HAAAT Home Inspection Services, LLC

Website: http://www.haaathomeinspections.com
Email: rvanvorst1@nycap.rr.com
Phone: (518) 465-8047 · (518) 469-6763

Summary Page

Property Inspection Report
Client(s): Mr. & Mrs John Smith
Property address: 123 Your Street.
Any Town, USA
Inspection date: 2-29-2008

This summary page published on 3/23/2008 7:03:31 PM EDT

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Concerns are shown and sorted according to these types:
SafetyPoses a risk of injury or death 
Repair/ReplaceRecommend repairing or replacing 
Repair/MaintainRecommend repair and/or maintenance 
Minor defectCorrection likely involves only a minor expense 
EvaluateRecommend evaluation by a specialist 
MonitorRecommend monitoring in the future 
CommentFor your information 

1) General information: - Evidence of one or more possible abandoned underground oil tanks were found (vent pipe, metal supply lines, etc.). The client(s) should determine if underground oil tank(s) exist on this property, or if tank(s) have been removed or legally decommissioned.

If the tank(s) haven't been decommissioned or removed, then the client(s) may be liable for decommission and/or cleanup of contaminated soil in the future. Recommend the following:

  • Have any non-decommissioned, abandoned underground oil tanks legally decommissioned or removed as necessary.
  • Have the soil tested for oil contamination.
  • Have contaminated soil removed as necessary
    2) General information: - Numerous wall, floor and/or ceiling surfaces were obscured by furniture and/or stored items, preventing a full evaluation of some areas.

    3) Roof and Ventilation: - At the roof over the right rear entrance, roofing material is extended too far past the roof edge, creating a situation where the water run-off is overshooting the gutters. I recommend a qualified individual evalute further and make the necessary repairs.

    4) Roof and Ventilation: - One or more downspout extensions are missing and/or ineffective. Recommend installing extensions such as splashblocks or a drain line where missing, or repairing where necessary so rain water is carried at least six feet away from the structure to soil that slopes down and away from the structure.

    5) Walls Windows and Doors: - There is evidence of vines growing on building and wrapping around electric entrance cable. Recommend having contractor remove vines that may contribute to deterioration of entrance cable and/or siding.

    6) Walls Windows and Doors: -

    7) Exterior and Landscaping: - Gaps larger than four inches were found in one or more guardrails. This is a safety hazard, especially for small children. A qualified contractor should make modifications as necessary so gaps in guardrails do not exceed four inches. For example, installing additional balusters or railing components.

    8) Exterior and Landscaping: - Recommend patching asphalt driveway where necessary and resealing to prevent further water infiltration which will cause further deterioration due to the freezing and thawing cycles.

    9) Exterior and Landscaping: - Tree(s) and shrubs are in contact with siding. Recommend pruning or moving tree(s) and shrubs so there's at least a one foot gap between them and siding.

    10) Exterior and Landscaping: - Natural gas service supply pipe enters through block basement wall. The penetration through the basement wall is not sealed. This can allow air infiltration as well as insect and rodent entry. I recommend a qualified individual seal the penetration with a non shrinking grout material.

    11) Exterior and Landscaping: - Minor cracks in sidewalk. These are only a cosmetic concern. No action is recommended.

    13) Kitchen: - Countertop on cabinets next to range and at microwave are not secured. I recommend a qualified individual secure countertops to the cabinents to prevent them from moving from place.

    15) Bathroom 3: - No ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) outlets installed. GFCI outlets help prevent electric shocks in areas that may have water present. Recommend having a qualified electrician install one or more GFCI outlets, especially over counter tops and around sinks.

    16) General Interior: - One or more open ground outlets. Recommend having a licensed upgrade these outlets to today's standard three prong which to establish a proper ground wire.

    1 In Kitchen at microwave

    19) Bedroom Three: - Too few electric receptacles are present and are two-pronged receptacles rather than three-pronged grounded receptacles are installed in one or more interior rooms. This can result in "octopus" wiring with extension cords. Two-prong receptacles are considered unsafe by today's standards.
    A qualified electrician should evaluate and install additional receptacles and grounded receptacles as per the client(s)' needs and standard building practices.

    20) Bedroom Four: - Few electric receptacles and two-pronged receptacles rather than three-pronged, grounded receptacles are installed in one or more interior rooms. This can result in "octopus" wiring with extension cords. Two-prong receptacles are considered unsafe by today's standards.
    A qualified electrician should evaluate and install additional receptacles and grounded receptacles as per the client(s)' needs and standard building practices

    21) Bedroom Five: - Few electric receptacles and two-pronged receptacles rather than three-pronged, grounded receptacles are installed in one or more interior rooms. This can result in "octopus" wiring with extension cords. Two-prong receptacles are considered unsafe by today's standards.
    A qualified electrician should evaluate and install additional receptacles and grounded receptacles as per the client(s)' needs and standard building practices it should be.

    22) Bedroom Five: - A multi plug receptacle adapter is being used in a two pronged outlet. The adapter is loose from not being screwed secure to the receptacle as required.

    23) Attic: - The stairway leading to the attic is located in the landing area of the second. The stairs are too steep due to the shortness of the tread. There is also no railing on the stairs. Both these conditions create a safety concern. I recommend a qualified individual evaluate further and make the necessary changes to the stairway. One example of change could be installing a pulldown stairway

    24) Attic: - Evidence of substantial water staining and broken or missing roof planking especially around chimney. This all appears to be prior to the installation of new plywood roof decking and new shingles. There also does not appear to be any flashing around the chimney, but several layers of roof cement. I recommend close monitoring of this area for future evidence of leaking. Further evaluation by a qualified individual is in order.

    25) Attic: - No weatherstrip is installed around the attic access hatch. Recommend installing weatherstrip around hatch to prevent heated interior air from entering attic.

    26) Basement: - Basement stairs from kitchen are too narrow and have no handrails, and are difficult to maneuver. I recommend a qualified contractor evaluate further and consult with other professional experts to design and construct an acceptable access to the basement from the interior.

    27) Electric service: - One or more wires in the main service panel appear to be undersized for their circuit breaker(s). This is fire hazard. Recommend that a qualified, licensed electrian evaluate and repair as necessary.

    28) Electric service: - A receptacle in the basement has it's grounding wire exposed outside of the box and wrapped around the BX, metal sheathed cable that feeds it. This is a safety concern as the receptacle is not grounded properlya dncould cause an electrical shock. I recommend a qualified electrician re-wire this receptacle and attach the ground according to industry standards.

    29) Electric service: - For this size house (5 bedrooms, 3 bathrooms) the electrical service is undersized for today's lifestyle. Additionally there is no main disconnect at the panel box which could create a hazard if the power required to be disconnected in an emergency situation. I recommend a qualified electrician evaluate further and make any upgrades to meet today's demands.

    30) Electric service: - One or more circuit breakers are "double tapped", where 2 or more wires are clamped in a circuit breaker terminal and the circuit breaker was only designed for 1 wire. This is a safety hazard since wires may come loose and cause arcing, sparking and fires. Recommend having a licensed electrician evaluate and repair.

    31) Electric service: - The ungrounded and obsolete outlets should be upgraded to include more modern and safer ones, which provide a pathway for the current to travel harmlessly to ground.

    32) Electric service: - An exterior conduit on the north side of the building is not secured to the wall with clamps. The conduit should be securely clamped at least every six feet. I recommend a qualified individual install clamps in order to securely fasten the conduit to the wall.

    33) Electric service: -

    35) Heating: - Examination of heating and cooling systems is mechanically limited since the units are not dismantled to examine interior components. The heating and cooling systems should be inspected and serviced on an annual basis. Before close of escrow, recommend obtaining from seller any documents concerning regular maintenance and service and/or a safety check by public utility, or a complete system evaluation by a qualified heating and cooling specialist, particularly if heating and cooling cannot be proven to have been inspected within the past twelve months. Utility companies typically, but not always, provide a free safety check of all gas-using appliances

    37) Domestic Water Heater # 1, Serves newer main bathr: - A permanently installed insulated jacket is installed on the water heater. It obscures the manufacturer's information label and most of the water heater. The inspector was unable to fully evaluate the water heater.

    38) Safety Concerns: - One or more smoke detectors appear inoperable or in need of repair. Recommend replacing inoperable smoke detectors as necessary, and installing additional smoke detectors as necessary so a functioning one exists in each hallway and bedroom. For more information on smoke detectors vist http://www.cpsc.gov/cpscpub/pubs/5077.html