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contact@countrysideinspections.com
(518) 966-8883 · (518) 701-9769
5299 Route 67 
East Durham NY 12423-1217
Inspector: Michael Mauriello
NYS LIC #16000051477

Property Inspection Report

Client(s):  ##########
Property address:  ##########
##########
Inspection date:  Sunday, June 12, 2011

This report published on Friday, October 19, 2018 6:58:03 PM EDT

This report is the exclusive property of Countryside Home Inspections and the client(s) listed in the report title. Use of this report by any unauthorized persons is prohibited.

How to Read this Report
This report is organized by the property's functional areas.  Within each functional area, descriptive information is listed first and is shown in bold type.  Items of concern follow descriptive information. Concerns are shown and sorted according to these types:
Concern typeSafetyPoses a risk of injury or death
Concern typeMajor DefectThe cost of correcting this condition will likely be in excess of $1500.00
Concern typeRepair/ReplaceRecommend repairing or replacing
Concern typeRepair/MaintainRecommend repair and/or maintenance
Concern typeStructural DefectStructural integrity may be compromised. Recommend evaluation by a qualified contractor.
Concern typeMaintainRecommend ongoing maintenance
Concern typeEvaluateRecommend evaluation by a specialist
Concern typeMonitorRecommend monitoring in the future
Concern typeCommentFor your information

Click here for a glossary of building construction terms.Contact your inspector If there are terms that you do not understand, or visit the glossary of construction terms at https://www.reporthost.com/glossary.asp

Table of Contents

General information
Roof
Exterior
Garage
Attic
Main Bathroom - Second Floor
Half Bathroom - First Floor
Fireplaces, woodstoves and chimneys
Interior rooms
Kitchen
Plumbing and laundry
Well
Heating and cooling
Water heater
Electric service
Basement

View summary

General information
Table of contents
Report number: 6111
Inspector's name: Michael D. Mauriello
Structures inspected: House and Garage
Type of building: Single family
Age of building: 100+
Property owner's name:
Time started: 10:00 A.M.
Time finished: 12:30 P.M.
Inspection Fee: 0
Payment method: n/a
Present during inspection: Client(s)
Occupied: Yes
Weather conditions: Rain
Temperature: Cool
Ground condition: Wet
Front of structure faces: West
Main entrance faces: West
Foundation type: Stone
The following items are excluded from this inspection: Private sewage disposal system, Private well, Water softener system
1) Structures built prior to 1979 may contain lead-based paint and/or asbestos in various building materials such as insulation, siding, and/or floor and ceiling tiles. Both lead and asbestos are known health hazards. Evaluating for the presence of lead and/or asbestos is not included in this inspection. The client(s) should consult with specialists as necessary, such as industrial hygienists, professional labs and/or abatement contractors for this type of evaluation. For information on lead, asbestos and other hazardous materials in homes, visit these websites:
2) Some wall, floor and/or ceiling surfaces were obscured by furniture and/or stored items. Some areas couldn't be evaluated.
Roof inspection method: Viewed from ground with binoculars
Roof type: Gable
Roof covering: Asphalt or fiberglass composition shingles, Metal
Estimated age of roof: Past life expectancy
Gutter & downspout material: Aluminum
Roof ventilation: None visible
3) Rust and/or corrosion is visible on one or more sections of metal roofing. A qualified roofing contractor should evaluate and either replace or repaint panels as necessary.
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Photo 3-1 Rust along edge of metal roof
4) Gaps were found in one or more roof surface seams. These may result in leaks. A qualified roofing contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary.
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Photo 4-1 Lifted seams
5) One or more plumbing vent pipes terminate less than six inches above the roof surface below. Debris or snow may block openings, and may result in sewer gases entering living spaces. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary so vent pipes terminate at least six inches above roof surfaces.
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Photo 5-1 Roof penetrated by plumbing vent
6) Flashing is detached along the chimney. This should be re-attached to prevent water penetration.
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Photo 6-1 loose flashing around chimney
7) There are lifted shingles on the roof that if left unattended may eventually allow water to penetrate the roof decking. Recommend repairs as needed to prevent damage to the roof and/or dwelling below.
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Photo 7-1 Raised shingles on addition roof
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Photo 7-2 Opposing view of addition roof
8) Debris has accumulated in one or more gutters. This is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects since gutters may overflow and cause water to come in contact with the structure's exterior or make water accumulate around the foundation. Gutters should be cleaned now and as necessary in the future.
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Photo 8-1 Standing water in gutter
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Photo 8-2 Standing water in gutter
9) Moss is growing on the roof. As a result, shingles may lift or be damaged. Leaks may result and/or the roof surface may fail prematurely. This is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects and organisms. Efforts should be taken to kill the moss during its growing season (wet months). Typically zinc-based chemicals are used for this, and must be applied periodically. For information on various moss treatment products and their pros and cons, visit:
http://www.google.com/search?q=moss+on+roof
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Photo 9-1 Moss around skylight
10) The roof structure below the surface is "skip sheathed" where batten boards rather than sheets of plywood support the roof surface. Installing a composition fiberglass or asphalt roof in the future will require the additional expense of installing sheathing, such as plywood or oriented strand board (OSB) over the batten boards.
Footing material: None
Foundation material: Stone
Apparent wall structure: Wood frame
Wall covering: Vinyl
Driveway material: Asphalt, Gravel
Sidewalk material: Asphalt
Exterior door material: Solid core steel
11) One or more trip hazards were found in sidewalk and/or patio sections due to cracks, settlement and/or heaving. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair or replace sidewalk and/or patio sections as necessary to eliminate trip hazards.
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Photo 11-1 Uneven walkway
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Photo 11-2 
12) One or more ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) electric receptacles did not trip when tested. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate and repair as necessary.
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Photo 12-1 
13) One or more downspouts have no extensions, or have extensions that are ineffective. This can result in water accumulating around the structure's foundation, or in basements and crawl spaces if they exist. Accumulated water is a conducive condition to wood destroying insects and organisms, and may also cause the foundation to settle and possibly fail over time. Repairs should be made as necessary, such as installing or repositioning splash blocks, or installing and/or repairing tie-ins to underground drain lines, so rain water is carried at least several feet away from the structure to soil that slopes down and away from the structure.
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Photo 13-1 Improperly directed downspout extension
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Photo 13-2 Improperly directed downspout extension
14) Siding is damaged and/or deteriorated in one or more areas. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs and/or replace siding as necessary to prevent water and vermin intrusion.
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Photo 14-1 Distorted siding
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Photo 14-2 Distorted siding over front porch
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Photo 14-3 Damaged vinyl siding
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Photo 14-4 Damaged vinyl siding
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Photo 14-5 Improper termination of vinyl trim
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Photo 14-6 Damage to siding
15) Vegetation such as trees, shrubs and/or vines are in contact with or less than one foot from the structure's exterior. Vegetation can serve as a conduit for wood destroying insects and may retain moisture against the exterior after it rains. Vegetation should be pruned and/or removed as necessary to maintain a one foot clearance between it and the structure's exterior.
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Photo 15-1 Vegetation encroaching upon front porch
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Photo 15-2 Vegetation encroaching upon front porch
16) Recommend resealing asphalt driveway.
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Photo 16-1 Cracks in asphalt
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Photo 16-2 Cracks in asphalt
17) Minor cracks were found in one or more sidewalk or patio sections. However they don't appear to be a structural concern and no trip hazards were found. No immediate action is recommended, but the client(s) may wish to have repairs made or have cracked sections replaced for aesthetic reasons.
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Photo 17-1 Crack in patio
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Photo 17-2 Crack in patio
18) Safety containment cables are missing for one or more vehicle door springs. This is a safety hazard. Safety containment cables prevent springs from snapping free and causing damage or injury. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs or replace components as necessary. For more information on garage door safety issues, visit:
http://www.cpsc.gov/cpscpub/pubs/523.html
http://www.ohdstl.com/safety.html
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Photo 18-1 Missing safety cable
19) Cover plate(s) are missing from one or more electric boxes, such as for receptacles, switches and/or junction boxes. They are intended to contain fire and prevent electric shock from exposed wires. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of fire and shock. Cover plates should be installed where missing.
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Photo 19-1 Uncovered box
20) One or more garage electric receptacles appear to have no ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate to determine if GFCI protection exists, and if not, repairs should be made so that all garage receptacles, except for one for use with a refrigerator or freezer, have GFCI protection. For example, install GFCI receptacles or circuit breaker(s) as needed.
21) One or more sections of wiring that weren't terminated were found. This is a potential safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate and repair as necessary. For example, cutting the wire to length and terminating the wire with wire nuts in a securely anchored, covered, properly sized junction box.
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Photo 21-1 Exposed wires under panel
22) Electric feed conductors to garage sub-panel have been cut so they would fit into the panel lugs. There is also a double tapped breaker in the panel. Recommend corrections be made by a qualified contractor.
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Photo 22-1 Service conductor to sub panel
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Photo 22-2 Double tapped breaker
23) Much of the garage, including areas around the interior perimeter and in the center are excluded from this inspection due to lack of access from stored items.
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Photo 23-1 View of walls obstructed
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Photo 23-2 View of walls obstructed
24) The main service breaker in the garage sub-panel was turned off, therefore operation of the door opener, lights, and outlets was not possible.
25) View of Garage
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Photo 25-1 Detached garage
Inspection method: Viewed from hatch
Roof structure type: Rafters
Ceiling structure: Ceiling beams
Insulation material: Blown in
Insulation depth: 8"
26) Ventilation is substandard in the attic. Inadequate attic ventilation may result in high attic and roof surface temperatures, reduce the life of the roof covering materials and increase cooling costs. High levels of moisture are also likely, and can be a conducive condition for wood destroying insects and organisms. Standard building practices require one square foot of vent area for 150 to 200 square feet of attic space. Vents should be evenly distributed between soffits, ridges and at corners to promote air circulation. A qualified contractor should evaluate and install vents as per standard building practices.
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Photo 26-1 No ventilation
27) There was water staining noted around the site of a previous chimney. The area does not appear to be an active leak, but the stains are in the area of lifted metal roofing detailed in the roofong section of this report. Recommend repairs as needed by a qualified contractor to prevent further water penetration.
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Photo 27-1 Efflourescence in attic
28) The vent pipe for the main bathroom stretches across the full distance of the house, where it terminates through the rear outer wall. Recommend re-routing this duct to a shorter exit point to ensure proper air exchange.
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Photo 28-1 Bathroom vent pipe
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Photo 28-2 Bathroom vent pipe
29) There is evidence of nesting in the attic along the eaves. Recommend sealing any openings to prevent entry into the attic.
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Photo 29-1 Nest in attic
Main Bathroom - Second Floor
Table of contents
30) Water diverter is not securely mounted, and could allow water to penetrate into the wall. Recommend securing and caulking the diverterr as needed.
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Photo 30-1 Loose diverter
31) Caulk is missing or deteriorated along the base of one or more bathtubs, where flooring meets the tub. It should be replaced where deteriorated and/or applied where missing to prevent water intrusion and damage to the floor structure.
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Photo 31-1 Chipped grout
32) Caulk is missing or deteriorated above one or more bathtubs, where the tub surround meets the tub. It should be replaced where deteriorated and/or applied where missing to prevent water intrusion and damage to the wall structure.
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Photo 32-1 Missing caulk
Half Bathroom - First Floor
Table of contents
33) The wooden countertop is waterstained and worn. Recommend repairinng the finish as needed to prevent further moisture penetration.
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Photo 33-1 Waterf stains/penetration
34) The GFCI outlet is improperly wired in with the lighting and fan circuit. Recommend repairs be made by a qualified contractor.
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Photo 34-1 GFCI outlet not properly wired
35) The lockset on the bathroom door sticks in the locked position. Recommend repair or replacement as needed.
Fireplaces, woodstoves and chimneys
Table of contents
Woodstove type: Metal
Chimney type: Masonry
36) Firebricks lining woodstove are cracked and/or broken. Firebricks should be replaced as necessary, and by a qualified stove or chimney service contractor if necessary. It us recommended this appliance not be used until repairs are made.
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Photo 36-1 Broken fire brick
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Photo 36-2 Broken fire brick
37) The flue pipe has been incorrectly installed, allowing flue gasses to enter the house. Recommend a qualified contractor correct the piping to prevent further contamination. It is also recommended this stove not be used until such repairs are made.
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Photo 37-1 Flue pipe connected improperly
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Photo 37-2 Flue pipe connected improperly
38) One or more chimney flues do not have a screened cover installed. Screened covers prevent the following:
  • Fire hazard from wood fire sparks and embers exiting flues
  • Wildlife (birds, rodents, raccoons, etc.) entering flues
  • Rainwater entering flues and mixing with combustion deposits, creating caustic chemicals which can corrode flues
  • Rainwater entering flues and causing damage to terracotta flue tiles from freeze-thaw cycles

A qualified chimney service contractor should install screened cover(s) where missing. Screens should have holes 1/4 inch or larger.
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Photo 38-1 Missing rain cap/spark arrestor on chimney
39) The chimney does not appear to be plumb. There are no visible cracks, therefore it is likely it was built out of plumb. Recommend this be monitored for signs of shifting, such as cracks between the block or gaps against the building. If such signs do appear, recommend contacting a qualified contractor to make necessary repairs.
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Photo 39-1 Exterior chimney not plumb
40) All solid fuel burning appliances (woodstoves and fireplaces, etc.) should be inspected annually by a qualified chimney service contractor, cleaned and repaired as necessary.
Interior rooms
Table of contents
41) One or more ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) electric receptacles did not trip when tested with the inspector's test instrument. These devices should trip when tested with a test instrument in addition to tripping via the test buttons on the receptacles. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate and repair as necessary.
42) The stairs leading the the secong story are covered with carpet and a carpet runner that is loose. these pose a trip hazard. Recommend secureing the carpet as needed to prevent tripping.
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Photo 42-1 Loose carpet runner
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Photo 42-2 Loose carpet runner
43) There are smoke detectors located in the kitchen and the second floor hallway. The kitchen unit is also a carbon monoxide detector. It is recommended smoke detectors and carbon monoxide detectors be located on every level of the house, including the basemant, and should be replaced every five years.
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Photo 43-1 smoke detector - second floor
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Photo 43-2 Smoke detector - kitchen
44) There is surface rust on the baseboard heat located in the front entrance. Sanding and painting is recommended to prevent further damage.
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Photo 44-1 Rusted baseboard
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Photo 44-2 Rusted baseboard
45) Minor cracks were found in walls in one or more areas. They do not appear to be a structural concern, but the client(s) may wish to repair these for aesthetic reasons.
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Photo 45-1 Crack above arch
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Photo 45-2 Crack above arch
46) One or more ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) electric receptacles did not trip when tested with the inspector's test instrument. These devices should trip when tested with a test instrument in addition to tripping via the test buttons on the receptacles. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate and repair as necessary.
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Photo 46-1 GFCI outlet does not trip
47) One or more electric receptacles that serve countertop surfaces within six feet of a sink appear to have no ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate to determine if GFCI protection exists, and if not, repairs should be made so that all receptacles that serve countertop surfaces within six feet of sinks have GFCI protection. For example, install GFCI receptacles or circuit breaker(s) as needed.
48) The dishwasher drain line is not configured with a "high loop" or "air gap". A high loop is created by routing the drain line up to the bottom surface of the counter top above, and securely fastening it to that surface. It is meant to prevent water from siphoning out of the dishwasher, and to prevent water from the sink drain or food disposal from entering the dishwasher. Some dishwashers have a built-in high loop where one is not required to be configured in the drain line. The clients should try to determine if a high loop is required for this brand and model of dishwasher (review installation instructions, etc.). If one is required, or it cannot be determined if one is not required, then a qualified contractor should install a high loop as per standard building practices.

Also, no "air gap" is installed. Air gaps are another device meant to prevent water from the sink drain or food disposal from entering the dishwasher. These are required in some municipalities for new construction and when remodeling. The client(s) should consult with a qualified contractor to determine if an air gap should be installed.
49) One or more sink drains have an active leak. For example, at pipe fittings and/or junctions between pipe and sink. A qualified plumber should evaluate and repair as necessary.
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Photo 49-1 Leak from left sink drain
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Photo 49-2 Active leak from drain
50) The countertop has not been properly supported, and is sagging on the right end. Recommend installation of proper support by a qualified contractor.
51) Caulk is missing and/or deteriorated where countertops meet backsplashes in wet areas, such as around sinks. Caulk should be replaced where deteriorated and/or applied where missing to prevent water damage.
52) The light in range hood is inoperable. Recommend replacing light bulb(s) or having repairs made by a qualified contractor as necessary.
53) One or more light fixtures appear to be inoperable. Recommend further evaluation by replacing bulb(s) and/or consulting with the property owner(s). Repairs or replacement of the light fixture(s) by a qualified electrician may be necessary.
54) Views of the kitchen
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Photo 54-1 Kitchen
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Photo 54-2 Kitchen
Plumbing and laundry
Table of contents
Water pressure (psi): 67
Location of main water shut-off valve: At pump
Location of main fuel shut-off: At oil tank
Visible fuel storage systems: Two 275 gallon oil tanks
Water service: Private
Service pipe material: Galvanized steel
Supply pipe material: Copper
Vent pipe material: Plastic
Drain pipe material: Plastic
Waste pipe material: Plastic, Galvanized steel
55) The GFCI outlet for the sump pumps does not trip when tested. Recommend replacement by a qualified contractor.
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Photo 55-1 Sump pupm GFCI outlet - does not trip
56) No air gap, or a substandard air gap, exists for the water softener's discharge line. This is a cross connection and may result in gray and/or black water flowing back up into the water softener and/or supply lines. A qualified plumbing contractor should evaluate and repair so that a minimum 1 inch air gap or acceptable indirect drain exists for this drain line as per standard building practices.
57) The sump pump's power supply appears to be on a circuit shared with other receptacles or fixtures. Sump pumps should be on a dedicated circuit so it doesn't stop working when other equipment malfunctions. A qualified electrician should evaluate and make repairs as necessary.
58) This property has both a septic system and a water softener system, and the water softener's discharge line appears to be routed into the septic waste line. There is some debate as to whether this configuration is advisable because of the following:
  • Salt in the discharge water may kill the needed bacteria, causing sludge to build up, and possibly plugging the lines.
  • Salt may interact with clay in the leach field soil and cause the water to not disperse.
  • The discharge cycle may disturb the septic tank when it cycles (usually at night), and prevent sludge from settling, resulting in sludge escaping from the tank.
  • Marginally sized septic tanks can be overwhelmed by the volume of water during the discharge cycle and may cause sludge to escape.

Recommend that the client(s) consult with one or more contractors who specialize in septic systems and water softeners for more information.
59) Neither the clothes washer nor dryer were operated or evaluated. They are excluded from this inspection.
60) Copper water supply pipes in homes built prior to 1986 may be joined with solder that contains lead. Lead is a known health hazard, especially for children. Laws were passed in 1985 prohibiting the use of lead in solder, but prior to that solder normally contained about 50 percent lead. The client(s) should be aware of this, especially if children will be living in this structure. Evaluating for the presence of lead in this structure is not included in this inspection. The client(s) should consider having a qualified lab test for lead, and if necessary take steps to reduce or remove lead from the water supply. Various solutions such as these may be advised:
  • Flush water taps or faucets. Do not drink water that has been sitting in the plumbing lines for more than six hours.
  • Install appropriate filters at points of use.
  • Use only cold water for cooking and drinking. Hot water dissolves lead more quickly than cold water.
  • Use bottled or distilled water.
  • Treat well water to make it less corrosive.
  • Have a qualified plumbing contractor replace supply pipes and/or plumbing components as necessary.

For more information visit:
http://www.cpsc.gov/CPSCPUB/PUBS/5056.html
http://www.epa.gov/safewater/lead/index.html
61) A sump pump is installed on the premises. This may indicate that water accumulates inside or below the structure. Recommend asking the property owners how often the sump pump operates and for how long at different times of the year. Also, the clients should be aware that the service life of most sump pumps is between five and seven years, and that the pump may need replacing soon depending on its age and how much it operates.
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Photo 61-1 Sump pump check valves
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Photo 61-2 Sump pumps
Location of well equipment: Basement
Location of tank shut off valve: At pressure tank
62) Recommend having the well water tested for coliform bacteria, nitrates, and anything else of local concern, by a qualified lab. For more information, visit:
http://www.wellowner.org
63) Well pump and pressure tank
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Photo 63-1 Water pump
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Photo 63-2 Pressure tank
Heating and cooling
Table of contents
Estimated age: unable to determine
Primary heating system energy source: Oil
Primary heat system type: Baseboard
Primary A/C energy source: N/A
Primary Air conditioning type: N/A
Manufacturer: Burnham
Model: PV802624
64) Copper oil supply lines are exposed and subject to damage. Leaks may occur as a result. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary so oil supply lines are not subject to damage.
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Photo 64-1 Exposed oil line
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Photo 64-2 Exposed oil line
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Photo 64-3 Damaged oil line
65) The barometric draft damper on the furnace or boiler flue is defective or not operating correctly. It should swing freely and easily. A qualified heating contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary.
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Photo 65-1 Missing damper counterweight
66) The boiler operated with the thermostat, but the ignition was delayed and noisy. The outer cabinet has been removed, and there are rust stains indicative of one or more water jacket leaks.The client advised that the basement was inundated by water. Recommend a thorough evaluation by a qualified contractor to determine its serviceability.
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Photo 66-1 Missing damper counterweight
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Photo 66-2 Boiler jacket removed - Water staining from leak
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Photo 66-3 Boiler jacket removed
67) The flue pipe from the boiler is pitched downward, and then upward. Also, the pipes are incorrectly connected, allowing exhaust gasses to escape into the living space. Recommend a qualified contractor correct the flue pipe configuration to prevent flue gasses, including carbon monoxide, from entering the dwelling.
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Photo 67-1 Improper flue pipe pitch
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Photo 67-2 Improper flue pipe pitch
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Photo 67-3 Flue pipe connected improperly
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Photo 67-4 Flue pipe connected improperly
68) Oil was found at the bottom of the oil tank. This is a side tap tank, and is well beyond its service life. The tank is also leaning towards the front wall of the house, indicating shifting. This tank should be replaced as it is failing.
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Photo 68-1 Oil leak from side tap tank
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Photo 68-2 Rusted oil tank
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Photo 68-3 Oil tank leaking and leaning against wall
69) The oil furnace or boiler flames are not orange or yellowish-white, or are sooty. The oil burner may need adjustment and/or nozzle(s) may be clogged. A qualified heating contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary.
Water heater
Table of contents
70) Potable hot water is heated via a coil in the boiler.
Electric service
Table of contents
Primary service type: Overhead
Primary service overload protection type: Circuit breakers
Service amperage (amps): 200
Service voltage (volts): 120/240
Location of main service switch: Top of Panel
Location of sub panels: Garage
Location of main disconnect: Breaker at top of main service panel
Service entrance conductor material: Aluminum
System ground: Cold water supply pipes
Main disconnect rating (amps): 200
Branch circuit wiring type: Non-metallic sheathed
Solid strand aluminum branch circuit wiring present: No
Smoke detectors present: No
71) One or more knockouts have been removed inside the main service panel where no wires and bushings are installed, and no cover(s) have been installed to seal the hole(s). This is a safety hazard due to the risk of fire. A qualified electrician should install knockout covers where missing.
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Photo 71-1 Missing knock-outs
72) The service entrance wires have one or more loose points of attachment. For example, brackets and/or fasteners are loose. This is a potential safety hazard. A qualified contractor or electrician should evaluate and make repairs as necessary.
73) One or more wires in the main service panel appear to be undersized for their overcurrent protection devices (circuit breakers or fuses). This is a safety hazard due to the risk of fire. A qualified electrician should evaluate and repair as necessary.
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Photo 73-1 Double tapped breakers
74) One or more overcurrent protection devices (circuit breakers or fuses) are "double tapped", where 2 or more wires are clamped in a terminal designed for only one wire. This is a safety hazard since the bolt or screw may tighten securely against one wire, but leave others loose. Arcing, sparks and fires may result. A qualified electrician should evaluate and repair as necessary.
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Photo 74-1 Double tapped breakers
75) The legend for overcurrent protection devices (breakers or fuses) in the main service panel is missing, unreadable or incomplete. Recommend installing, updating or correcting the legend as necessary so it's accurate. Evaluation by a qualified electrician may be necessary.
Insulation material underneath floor above: None visible
Pier or support post material: Wood, Steel
Beam material: Solid wood
Floor structure above: Solid wood joists
76) Extension cords are being used as permanent wiring in one or more areas. They should only be used for portable equipment on a temporary basis. Using extension cords as permanent wiring poses a fire and shock hazard, and is an indication that wiring is inadequate and should be updated. Extension cords may be undersized. Connections may not be secure, resulting in power fluctuations, damage to equipment, and sparks that could start a fire. Extension cords should be removed as necessary, or a qualified electrician should evaluate and make repairs as necessary. For example, install additional circuits and/or electric receptacles.
77) Handrail(s) at some stairs are loose. This is a safety hazard. A qualified contractor should make repairs as necessary. For example, installing new fasteners and/or hardware so handrails are securely attached.
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Photo 77-1 Loose handrail
78) Cover plate(s) are missing from one or more electric boxes, such as for receptacles, switches and/or junction boxes. They are intended to contain fire and prevent electric shock from exposed wires. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of fire and shock. Cover plates should be installed where missing.
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Photo 78-1 Outlet hanging out of box
79) One or more handrails are not continuous for the entire length of the flight of stairs. This is a safety hazard. Handrails should be continuous, and extend the full length of flights of stairs. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary.
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Photo 79-1 Improper handrail
80) Wire splices are exposed due to not being contained in a covered junction box. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock and fire. A qualified electrician should evaluate and make repairs as necessary. For example, install securely mounted junction boxes with cover plates where needed to contain wiring splices.
81) Standing water and/or wet areas were found in one or more sections of the basement. Accumulated water is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects and organisms and should not be present in the basement. A qualified contractor who specializes in drainage issues should evaluate and repair as necessary. Typical repairs for preventing water from accumulating in the basement include:
  • Repairing, installing or improving rain run-off systems (gutters, downspouts and extensions or drain lines)
  • Improving perimeter grading
  • Repairing, installing or improving underground footing and/or curtain drains

Ideally, water should not enter the basement, but if water must be controlled after it enters the basement, then typical repairs include installing sump pump(s) or interior perimeter drains.
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Photo 81-1 Cracks in floor with moisture evident
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Photo 81-2 Wet foundation
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Photo 81-3 Wet foundation
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Photo 81-4 Cracks in floor with moisture evident


This report reflects the results of a visual inspection of the residence listed above. The report is in no way intended to replace thorough evaluation by qualified professionals in specific fields. We recommend all areas of concern be further investigated to ensure complete and accurate information is available to our clients.