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Evergreen Home Inspections, LLC

Website: http://http:/evergreenhomeinspect.com
Email: wgreen@evergreenhomeinspect.com
Phone: (970) 497-0656
1412 Avon Dr 
Montrose CO 81401-5110
Inspector: Walter Green

 

SAMPLE

Client(s):  SAMPLE
Property address:  SAMPLE
Inspection date:  Thursday, May 10, 2018

This report published on Thursday, May 10, 2018 8:46:09 AM MDT

This report is the exclusive property of this inspection company and the client(s) listed in the report title. Use of this report by any unauthorized persons is prohibited.
How to Read this Report
This report is organized by the property's functional areas.  Within each functional area, descriptive information is listed first and is shown in bold type.  Items of concern follow descriptive information. Concerns are shown and sorted according to these types:
Concern typeSafetyPoses a safety hazard
Concern typeMajor DefectCorrection likely involves a significant expense
Concern typeRepair/ReplaceRecommend repairing or replacing
Concern typeRepair/MaintainRecommend repair and/or maintenance
Concern typeMinor DefectCorrection likely involves only a minor expense
Concern typeMaintainRecommend ongoing maintenance
Concern typeEvaluateRecommend evaluation by a specialist
Concern typeMonitorRecommend monitoring in the future
Concern typeServiceableItem or component is in serviceable condition
Concern typeCommentFor your information

Click here for a glossary of building construction terms.Contact your inspector If there are terms that you do not understand, or visit the glossary of construction terms at https://www.reporthost.com/glossary.asp

Table of Contents
Grounds
Roof
Exterior and Foundation
Attic and Roof Structure
Interior, Doors and Windows
Bathrooms, Laundry and Sinks
Fireplaces, Stoves, Chimneys and Flues
Kitchen
Crawl Space
Plumbing / Fuel Systems
Electric
Water Heater
Heating, Ventilation and Air Condition (HVAC)
General Information

View summary


Grounds
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Site profile: Level
Condition of driveway: Appeared serviceable
Driveway material: Gravel
Condition of sidewalks and/or patios: Appeared serviceable
Sidewalk material: Poured in place concrete

1) The soil or grading sloped away from the building perimeters, however in one or more areas the ground level was at or above the vent for the crawl space. This can result in water accumulating around building foundations or underneath buildings. It can be a conducive condition for wood-destroying organisms. Recommend grading soil so it slopes down and away from buildings with a slope of at least 1 inch per horizontal foot for at least 6 feet out from buildings.
Photo
Photo 1-1
Grading of soil needs to be corrected to keep water from flooding crawl space through vents.
 

Roof
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Roof inspection method: Traversed
Condition of roof surface material: Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Roof surface material: Asphalt or fiberglass composition shingles
Roof type: Gable
Apparent number of layers of roof surface material: Multiple
Condition of exposed flashings: Appeared serviceable
Condition of gutters, downspouts and extensions: Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)

2) There appeared to be multiple layers of composition roofing on this manufactured home. The roof structures on manufactured homes are engineered, and are typically not rated for the weight of multiple layers of roofing. The roof structure may be overloaded as a result. Consult with a qualified contractor or structural engineer.
Photo
Photo 2-1
Arrows indicate three separate layers of shingles.
Photo
Photo 2-2
Three layers of shingles.

3) One or more gutters were missing. Rainwater can come in contact with the building exterior or accumulate around the building foundation as a result. This is a conducive condition for wood-destroying organisms. Recommend that a qualified person repair as necessary.
Photo
Photo 3-1
Gutters should be installed around entire structure, this diverts water away from the dwelling, and foundation.
Photo
Photo 3-2
Missing gutter above exterior door.
Photo
Photo 3-3
No down spouts or diverters to move water away from structure.
Photo
Photo 3-4
No gutter above exterior door.

4) Nail heads were exposed at one or more shingles. More than just a few exposed nail heads may indicate a substandard roof installation. Recommend applying an approved sealant over exposed nail heads now and as necessary in the future to prevent leaks.
Photo
Photo 4-1
Exposed nail heads
Photo
Photo 4-2
Blue arrow indicates where vent is damaged and will allow water, ice or snow to accumulate.
Photo
Photo 4-3
Exposed nail heads and missing shingle.
 

Exterior and Foundation
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Wall inspection method: Viewed from ground, from a ladder
Condition of wall exterior covering: Appeared serviceable
Apparent wall structure: Wood frame
Wall covering: Wood
Condition of foundation and footings: Appeared serviceable
Apparent foundation type: Crawl space
Foundation/stem wall material: Concrete block
Footing material (under foundation stem wall): Poured in place concrete

5) One or more minor cracks (1/8 inch or less) were found in the foundation. These didn't appear to be a structural concern, but recommend sealing them to prevent water infiltration and monitor them in the future. Numerous products exist to seal such cracks including hydraulic cement, non-shrinking grout, resilient caulks and epoxy sealants.
Photo
Photo 5-1
Crack in foundation block.
 

6) Caulk was substandard in some areas. For example, at siding butt joints and/or at siding-trim junctions. Recommend that a qualified person renew or install caulk as necessary. Where gaps are wider than 1/4 inch, an appropriate material other than caulk should be used.
Photo
Photo 6-1
Gap in fascia board.
Photo
Photo 6-2
Gap in fascia board behind gutter.
Photo
Photo 6-3
Gap between window and surrounding trim.
Photo
Photo 6-4
Gap in trim around window.

Attic and Roof Structure
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Condition of roof structure: Appeared serviceable
Roof structure type: Rafters
Ceiling structure: Ceiling joists
Condition of insulation in attic (ceiling, skylight chase, etc.): Not determined (inaccessible or obscured)
Ceiling insulation material: Fiberglass loose fill
Approximate attic insulation R value (may vary in areas): R-33
Condition of roof ventilation: Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Roof ventilation type: Box vents (roof jacks)

7) Several box vents were installed on top of the roofing shingles, this is poor construction techniques that can lead to water infiltrating underneath the roofing material and create conditions that allow for moisture accumulation that is conducive condition to wood-rotting organisms. Recommend that a qualified contractor evaluate and repair the roof vents.
Photo
Photo 7-1
Vent installed on top of shingle.
Photo
Photo 7-2
Photo
Photo 7-3
Installed on top of shingles, no proper flashing.
 

8) Two roof vents were damaged and could cause water/ice snow to accumulate and infiltrate into the roof structure underneath the roofing material. This could create conditions that allow for moisture accumulation that is conducive condition to wood-rotting organisms. Recommend that a qualified contractor evaluate and repair the roof vents.
Photo
Photo 8-1
Blue arrow indicates where vent is damaged and will allow water, ice or snow to accumulate.
 

Interior, Doors and Windows
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Condition of exterior entry doors: Appeared serviceable
Exterior door material: Wood
Condition of interior doors: Appeared serviceable
Condition of windows and skylights: Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Type(s) of windows: Vinyl, Multi-pane
Condition of walls and ceilings: Appeared serviceable
Wall type or covering: Drywall
Ceiling type or covering: Drywall
Condition of flooring: Appeared serviceable
Flooring type or covering: Carpet, Vinyl, linoleum or marmoleum, Laminate, Tile

9) The front entry storm door was loose I'm the frame, was missing fasteners and had broke framing. This could cause the entire door to fail and cause bodily injury if it were to become separated from its framing. Recommend a qualified individual repair or replace the door as necessary.
Photo
Photo 9-1
Broken door frame.
Photo
Photo 9-2
Yellow arrow and circle indicate loose and missing fasteners, red arrow indicates broken door frame.

10) Most of the windows were difficult to open and close. Additionally, the window frames and casing were showing signs of deterioration. Recommend that a qualified person replace windows as necessary.
Photo
Photo 10-1
Broken sash on window, window would not stay open.
Photo
Photo 10-2
Broken sash on bedroom window.
Photo
Photo 10-3
Window was loose in frame and was difficult to open, and would not stay open.
Photo
Photo 10-4
Blue arrow is the multi pane assembly, and the yellow arrow is the vinyl frame. There is separation between the window glass and the frame.
Photo
Photo 10-5
Vinyl window casing is showing sun damage/deterioration.
 

11) Glass in one or more windows was cracked, broken and/or missing. Recommend that a qualified contractor replace glass where necessary.
Photo
Photo 11-1
Broken window glass.
Photo
Photo 11-2
Broken window glass.
Photo
Photo 11-3
Chipped/Broken Glass.
 

12) Damaged wall on east end of kitchen. Recommend that a qualified person repair as necessary.
Photo
Photo 12-1
Damaged wall in kitchen.
 

13) Vinyl, linoleum or marmoleum flooring in one or more areas was loose and/or curling. If in a wet area, water can damage the sub-floor as a result. Recommend that a qualified contractor replace or repair flooring as necessary.
Photo
Photo 13-1
Loose and missing flooring in dishwasher alcove.
Photo
Photo 13-2
Missing tile and loose/curling edge of flooring in dishwasher alcove.

14) Minor cracks, nail pops and/or blemishes were found in walls and/or ceilings in one or more areas. Cracks and nail pops are common, are often caused by lumber shrinkage or minor settlement, and can be more or less noticeable depending on changes in humidity. They did not appear to be a structural concern, but the client may wish to repair these for aesthetic reasons.
Photo
Photo 14-1
Loose and sagging wall paper, indication of settling.
Photo
Photo 14-2
Ceiling crack in hallway.
Photo
Photo 14-3
loose sagging wall paper, indication of settling/movement.
 

15) Screens were missing from many windows. These windows may not provide ventilation during months when insects are active.

Bathrooms, Laundry and Sinks
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Location #A: Full bath
Location #B: Laundry room/area
Location #C: Master bath
Condition of counters: Appeared serviceable
Condition of cabinets: Appeared serviceable
Condition of flooring: Appeared serviceable
Condition of sinks and related plumbing: Appeared serviceable
Condition of toilets: Appeared serviceable
Condition of bathtubs and related plumbing: Appeared serviceable
Condition of shower(s) and related plumbing: Appeared serviceable
Condition of ventilation systems: Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Bathroom and laundry ventilation type: Spot exhaust fans
240 volt receptacle for laundry equipment present: Yes

16) One or more cabinets, drawers and/or cabinet doors at location(s) #A were . Recommend that a qualified person repair or replace as necessary.

Vanity door in location A would not stay closed, this presents a condition where a person could get caught on the door or even be injured by impacting the door. Recommend that a qualified individual evaluate and repair the door.
Photo
Photo 16-1
Vanity door will not remain closed.
 

17) The exhaust fan at location(s) #A and C was inoperable. Moisture may accumulate and result in mold, bacteria or fungal growth. Recommend that a qualified person clean, repair or replace fans as necessary.

Fireplaces, Stoves, Chimneys and Flues
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Condition of wood-burning fireplaces, stoves: Appeared serviceable
Wood-burning stove type: Freestanding
Condition of chimneys and flues: Appeared serviceable
Wood-burning chimney type: Metal

18) One or more chimneys for wood-burning devices were too short. Fireplace and/or wood stove chimneys should terminate more than 3 feet above the roof surface and/or more than 2 feet above any object on the roof within 10 feet horizontally. Shorter chimneys can have a drafting problems due to air turbulence around the roof or building structure. Recommend that a qualified contractor repair per standard building practices.
Photo
Photo 18-1
Height of chimney is less than 3' above where it penetrates roof.
 

19) The hearth for the wood burning stove is inadequate, a wood burning stove should sit on a non-combustible hearth which extends at least 18 inches out from the stove in the front and 8 inches at the sides and rear or if a reduced clearance stove it should be installed per manufacturers guidance. Recommend a certified contractor inspect/evaluate and correct as necessary.
Photo
Photo 19-1
Burn on floor in front of wood stove.
Photo
Photo 19-2
Hearth needs to be extended in front of wood stove.
Red arrow is burn mark on floor.

Kitchen
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Condition of counters: Appeared serviceable
Condition of cabinets: Appeared serviceable
Condition of sinks and related plumbing: Appeared serviceable
Condition of under-sink food disposal: N/A (none installed)
Condition of dishwasher: N/A (none installed)
Condition of ranges, cooktops and/or ovens: Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Range, cooktop, oven type: Electric
Type of ventilation: Hood or built into microwave over range or cooktop
Condition of refrigerator: Appeared serviceable

20) The range could tip forward. An anti-tip bracket may not be installed. This is a potential safety hazard since the range can tip forward when weight is applied to the open door, such as when a small child climbs on it or if heavy objects are dropped on it. Anti-tip brackets have been sold with all free-standing ranges since 1985. Recommend installing an anti-tip bracket to eliminate this safety hazard.

21) The side trim on the oven door was broken/loose. This could snag clothing when inserting or removing items from the oven, which could result in severe burns. Recommend that a qualified individual replace the broken trim piece.
Photo
Photo 21-1
Loose door trim.
 

22) The kitchen island cabinet was loose. This could be hazardous if someone was to lean against the cabinet or went to place a heavy/hot object on the island and have it move out of position. Recommend a qualified individual secure the cabinet to the floor.
Photo
Photo 22-1
 

Crawl Space
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Crawl space inspection method: Partially traversed
Condition of floor substructure above: Not determined (inaccessible or obscured)
Pier or support post material: Steel jacks
Beam material: Steel
Floor structure above: Not determined (inaccessible or obscured)
Condition of insulation underneath floor above: Appeared serviceable
Insulation material underneath floor above: Fiberglass roll or batt
Condition of vapor barrier: Appeared serviceable
Vapor barrier present: Yes
Condition of crawl space ventilation: Appeared serviceable
Ventilation type: with vents

23) Evidence of prior water intrusion or accumulation was found in one or more sections of the crawl space. For example, sediment stains on the vapor barrier or foundation, and/or efflorescence on the foundation. Accumulated water is a conducive condition for wood-destroying organisms and should not be present in the crawl space. Recommend that the client review any disclosure statements available and ask the property owner about past accumulation of water in the crawl space. The crawl space should be monitored in the future for accumulated water, especially after heavy and/or prolonged periods of rain. If water is found to accumulate, then recommend that a qualified contractor who specializes in drainage issues evaluate and repair as necessary. Typical repairs for preventing water from accumulating in crawl spaces include:
  • Repairing, installing or improving rain run-off systems (gutters, downspouts and extensions or drain lines)
  • Improving perimeter grading
  • Repairing, installing or improving underground footing and/or curtain drains
Ideally, water should not enter crawl spaces, but if water must be controlled after it enters the crawl space, then typical repairs include installing trenches, gravity drains and/or sump pump(s) in the crawl space.
Photo
Photo 23-1
Furrowing is an indication of past water in crawl space.
Photo
Photo 23-2
Efflorescence (white stains) on the foundation.

Plumbing / Fuel Systems
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Condition of service and main line: Appeared serviceable
Water service: Public
Location of main water shut-off: Not determined (obscured, inaccessible or none found)
Condition of supply lines: Appeared serviceable
Supply pipe material: Copper, PEX plastic
Condition of drain pipes: Appeared serviceable
Drain pipe material: Plastic
Condition of waste lines: Appeared serviceable
Waste pipe material: Plastic
Vent pipe condition: Appeared serviceable
Vent pipe material: Plastic
Condition of fuel system: Appeared serviceable
Visible fuel storage systems: Below ground, propane tank
Location of main fuel shut-off valve: At propane tank

24) Based on visible components or information provided to the inspector, this property appeared to have a private sewage disposal (septic) system. These are specialty systems and are excluded from this inspection. Comments in this report related to this system are made as a courtesy only and are not meant to be a substitute for a full evaluation by a qualified specialist. Generally, septic tanks should be pumped and inspected every 3 years. Depending on the type of system and municipal regulations, inspection and maintenance may be required more frequently, often annually.

25) The inspector did not determine the location of the main water shut-off valve, or verify that a readily accessible shut-off valve in the building exists. Recommend consulting with the property owner to determine if a main shut-off valve exists, locating it yourself, or that a qualified plumber find it if necessary. If no readily accessible main shut-off valve is found in the building, then recommend that a qualified plumber install one so the water supply can be quickly turned off in the event of an emergency, such as when a supply pipe bursts.

26) This property has an underground propane tank. Inspector was unable to determine condition of the storage tank. Recommend that a propane service contractor inspect and certify the storage tank prior to next service/fill of the propane tank. Tank did have a legible certification plate from the manufacturer, dated 1995. With the last service of the tank being 11/2017.
Photo
Photo 26-1
Photo
Photo 26-2

Electric
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Electric service condition: Appeared serviceable
Primary service type: Underground
Number of service conductors: 2
Service voltage (volts): 120-240
Estimated service amperage: 200
Primary service overload protection type: Circuit breakers
Service entrance conductor material: Stranded aluminum
Main disconnect rating (amps): 200
System ground: Ground rod(s) in soil
Condition of main service panel: Appeared serviceable
Location of main service panel #A: Laundry room
Location of main disconnect: Breaker at bottom of main service panel
Condition of branch circuit wiring: Serviceable
Branch circuit wiring type: non-metallic sheathed
Ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection present: Yes
Smoke alarms installed: Yes, but not tested
Carbon monoxide alarms installed: Yes, but not tested

27) The ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) devices protecting receptacles in the bathroom at location A wouldn't trip when tested, wouldn't trip with a test instrument and was energized when tripped, (GFCI could be tripped from the master bathroom location). This is a potential shock hazard. Recommend that a qualified electrician evaluate and repair as necessary.
Photo
Photo 27-1
Photo
Photo 27-2

28) One or more cover plates installed outside were not rated for exterior use. This is a potential shock and fire hazard. Recommend that a qualified electrician repair per standard building practices.
Photo
Photo 28-1
Cover does not seal the outlet box. Water/snow or ice could enter outlet and cause an electrical short.
 

29) Substandard wiring was found at the interior rooms. For example, loose boxes. This is a safety hazard. Recommend that a qualified electrician evaluate and repair as necessary and per standard building practices.
Photo
Photo 29-1
Outlet box in den was loose in wall.
Photo
Photo 29-2
When pulled upon, outlet would move, this is a safety/electrical hazard.

30) Extension cords were being used as permanent wiring at one or more locations. They should only be used for portable equipment on a temporary basis. Using extension cords as permanent wiring is a potential fire and shock hazard, and indicates that wiring is inadequate and needs updating. Extension cords may be undersized. Connections may not be secure resulting in power fluctuations, damage to equipment, overheating and sparks that could start a fire. Recommend that a qualified electrician repair per standard building practices and eliminate extension cords for permanently installed equipment.
Photo
Photo 30-1
Extension cord being used as permanent wiring for water line heating.
Photo
Photo 30-2
Extension cord running to water heater closet.

31) One or more cover plates for switches, receptacles or junction boxes were missing or broken. These plates are intended to contain fire and prevent electric shock from occurring due to exposed wires. Recommend that a qualified person install cover plates where necessary.
Photo
Photo 31-1
Missing switch cover.
Photo
Photo 31-2
Missing outlet cover.

Water Heater
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Condition of water heater: Appeared serviceable
Type: Tank
Energy source: Propane
Capacity (in gallons): 40
Temperature-pressure relief valve installed: Yes
Location of water heater: Exterior closet
Hot water temperature tested: Yes
Water temperature (degrees Fahrenheit): 116 degrees F at furthest fixture from water heater.

32) The floor supporting the water heater was soft and allowed the unit to move back and forth. This could indicate rot in the sub floor or broken damaged supports below the floor. There were no evident water stains or damage visible. Recommend that a qualified contractor evaluate the floor and surrounding structure and repair as necessary.

33) The estimated useful life for most water heaters is 8-12 years. This water heater appeared to be beyond this age and/or its useful lifespan and may need replacing at any time. Recommend budgeting for a replacement in the near future, or considering replacement now before any leaks occur. The client should be aware that significant flooding can occur if the water heater fails. If not replaced now, consider having a qualified person install a catch pan and drain or a water alarm to help prevent damage if water does leak.

Water heater is a 2004 model, making it 14 yrs old.
Photo
Photo 33-1
Serial number indicates a 2004 unit, making water heater approximately 14yrs old.
 

Heating, Ventilation and Air Condition (HVAC)
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General heating system type(s): Forced air, Furnace
General heating distribution type(s): Ducts and registers
Condition of forced air heating/(cooling) system: Appeared serviceable
Forced air heating system fuel type: Propane
Estimated age of forced air furnace: 22yrs
Location of forced air furnace: Laundry room
Location for forced air filter(s): Behind return air grill(s)
Condition of forced air ducts and registers: Appeared serviceable

34) The estimated useful life for most forced air furnaces is 15-20 years. This furnace appeared to be beyond this age and/or its useful lifespan and may need replacing or significant repairs at any time. Recommend budgeting for a replacement in the near future.
Photo
Photo 34-1
While furnace appeared serviceable, it is original to the house and approximately 22yrs old.
Photo
Photo 34-2
Serial number indicates a 1995 manufacture date.

35) Cooling is provided by evaporative cooling units, the property is designed to have two units installed, however only one unit was present and the other had been blocked off. This could leave some rooms without adequate ventilation during warmer weather. Recommend that a qualified HVAC technician evaluate the requirements of the property and install the correct size/number of units for the house.
This property has a roof mounted evaporative cooler unit. The unit
was winterized and not evaluated by the inspector.
Photo
Photo 35-1
Blocked off ducting for second evaporative cooler unit.
Photo
Photo 35-2
Roof mounted evaporative cooler.
Photo
Photo 35-3
Roof mounted evaporative cooler.
 

36) Air filters for the heating and/or cooling system were missing at one or more locations where they should have been installed. Indoor air quality will be reduced as a result. Recommend installing good quality filters at intended locations (e.g. in or at the air handler, behind return air grills). Filters should be sized correctly to minimize air gaps. Many types of filters are available. Recommend installing pleated filters or better rather than the cheapest disposable kind.

General Information
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Report number: EHI-2018-006
Time started: 10:00am
Time finished: 1:00pm
Present during inspection: Client
Client present for discussion at end of inspection: Yes
Weather conditions during inspection: Dry (no rain)
Temperature during inspection: Cool
Inspection fee: 275.00
Payment method: Check
Type of building: Single family
Buildings inspected: One house
Age of main building: 22yrs
Front of building faces: South
Main entrance faces: South
Occupied: No
Report number: EHI-2018-Sample
Type of building: Single family, Mobile home
Number of residential units inspected: 1
Source for main building age: Municipal records or property listing

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