  Medford, N.Y. 11763
Inspection date:  Thursday, January 07, 2016

This report published on Wednesday, February 03, 2016 12:54:59 AM EST

This report is the exclusive property of this inspection company and the client(s) listed in the report title. Use of this report by any unauthorized persons is prohibited.

Concerns are shown and sorted according to these types:
Concern typeSafetyPoses a safety hazard
Concern typeMajor DefectCorrection likely involves a significant expense
Concern typeRepair/ReplaceRecommend repairing or replacing
Concern typeRepair/MaintainRecommend repair and/or maintenance
Concern typeMaintainRecommend ongoing maintenance
Concern typeEvaluateRecommend evaluation by a specialist
Concern typeMonitorRecommend monitoring in the future
Concern typeCommentFor your information


Grounds
1 - Flashing appeared to be missing from above one or more deck or porch ledger boards, or could not be verified. Missing flashing at this location can cause moisture to accumulate between the ledger boards and the building. Fungal rot may occur in this area and cause the ledger board fasteners to fail. The deck may separate from the building in this event. This is a potential safety hazard. Recommend that a qualified contractor install flashing above ledger boards per standard building practices. For more information, visit:
http://www.reporthost.com/?LB
http://www.reporthost.com/?SD
2 - Soil was in contact with or close to wooden stairs at one or more locations. This is a conducive condition for wood-destroying organisms. Soil should be graded and/or removed so no wood-soil contact is present, if possible. Otherwise, installing products such as borate-based Impel rods may help to prevent infestation and damage. For more information, visit:
http://www.reporthost.com/?IMPEL

Exterior and Foundation
3 - Flashing at one or more locations was missing. Leaks can occur as a result. Recommend that a qualified person repair, replace or install flashing as necessary, and per standard building practices.
4 - Soil was in contact with or less than 6 inches from siding or trim. Regardless of what material is used for siding, it should not be in contact with the soil. If made of wood, siding or trim will eventually rot. For other materials, ground or surface water can infiltrate siding or trim and cause damage to the wall structure. Wood-destroying insects are likely to infest and damage the wall structure. This is a conducive condition for wood-destroying organisms. Recommend grading or removing soil as necessary to maintain a 6-inch clearance. Note that damage from fungal rot and/or insects may be found when soil is removed, and repairs may be necessary.
5 - One or more holes or gaps were found in siding or trim. Vermin, insects or water may enter the structure. Recommend that a qualified person repair as necessary.
6 - Vegetation such as trees, shrubs and/or vines was in contact with or close to the building exterior. Vegetation can serve as a pathway for wood-destroying insects and can retain moisture against the exterior after it rains. This is a conducive condition for wood-destroying organisms. Recommend pruning, moving or removing vegetation as necessary to maintain at least 6 inches of space between it and the building exterior. A 1-foot clearance is better.
7 - Caulk was missing in some areas. For example, around windows and/or around doors. Recommend that a qualified person renew or install caulk as necessary. Where gaps are wider than 1/4 inch, an appropriate material other than caulk should be used. For more information, visit:
http://www.reporthost.com/?CAULK

Crawl Space
8 - Evidence of rodent infestation was found in the form of dead rodents and/or damaged insulation in the crawl space. Consult with the property owner about this. A qualified person should make repairs to seal openings in the structure, set traps, and clean rodent waste as necessary. Recommend following guidelines in these Center for Disease Control articles:
http://www.reporthost.com/?SEALUP
http://www.reporthost.com/?TRAPUP
http://www.reporthost.com/?CLEANUP
9 - Ventilation for the crawl space was substandard. There were too few vents. This can result in high levels of moisture in the crawl space and is a conducive condition for wood-destroying organisms. One square foot of vent area should be installed for 150 square feet of crawl space. Vents should be evenly distributed and within a few feet of corners to promote air circulation. Recommend that a qualified contractor install or improve venting per standard building practices.
10 - Under-floor insulation was damaged or deteriorated in some areas, and may result in reduced energy efficiency. Recommend that a qualified person repair or replace insulation as necessary.
11 - The vapor barrier in some areas of the crawl space was damaged, loose or askew and/or missing. Soil was exposed as a result and will allow water from the soil to evaporate up into the structure. This is a conducive condition for wood-destroying organisms. A 6 mil black plastic sheet should be placed over all exposed soil with seams overlapped to 24 inches, and not in contact with any wood structural components. The sheeting should be held in place with bricks or stones, not wood. Recommend that a qualified person replace or repair the vapor barrier where necessary and per standard building practices.

Roof
13 - The roof surface appeared to be near the end of its service life and will likely need replacing in the near future even if repairs are made now. Recommend discussing replacement options with a qualified contractor, and budgeting for a replacement roof surface in the near future. The client may also wish to consider having a qualified contractor attempt to issue a "5 year roof certificate."
14 - Flashings at the base of one or more chimneys were loose. Leaks can occur as a result. This is a conducive condition for wood-destroying organisms. Recommend that a qualified contractor evaluate and repair as necessary.
15 - Water damage and/or evidence of past leaks was found at one or more skylights. Consult with the property owner to determine if leaks have occurred, or if repairs have been made. Recommend that a qualified contractor evaluate and repair as necessary.
16 - Extensions such as splash blocks or drain pipes for one or more downspouts were missing. Water can accumulate around the building foundation or inside crawl spaces or basements as a result. Recommend that a qualified person install, replace or repair extensions as necessary so rainwater drains away from the structure.
17 - One or more roof flashings were lifting, loose and/or missing. Leaks can occur as a result. This is a conducive condition for wood-destroying organisms. Recommend that a qualified person repair as necessary.
18 - One or more downspouts were incomplete. Rainwater can come in contact with the building exterior or accumulate around the building foundation as a result. This is a conducive condition for wood-destroying organisms. Recommend that a qualified person repair as necessary.
19 - Significant amounts of debris have accumulated in one or more gutters or downspouts. Gutters can overflow and cause water to come in contact with the building exterior, or water can accumulate around the foundation. This is a conducive condition for wood-destroying organisms. Recommend cleaning gutters and downspouts now and as necessary in the future.
20 - Moss was growing on the roof. As a result, shingles can lift or be damaged. Leaks can result and/or the roof surface can fail prematurely. Efforts should be made to kill the moss during its growing season (wet months). Typically, zinc or phosphate-based chemicals are used for this and must be applied periodically. For information on various moss treatment products and their pros and cons, visit:
http://www.reporthost.com/?MOSS
21 - Nail heads were exposed at one or more shingles. More than just a few exposed nail heads may indicate a substandard roof installation. Recommend applying an approved sealant over exposed nail heads now and as necessary in the future to prevent leaks.

Attic and Roof Structure
22 - One or more recessed "can" lights were installed in the attic and were in contact with insulation. The inspector was unable to find a label or markings that indicated that these lights are designed to be in contact with insulation. If lights are not "IC" rated then this is a fire hazard. Recommend further evaluation by a qualified contractor to determine if these lights are rated for contact with insulation. If they aren't, or if their rating can't be determined, then recommend that a qualified person make permanent repairs as necessary. For example, by installing shields around lights or moving insulation.
23 - The roof decking was spongy, soft or springy in one or more areas when the inspector walked on those areas. This may be caused by deteriorated sheathing, damaged rafters or trusses, and/or otherwise substandard construction. Recommend that a qualified contractor evaluate and repair as necessary.
24 - The ceiling insulation installed in the attic was substandard and appeared to have an R rating that's significantly less than current standards (R-38). Heating and cooling costs will likely be higher due to poor energy efficiency. Recommend that a qualified contractor install insulation for better energy efficiency and per standard building practices.
25 - One or more exhaust fan ducts in the attic were not attached to a vent hood or cap. As a result, conditioned air will enter the attic when the fan is operated. Ducts terminating near an attic vent but without a dedicated vent hood or cap will likely blow conditioned air back into the attic. This can result in excessive moisture in the attic. Recommend that a qualified contractor repair per standard building practices, so exhaust fan ducts are permanently fastened to vent hoods or caps.
26 - One or more attic access hatches or doors were not insulated, or had substandard insulation. Recommend installing insulation as necessary and per current standards at hatches or doors for better energy efficiency. For more information, visit:
http://www.reporthost.com/?ATTACC
27 - One or more attic access hatches or doors had no weatherstripping, or the weatherstripping was substandard. Weatherstripping should be installed around hatches or doors as necessary to prevent heated interior air from entering the attic. For more information, visit:
http://www.reporthost.com/?ATTACC
28 - One or more exhaust ducts (e.g. bathroom fan, clothes dryer) in the attic have come apart, were loose or have fallen down. This can result in increased moisture levels inside the structure and is a conducive condition for wood-destroying organisms. Recommend that a qualified person make permanent repairs as necessary.

Electric
29 - One or more electric receptacles (outlets) at the kitchen, bathroom(s) and/or crawl space had no visible ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection, or the inspector was unable to determine if GFCI protection was present. If not GFCI-protected, receptacles in wet areas pose a shock hazard. Recommend that a qualified electrician evaluate and install GFCI protection if necessary and per standard building practices. General guidelines for GFCI-protected receptacles include the following locations:For more information, visit:
http://www.reporthost.com/?GFCI
30 - Neutral wires were doubled or bundled together under the same lug on the neutral bus bar in panel(s) #. This is a potential safety hazard in the event that one of the circuits needs to be isolated during servicing. For one neutral to be disconnected, other neutrals from energized circuits sharing the same lug will be loosened. Power surges may result on the energized circuits and result in damage or fire. Also, multiple wires under the same lug may not be secure, resulting in loose wires, arcing, sparks and fire. Recommend that a qualified electrician repair per standard building practices. For more information, visit:
http://www.reporthost.com/?DTNB
31 - Non-metallic sheathed wiring in the attic was routed on surfaces within 6 feet of one or more access hatches or doors, and was subject to damage. Wiring can be damaged when hatches are lifted and set aside, when stored items are moved into or out of the attic, etc. This is a potential shock and/or fire hazard. Recommend that a qualified electrician repair per standard building practices.
32 - Non-metallic sheathed wiring was loose, unsupported, or inadequately supported at one or more locations. Such wiring should be trimmed to length if necessary and attached to runners or to solid backing with fasteners at intervals of 4 1/2 feet or less. Fasteners should be installed within 12 inches of all enclosures. Recommend that a qualified electrician repair per standard building practices.
33 - Bare wire ends, or wires with a substandard termination, were found at one or more locations. This is a potential shock hazard. Recommend that a qualified electrician repair as necessary. For example, by cutting wires to length and terminating with wire nuts in a permanently mounted, covered junction box.
34 - One or more wires inside panel(s) #A were loose, and were not terminated. This poses a safety hazard for shock and/or fire. Recommend that a qualified electrician remove any abandoned wiring or repair as necessary. For example, by trimming wires to length and installing wire nuts.
35 - One or more cover plates for switches, receptacles (outlets) or junction boxes were missing or broken. These plates are intended to contain fire and prevent electric shock from occurring due to exposed wires. Recommend that a qualified person install cover plates where necessary.
36 - Batteries in all the smoke alarms should be replaced after taking occupancy, and annually in the future. "Chirping" noises emitted from smoke alarms typically indicate that batteries need replacing. For more information, visit:
http://www.reporthost.com/?SMKALRM
37 - Branch circuit wiring installed in buildings built prior to the mid 1980s is typically rated for a maximum temperature of only 60 degrees Celsius. This includes non-metallic sheathed (Romex) wiring, and both BX and AC metal-clad flexible wiring. Knob and tube wiring, typically installed in homes built prior to 1950, may be rated for even lower maximum temperatures. Newer electric fixtures including lighting and fans typically require wiring rated for 90 degrees Celsius. Connecting newer fixtures to older, 60-degree-rated wiring is a potential fire hazard. Repairs for such conditions may involve replacing the last few feet of wiring to newer fixtures with new 90-degree-rated wire, and installing a junction box to join the old and new wiring.

It is beyond the scope of this inspection to determine if such incompatible components are installed, or to determine the extent to which they're installed. Based on the age of this building, the client should be aware of this safety hazard, both for existing fixtures and when planning to upgrade with newer fixtures. Consult with a qualified electrician for repairs as necessary.

Plumbing / Fuel Systems
38 - Copper water supply pipes were installed. Copper pipes installed prior to the late 1980s may be joined with solder that contains lead, which is a known health hazard especially for children. Laws were passed in 1985 prohibiting the use of lead in solder, but prior to that solder normally contained approximately 50% lead. The client should be aware of this, especially if children will be using this water supply system. Note that the inspector does not test for toxic materials such as lead. The client should consider having a qualified lab test for lead, and if necessary take steps to reduce or remove lead from the water supply. Various solutions include:For more information visit:
http://www.reporthost.com/?LEADDW
http://www.reporthost.com/?LEAD
39 - Significant corrosion was found in some water supply pipes or fittings. Leaks can occur as a result. Recommend that a qualified plumber evaluate and replace components as necessary.
40 - Pin holes and/or corrosion were visible on one or more copper water supply pipes. This can occur with acidic water, and from flux applied at fittings for soldering when the pipes were installed or repaired. Leaks can occur from pinholes and corrosion usually indicates past leaks. Recommend consulting with the local municipality and/or a qualified plumber about the local water supply's pH level, and researching solutions for this if necessary. Also recommend that a qualified plumber evaluate and replace water supply components if necessary.
41 - One or more hose bibs (outside faucets) appeared to be inoperable. No water flowed from the bib(s) when turned on. This may be due to a shut-off valve being turned off. Note that the inspector does not operate shut-off valves. Recommend consulting with the property owner about inoperable hose bibs, and if necessary have a qualified plumber make repairs.
42 - Insulation for one or more water supply pipes in the was missing. Recommend replacing or installing insulation on pipes per standard building practices to prevent them from freezing during cold weather, and for better energy efficiency with hot water supply pipes.
43 - Based on visible equipment or information provided to the inspector, this property appeared to have a yard irrigation (sprinkler) system. These are specialty systems and are excluded from this inspection. Comments in this report related to this system are made as a courtesy only and are not meant to be a substitute for a full evaluation by a qualified specialist. When this system is operated, recommend verifying that water is not directed at building exteriors, or directed so water accumulates around building foundations. Sprinkler heads may need to be adjusted, replaced or disabled. Consider having a qualified plumber verify that a backflow prevention device is installed per standard building practices to prevent cross-contamination of potable water. Recommend that a qualified specialist evaluate the irrigation system for other defects (e.g. leaks, damaged or malfunctioning sprinkler heads) and repair if necessary.
44 - One or more copper water supply pipes had substandard support or were loose. Leaks can occur as a result. Copper supply pipes should have approved hangers every 6-8 feet. If hangers are in contact with the copper pipe, they should be made of a material that doesn't cause the pipes or hangers to corrode due to contact of dissimilar metals. Recommend that a qualified person install hangers or secure pipes per standard building practices.
45 - One or more plastic PEX water supply pipes had substandard support or were loose. Leaks can occur as a result. PEX supply pipes should have approved hangers every 32-36 inches when run horizontally. Special hangers that allow movement from expansion and that won't damage the soft plastic piping should be used. Recommend that a qualified person install hangers or secure pipes per standard building practices.
46 - One or more waste pipes had a substandard slope. Clogging or leaks can occur as a result. Drain and waste pipes should be sloped 1/4 inch per foot of length if less than 3 inches in diameter, or 1/8 inch per foot of length for larger diameters. Recommend that a qualified plumber repair per standard building practices.
47 - Based on visible components or information provided to the inspector, this property appeared to have a private sewage disposal (septic) system. These are specialty systems and are excluded from this inspection. Comments in this report related to this system are made as a courtesy only and are not meant to be a substitute for a full evaluation by a qualified specialist. Generally, septic tanks should be pumped and inspected every 3 years. Depending on the type of system and municipal regulations, inspection and maintenance may be required more frequently, often annually. Recommend the following:For more information, visit:
http://www.reporthost.com/?SEPTIC

Water Heater
49 - No drain line was installed for the temperature-pressure relief valve. This is a potential safety hazard due to the risk of scalding if someone is standing next to the water heater when the valve opens. Recommend that a qualified plumber install a drain line per standard building practices.

Fireplaces, Stoves, Chimneys and Flues
50 - One or more masonry chimney crowns were cracked. Crowns are meant to keep water off of the chimney structure and prevent damage from freeze-thaw cycles. Chimney crowns are commonly constructed by mounding concrete or mortar on the top chimney surface, however this is substandard. A properly constructed chimney crown should:Recommend that a qualified contractor repair or replace crowns as necessary, and per standard building practices.
51 - Mortar at the brick chimney was deteriorated (e.g. loose, missing, cracked). As a result, water is likely to infiltrate the chimney structure and cause further damage. Recommend that a qualified contractor repair as necessary. For example, by repointing the mortar.

Kitchen
52 - The range could tip forward. An anti-tip bracket may not be installed. This is a potential safety hazard since the range can tip forward when weight is applied to the open door, such as when a small child climbs on it or if heavy objects are dropped on it. Anti-tip brackets have been sold with all free-standing ranges since 1985. Recommend installing an anti-tip bracket to eliminate this safety hazard. For more information, visit:
http://www.reporthost.com/?ATB

Bathrooms, Laundry and Sinks
53 - The clothes dryer was equipped with a vinyl or mylar, accordion-type, flexible exhaust duct. The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission considers these types of ducts to be unsafe, and a fire hazard. They can trap lint and are susceptible to kinks or crushing, which can greatly reduce the air flow and cause overheating. Recommend that such ducts be replaced with a rigid or corrugated semi-rigid metal duct, and by a qualified contractor if necessary. For more information, visit:
http://www.reporthost.com/?DRYER
54 - The clothes dryer exhaust duct was kinked, crushed or damaged. Air flow will be restricted as a result and the clothes dryer may overheat. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of fire. Recommend that a qualified person replace or repair the duct as necessary. For more information, visit:
http://www.reporthost.com/?DRYER
55 - The toilet at location(s) # was loose where it attached to the floor. Leaks can occur. Flooring, the sub-floor or areas below may get damaged. Sewer gases can enter living spaces. Recommend that a qualified contractor remove the toilet(s) for further evaluation and repair if necessary. A new wax ring should be installed and toilet(s) should be securely anchored to the floor to prevent movement and leaking.
56 - The bathtub surround at location(s) # was deteriorated, damaged or substandard. Water can damage the wall structure as a result. Recommend that a qualified contractor replace or repair the surround as necessary.
57 - Caulk around the base of the toilet at location(s) # was missing, substandard and/or deteriorated. Modern standards require caulk to be installed around the entire toilet base where it meets the floor for sanitary reasons. Without it, soiled water can soak into flooring and sub-floor materials if the toilet overflows. Condensation from the toilet can also soak into the flooring. Recommend that a qualified person caulk around toilet bases per standard building practices.
58 - Caulk was missing around the base of the bathtub spout, or there was a gap behind it, at location(s) #. Water may enter the wall structure behind the bathtub. Recommend that a qualified person repair as necessary to eliminate the gap. For example, by installing or replacing caulk if the gap is small enough. For larger gaps, a shorter spout nipple or an escutcheon plate can be installed.
59 - Gaps, no caulk, or substandard caulking were found between the bathtub and the floor and/or walls at location(s) #. Water may penetrate these areas and cause damage. Recommend that a qualified person re-caulk or install caulking as necessary.
60 - Gaps, no caulk, or substandard caulking were found between the shower enclosure and the floor and/or walls at location(s) #. Water can penetrate these areas and cause damage. Recommend that a qualified person re-caulk or install caulking as necessary.
61 - The clothes dryer exhaust duct was in one or more places. Clothes dryers produce large amounts of moisture which should not enter structure interiors. Moisture can accumulate and result in mold, bacteria or fungal growth. Recommend that a qualified person make permanent repairs as necessary. For more information, visit:
http://www.reporthost.com/?DRYER

Interior, Doors and Windows
62 - Stains were found in one or more ceiling areas. The inspector was unable to determine if an active leak exists (e.g. recent dry weather, inaccessible height). Recommend asking the property owner about this, monitoring the stains in the future, and/or having a qualified contractor evaluate and repair if necessary.
63 - Crank handles at some windows were loose. Recommend that a qualified person replace handles or make repairs as necessary.

Wood Destroying Organism Findings
64 - Evidence of past infestation of subterranean termites was found at location(s) # in the form of with visible wood damage. Recommend the following: