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http://www.HomeProNY.com
Doug@HomeProNY.com
(845) 726-4663
PO Box 601 
Johnson NY 10933
Inspector: Douglas Myers
Licensed New York State Home Inspector
160000058964

Property Inspection Report

Client(s):  Home Buyers
Property address:  69 Maple Ave
Anytown USA
Inspection date:  Wednesday, October 31, 2018

This report published on Friday, November 9, 2018 10:41:01 AM EDT

This report is the exclusive property of this inspection company. Only the client(s) listed in the report title have authorized use of the report.. Use of this report by any unauthorized persons is prohibited. Signature The ASHI Experience

How to Read this Report
This report is organized by the property's functional areas.  Within each functional area, descriptive information is listed first and is shown in bold type.  Items of concern follow descriptive information. Concerns are shown and sorted according to these types:
SafetyPoses a risk of injury or death
Repair/ReplaceRecommend repairing or replacing
Repair/MaintainRecommend repair and/or maintenance
Minor defectCorrection only involves a minor expense
MaintainRecommend ongoing maintenance
EvaluateRecommend evaluation by a specialist
CommentInformation for you

Click here for a glossary of building construction terms.Contact your inspector If there are terms that you do not understand, or visit the glossary of construction terms at https://www.reporthost.com/glossary.asp

Table of Contents

General Information
Grounds
Exterior and Foundation
Basement
Roof
Attic and Roof Structure
Garage
Electric
Plumbing / Fuel Systems
Water Heater
Heating, Ventilation and Air Condition (HVAC)
Fireplaces, Stoves, Chimneys and Flues
Kitchen
Bathrooms and Laundry
Interiors
Private Well
Wood Destroying Insects and Organism Findings
Septic Information
Perspective Summary
Additional Inspection Information
Closing

View summary

General Information
Table of contents
Report number: C1031-1
Time started: 9:15
Time finished: 11:30
Report Creation Time:: 2 hrs.
Present during inspection: Client, Buyers Realtor
Client present for discussion at end of inspection: Yes
Weather conditions during inspection: Dry (no rain)
Temperature during inspection: Cold, 45
Ground condition: Damp
Recent weather: Dry (no rain), Rain
Overnight temperature: Cold
Payment method: Credit card
Buildings inspected: One house, One detached garage
Number of residential units inspected: 1
Age of main building: 17
Building Size: 2498
Additional tests and services ordered: Radon test
1) Comment - This was a furnished house. Furnishings in houses limit the inspection process. Furniture, floor finishing, wall coverings, draperies, stored items, etc.. Many times windows and doors will be blocked and not available for inspection. The same thing holds true for walls, floors and some ceiling areas. Many wall receptacles will be blocked by furnishings and can not be tested. It is especially important to do a thorough walk-through inspection prior to the closing. This is usually done the day prior to closing along with your real estate agent. Areas that were not available for viewing during the inspection, should be scrutinized during the walk-through inspection. Any deficiencies or damages should be immediately noted. All concerns should be dealt with prior to closing.
2) Comment - Exterior views of the house and grounds.
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3) Comment - A radon test was placed in the house. It will need to remain in the house for at least 48 hours, although it could be longer.

The inspector will return to collect the test and determine if the instructions for closed house conditions were adhered to.

For additional information click:

http://www.epa.gov/radon/realestate.html
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Limitations: Unless specifically included in the inspection, the following items and any related equipment, controls, electric systems and/or plumbing systems are excluded from this inspection: detached buildings or structures; fences and gates; retaining walls; underground drainage systems, catch basins or concealed sump pumps; swimming pools and related safety equipment, spas, hot tubs or saunas; whether deck, balcony and/or stair membranes are watertight; trees, landscaping, properties of soil, soil stability, erosion and erosion control; ponds, water features, irrigation or yard sprinkler systems; sport courts, playground, recreation or leisure equipment; areas below the exterior structures with less than 3 feet of vertical clearance; invisible fencing; sea walls, docks and boathouses; retractable awnings. No information regarding prior or future susceptibility to flooding is offered. If you desire information concerning flooding is available from the local municipality. Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only.
Condition of fences and gates: Appeared serviceable
Condition of retaining walls: Appeared serviceable
Retaining wall material: Rock
Site profile: Moderate slope
Condition of driveway: Appeared serviceable
Driveway material: Gravel
Condition of sidewalks and/or patios: Appeared serviceable
Sidewalk material: Stones
Condition of deck, patio and/or porch covers: Appeared serviceable
Deck, patio, porch cover material and type: Open, Covered (Refer to Roof section)
Condition of decks, porches and/or balconies: Appeared serviceable
Deck, porch and/or balcony material: Wood
Condition of stairs, handrails and guardrails: Appeared serviceable
Exterior stair material: Wood, Stones
4) Safety, Repair/Replace - Risers for stairs at one or more locations were higher than 7 3/4 inches and posed a fall or trip hazard. Risers should be 7 3/4 inches or shorter. At a minimum, be aware of this hazard, especially when guests who are not familiar with the stairs are present. Recommend that a qualified contractor repair per standard building practices.
5) Safety, Repair/Replace - The risers for stairs at one or more locations varied in height and pose a fall or trip hazard. Risers within the same flight of stairs should vary by no more than 3/8 inch. At a minimum, be aware of this hazard, especially when guests who are not familiar with the stairs are present. Recommend that a qualified contractor repair per standard building practices.
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6) Safety, Repair/Maintain - A proper landing should be installed at the steps in order to properly support the steps and help prevent tripping.
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7) Repair/Replace, Evaluate - Fungal rot was found in decking boards and/or support posts at one or more decks or porches. Conducive conditions for this such as wood-soil contact should be corrected. Recommend that a qualified contractor evaluate and repair as necessary. All rotten wood should be replaced.
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8) Repair/Replace, Evaluate - Fungal rot was found in support posts at one or more sets of exterior stairs. Fungal rot in some stair components may pose a safety hazard. Recommend that a qualified person evaluate and repair as necessary. All rotten wood should be replaced.
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9) Maintain - Wooden deck or porch surfaces were overdue for normal maintenance. Recommend that a qualified person clean and preserve as necessary. Where decks have been coated with a finish such as opaque stains or paint, it may be too difficult to strip the finish and apply anything but paint or opaque stain. Where transparent stain or penetrating oil has been applied in the past, recommend that a penetrating oil be used. For more information, visit:
http://www.google.com/search?q=penetrating+oil+decks
http://www.google.com/search?q=deck+maintenance
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10) Evaluate, Comment - Due to the season leaves on many trees were were missing. No determination could be made about the health of the trees located on the property.
11) Comment - Minor deterioration (e.g. cracks, holes, settlement, heaving) was found in sidewalks or patios, but no trip hazards were found. The client may wish to have repairs made for cosmetic reasons.
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12) Comment - There is a shed located on property that is in need of some repairs.
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Exterior and Foundation
Table of contents
Limitations: The inspector performs a visual inspection of accessible components or systems at the exterior. Items excluded from this inspection include below-grade foundation walls and footings; foundations, exterior surfaces or components obscured by vegetation, stored items or debris; wall structures obscured by coverings such as siding or trim. Some items such as siding, trim, soffits, vents and windows are often high off the ground, and may be viewed using binoculars from the ground or from a ladder. This may limit a full evaluation. Regarding foundations, some amount of cracking is normal in concrete slabs and foundation walls due to shrinkage and drying. Note that the inspector does not determine the adequacy of seismic reinforcement.
Condition of wall exterior covering: Appeared serviceable
Apparent wall structure: Wood frame
Wall covering: Wood
Condition of foundation and footings: Appeared serviceable
Apparent foundation type: Finished basement
Foundation/stem wall material: Poured in place concrete
Footing material (under foundation stem wall): Poured in place concrete
13) Repair/Replace - The masonry (brick or stone) veneer was deteriorated or damaged in some areas. Where cracks or openings are exposed, water can enter the wall structure causing mold, fungal growth and structural damage. This is a conducive condition for wood-destroying organisms. Recommend that a qualified contractor repair as necessary. For example, by repointing mortar or replacing broken or missing masonry.
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14) Maintain - Vegetation such as trees, shrubs and/or vines was in contact with or close to the building exterior. Vegetation can serve as a pathway for wood-destroying insects and can retain moisture against the exterior after it rains. This is a conducive condition for wood-destroying organisms. Recommend pruning, moving or removing vegetation as necessary to maintain at least 6 inches of space between it and the building exterior. A 1-foot clearance is better.
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15) Maintain - The paint or stain finish over much of the entire structure was failing (e.g. peeling, faded, worn, thinning). Siding and trim with a failing finish can be damaged by moisture.Recommend that a qualified contractor prep (e.g. clean, scrape, sand, prime, caulk) and repaint or restain the entire building exterior per standard building practices. Any repairs needed to the siding or trim should be made prior to this.
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Limitations: Structural components such as joists and beams, and other components such as piping, wiring and/or ducting that are obscured by under-floor insulation are also excluded from this inspection. Note that the inspector does not determine if support posts, columns, beams, joists, studs, trusses, etc. are of adequate size, spanning or spacing.

The inspector does not guarantee or warrant that water will not accumulate in the basement in the future. Access to the basement during all seasons and during prolonged periods of all types of weather conditions (e.g. heavy rain, melting snow) would be needed to do so. The inspector does not determine the adequacy of basement floor or stairwell drains, or determine if such drains are clear or clogged.

Note that all basement areas should be checked periodically for water intrusion, plumbing leaks and pest activity.

No inspection was performed concerning the presence or damage from any mice, rodents, vermin or any other pests, any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. This type of inspection is available from extermination companies and it is recommended that such inspections be conducted to determine the presence or damage from any insects, mice, rodents, vermin or any other pests.
Condition of exterior entry doors: Appeared serviceable
Exterior door material: Wood
Condition of floor substructure above crawl space: Appeared serviceable
Pier or support post material: Steel
Beam material: Laminated wood
Floor structure: Solid wood joists
16) Safety, Repair/Replace - Handrails at one or more flights of stairs were missing. This is a potential fall hazard. Handrails should be installed at stairs with four or more risers or where stairs are greater than 30 inches high. Recommend that a qualified contractor install handrails where missing and per standard building practices.
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17) Comment - Basement views.
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18) Comment - There is a wave ventilation system installed in the basement.
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19) - There did not appear to be adequate basement egress for the finished below grade area of the house.

Egress Requirements
Whether it is an egress window or an egress door, it has to open to the outside and open easily without the use of keys or tools. It must also follow code requirements for the height and width of basement egress windows. Egress opening requirements include:

• A window with a minimum width of opening of 20 inches.

• A window with a minimum height of opening of 24 inches.

• A window with a minimum net clear opening — the actual opening through which a person must crawl — of 5.7 square feet.

• A sill height no higher than 44 inches above the floor.

• A window-well floor space of 9 square feet with minimum dimensions of 36 inches wide and long.

• A permanent ladder or steps if the window well depth is more than 44 inches.

Homeowners may come up with all sorts of reasons why they don’t think they need an egress. But, says Nard, “It’s not about you. It’s about the firefighter or rescue worker carrying gear and wearing an oxygen backpack who has to get through that opening to drag you out in case you are unconscious from a fire or other emergency.” It’s also about anyone who will own the home after you and may use that basement space.

For additional information click below:

http://www.bobvila.com/articles/333-know-the-rules-for-finished-basements/#.Ux8EGfldXF8
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Limitations: The following items or areas are not included in this inspection: areas that could not be traversed or viewed clearly due to lack of access; solar roofing components. Any comments made regarding these items are made as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not provide an estimate of remaining life on the roof surface material, nor guarantee that leaks have not occurred in the roof surface, skylights or roof penetrations in the past. Regarding roof leaks, only active leaks, visible evidence of possible sources of leaks, and evidence of past leaks observed during the inspection are reported on as part of this inspection. The inspector does not guarantee or warrant that leaks will not occur in the future. Complete access to all roof and attic spaces during all seasons and during prolonged periods of all types of weather conditions (e.g. high wind and rain, melting snow) would be needed to do so. Regarding the roof drainage system, unless the inspection was conducted during and after prolonged periods of heavy rain, the inspector was unable to determine if gutters, downspouts and extensions performed adequately or were leak-free.
Age of roof surface(s): 17
Roof inspection method: Viewed from ground
Condition of roof surface material: Appeared serviceable
Roof surface material: Metal panel
The roofing on this house has a five year replacement probability that would be considered to be:: Low
Condition of exposed flashings: Appeared serviceable, Near, at or beyond service life
Condition of gutters, downspouts and extensions: Appeared serviceable
Gutter and downspout material: Metal
Gutter and downspout installation: Full
20) Comment - Roof views.
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Attic and Roof Structure
Table of contents
Limitations: The following items or areas are not included in this inspection: areas that could not be traversed or viewed clearly due to lack of access; areas and components obscured by insulation. Any comments made regarding these items are made as a courtesy only. The inspector does not determine the adequacy of the attic ventilation system. Complete access to all roof and attic spaces during all seasons and during prolonged periods of all types of weather conditions (e.g. high/low temperatures, high/low humidity, high wind and rain, melting snow) would be needed to do so. The inspector is not a licensed engineer and does not determine the adequacy of roof structure components such as trusses, rafters or ceiling beams, or their spacing or sizing.
Condition of roof structure: Appeared serviceable
Ceiling structure: Ceiling beams
Condition of insulation in attic (ceiling, skylight chase, etc.): Not determined (inaccessible or obscured)
Approximate attic insulation R value (may vary in areas): Not determined (inaccessible or obscured)
Vapor retarder: Not determined (inaccessible or obscured)
21) Comment - No accessible attic spaces were found or inspected at this property. The inspector attempts to locate attic access points and evaluate attic spaces where possible. Such access points may be obscured by stored items or furnishings, but various home inspection standards of practice do not require inspectors to move stored items, furnishings or personal belongings. If such access points are found in the future and/or made accessible, a qualified person should fully evaluate those attic spaces and roof structures.
Limitations: The inspector does not determine the adequacy of firewall ratings. Requirements for ventilation in garages vary between municipalities.
Type: Detached
Condition of exterior entry doors: Appeared serviceable
Condition of garage vehicle door(s): Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Type of garage vehicle door: Sectional
Number of vehicle doors: 3
Condition of automatic opener(s): Appeared serviceable
Mechanical auto-reverse operable (reverses when meeting reasonable resistance during closing): Yes
Condition of garage floor: Appeared serviceable
Condition of garage interior: Appeared serviceable
Condition of detached garage or carport structure: Appeared serviceable
Condition of wall exterior covering: Appeared serviceable
Condition of roof structure: Appeared serviceable
Roof type: Flat or low slope
22) Repair/Replace - One or more garage vehicle doors were damaged or deteriorated. Recommend that a qualified contractor repair or replace door(s) as necessary.
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23) Repair/Replace - Some sections of siding and/or trim were damaged. Recommend that a qualified person repair, replace or install siding or trim as necessary.
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24) Repair/Maintain - One or more drain pipes were leaking. Rainwater can come in contact with the building exterior or accumulate around the building foundation as a result. This is a conducive condition for wood-destroying organisms. Recommend that a qualified person repair as necessary.
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25) Comment - Some floor areas were obscured by stored items and/or debris and couldn't be fully evaluated.
26) Comment - Minor cracks were found in the concrete slab floor. These are common and appeared to be only a cosmetic issue.
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27) Comment - Garage views.
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Limitations: The following items are not included in this inspection: generator systems, transfer switches, surge suppressors, inaccessible or concealed wiring; underground utilities and systems; low-voltage lighting or lighting on timers or sensors. Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not determine the adequacy of grounding or bonding, if this system has an adequate capacity for the client's specific or anticipated needs, or if this system has any reserve capacity for additions or expansion. The inspector does not operate circuit breakers as part of the inspection, and does not install or change light bulbs. The inspector does not evaluate every wall switch or receptacle, but instead tests a representative number of them per various standards of practice. When furnishings, stored items or child-protective caps are present some receptacles are usually inaccessible and are not tested; these are excluded from this inspection. Receptacles that are not of standard 110 volt configuration, including 240-volt dryer receptacles, are not tested and are excluded. The functionality of, power source for and placement of smoke and carbon monoxide detectors is not determined as part of this inspection. Upon taking occupancy, proper operating and placement of smoke and carbon monoxide detectors should be verified and batteries should be changed. These devices have a limited lifespan and should be replaced every 10 years. The inspector attempts to locate and evaluate all main and sub-panels. However, panels are often concealed. If panels are found after the inspection, a qualified electrician should evaluate and repair if necessary. The inspector attempts to determine the overall electrical service size, but such estimates are not guaranteed because the overall capacity may be diminished by lesser-rated components in the system. Houses that are over 50 years old should have an evaluation by a licensed electrician. Any repairs recommended should be made by a licensed electrician.
The electrical system installed in this house has a five year replacement probability that would be considered to be: Low
Electric service condition: Appeared serviceable
Primary service type: Underground
Number of service conductors: 3
Service voltage (volts): 120-240
Estimated service amperage: 200
Primary service overload protection type: Circuit breakers
Service entrance conductor material: Stranded aluminum
Main disconnect rating (amps): 200
System ground: Ground rod(s) in soil
Condition of main service panel: Appeared serviceable
Condition of sub: Appeared serviceable
Location of main service panel #A: Basement
Location of sub-panel #B: Basement
Location of sub-panel #C: Garage
Location of sub-panel #D: Shed
Location of main disconnect: Breaker at top of main service panel
Condition of branch circuit wiring: Serviceable
Branch circuit wiring type: Non-metallic sheathed
Smoke alarms installed: Yes, but not tested
Carbon monoxide alarms installed: Yes, but not tested
Smoke alarm power source(s): Hard wired
28) Safety, Repair/Replace - One or more circuit breakers in panel(s) #A and C were "double tapped," where two or more wires were installed in the breaker's lug. Most breakers are designed for only one wire to be connected. This is a safety hazard since the lug bolt can tighten securely against one wire but leave other(s) loose. Arcing, sparks and fires can result. Recommend that a qualified electrician repair as necessary. For more information, visit:

http://tinyurl.com/kreuhtd

http://www.google.com/search?q=double+tap+circuit+breaker
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29) Safety, Repair/Replace - Neutral wires were doubled or bundled together under the same lug on the neutral bus bar in panel(s) #A and B. This is a potential safety hazard in the event that one of the circuits needs to be isolated during servicing. For one neutral to be disconnected, other neutrals from energized circuits sharing the same lug will be loosened. Power surges may result on the energized circuits and result in damage or fire. Also, multiple wires under the same lug may not be secure, resulting in loose wires, arcing, sparks and fire. Recommend that a qualified electrician repair per standard building practices. For more information, visit:
http://www.google.com/search?q=double+tap+on+neutral+bus+bar
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30) Safety, Repair/Replace - Flexible lamp or appliance cord was being used for permanent wiring at one or more locations. Such wiring is not intended to be used as permanent wiring and poses a safety hazard of shock and fire. Recommend that a qualified electrician repair per standard building practices.
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31) Safety, Repair/Replace - One or more receptacles (outlets) were installed directly above electric baseboard heaters. This was a common practice in the past, but insulation on appliance cords in contact with the heater(s) can be damaged by heaters. This is a shock and fire hazard. Recommend that a qualified electrician make repairs or modifications as necessary. For example, by converting receptacles to junction boxes, moving receptacles and/or moving baseboard heaters.
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32) Safety, Repair/Replace - Light fixtures with fully or partially exposed incandescent bulbs were installed in one or more closets. This is a fire hazard. Flammable stored items can come into contact with hot bulbs, or hot fragments from broken bulbs can fall on combustible materials. Closet lighting should use fluorescent light fixtures or fully enclosed incandescent fixtures. Installing a compact fluorescent lamp in a lamp holder is not an acceptable practice. If globes or covers are missing, they should be replaced. Otherwise recommend that a qualified electrician replace closet lights per standard building practices.
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33) Safety, Repair/Maintain - One or more knockouts were missing from panel(s) #C. Holes in panels are a potential fire hazard if a malfunction ever occurs inside the panel. Rodents can also enter panels through holes. Recommend that a qualified person install knockout covers where missing and per standard building practices.
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34) Repair/Replace - There was evidence of rodent intrusion in the electric panel(s).

Mice in electrical panels can cause considerable damage and create a fire risk. From the homeowner's perspective this is a safety concern. From the perspective of a mouse the electrical panel is likely to be a warm dry home, safe from cats and other enemies. The mice will furnish the electrical panel with cozy bedding such as insulation and also stock pile groceries, often pet food or nuts. For entertainment the mice will chew on the electrical wiring and their urine is corrosive.
How do the mice gain entry to the panel? The mice only need a very small opening about the size of a dime to squeeze inside the panel. The National Electrical Code requires that all opening in electrical panels be sealed. Unfortunately, electricians, homeowners other tradesman often overlook this issue despite this requirement.

What to do? If an opening is discovered, a qualified electrician should be engaged for repair.
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35) Repair/Replace - There are breakers installed in the panel that are not approved by the manufacturer.

NEC 110-3(b) prohibits the use of equipment where labeling strictly disallow the use of those components.

Article 110-3(b) of the NEC states that Listed or labeled equipment shall be used or installed in accordance with any instructions included in the listing or labeling. Just because a breaker fits in the panel does not mean that it is okay to install it in that panel. To my knowledge, only one manufacturer has had their breakers tested and listed to install in other manufacturers panels. However, even that breaker is not allowed in a panel that is specifically labeled against installing other brands of breakers. Some panels even limit the use of certain series of their own breakers in their panels.
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36) Repair/Maintain - One for more floor receptacles for missing the covers.
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37) Evaluate, Comment - There is an electric backup generator system installed. This system was not inspected and a qualified electrician should determine the condition of the system and provide any servicing needed. Any information offered about the system during the inspection is done as a courtesy and should not be considered as an inspection or evaluation of the system.

These systems need regular servicing to ensure proper and safe operation.

We recommend, upon closing, that it be inspected by a licensed, insured, generator company or at the very least a licensed, insured, electrical contractor that is versed in these systems.

Generac

17KW

Model # 0055040
Serial # 5098713
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38) Comment - Installed main electric service and panel.
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39) Comment - Installed electric sub panels
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40) Comment - CO alarms should be installed in a central location outside each sleeping area and on every level of the home and in other locations where required by applicable laws, codes or standards. Read all of NFPA's Carbon Monoxide safety tips and download our free safety tip sheet.

http://www.nfpa.org/~/media/files/safety-information/safety-tip-sheets/cosafety.pdf?la=en

Download the tip sheet in Spanish.

http://www.nfpa.org/~/media/files/safety-information/safety-tip-sheets/cosafetyspanish2.pdf?la=en
41) Comment - The house has an alarm system installed. No inspection was performed on the alarm system. The owner should provide information regarding the system and the company that is monitoring the home.
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42) - The house has propane installed. A combustion gas detector should be installed to provide early warning for the presence of explosive gas.

For additional information click:

http://www.kidde.com/Documents/900-0113%20sheet.pdf

http://www.walmart.com/ip/Kidde-AC-DC-Carbon-Monoxide-and-Gas-Alarm/10910790?adid=22222222227000000000&wl0=&wl1=g&wl2=c&wl3=41833582510&wl4=&wl5=pla&wl6=19880599990&veh=sem
Plumbing / Fuel Systems
Table of contents
Limitations: The following items are not included in this inspection: private/shared wells and related equipment; private sewage disposal systems; hot tubs or spas; main, side and lateral sewer lines; gray water systems; pressure boosting systems; trap primers; incinerating or composting toilets; fire suppression systems; water softeners, conditioners or filtering systems; plumbing components concealed within the foundation or building structure, or in inaccessible areas such as below tubs; underground utilities and systems; overflow drains for tubs and sinks; backflow prevention devices. Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not operate water supply or shut-off valves due to the possibility of valves leaking or breaking when operated. The inspector does not test for lead in the water supply, the water pipes or solder, does not determine if plumbing and fuel lines are adequately sized, and does not determine the existence or condition of underground or above-ground fuel tanks. Any home would benefit from, and we recommend, a sewer/septic line inspection using video scoping equipment. Houses that are over 50 years old should have an evaluation by a licensed plumber. These and other services are available either by us as an added service or from other companies.
Condition of service and main line: Appeared serviceable
Main Service Location: Basement Rear
Location of main water shut-off: Basement
Service pipe material: Plastic
Condition of supply lines: Appeared serviceable
Supply pipe material: Copper
Condition of drain pipes: Appeared serviceable
Drain pipe material: Plastic
Condition of waste lines: Appeared serviceable
Waste pipe material: Cast iron
Vent pipe condition: Appeared serviceable
Sump pump installed: No
Sewage ejector pump installed: Yes
Condition of sewage ejector pump: Appeared serviceable
Type of irrigation system supply source: Private well
Condition of fuel system: Appeared serviceable
Visible fuel oil storage systems: Above ground, 330 gallon tank
Location of main fuel shut-off valve: At propane tank, At oil tank
43) Repair/Replace - One or more hose bibs (outside faucets) were not the "frost-free" design, and are more likely to freeze during cold weather than frost-free hose bibs. Recommend that a qualified plumber upgrade these with frost-free hose bibs to prevent freezing, pipes bursting, flooding and possible water damage.
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44) Comment - There is an irrigation / sprinkler system installed. The system was not operated or inspected and information should be obtained from the current homeowner concerning the operation and condition of the system.

For additional information visit:

http://www.home-smart.org/basic_care/section_detail.aspx?itemID=2946&catID=759&SelectCatID=759&cat_1=751&cat_2=759&ref=2946:BC_I_2

http://www.irrigationtutorials.com/
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45) Comment - The installed propane tank(s).
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46) Comment - The home has propane gas service installed.

In all likelihood an inspection of the system will be required prior to the gas company connecting the gas to the house. This inspection should take place prior to closing to insure any deficiencies are addressed prior to closing. In many areas the gas code at the time of property transfer will be enforced, not the gas code when the system was installed.

It is best practice to contact a number of propane suppliers to determine the market price of gas in the area. Call the company that owns the tank currently installed to compare pricing.

After choosing a company it is best to set up an automatic delivery account to prevent running out of gas.

WHO OWNS THE TANK?
Some homes own their propane tank outright, while others rent it from a fuel company. Both arrangements have pros and cons. With a tank that is owned outright, there is no need to worry about budgeting for monthly rental fees. You’ll also have more freedom to make long-term decisions about your home’s fuel use. The downside to this, however, is that purchasing a tank can be a significant cost up front, so that cost will definitely be factored into the asking price for the home.
On the other hand, the main advantage to renting is that you’re not responsible for the maintenance of the tank. If the unit ever needs repairs or replacing, it’s not an expense you will have to worry about. Most fuel companies will happily transfer over a tank rental agreement when the house is sold, though you may be given the option of buying it outright, too. If buying the tank is the option you choose, be sure to get documentation proving your ownership of the tank.
47) Comment - Installed fuel tank(s).
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48) Comment - The main water service and shut off valve is located in the basement closet.
49) Comment - The main gas shut off valve was located at the tanks.
Water Heater
Table of contents
Limitations: Evaluation of and determining the adequacy or completeness of the following items are not included in this inspection: water recirculation pumps; solar water heating systems; Energy Smart or energy saver controls; catch pan drains. Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not provide an estimate of remaining life on water heaters, does not determine if water heaters are appropriately sized, or perform any evaluations that require a pilot light to be lit or a shut-off valve to be operated.
Condition of water heater: Appeared serviceable
Type: Integral with heating system, with storage tank
Energy source: Oil
Capacity (in gallons): 40
Temperature-pressure relief valve installed: Yes
Manufacturer: Amtrol
The water heater installed in this house has a five year replacement probability that would be considered to be: Medium
Model number: WH7Z
Serial number: S31201D4000000035
Location of water heater: Basement
50) Comment - Installed water heater.
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Heating, Ventilation and Air Condition (HVAC)
Table of contents
Limitations: The following items are not included in this inspection: humidifiers, dehumidifiers, electronic air filters; solar, coal or wood-fired heat systems; thermostat or temperature control accuracy and timed functions; heating components concealed within the building structure or in inaccessible areas; underground utilities and systems; safety devices and controls (due to automatic operation). Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not provide an estimate of remaining life on heating or cooling system components, does not determine if heating or cooling systems are appropriately sized, does not test coolant pressure, or perform any evaluations that require a pilot light to be lit, a shut-off valve to be operated, a circuit breaker to be turned "on" or a serviceman's or oil emergency switch to be operated. It is beyond the scope of this inspection to determine if furnace heat exchangers are intact and free of leaks. Condensation pans and drain lines may clog or leak at any time and should be monitored while in operation in the future. Even where buildings are vacant, contain furnishings or stored items, the inspector may not be able to verify that a heat source is present in all "liveable" rooms (e.g. bedrooms, kitchens and living/dining rooms).
General heating system type(s): Circulated Hot Water, Electric heaters
General heating distribution type(s): Pipes and convectors
The heating system installed in this house has a five year replacement probability that would be considered to be: Medium
Condition of electric heaters (not forced air): Appeared serviceable
Electric heater type (not forced air): Baseboard
Condition of hydronic or steam heat system: Appeared serviceable
Type of hydronic or steam heat: Hydronic (hot water)
Hydronic or steam heat fuel type: Oil
Manufacturer:: Weil-McLain
Boiler model #: P-WGO-4
Boiler serial number: CP4271646
Manufactured Date: 11/12/2001
Condition of burners: Appeared serviceable
Condition of venting system: Appeared serviceable
Condition of combustion air supply: Appeared serviceable
51) Safety, Evaluate - There is no Low Water Cut Off Valve installed on the boiler
One of the most important safety devices on your boiler is the low water cutoff valve.

This device detects if the water level within your boiler has dropped below the manufacturers recommended level. Should this occur, the low water cutoff will do just as its name implies. It will cut-off the burner and shut the boiler down.
Without a properly functioning low water cutoff, the burner can continue to fire allowing for intense heat to build. The results can be catastrophic - explosions, fires and the possibility of severe injuries to personnel and property.

Regular inspections of this crucial safety device. Make sure it is operating properly. If it needs rebuilt or replaced, attend to it immediately.
Inquire if your service technician recommends turning off the water fill valve to the boiler if you do have a Low Water Cut Off Valve
52) Safety - The house has one or more electric baseboard heaters installed. There are some safety concerns with electric baseboard heaters.

CAUTION - High Temperature. Keep electrical cords, drapes, and other furnishings away from heater. When using electrical appliances, basic precautions should always be followed to reduce the risk of fire, electric shock, and injury to persons, including the following:

The heater is hot when in use. To avoid burns, do not let bare skin touch hot surfaces. Use caution when any heater is used by or near children or invalids and whenever the heater is left operating unattended.

Keep combustible materials, such as furniture, pillows, bedding, papers, clothes, and curtains away from heater, minimum of 12 inches in front and above, 6 inches on both sides is the minimum clearance.

Do not insert or allow foreign objects to enter any ventilation or exhaust opening as this may cause an electric shock or fire, or damage the heater.

To prevent a possible fire, do not block air intakes or exhaust in any manner. Heater must be kept clear of all obstructions: minimum of 12 inches in front and above, 6 inches on both sides.

Heater must be kept clean of excessive lint, dirt and debris

Use this heater only as described in this manual. Any other use not recommended by the manufacturer may cause fire, electrical shock, or injury to persons.
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53) Repair/Maintain - One or more air elimination valves on the heating system appear to be leaking.

It needs to be replaced.

For additional information click:

http://inspectapedia.com/heat/Air_Bleed_Valve_Repair.php
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54) Comment - Contact NYSERDA concerning rebates for upgrading the current system to a high efficiency system.

Visit this website for additional information:

http://www.nyserda.ny.gov/
Telephone #: 1-877-NYSMART

Contact the IRS concerning tax rebates for upgrading the system to a high efficiency system.

Visit this website for additional information: http://www.energystar.gov/index.cfm?c=tax_credits.tx_index
55) Comment - Consider upgrading the boilers aquastat to a more energy efficient unit. Visit these websites for additional information:

https://www.beckettcorp.com/product/aquasmart-7600-boiler-control/

http://www.smartbuildingproducts.com/products/
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56) Comment - Contact the utility company prior to any energy upgrades for possible rebates or programs.

Orange and Rockland:

http://www.oru.com/customerprograms/incentivesandrebates/newyork/index.html

Central Hudson:

http://www.savingscentral.com/

New York State Electric and Gas:

http://www.nyseg.com/

Delaware County Electric Cooperative (DCEC):

http://www.dce.coop/
57) - The installed heating system.
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Fireplaces, Stoves, Chimneys and Flues
Table of contents
Limitations: The following items are not included in this inspection: coal stoves, gas logs, chimney flues (except where visible). Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not determine the adequacy of drafting or sizing in fireplace and stove flues, and also does not determine if prefabricated or zero-clearance fireplaces are installed in accordance with the manufacturer's specifications. The inspector does not perform any evaluations that require a pilot light to be lit, and does not light fires. The inspector provides a basic visual examination of a chimney and any associated wood burning device. The National Fire Protection Association has stated that an in-depth Level 2 chimney inspection should be part of every sale or transfer of property with a wood-burning device. Such an inspection may reveal defects that are not apparent to the home inspector who is a generalist.
Condition of wood-burning fireplaces, stoves: Appeared serviceable
Wood-burning fireplace type: Masonry
Condition of chimneys and flues: Appeared serviceable
Wood-burning chimney type: Masonry
58) Safety, Repair/Maintain, Evaluate - One or more wood-burning fireplaces or stoves were found at the property. When such devices are used, they should be professionally inspected and cleaned annually to prevent creosote build-up and to determine if repairs are needed. The National Fire Protection Association states that a "Level 2" chimney inspection should be performed with every sale or transfer of property with a wood-burning device. Recommend consulting with the property owner about recent and past servicing and repairs to all wood-burning devices and chimneys or flues at this property. Recommend that a qualified specialist evaluate all wood-burning devices and chimneys, and clean and repair as necessary. Note that if a wood stove insert is installed, it may need to be removed for such an evaluation. For more information, search for "chimney inspection" at:
http://www.csia.org/
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59) Safety, Comment - The National Fire Protection Agency (NFPA) recommends a yearly inspection and cleaning and repairs done as necessary. Free standing wood stoves or fire place inserts used to heat the home should be inspected and cleaned if needed every year. Regular open fireplaces need to be maintained and cleaned on a consistent basis as well. Usually a cleaning is needed for every cord of wood burned or at least 2 years.

We recommend that all the flues in the home be inspected and serviced prior to closing to assure there are no problems or concerns. Chimney service technicians have video equipment which allows them to see much more and even beyond bends in the flue.

Why should I have my chimney cleaned?

The purpose of chimney cleaning is to remove flammable deposits such as soot and creosote from the interior walls of a chimney. If these deposits are allowed to build up, they will eventually ignite and cause a chimney fire. During the winter months, in many areas, chimney fires are the #1 cause of house fires. Chimney fires damage chimneys, cause fires within other areas of the home and cause millions of dollars in property damage annually. In the United States well over 50,000 homes annually catch on fire due to the use of solid fuel burning appliances. (The majority of solid fuel used by homeowners is wood, but also includes coal, wood pellets and biofuel.)

How often should I have my chimney cleaned?

The National Fire Protection Agency (NFPA) recommends that a chimney be inspected annually to determine if cleaning or repairs are necessary. Many condominium and apartment complexes in the United States require annual cleaning and inspections. It is also a legal requirement in many countries in Europe. If you are a heavy user of a wood, wood pellet, coal or biofuel appliance such as a solid fuel stove, pizza oven, furnace or fireplace, many manufacturers recommend inspecting the chimney every 2 weeks to see if cleaning is needed. After periodically inspecting your chimney, you will get a better idea how quickly soot and creosote builds up and you can schedule cleaning your chimney accordingly, but remember certain factors such as frequency of use, duration of use, moisture content of the wood, type of wood, the individual characteristics of your appliance and how you have it adjusted can greatly affect the soot build up within your chimney.
Adjustments include damper settings, outside air vents, interior air intake settings, and the use and positioning of glass doors on fireplaces and stoves.
Strange as it may sound, in many cases greater buildup of soot occurs during periods of infrequent and shorter burn times such as fall and spring than it does in the middle of the winter when far more fuel is burned. This is because the chimney walls stay cool during short time frames and condensation occurs much more rapidly on cool surfaces. ERR ON THE SIDE OF SAFETY, IF IN DOUBT HAVE YOUR CHIMNEY INSPECTED IMMEDIATELY
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Limitations: The following items are not included in this inspection: household appliances such as stoves, ovens, cook tops, ranges, warming ovens, griddles, broilers, dishwashers, trash compactors, refrigerators, freezers, ice makers, hot water dispensers and water filters; appliance timers, clocks, cook functions, self and/or continuous cleaning operations, thermostat or temperature control accuracy, and lights. Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not provide an estimate of the remaining life of appliances, and does not determine the adequacy of operation of appliances. The inspector does not note appliance manufacturers, models or serial numbers and does not determine if appliances are subject to recalls. Areas and components behind and obscured by appliances are inaccessible and excluded from this inspection.
Permanently installed kitchen appliances present during inspection: Range, Dishwasher, Refrigerator, Microwave oven
Condition of counters: Appeared serviceable
Condition of cabinets: Appeared serviceable
Condition of sinks and related plumbing: Appeared serviceable
Condition of dishwasher: Appeared serviceable
Condition of range, cooktop: Appeared serviceable
Range, cooktop type: Propane
Condition of refrigerator: Appeared serviceable
Condition of built: Appeared serviceable
60) Comment - Kitchen views.
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Bathrooms and Laundry
Table of contents
Limitations: The following items are not included in this inspection: overflow drains for tubs and sinks; heated towel racks, saunas, steam generators, clothes washers, clothes dryers. Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not determine the adequacy of washing machine drain lines, washing machine catch pan drain lines, or clothes dryer exhaust ducts. The inspector does not operate water supply or shut-off valves for sinks, toilets, bidets, clothes washers, etc. due to the possibility of valves leaking or breaking when operated. The inspector does not determine if shower pans or tub and shower enclosures are water tight, or determine the completeness or operability of any gas piping to laundry appliances.
Location #A: Full bath, second floor
Location #B: 3/4 bath, Master bath
Location #C: Half bath, first floor
Condition of counters: Appeared serviceable
Condition of cabinets: Appeared serviceable
Condition of flooring: Appeared serviceable
Condition of sinks and related plumbing: Appeared serviceable
Condition of toilets: Appeared serviceable
Condition of bathtubs and related plumbing: Appeared serviceable
Condition of shower(s) and related plumbing: Appeared serviceable
Condition of ventilation systems: Appeared serviceable
Gas supply for laundry equipment present: No
240 volt receptacle for laundry equipment present: Yes
61) Safety, Maintain - The clothes dryer exhaust duct may need cleaning. Because we have no way of knowing when it was last cleaned, we suggest having the dryer vent cleaned as soon as possible. Significant amounts of lint build-up may be present and may reduce air flow. This is a fire hazard. Recommend that a qualified person clean this duct now and as necessary in the future. Some chimney sweeps or heating/cooling duct cleaners perform this service.

For more information, visit:

https://www.cpsc.gov/s3fs-public/5022.pdf
62) Comment - Installed laundry equipment.
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63) Comment - Bathroom views.
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64) Comment - One or bathrooms have bowl sinks installed. It is important to know that these sinks have no overflow protection. Water should never be left on and unattended.
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Limitations: The following items are not included in this inspection: security, intercom and sound systems; communications wiring; central vacuum systems; elevators and stair lifts; cosmetic deficiencies such as nail-pops, scuff marks, dents, dings, blemishes or issues due to normal wear and tear in wall, floor and ceiling surfaces and coverings, or in equipment; deficiencies relating to interior decorating; low voltage and gas lighting systems. Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not evaluate any areas or items which require moving stored items, furnishings, debris, equipment, floor coverings, insulation or similar materials. The inspector does not test for asbestos, lead, radon, mold, hazardous waste, urea formaldehyde urethane, or any other toxic substance. Some items such as window, drawer, cabinet door or closet door operability are tested on a sampled basis. The client should be aware that paint may obscure wall and ceiling defects, floor coverings may obscure floor defects, and furnishings may obscure wall, floor and floor covering defects. If furnishings were present during the inspection, recommend a full evaluation of walls, floors and ceilings that were previously obscured when possible. Determining the cause and/or source of odors is not within the scope of this inspection. No inspection was performed concerning the presence or damage from any mice, rodents, vermin or any other pests, any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. This type of inspection is available from extermination companies and it is recommended that such inspections be conducted to determine the presence or damage from any insects, mice, rodents, vermin or any other pests.
Condition of exterior entry doors: Appeared serviceable
Exterior door material: Wood
Condition of interior doors: Appeared serviceable
Condition of windows and skylights: Appeared serviceable
Type(s) of windows: Wood, Multi-pane, Double-hung
Condition of walls and ceilings: Appeared serviceable
Wall type or covering: Drywall, Wood
Ceiling type or covering: Wood & beam
Condition of flooring: Appeared serviceable
Flooring type or covering: Wood or wood products, Laminate, Tile, Stone
Condition of stairs, handrails and guardrails: Appeared serviceable
65) Repair/Replace - One or more exterior doors wouldn't latch. Recommend that a qualified person repair as necessary.
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66) Repair/Replace - Crank handles at some windows were missing. Recommend that a qualified person replace handles or make repairs as necessary.
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67) Minor defect - Minor cracks, nail pops and/or blemishes were found in walls and/or ceilings in one or more areas. Cracks and nail pops are common, are often caused by lumber shrinkage or minor settlement, and can be more or less noticeable depending on changes in humidity. They did not appear to be a structural concern, but the client may wish to repair these for aesthetic reasons. For recurring cracks, consider using an elastic crack covering product:
http://www.google.com/search?q=elastic+crack+cover
68) Comment - Interior Views.
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Private Well
Table of contents
Limitations: Private well water supplies are specialty systems and are beyond the scope of the standards of practice for home inspections. Comments in this report related to a private well are made as a courtesy only and are not meant to be a substitute for a full evaluation by a qualified well specialist. The inspector does not test private well water for contamination or pollutants, determine if the supply and/or flow are adequate, or provide an estimate for remaining life of well pumps, pressure tanks or equipment. Only visible components are evaluated.
Condition of private water supply: Appeared serviceable
Type of well: Drilled
Location of well: Rear
Source for information about the well: Observation
Condition of pump: Appeared serviceable
Type of pump: Submersible
Condition of well equipment: Appeared serviceable
Location of well equipment: Basement
Condition of pressure tank: Appeared serviceable
69) Safety, Repair/Replace - The cap to the well casing was loose. This is a potential source for contamination of the well water. A qualified person should repair or replace the cap as necessary.
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70) Evaluate - Because this is a specialty system, recommend the following:

  • That the well water be tested per the client's concerns (e.g. coliforms, pH, contaminants) by a qualified lab
  • That the client obtain information from the current owner concerning the well's history
For more information, visit:
http://www.google.com/search?q=private+well
71) Comment - The estimated useful life for most well pumps is 15-20 years. The inspector was unable to determine the age of the pump. The client should be aware that this pump may be near, at, or beyond its useful life and may need replacing at any time. Recommend attempting to determine the pump's age (ask property owner or well contractor), and budgeting for a replacement if necessary.
72) Comment - Installed pressure tank
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73) Comment - Installed water filtration equipment.

For additional information click below:

http://www.wqa.org/sitelogic.cfm?ID=2350

http://www.wqa.org/
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74) Comment - The system has a constant pressure control installed.
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75) - Installed well.
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76) - Properly label the pump shut off switch to help prevent accidental shut off.
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77) - There is a UV filter installed .The bulb needs to be replaced yearly.

There should also be a whole house filter installed prior to the UV filter.

For additional information click:

www.uvsuperstore.com

http://inspectapedia.com/water/UV_Water_Treatment_Systems.htm
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Wood Destroying Insects and Organism Findings
Table of contents
Limitations: This report only includes findings from accessible and visible areas on the day of the inspection and only includes services ordered. In addition to the inaccessible areas documented in this report, examples of other inaccessible areas include: sub areas less than 18 inches in height; attic areas less than 5 feet in height, areas blocked by ducts, pipes or insulation; areas where locks or permanently attached covers prevent access; areas where insulation would be damaged if traversed; areas obscured by vegetation. All inaccessible areas are subject to infestation or damage from wood-destroying organisms. The inspector does not move furnishings, stored items, debris, floor or wall coverings, insulation, or other materials as part of the inspection, nor perform destructive testing. Wood-destroying organisms may infest, re-infest or become active at any time. No warranty or guarantee is provided as part of this inspection. It is advisable that a pest control company inspect the property for all insect or rodent and other animal concerns prior to closing.
78) Repair/Replace, Evaluate - Evidence of rodent infestation was found in the form of feces, urine stains, traps and/or poison in the basement, garage and/or interior rooms. Consult with the property owner about this. A qualified person should make repairs to seal openings in the structure, set traps, and clean rodent waste as necessary. Recommend following guidelines in these Center for Disease Control articles:
http://www.cdc.gov/rodents/prevent_infestations/seal_up.html
http://www.cdc.gov/rodents/prevent_infestations/trap_up.html
http://www.cdc.gov/rodents/prevent_infestations/clean_up.html
79) Evaluate, Comment - No termite or WDI inspection was ordered or performed.
Septic Information
Table of contents
80) Comment - Pump-outs
Because pump-outs are the most regularly required type of maintenance, the maintenance schedules are commonly based upon the anticipated need for pumping. Some systems may go for long periods of time without needing a pump-out. Such systems should still be inspected at least once over 5 years with a complete functional inspection to ensure that other types of maintenance and repair are not needed.

Scheduling functional inspections should be based upon the tank volume and the household occupancy. The following table can be used to determine the maximum interval of time between functional inspections.


Tank size (gallons) Household Occupancy (number of people)
1-4 4-6 6-8 10 or more
1000 5 years 3 years Undersized tanks
1250 5 years 4 years 3 years Undersized tank
1500 5 years 5 years 4 years 3 years

Tank size (gallons) House Occupancy (# of people) Pumping Frequency
750 1-4 3 Years
4-6 2 Years
6-8 Undersized Tank
1000 1-4 5 Years
4-6 4 Years
6-8 3 Years
1250 1-4 5 Years
4-6 4 Years
6-8 3 Years
1500 1-4 5 Years
4-6 4 Years
6-8 3 Years



Click below for additional information regarding the septic system and its maintenance:

http://homeprony.inspectorxsites.com/xSites/Inspectors/HomeProNY/Content/UploadedFiles/homeowner_guide_long.pdf

http://www.nesc.wvu.edu/subpages/septic.cfm
81) Comment - No septic test or inspection was ordered or performed.
Perspective Summary
Table of contents
Grounds:: Average
Exterior / Foundation: Average
Basement: Above Average
Roof: Above Average
Attic and Roof Structure: Average
Garage: Average
Electric: Average
Plumbing / Fuel Systems: Average
Water Heater: Average
Heating / HVAC: Average
Fireplace / Chimneys: Average
Kitchen: Average
Bathroom / Laundry: Average
Interior: Above Average
Well: Average
82) Comment - The Building In Perspective

While we look for significant issues and deficiencies, another part of our job consists of providing basic factual information to the client. Often, this factual information, when put in perspective, provides valuable insight into the condition of the building.

We provide facts to the client. Sometimes these facts and descriptions disclose obvious deficiencies at the property or the building, such as leaking pipes. Other times the facts might be as basic as describing the materials used in the construction of the building: the driveway is gravel; the sidewalk is concrete; the heating system is new, propane and 80% efficient; the building has a septic tank; the water comes from a well; the shingles are architectural grade composition material and so forth. On other occasions, we might provide interpretations of the facts, such as explaining why a certain deficiency is a significant problem and not merely a trivial annoyance.

It is not unusual to find that providing the facts will disclose a deficiency, even if other obvious problems are not readily apparent. As an example, old knob and tube wiring (pre-1950's) is a safety concern that makes a building harder or more costly to insure. Old galvanized steel pipes, used as supply pipes or for drain systems, are of such an age that they are currently past their design lives. Whether these old steel pipes are rusted, leaking or in good condition at the time of the inspection, anyone buying a building with pipes of this vintage should be told that the plumbing will need an upgrade in the not too distant future.

On the other hand we have the responsibility to point out items in the building that would be considered above that of the typical or average building. That may be a 200 ampere electric service where a 100 ampere system would be expected. A high efficiency heating system; a greater amount of insulation then code calls for; granite kitchen counter tops; a higher level of trim and finishing. Etc.

Any building inspector, who does not provide essential information on the systems, components and materials found at the building, is not a thorough professional and is not doing a quality job that serves the best interests of his or her clients.

With all the information provided we look at a building in perspective to its peers. That is we compare1950's brick buildings to other buildings of the same type and age. We never compare new buildings to old buildings, etc.
Additional Inspection Information
Table of contents
83) Comment - Click on the link for additional report information:

Report Information
84) Comment - Click below for a Home Maintenance Check List to help you maintain your home.

Home Maintenance Check List
86) Comment - Here is a link to the Report Letter which is part of your inspection report.

http://homeprony.inspectorxsites.com/xSites/Inspectors/HomeProNY/Content/UploadedFiles/HomePro%20Report%20Letter%201.pdf
87) - Here is a link to the NYS Code of Ethics and Standards of Practice:

http://homeprony.inspectorxsites.com/xSites/Inspectors/HomeProNY/Content/UploadedFiles/NYS%20HI%20SOP%20COE.pdf
88) - Dear Client,

Thank you for choosing HomePro Inspections LLC to perform your home inspection. The goal of this inspection and report is to put you in a better position to make an informed real estate decision. This report is a general guide and provides you with some objective information to help you make your own evaluation of the overall condition of the home and is not intended to reflect the value of the property, or to make any representation as to the advisability of purchase. Although we will do best to discover the concerns in the house, not all defects will be identified during this inspection. Unexpected repairs should still be anticipated. This inspection is not a guarantee or warranty of any kind.

HomePro Inspections endeavors to perform all inspections in substantial compliance with the Standards of Practice of the American Society of Home Inspectors® (ASHI) and the New York State Standards Of Practice. As such, we inspect the readily accessible, visually observable,
installed systems and components of a home as designated in the ASHI® Standards—except as may be noted in the “Limitations of Inspection” sections within this report. This Property Inspection Report contains observations of those systems and components that, in the professional judgment of the inspector, are not functioning properly, significantly deficient, unsafe, or are near the end of their service lives. If the cause for the deficiency is not readily apparent, the suspected cause or reason why the system or component is at or near end of expected service life is reported, and recommendations for correction or monitoring are made as
appropriate. When systems or components designated in the ASHI® or NYS Standards are present but are not inspected, the reason(s) the item was not inspected is reported as well.

A copy of the ASHI® Standards of Practice is available at: www.homeinspector.org/docs/standards.pdf

A copy of the NYS Standards of Practice is available at:
http://homeprony.inspectorxsites.com/xSites/Inspectors/HomeProNY/Content/UploadedFiles/NYS%20HI%20SOP%20COE.pdf

These standards define the scope of a home inspection. Clients sometimes assume that a home inspection will include many things that are beyond the scope. We encourage you to read the ASHI and NYS Standards of Practice so that you clearly understand what things are included in the home inspection and report.

The report is effectively a snapshot of the house—recording the conditions on a given date and time. Home inspectors cannot predict future behavior, and as such, we cannot be responsible for things that occur after the inspection. If conditions change, we are available to revisit the property and update our report.

The report has been prepared for your exclusive use, as our client. No use by third parties is intended. We will not be responsible to any parties for the contents of the report, other than the party named herein. The report itself is copyrighted, and may not be used in whole or in part without HomePro Inspections express written permission.

Again, thanks very much for the opportunity of conducting this inspection for you. We are available to you throughout the entire real estate transaction process. Should you have any questions, please call or email us.

Sincerely,

Doug Myers

ASHI Inspector #99400 (former)
NYS Licensed Home Inspector # 16000058964
InterNACHI
HomePro Inspections LLC
www.HomeProNY.com
info@HomeProNY.com
1-800-724-7088


HomePro Inspections c 2018 - No unauthorized use of this report allowed. Contact HomePro for additional information. This report has been produced in accordance with our signed contract and is subject to the terms and conditions agreed upon therein.