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Aggressive Home Inspection LLC

http://aggressivehomeinspection.com
stephendolph@Hotmail.com
(860) 946-7015
Inspector: Stephen Dolph
Inspector's email: stephendolph@hotmail.com
New York State License #16000049100
Connecticut state license #HOI.0000872
Jeffrey Molloy # 16000013750
NACHI Certified (www.nachi.org)

Summary

Client(s):  Scarlet Pimpernel
Property address:  1 Mountaintop Way
Nowhere CT 12345
Inspection date:  Sunday, October 21, 2018

This report published on Thursday, January 24, 2019 1:46:36 PM EST

This home is/ was constructed to what, in the Inspectors opinion, were/ are average levels of quality.

Lack of maintenance and/or some alterations have created safety concerns and repair issues. Overall, most of the safety conditions can be corrected at reasonable cost by a qualified professional. Many maintenance items can be performed by a skilled homeowner at minimal expense. Some conditions will require professional attention.

Concerns are shown and sorted according to these types:
Concern typeSafetyPoses a potential risk of personal injury or death without regard to cost of repair
Concern typeMajor Cost ConcernCorrection most likely involves a significant near term expense exceeding $1,000
Concern typeRepair/Replace - MajorInvolves major repairs or replacement cost
Concern typeReplace or Repair - ModerateRecommend repair and/or maintenance with potential significant expense
Concern typeReplace or Repair - MinorCorrection likely involves only a minor expense
Concern typeMaintainRecommend ongoing maintenance (Variable Cost)
Concern typeEvaluateRecommend evaluation by a specialist - Significant
Concern typeMonitorRecommend monitoring in the future
Concern typeFYIFor your information
Concern typeDamageVisible and/or possible hidden Damage caused by wood destroying insects or organisms (Mold, Water/Wood Rot, carpenter ant galleries, etc.)
Concern typeConducive conditionsConditions conducive for wood destroying insects or organisms that, when not corrected will likely result in future problems (Wood-soil contact, shrubs in contact with siding, roof or plumbing leaks, etc.)


General Information
1) Evidence of past or present rodents was found in the form of feces and/or traps in one or more areas. For example, in the attic and/or garage. Recommend consulting with the property owner about this. A qualified person should make repairs to seal openings in the structure, set traps, and clean rodent waste as necessary. Recommend following guidelines in these Center for Disease Control articles:
http://www.cdc.gov/rodents/prevent_infestations/
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Photo 1-3 A white powdery substance was noted in one or more areas of the attic. This may be a chemical treatment for insects and or rodents. Ask the homeowners?

Grounds
4) Handrails at one or more flights of stairs were missing. This is a safety hazard. Common building practices require that handrails be:
  • Installed at stairs with three or more risers
  • Sized and shaped so your hand can encircle them
  • Permanently and securely attached, and able to withstand a 200 pound force in any direction at any point
  • Continuous and extend for the entire flight of the stairs
  • Located between 30 and 38 inches above the leading edge of the stair treads

A qualified person should repair, replace or install as necessary.
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Exterior / Foundation
15) DamageRot or water damage was found at one or more sections of trim, window frames, soffits and/or rate boards. A qualified person should evaluate and repair as necessary. All rotten wood should be replaced.
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Photo 15-1 Wood rot and or water damage was noted at many windows. The window replacements will likely be quite expensive the client may wish to evaluate prior to purchase.
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Photo 15-7 This gutter is loose because the trim board is rotted.
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Photo 15-17 Some Wood rot was noted in the three season porch area. A qualified person should evaluate and repair as needed.
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16) Conducive conditionsCracks, deterioration and/or damage were found in one or more areas of the stucco siding. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs and/or replace stucco siding as necessary.
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17) Conducive conditionsThe exterior finish over the entire structure was failing. A qualified painting contractor should prep (pressure wash, scrape, sand, prime caulk, etc.) and repaint or restain the entire structure as per common building practices.
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Roof / Attic
26) Conducive conditionsPaper facing on batt insulation in the attic was exposed. The paper facing is flammable, and poses a safety hazard due to the risk of fire. Also, the paper facing typically acts as a vapor barrier, and if located away from the interior surfaces, can trap moisture from condensation in the cavity between the paper facing and the interior spaces. This is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects. The inspector was unable to evaluate the structure obscured by the insulation. A qualified person should reinstall or replace the insulation as per standard building practices and as per the manufacturer's instructions.
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27) One or more downspouts or downspout extensions drained onto walkways and or driveway. This may result in ice or moss forming and may pose a falling hazard. Where practical, A qualified person should evaluate and install or modify extensions as necessary so rainwater isn't directed onto walkways and or driveway.
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Garage / Carport
41) The self-closing device on the garage-dwelling door is missing. This door is intended to prevent vehicle fumes from entering living spaces and to slow the spread of fire from the garage to living spaces. A qualified person should evaluate and make repairs as necessary.
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42) Hardware on one or more garage vehicle doors was loose. A qualified person should evaluate and repair as necessary.
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43) The ceilings between the attached garage and interior living spaces had holes. These surfaces are intended to prevent vehicle fumes from entering living spaces, and to slow the spread of fire from the garage to living spaces. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary so the attached garage wall and ceiling surfaces that adjoin living spaces are tightly sealed and fire rated as per standard building practices. Typically these surfaces require a one-hour fire rating.
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Photo 43-1 Install missing cover plate
44) The auto-reverse mechanism on the vehicle door opener needs adjustment. This is a safety hazard, especially for small children. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary. For more information on garage door safety issues, visit:
http://www.cpsc.gov/cpscpub/pubs/523.html
http://www.ohdstl.com/safety.html
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Electric
50) One or more electric receptacles at the kitchen, laundry room, exterior and/or basement had no visible ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. Recommend having a qualified electrician evaluate to determine if GFCI protection exists, and if not, repair as necessary. For more information, visit:
http://www.mikeholt.com/documents/nec/pdf/GFCI_requirement_page2.pdf
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51) One or more wires in panel #B appeared to be undersized for their overcurrent protection devices (circuit breakers or fuses). This is a safety hazard due to the risk of fire. A qualified electrician should evaluate and repair as necessary.
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52) Wire splices were exposed due to not being contained in a covered junction box. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock and fire. A qualified electrician should evaluate and make repairs as necessary. For example, install securely mounted junction boxes with cover plates where needed to contain wiring splices.
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Photo 52-2 Missing cover?
53) Some receptacles were worn. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock and fire. A qualified electrician should evaluate and repair or replace as necessary.
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Photo 53-1 This was the only one noted. All outlets should be checked.
54) One or more ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) electric receptacles wouldn't trip and/or wouldn't trip with test instrument at the following "wet" locations: . This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate and repair as necessary.
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55) Some cover plates on junction and/or receptacle boxes were missing. They are intended to contain fire and prevent electric shock from exposed wires. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of fire and shock. A qualified person should repair as necessary.
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Photo 55-5 Install missing cover plate
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56) Based on the age of this structure and the appearance of existing smoke alarms, the alarms may be older than 10 years old. According to National Fire Protection Association, aging smoke alarms don't operate as efficiently and often are the source for nuisance alarms. Older smoke alarms are estimated to have a 30% probability of failure within the first 10 years. Newer smoke alarms do better, but should be replaced after 10 years. Unless you know that the smoke alarms are new, replacing them when moving into a new residence is also recommended by NFPA. For more information, visit this article: NFPA urges replacing home smoke alarms after 10 years.
57) Smoke detectors were missing from bedrooms and/or on one or more levels. Additional smoke detectors should be installed as necessary so a functioning one exists in each hallway leading to bedrooms, in each bedroom, and one each level of the building. For more information, visit http://www.cpsc.gov/cpscpub/pubs/5077.html
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58) All smoke detectors and carbon monoxide detectors should be fully evaluated after taking occupancy. Replace batteries,checking date codes and testing all smoke detectors and carbon monoxide detectors for proper operation.
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Water Heater
73) Temperature-pressure relief valve drain line was too short. This is a potential safety hazard due to the risk of scalding if someone is standing next to the water heater when the valve opens. A qualified plumber should extend the drain line to 6 inches from the floor, or route it so as to drain outside.
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Photo 73-1 The drain line is a little short.

Heating
75) The estimated useful life for most cast iron boilers is 30 years. This boiler appeared to be at this age and/or its useful lifespan and may need replacing or significant repairs at any time. Recommend budgeting for a replacement in the near future.
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76) One or more areas of deterioration were found at the burner chamber.
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Photo 76-1 This is a view of inside the oil burner. At the time of service a qualified person should evaluate and repair as/if needed.

Cooling / Heat Pump
81) The estimated useful life for most cooling systems and heat pumps is 10 to 15 years. This system appears to be near this age and/or its useful lifespan and may need replacing or significant repairs at any time. Recommend budgeting for a replacement in the near future.
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Photo 81-1 The AC condensers are about 12 years old. (Manufacturer date 2006)

Fireplaces / Stoves / Chimneys
87) The wood stove at location #B appeared to be too close to combustibles at the top. This is a fire hazard. Standard minimum clearances to combustibles for uncertified wood stoves are:
  • Top: 60 inches
  • Loading door side: 48 inches
  • Sides and back: 48 inches
  • Sides and back with acceptable shielding: 36 inches

A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary. For more information.
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88) A significant amount of creosote (1/8 inch or more) was visible in flue(s) at location # A. A qualified contractor should inspect, clean, and repair if necessary now and annually in the future.
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89) Screws were missing from one or more single wall flue pipe joints at location #A. Standard building practices require that three screws be installed at each joint, and at the flue collar and chimney ends. A qualified person should repair as necessary.
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Photo 89-1 All screws are missing. Termination at chimney requires cement/ sealing!
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Bathrooms / Laundry / Sinks
98) The clothes dryer was equipped with a vinyl, accordion-type, flexible exhaust duct. The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission considers these types of ducts to be unsafe, and a fire hazard. These types of ducts can trap lint and are susceptible to kinks or crushing, which can greatly reduce the air flow. This duct should be replaced with a rigid or corrugated semi-rigid metal duct, and by a qualified contractor if necessary. Most clothes dryer manufacturers specify the use of a rigid or corrugated semi-rigid metal duct. For more information on dryer safety issues, visit:
http://www.cpsc.gov//PageFiles/118931/5022.pdf
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Photo 98-1 It is not recommended to use dryer ducts for heat. Dryers produce high levels of moisture.
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Photo 98-2 Flexible dryer ducts should not penetrate walls floors and or ceilings
99) The clothes dryer exhaust duct appeared to need cleaning. Significant amounts of lint build up were found. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of fire from decreased air flow. This duct should be cleaned now and annually, or more often if necessary in the future. Some chimney sweeps or heating/cooling duct cleaners perform this service. For more information, visit:
http://www.cpsc.gov/CPSCPUB/PUBS/5022.html
http://chimneykeepers.com/dryerclean.html
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Interior Rooms / Areas
103) One or more guardrails and or handrails were wobbly and/or unsafe due to large gaps. This is a safety hazard. Common building practices require that they:
  • Be installed where walking surfaces are more than 30 inches above the surrounding grade
  • Be securely and permanently attached
  • Be at least 36 inches in height
  • Not be climbable by children
  • Not have gaps or voids that allow passage of a sphere equal to or greater than four inches in diameter

A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair, replace or install guardrails as necessary.


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104) Handrails at one or more flights of stairs were missing. This is a safety hazard. Common building practices require that handrails be:
  • Installed at stairs with three or more risers
  • Sized and shaped so your hand can encircle them
  • Permanently and securely attached, and able to withstand a 200 pound force in any direction at any point
  • Continuous and extend for the entire flight of the stairs
  • Located between 30 and 38 inches above the leading edge of the stair treads

A qualified person should repair, replace or install as necessary.
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105) One or more doors swung outward over stairs, and either no landing was installed, or the landing didn't extend at least 20 inches beyond the outermost swing area of the door. This a safety hazard, especially in the case of someone tripping or falling when standing on the stairs and opening the door while someone else walks through the door as it is opened. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary.
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Private Well
120) Recommend having the well water tested for coliform bacteria, nitrates, and anything else of local concern, by a qualified lab. For more information, visit http://www.wellowner.org

Lab testing in progress.
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Photo 120-1 Water samples were delivered to the lab and we are waiting on the results. This information will be sent to you as soon as it becomes available.