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Cornerstone Building Analysis


Email: lalo2838@yahoo.com
Inspector's email: lalo2838@yahoo.com
Phone: (562) 587-8511
Inspector's phone: (562) 587-8511
14461 E. Oak Canyon Dr. 
Hacienda Heights, Ca. 91745
Inspector: Edward Rodriguez , Jr.
Please visit: www.Cornerstonebuildinganalysis.net

Certified member of InterNACHI #NACHI11012201

Click the following link to verify:
http://www.nachi.org/verify.php?nachiid=NACHI11012201

  

Property Inspection Report

Client(s):  Prospect Buyers
Property address:  1234 E Sundance Cir
Orange CA 92869-2334
Inspection date:  Friday, August 22, 2014

This report published on Saturday, September 06, 2014 4:19:45 AM PDT

Dear Customer:

Thank you for choosing Cornerstone Building Analysis to perform the following inspection on the property you wish to purchase. This report is the exclusive property of Cornerstone Building Analysis and the individual(s) paying for the inspection fee and report. Use of this report by any unauthorized persons is prohibited.

All findings should be made to Cornerstone Building Analysis.

This report represents our professional opinion of the condition of the inspected elements of the subject property, determine during a limited time inspection. This inspection was performed, where applicable, in a manner consistent with the standards of the home inspection industry, terms and conditions of the inspection agreement and limitations noted in the inspection agreement. Information contained herein was prepared exclusively for the named client and their authorized representatives.

We have inspected the subject property and must report to you exactly what we found. Because of the age, design and location of the home, we might find some hairline cracks on driveways or walls, see paint peeling off walls, cracks on tiles, chipped bathtubs or some cracks over windows and doors. These are normal and cosmetic conditions.

While due care was exercised in the performance of this inspection, the company makes no representations or guarantees with respect to latent deficiencies or future conditions as part of the inspection or this report. This report is valid only for a period of thirty (30) days from the date of the inspection. This report, including any attachments, should be reviewed in its entirety. Any questions about the inspection or report should be resolved prior to title transfer.

This inspection report was prepared in a format specifically for the individual/s paying for the inspections fee and report and such transfer does not cover all potential areas of concern a third party may have. This report is transferable only with the consent of the individual/s paying for inspections fee and report and such transfer does not imply any warranty or guarantee regarding the report by inspection firm.

No warranty, guarantee, or insurance by Cornerstone Building Analysis is expressed or implied. This report does not include inspection for wood destroying insects, mold, lead or asbestos. A representative sampling of the building components is viewed in areas that are accessible at the time of the inspection. No destructive testing or dismantling of components is performed. Not all defects will be identified during this inspection. Unexpected repairs should be anticipated.

The person conducting your inspection is not a licensed structural engineer or other professional whose license authorizes the rendering of an opinion as to the structural integrity of a building or its other component parts.

You are advised to seek two professional opinions and acquire estimates of repair as to any defects, comments, improvements or recommendations mentioned in this report. We recommend that the professional making any repairs inspect the property further, in order to discover and repair related problems that were not identified in the report. We recommend that all repairs, corrections, and cost estimates be completed and documented prior to closing or purchasing the property. Feel free to hire other professionals to inspect the property prior to closing, including HVAC professionals, electricians, plumbers, engineers, or roofers.

If you have any questions regarding this report, please feel free to call us.
How to Read this Report
This report is organized by the property's functional areas.  Within each functional area, descriptive information is listed first and is shown in bold type.  Items of concern follow descriptive information. Concerns are shown and sorted according to these types:
Concern typeSafetyPoses a safety hazard
Concern typeRepair/ReplaceRecommend repairing or replacing
Concern typeRepair/MaintainRecommend repair and/or maintenance
Concern typeMinor defectCorrection only involves a minor expense
Concern typeMaintainRecommend ongoing maintenance
Concern typeEvaluateRecommend evaluation by a specialist
Concern typeMonitorRecommend monitoring in the future
Concern typeServiceableItem or component is in serviceable condition
Concern typeCommentFor your information
Concern typeDamageDamage caused by wood destroying insects or organisms (Rot, carpenter ant galleries, etc.)
Concern typeConducive conditionsConditions conducive for wood destroying insects or organisms (Wood-soil contact, shrubs in contact with siding, roof or plumbing leaks, etc.)

Click here for a glossary of building construction terms.Contact your inspector If there are terms that you do not understand, or visit the glossary of construction terms at http://www.reporthost.com/glossary.asp

Table of Contents
General information
Exterior
Roof
Swimming Pool/Water features
Garage
Attic
Electric service
Water heater
Heating and cooling
Plumbing and laundry
Fireplaces, woodstoves and chimneys
Kitchen
Bathrooms
Interior rooms


General information
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Report number: 703292869
Inspector's name: Edward Rodriguez, RHI
Structures inspected: Residential
Type of building: Single-family
Age of building: 1977
Property owner's name: Prospect Buyer(s)
Time started: 8:05am
Time finished: 12:55pm
Inspection Fee: $475.00
Payment method: Check
Present during inspection: Client(s), Property owner(s), Realtor(s)
Occupied: Yes
Weather conditions: Cloudy
Front of structure faces: West
Main entrance faces: West
Foundation type: Slab on grade
The following items are excluded from this inspection: Security system, Irrigation system, Low voltage outdoor lighting, BBQ island
1) This property has one or more fuel burning appliances, and no carbon monoxide alarms are visible. This is a safety hazard. Recommend installing one or more carbon monoxide alarms as necessary and as per the manufacturer's instructions. For more information, visit http://www.cpsc.gov/CPSCPUB/PREREL/prhtml05/05017.html
2) Structures built prior to 1979 may contain lead-based paint and/or asbestos in various building materials such as insulation, siding, and/or floor and ceiling tiles. Both lead and asbestos are known health hazards. Evaluating for the presence of lead and/or asbestos is not included in this inspection. The client(s) should consult with specialists as necessary, such as industrial hygienists, professional labs and/or abatement contractors for this type of evaluation. For information on lead, asbestos and other hazardous materials in homes, visit these websites:
3) Some wall, floor and/or ceiling surfaces were obscured by furniture and/or stored items. Some areas couldn't be evaluated.
4)

Now that you've had a home inspection, below are some useful links for Prospective Buyers:



http://frugalliving.about.com/od/homemaintenancerepair/a/Home-Maintenance-Checklist.htm
http://frugalliving.about.com/od/homemaintenancerepair/Home_MaintenanceRepair.htm
5)  

What Really Matters



by Nick Gromicko (Founder of InterNACHI)

Buying a home? The process can be stressful. A home inspection is supposed to give you peace of mind, but often has the opposite effect. You will be asked to absorb a lot of information in a short time. This often includes a written report, a checklist, photographs, environmental reports, and what the inspector himself says during the inspection. All this, combined with the seller's disclosure and what you notice yourself, makes the experience even more overwhelming. What should you do?

Relax. Most of your inspection will be maintenance recommendations, life expectancies for various systems and components, and minor imperfections. These are useful to know about. However, the issues that really matter will fall into four categories:

1. major defects. An example of this would be a structural failure;
2. things that lead to major defects, such as a small roof-flashing leak, for example;
3. things that may hinder your ability to finance, legally occupy, or insure the home; and
4. safety hazards, such as an exposed, live buss bar at the electrical panel.

Anything in these categories should be addressed. Often, a serious problem can be corrected inexpensively to protect both life and property (especially in categories 2 and 4).
Most sellers are honest and are often surprised to learn of defects uncovered during an inspection. Realize that sellers are under no obligation to repair everything mentioned in the report. No home is perfect. Keep things in perspective. Do not kill your deal over things that do not matter. It is inappropriate to demand that a seller address deferred maintenance, conditions already listed on the seller's disclosure, or nit-picky items.
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6)  

Modern Standards



The home was older and may not meet many generally-accepted current building standards. Older homes are inspected within the context of the time period in which they were built, taking into account the generally-accepted building practices of that time period. The Inspection Report will comment on unsafe conditions, but problems will be described as defects at the Inspector's discretion.
Homes are not required to be constantly upgraded to comply with newly-enacted building codes but are only required to comply with building codes or generally-accepted standards which existed at the time of original construction.
An exception may exist when a home is remodeled, depending on the scope of work. New work must usually comply with building codes in effect at the time in which the remodel work is performed.
The General Home Inspection is not a building code-compliance inspection, but an inspection for safety and system defects. The Inspection Report may comment on and identify as problems systems, components and/or conditions which may violate building codes, but confirmation of compliance with any building code or identification of any building code violation is not the goal of this Inspection Report and lies beyond the scope of the General Home Inspection.
If you wish to ascertain the degree to which the home complies with any applicable building codes, you should schedule a code-compliance inspection.
Exterior
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Limitations: The following items are not included in this inspection: below-grade foundation walls and footings, or those obscured by vegetation or building components; exterior building surfaces or components obscured by vegetation, stored items or debris. Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Some amount of cracking is normal in concrete slabs and foundation walls due to shrinkage and drying. Note that the inspector does not determination the adequacy of sump pumps, seismic reinforcement, nor determine if support posts, columns, beams, joists, studs, trusses, etc. are of adequate size, spanning or spacing.
In addition, the following items are not included in this inspection: water features and related equipment; playground, recreation or leisure equipment; landscape lighting; areas below exterior structures with less than three feet of vertical clearance; irrigation systems; invisible fencing; sea walls, docks and boathouses. Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not test or determine the adequacy of drainage systems for grounds, walkways, below-grade stairs and roof downspouts. The inspector does not provide an evaluation of geological conditions and/or site stability, compliance of pool or spa fencing with municipal requirements, or determination that deck, balcony and/or stair membranes are watertight.
Footing material: Poured in place concrete
Foundation material: Poured in place concrete
Apparent wall structure: Wood frame
Wall covering: Composition wood clapboard
Driveway material: Poured in place concrete, Brick
Sidewalk material: Poured in place concrete, Gravel, Brick
Exterior door material: Glass panel, Sliding glass door
7) One or more trip hazards were found in the driveway due to cracks, settlement and/or heaving. Recommend having a qualified contractor evaluate and repair or replace driveway sections as necessary to eliminate trip hazards.
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8) One or more outdoor electric receptacles appear to have no ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate to determine if GFCI protection exists, and if not, repairs should be made so that all outdoor receptacles within six feet six inches of ground level have GFCI protection. For example, install GFCI receptacles or circuit breaker(s) as needed.
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9) One or more exterior electric receptacles are being used for appliances or systems that are constantly in use, and are not equipped with a "while in use" receptacle covers for wet locations. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock and fire. "While in use" covers should be installed where necessary. For more information, visit:
http://www.google.com/search?q=while+in+use+receptacle+cover
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  • Example of a while in use cover

10) One or more wall-mounted exterior light fixtures have wiring that's subject to water intrusion due to caulk not being installed around the light fixture's back plate. Caulk should be applied around the perimeter of back plates where missing. A gap should be left at the bottom for condensation to drain out.
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11) One or more outside faucets are missing backflow prevention devices. These devices reduce the likelihood of polluted or contaminated water entering the potable water supply. This condition can occur when an outside faucet is left in the "on" position with a hose connected and the sprayer head turned off. When pressure in the system fluctuates, water can be drawn back into the water supply pipes from the house. If a chemical sprayer is being used with the hose, those chemicals can enter the water supply pipes.

Recommend installing backflow prevention devices on all exterior hose bibs where missing. They are available at most home improvement stores and are easily installed. For more information, visit:
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/AE113
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12) One or more yard drain screens are damaged or deteriorated. Recommend replacing screens to prevent clogging.
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  • Located North/West of RV
 

13) Damage Rot was found at one or more rafter and/or barge board ends. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary, replacing or removing rotten wood.
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14) Conducive conditions Siding is loose, damaged and/or deteriorated in one or more areas. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs and/or replace siding as necessary to prevent water and vermin intrusion.
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15) One or more doors will not latch when closed. Repairs should be made as necessary, and by a qualified contractor if necessary. For example, aligning strike plates with latch bolts and/or replacing locksets.
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16) One or more sprinkler heads are damaged or deteriorated. Recommend having a qualified irrigation specialist evaluate and/or repair as necessary.
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17) Conducive conditions One or more downspouts have no extensions, or have extensions that are ineffective. This can result in water accumulating around the structure's foundation, or in basements and crawl spaces if they exist. Accumulated water is a conducive condition to wood destroying insects and organisms, and may also cause the foundation to settle and possibly fail over time. Repairs should be made as necessary, such as installing or repositioning splash blocks, or installing and/or repairing tie-ins to underground drain lines, so rain water is carried at least several feet away from the structure to soil that slopes down and away from the structure.
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18) Gaps exist at one or more openings around the exterior. Gaps should be sealed as necessary to prevent moisture intrusion and entry by vermin.
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19) One or more fence gates are difficult to open, close and/or latch, or are damaged and/or deteriorated. Repairs should be made as necessary, and by a qualified contractor if necessary, so gates operate easily.
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20) Conducive conditions Vegetation such as trees, shrubs and/or vines are in contact with or less than one foot from the structure's exterior. Vegetation can serve as a conduit for wood destroying insects and may retain moisture against the exterior after it rains. Vegetation should be pruned and/or removed as necessary to maintain a one foot clearance between it and the structure's exterior.
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21) One or more light fixtures appear to be inoperable. Recommend further evaluation by replacing bulb(s) and/or consulting with the property owner(s). Repairs or replacement of the light fixture(s) by a qualified electrician may be necessary.
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22) Cracks were found in the driveway. However they don't appear to be a structural concern. No immediate action is recommended, but the client(s) may wish to have repairs made or have cracked sections replaced for aesthetic reasons.
23) Cracks were found in one or more sidewalk or patio sections. However they don't appear to be a structural concern and no trip hazards were found. No immediate action is recommended, but the client(s) may wish to have repairs made or have cracked sections replaced for aesthetic reasons.
Roof
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Limitations: The following items or areas are not included in this inspection: areas that could not be traversed or viewed clearly due to lack of access; areas and components obscured by insulation; solar roofing components; any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not determination if rafters, trusses, joists, beams, etc. are of adequate size, spanning or spacing. The inspector does not provide an estimate of remaining roof surface life, does not determine that the roof has absolutely no leaks at the time of the inspection, and does not determine that the roof won't leak in the future. Only active leaks and evidence of past leaks observed during the inspection are reported on as part of this inspection. To absolutely determine that no leaks exist, complete access to all roof structure areas must be available during a wide variety of weather conditions, including prolonged heavy rain, high wind from varying directions, heavy accumulations of snow and/or ice, and melting snow and ice.
Roof type: Cross gable
Roof covering: Asphalt or fiberglass composition shingles, Concrete tile
Gutter & downspout material: Aluminum
Roof ventilation: Adequate
24) Conducive conditions One or more roofing tiles are chipped and/or cracked. A qualified roofing contractor should evaluate and replace tiles as necessary.
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25) Conducive conditions One or more roofing tiles have slipped, and are loose. A qualified roofing contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary.
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26) Conducive conditions Two sections of roof surfaces are sloped towards each other. Debris such as leaves or needles are more likely to accumulate in this area than rest of the roof. Leaks may occur as a result. Recommend monitoring such areas for accumulated debris in the future and cleaning as necessary.
27) Conducive conditions Debris has accumulated in one or more gutters. This is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects since gutters may overflow and cause water to come in contact with the structure's exterior or make water accumulate around the foundation. Gutters should be cleaned now and as necessary in the future.
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28) Conducive conditions Debris such as leaves, needles, seeds, etc. have accumulated on the roof. This is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects and organisms since water may not flow easily off the roof, and may enter gaps in the roof surface. Leaks may occur as a result. Debris should be cleaned from the roof now and as necessary in the future.
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29) Overall, at the time of inspection the roof covering appeared to be in serviceable condition, except as noted.
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30) At the time of inspection there appeared to be asphalt shingles installed on the South side of the patio roof as opposed to concrete tile. No immediate action is recommended, but the client(s) may wish to have repairs made for aesthetic reasons.
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Swimming Pool/Water features
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Limitations: The following items are not included in this inspection: swimming pool bodies; equipment on timers, remote controls or sensors; underground or concealed piping; motorized covers; waterfalls and related equipment; Ozone generators; ultraviolet light systems; filter backflushing mechanisms. Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not disassemble filters, remove pool covers, nor determine if swimming pool bodies, filters or skimmers leak, nor determine if swimming pool bodies are level.
Water level: Full
Condition of fences and gates: Appeared serviceable
Fence and gate material: Plastic
Condition of body: Appeared serviceable
Body type: Below ground ~
Body material: Plaster-Gunite ~
Condition of deck: Appeared serviceable
Condition of coping: Appeared serviceable
Condition of pumps, lines and valves: Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Water is refilled through: Valve
Types of pumps installed: Circulation
Line material: PVC
Condition of heater and related equipment: Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Heater energy source: Natural gas
Condition of filter and related equipment: Appeared serviceable
Filter type: Diatomaceous earth
Filter air relief valve installed: Yes
Filter pressure gauge installed: Yes
Condition of skimmers: Appeared serviceable
Condition of electrical equipment: Appeared serviceable
Location of electrical disconnect: In sub-panel at equipment
Type of wiring: Liquid Tite Flex
31) Some conduit sections and/or fittings were loose. This is a potential safety hazard for shock or fire. A qualified person should evaluate and repair as necessary.
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  • Loose fitting

32) One or more ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) electric wouldn't trip with test instrument. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate and repair as necessary.
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33) No switch was found for one or more underwater lights. As a result, the light(s) were not fully evaluated. A missing switch may indicate that a circuit breaker is being used for an on/off switch. This is substandard and poses a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. Efforts should be made (consult with property owner, have electrician evaluate, etc.) to determine if underwater lights are controlled by switches. If they're not, then a qualified electrician should install switches as per standard building practices.
34) Wiring was exposed inside the timer box because the cover inside the box was missing or deteriorated. This is a safety hazard for shock. A qualified person should repair as necessary. For example, by installing a new cover.
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35) Significant amounts of debris were found inside the heater's flue pipe. This is a potential safety hazard. Debris should be removed now, prevented from accumulating in the future and/or removed as necessary in the future.
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36) The circulation pump was noisy. A qualified person should evaluate and make repairs or replace components as necessary.
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37) One or more sections of water return, supply lines or valves were leaking. A qualified person should evaluate and repair as necessary.
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38) At the time of inspection the water mill wheel was damaged or deteriorated. Recommend having a qualified person evaluate and/or repair as necessary.
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39) White plastic PVC pipes were exposed to direct sunlight. This type material is deteriorated by the ultra-violet (UV) radiation in sunlight, and this condition will result in premature failure of pipes compared to similar pipes protected from UV. The Inspector recommends that steps (such as painting the pipes) be taken to protect the affected PVC pipes.
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40) The motor for the circulation pump was noisy at the time of inspection and may be near, at or beyond its service life. Typically this is eight years but may be longer. The motor may need rebuilding or replacement in the near future.
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41)   one or more components appeared to have substandard support. Recommend having a qualified pool specialist evaluate and/or repair as necessary.
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Garage
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42) One or more wall and/or ceiling surfaces between the attached garage and interior living spaces have gaps, holes, or missing or inadequate surface materials. These surfaces are intended to prevent vehicle fumes from entering living spaces, and to slow the spread of fire from the garage to living spaces. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary so the attached garage wall and ceiling surfaces that adjoin living spaces are tightly sealed and fire rated as per standard building practices. Typically these surfaces require a one-hour fire rating.
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  • North side of the attic storage area

43) One or more electric receptacles and/or the boxes they are installed in are loose and/or not securely anchored. Wire conductors may be damaged due to repeated movement and/or tension on wires, or insulation may be damaged. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock and fire. A qualified electrician should evaluate and repair as necessary.
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44) One or more garage electric receptacles appear to have no ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate to determine if GFCI protection exists, and if not, repairs should be made so that all garage receptacles, except for one for use with a refrigerator or freezer, have GFCI protection. For example, install GFCI receptacles or circuit breaker(s) as needed.
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45) Weatherstrip around or at the bottom of the garage-house door is damaged or deteriorated. It should be replaced as necessary to prevent vehicle fumes from entering living spaces.
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46) Screen(s) in one or more windows are torn or have holes in them. Screens should be replaced where necessary.
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47) At the time of inspection the vehicle garage door, opener and/or safety components were tested and appear to be operational and in serviceable condition.
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Attic
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Inspection method: Traversed
Roof structure type: Rafters
Ceiling structure: Ceiling beams
Insulation material: Fiberglass roll or batt
48) Cover plate(s) are missing from one or more electric boxes, such as for receptacles, switches and/or junction boxes. They are intended to contain fire and prevent electric shock from exposed wires. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of fire and shock. Cover plates should be installed where missing.

-South/East Kitchen area
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49) Ceiling insulation is missing in some areas or has fallen down. Recommend installing insulation where missing or repair for better energy efficiency.
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50) Insulation is missing around one or more skylight chases. A qualified contractor should install insulation around skylight chases where missing and as per standard building practices.

-North/East side of the structure, Master bedroom
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51) Pull-down stairs are installed for the attic access. No insulation is installed above the stairs and no weatherstripping is installed around the hatch perimeter. To reduce air leakage, recommend installing weatherstripping and an insulated hatch cover. An example of one can be seen at http://www.batticdoor.com/

Interior air leaking into the attic results in heating and cooling losses, increased energy costs, and a possible increase in moisture levels in the attic due condensation forming on the underside of the roof sheathing during cold weather.
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52) Screens are missing and/or deteriorated at one or more soffit, gable, and/or ridge vents. Birds and vermin may enter the attic because of this. Screens should be replaced or repaired where necessary, or installed where missing.
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53) No insulation is installed over the attic access hatch. Recommend installing insulation above hatch for better energy efficiency.
54) No weatherstrip is installed around the attic access hatch. Weatherstrip should be installed around the hatch to prevent heated interior air from entering attic.
55) Overall the attic appeared to be well insulated, except as noted
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Electric service
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Limitations: The following items are not included in this inspection: generator systems, surge suppressors, inaccessible or concealed wiring; underground utilities and systems; low voltage lighting or lighting on timers or sensors. Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not determine the adequacy of grounding or bonding, does not determine if this system has an adequate capacity for the client's specific needs, nor determine if this system has any reserve capacity for additions or expansion. The inspector does not operate circuit breakers as part of the inspection, install or change light bulbs, nor determine the operability of every wall switch.
Primary service type: Underground
Primary service overload protection type: Circuit breakers
Service amperage (amps): 200
Service voltage (volts): 120/240
Location of main service switch: South
Location of sub panels: Garage
Location of main disconnect: Top/left
Service entrance conductor material: Copper
System ground: Copper
Main disconnect rating (amps): 200
Branch circuit wiring type: Non-metallic sheathed
Solid strand aluminum branch circuit wiring present: No
56) Exposed wiring and/or bus bars exist in the main service panel due to closure covers missing (slots where circuit breakers fit through the panel cover). This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. Closure covers should be installed where missing to eliminate exposed wiring, and by a qualified electrician if necessary.
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57) One or more screws are missing from the main service or sub panel cover and should be replaced. Because energized wiring may exist behind the holes with the missing screws, recommend that a qualified, licensed electrician replace these screws, or that care be taken to ensure that the new screws do not come in contact with wiring inside the panel when they are installed. Stock screws from the panel manufacturer should be used, or their equivalent.
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58) The legend for overcurrent protection devices (breakers or fuses) in the main service panel is missing, unreadable or incomplete. Recommend installing, updating or correcting the legend as necessary so it's accurate. Evaluation by a qualified electrician may be necessary.
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59) At the time of inspection the main service and/or sub panel(s) appeared to be in serviceable condition, except as noted
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Water heater
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Limitations: The following items are not included in this inspection: solar water heating systems; circulation systems. Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not provide an estimate of remaining life on water heaters, does not determine if water heaters are appropriately sized, or perform any evaluations that require a pilot light to be lit.
Estimated age: 2006
Energy source: Natural gas
Capacity (in gallons): 50
Manufacturer: Kenmore
60) The water heater's seismic straps or struts are substandard or loose. For example, they may allow significant movement or use improper fasteners. This is a potential safety hazard since movement can cause leaks in the gas supply lines or damage wiring. Leaks may also occur in water supply pipes. A qualified contractor should evaluate and either repair existing straps or install new straps or struts as necessary and as per standard building practices.
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61) The hot water temperature is greater than 120 degrees Fahrenheit. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of scalding. The thermostat should be adjusted so the water temperature doesn't exceed 120 degrees. For more information on scalding dangers, visit:
http://www.cpsc.gov/cpscpub/pubs/5098.html
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62) A flexible connectors was used for the temperature-pressure relief valve drain line. Flex connectors can be bent or kinked so as to restrict the flow of the drain line and impair the operation of the valve. They typically are not rated for the temperature and pressure of water being discharged (potentially 150 psi and 210 degrees F). Flex connectors used this way pose a potential safety hazard for explosion. Recommend that a qualified plumber repair per standard building practices. For example, by installing a drain line made of rigid copper or CPVC plastic pipe.
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63) Conducive conditions The water heater located in the garage is installed over or in an area that is attached to finished living spaces and has no catch pan and drain installed. Recommend having a qualified contractor install a catch pan and drain to prevent water damage to finished interior spaces below if/when the water heater develops a leak or is drained.
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64) No drip leg is installed on the water heater gas supply line. Drip legs are intended to trap oil, scale, water condensation and/or debris from the gas supply lines before they reach and damage the water heater components. A qualified contractor should install a drip leg as per standard building practices.
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65) The estimated useful life for most water heaters is 8 to 12 years. These water heaters appear to be at this age or older and may need replacing at any time. Recommend budgeting for a replacements if/when necessary.
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66) At the time of inspection the water heaters appeared to be in functional condition, except as noted.
Heating and cooling
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Limitations: The following items are not included in this inspection: humidifiers, dehumidifiers, electronic air filters; solar, coal or wood fired heat systems; thermostat or temperature control accuracy and timed functions; heating components concealed within the building structure or in inaccessible areas; underground utilities and systems; safety devices and controls (due to automatic operation). Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not provide an estimate of remaining life on heating system components, does not determine if heating systems are appropriately sized, or perform any evaluations that require a pilot light to be lit. It is beyond the scope of this inspection to determine if furnace heat exchangers are intact and free of leaks.
In addition, the following items are not included in this inspection: Cooling components concealed within the building structure or in inaccessible areas; underground utilities and systems; safety devices and controls (due to automatic operation). Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not provide an estimate of remaining life on cooling system components, does not determine if cooling systems are appropriately sized, and does not test coolant pressure. Condensation pans and drain lines may clog or leak at any time and should be monitored while in operation in the future.
Estimated age: Heaters-1992, 1998 & 2001 & / AC-1992 & 2001
Primary heating system energy source: Natural gas, Electric
Primary heat system type: Forced air, Heat pump
Primary A/C energy source: Electric
Primary Air conditioning type: Split system
Manufacturer: Rheem, BDP
Filter location: Behind return air grill, At the base of the furnace
67) One or more flexible gas supply connectors are routed through a metal cabinet. Standard building practices require that solid iron pipe be used where gas supply lines are routed through holes in metal cabinets. Continued vibration from this equipment may cause the edge of the metal cabinet to wear through the flexible connector, resulting in gas leaks. This is a safety hazard. A qualified heating and cooling contractor should evaluate and make repairs and/or modifications as necessary.
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68) The last service date of the heating systems appears to be more than one year ago, or the inspector was unable to determine the last service date. The client(s) should ask the property owner(s) when they were last serviced. If unable to determine the last service date, or if these systems were serviced more than one year ago, a qualified heating and cooling contractor should inspect, clean, and service these systems, and make repairs if necessary. For safety reasons, and because these systems are fueled by gas or oil, this servicing should be performed annually in the future. For more information visit:
http://www.cpsc.gov/CPSCPUB/PREREL/prhtml05/05017.html
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69) Insulation on one or more heating/cooling ducts in unconditioned spaces is damaged and/or deteriorated. A qualified contractor should evaluate and replace insulation and/or ducts as necessary and as per standard building practices.

-South/East and North/East side of the attic
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70) The outside condensing unit is not level. Damage may occur if it is more than ten degrees off from level. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary, such as replacing the pad that the condensing unit is installed on.

-West side unit
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71) The outside condensing unit and/or pad located below is not securely anchored to the floor. Damage to equipment may occur as a result. A qualified heating and cooling contractor should evaluate and/or repair as necessary.
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72) The cooling fins on the outdoor condensing unit's evaporator coils are bent, damaged and/or deteriorated. This may result in reduced efficiency and higher energy costs. A qualified heating and cooling contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary.
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73) No drip leg is installed on the furnace or boiler gas supply line. Drip legs are intended to trap oil, scale, water condensation and/or debris from the gas supply lines before they reach and damage the furnace or boiler components. A qualified contractor should install a drip leg as per standard building practices.
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74) Insulation for the outside condensing unit's refrigerant lines is damaged, deteriorated and/or missing in one or more areas. This may result in reduced efficiency and increased energy costs. A qualified heating and cooling contractor should replace insulation as necessary.
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75) The last service date of the cooling systems appears to be more than one year ago, or the inspector was unable to determine the last service date. The client(s) should ask the property owner(s) when they were last serviced. If unable to determine the last service date, or if these systems were serviced more than one year ago, a qualified heating and cooling contractor should inspect, clean, and service these systems, and make repairs if necessary. This servicing should be performed annually in the future.
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76) Air handler filter(s) are dirty and should be washed now. They should be checked monthly in the future and washed as necessary.
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77) The estimated useful life for most forced air furnaces is 15 to 20 years. This furnace appears to be at this age or older and may need replacing at any time. Recommend budgeting for a replacement if/when necessary.

78) The estimated useful life for most heat pumps is 15 to 20 years. This heat pump appears to be at this age or older and may need replacing at any time. Recommend budgeting for a replacement if/when necessary.

79) The estimated useful life for air conditioning compressors is 8 to 15 years. This unit appears to have exceeded this age and may need replacing at any time. Recommend budgeting for a replacement if/when necessary.

80) All heating and cooling units appeared to be in functional condition as indicated with pictures below.
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Plumbing and laundry
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Limitations: The following items are not included in this inspection: private wells and sewage disposal systems; main, side and lateral sewer lines; gray water systems; pressure boosting systems; incinerating or composting toilets; fire suppression sprinkler systems; water softeners, conditioners or filtering systems; plumbing components concealed within the foundation or building structure, or in inaccessible areas such as below tubs; underground utilities and systems; overflow drains for tubs and sinks; backflow prevention devices. Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not operate water supply or shut-off valves due to the possibility of valves leaking or breaking when operated, does not determine the adequacy of washing machine drain lines, washing machine catch pan drain lines, or clothes dryer exhaust ducts. The inspector does not test for lead in the water supply, the water pipes or solder, does not determine if plumbing and fuel lines are adequately sized, and does not determining the existence or condition of underground or above-ground fuel tanks.
Water pressure (psi): 110psi
Location of main water shut-off valve: West
Location of main water meter: West
Location of main fuel shut-off: South
Water service: Public
Service pipe material: Copper
Supply pipe material: Copper
Vent pipe material: Plastic
Drain pipe material: Plastic
Waste pipe material: Plastic
81) Copper water supply pipes in homes built prior to 1986 may be joined with solder that contains lead. Lead is a known health hazard, especially for children. Laws were passed in 1985 prohibiting the use of lead in solder, but prior to that solder normally contained about 50 percent lead. The client(s) should be aware of this, especially if children will be living in this structure. Evaluating for the presence of lead in this structure is not included in this inspection. The client(s) should consider having a qualified lab test for lead, and if necessary take steps to reduce or remove lead from the water supply. Various solutions such as these may be advised:

For more information visit:
http://www.cpsc.gov/CPSCPUB/PUBS/5056.html
http://www.epa.gov/safewater/lead/index.html
82) The water supply pressure is greater than 80 psi. Pressures above 80 psi may void warranties for some appliances such as water heaters or washing machines. Flexible supply lines to washing machines are more likely to burst with higher pressures. Typically the pressure cannot be regulated at the water meter. Recommend having a qualified plumber evaluate and make modifications to reduce the pressure below 80 psi. Installing a pressure reducing valve on the main service pipe is a common solution to this problem. If one exists, then it should be adjusted for lower pressures.
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83) Conducive conditions The washing machine is installed over a finished living space and has no catch pan or drain installed. These are not commonly installed, but they are recommended to prevent water damage to finished interior spaces below if or when the washing machine leaks, overflows or is drained. Recommend having a qualified contractor install both a catch pan and drain.
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84) Neither the clothes washer nor dryer were operated or evaluated. They are excluded from this inspection.
85)
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  • Location of main water shut-off valve: West
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  • Location of main water meter: West
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  • Location of main fuel shut-off: South
 

Fireplaces, woodstoves and chimneys
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Limitations: The following items are not included in this inspection: coal stoves, gas logs, chimney flues (except where visible). Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not determine the adequacy of drafting or sizing in fireplace and stove flues, nor determine if prefabricated or zero clearance fireplaces are installed in accordance with the manufacturer's specifications. The inspector does not perform any evaluations that require a pilot light to be lit.
Fireplace type: Masonry, Metal prefabricated
Chimney type: Masonry
86) One or more fireplaces equipped with a gas burner has a damper that can be closed. This is a safety hazard due to the possibility of burner or pilot light exhaust gases entering living spaces. A qualified chimney service contractor should make repairs as necessary so the damper is made permanently open. Typically a bracket or bolt is installed for this purpose.
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87) The masonry chimney crown is deteriorated (cracked or broken) and needs repairs or replacement. The crown is meant to keep water off of the chimney structure. The chimney can be damaged by wet masonry going through freeze-thaw cycles. A properly constructed chimney crown should:

A qualified chimney service contractor or mason should evaluate and repair or replace the crown as necessary.
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88) A wood burning fireplace has been converted to use gas logs, and no glass doors are installed on the fireplace. For gas conversions like this, the fireplace damper is modified so it is permanently open to prevent combustion gases from the pilot light and main burners accumulating in living spaces. Since the damper is always open, unconditioned air from outside can enter living spaces through the chimney, and conditioned air from inside can exit through the chimney. This can result in higher energy costs from heating and cooling. The client(s) should consider having a qualified chimney service contractor install glass doors on the fireplace to reduce or eliminate this air flow.
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Kitchen
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Limitations: The following items are not included in this inspection: free-standing or portable appliances such as dishwashers, trash compactors, refrigerators, freezers, ice makers; specialty appliances such as hot water dispensers, water filters and trash compactors; appliance timers, clocks, cook functions, self and/or continuous cleaning operations, thermostat or temperature control accuracy, and lights. Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not provide an estimate of the remaining life of appliances, and does not determine the adequacy of operation of appliances such as dishwashers, garbage disposals, trash compactors, ovens, broilers, etc.
89) Substandard wiring was found for the under-sink food disposal. Unprotected solid-strand, non-metallic sheathed (Romex) wiring is used. The insulation can be damaged by objects coming in contact with it and/or it being repeatedly moved. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock and fire. Armored (BX) cable, or a flexible appliance cord with a plug end and electric outlet should be used. A qualified electrician should evaluate and repair as necessary.
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90) One or more electric receptacles that serve countertop surfaces within six feet of a sink appear to have no ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate to determine if GFCI protection exists, and if not, repairs should be made so that all receptacles that serve countertop surfaces within six feet of sinks have GFCI protection. For example, install GFCI receptacles or circuit breaker(s) as needed.
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91) Cover plate(s) are broken at one or more electric boxes, such as for receptacles, switches and/or junction boxes. They are intended to contain fire and prevent electric shock from exposed wires. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of fire and shock. Cover plates should be replaced where necessary.
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92) The point-of-use filtered water dispenser is inoperable. Recommend asking the property owner(s) about this and if necessary, having a qualified plumber repair, replace or remove as necessary.
93) One or more faucets leak by handle(s) or at their base when turned on. A qualified plumber should evaluate and repair as necessary.
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94) Drawers are difficult to open and close in one or more cabinets. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary.
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95) At the time of inspection the kitchen appliances, flooring, cabinets and countertops pictured below were evaluated and appeared to be in serviceable condition, except as noted.
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Bathrooms
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Limitations: The following items are not included in this inspection: overflow drains for tubs and sinks; bidets, heated towel racks, saunas, steam generators, clothes washers, clothes dryers. Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. The inspector does not operate water supply or shut-off valves for sinks, toilets, bidets, clothes washers, etc. due to the possibility of valves leaking or breaking when operated. The inspector does not determine if shower pans or tub and shower enclosures are water tight, or determine the completeness or operability of any gas piping to laundry appliances.
96) One or more electric receptacles and/or the boxes they are installed in are loose and/or not securely anchored. Wire conductors may be damaged due to repeated movement and/or tension on wires, or insulation may be damaged. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock and fire. A qualified electrician should evaluate and repair as necessary.
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97) Conducive conditions One or more toilets are loose. A qualified contractor should remove the toilet(s) for further evaluation and repairs if necessary. A new wax ring should be installed and toilet(s) should be securely anchored to the floor to prevent movement and leaking.
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98) One or more light fixtures or switches are damaged and/or deteriorated. A qualified electrician should evaluate and repair or replace light fixtures or switches where necessary.
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99) One or more hand showers leak hand at their base when turned on. A qualified plumber should evaluate and repair as necessary.
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100) The shower diverter valve for one or more bathtub faucets is defective. A qualified plumber should evaluate and replace components or make repairs as necessary.
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101) Corrosion was found on fittings and/or water supply lines. A qualified plumbing contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary.
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102) One or more sliding shower doors are difficult to open or close. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair or replace door(s) as necessary.
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103) One or more sinks are clogged or drain slowly. Drain(s) should be cleared as necessary, and by a qualified plumber if necessary.
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104) Conducive conditions Caulk is missing or deteriorated around the base of one or more bathtub spouts and/or escutcheons. It should be replaced where deteriorated and/or applied where missing to prevent water intrusion and damage to wall structures.
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105) Recommend cleaning and sealing grout in countertops now and in the future as necessary to prevent staining and to improve waterproofing.
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106)   At the time of inspection the bathroom fixtures, flooring, cabinets and countertops pictured below were evaluated and appeared to be in serviceable condition, except as noted.
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Interior rooms
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Limitations: The following items are not included in this inspection: security, intercom and sound systems; communications wiring; central vacuum systems; elevators and stair lifts; sources of obnoxious odors; cosmetic deficiencies due to normal wear and tear in wall, floor and ceiling surfaces and coverings, or in equipment; deficiencies relating to interior decorating; low voltage and gas lighting systems. Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not evaluate any areas or items which require moving stored items, furnishings, debris, equipment, floor coverings, insulation or similar materials. The inspector does not test for asbestos, lead, radon, mold, hazardous waste, urea formaldehyde urethane, or any other toxic substance. Some items such as window operability are tested on a sampled basis. The client should be aware that paint may obscure wall and ceiling defects, floor coverings may obscure floor defects, and furnishings may obscure wall, floor and floor covering defects. If furnishings were present during the inspection, recommend a full evaluation of walls, floors and ceilings that were previously obscured when possible. Determining the cause of odors is not within the scope of this inspection.
107) One or more electric receptacles that serve countertop surfaces within six feet of a sink appear to have no ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate to determine if GFCI protection exists, and if not, repairs should be made so that all receptacles that serve countertop surfaces within six feet of sinks have GFCI protection. For example, install GFCI receptacles or circuit breaker(s) as needed.
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108) An insufficient number of smoke alarms are installed. Additional smoke alarms should be installed as necessary so a functioning one exists in each hallway leading to bedrooms, and in each bedroom. For more information, visit http://www.cpsc.gov/cpscpub/pubs/5077.html
109) One or more interior doors have a keyed lockset or deadbolt installed. This is a safety hazard for small children in the event that they lock themselves in the room, do not know how to unlock the door, and the key is not available. Keyed locksets and/or deadbolts should be replaced as necessary with "privacy" locksets that don't require a key.
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110) One or more doors bind in their jamb and cannot be closed and latched, or are difficult to open and close. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary. For example, adjusting jambs or trimming doors.
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111) Screens in one or more sliding doors are torn or have holes in them. Screens should be replaced where necessary.
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112) One or more doors will not latch when closed. Repairs should be made as necessary, and by a qualified contractor if necessary. For example, aligning strike plates with latch bolts and/or replacing locksets.
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113) Carpeting in one or more rooms is soiled and/or stained. Recommend having carpeting professionally cleaned as necessary.
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114) One or more light fixtures appear to be inoperable. Recommend further evaluation by replacing bulb(s) and/or consulting with the property owner(s). Repairs or replacement of the light fixture(s) by a qualified electrician may be necessary.
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115) Cracks were found in ceilings in one or more areas. They do not appear to be a structural concern, but the client(s) may wish to repair these for aesthetic reasons.
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1.1. A Home Inspection is a non-invasive, visual examination of a residential dwelling, performed for a fee, which is designed to identify observed material defects within specific components of said dwelling. Components may include any combination of mechanical, structural, electrical, plumbing, or other essential systems or portions of the home, as identified and agreed to by the Client and Inspector, prior to the inspection process.

I. A home inspection is intended to assist in evaluation of the overall condition of the dwelling. The inspection is based on observation of the visible and apparent condition of the structure and its components on the date of the inspection, and not the prediction of future conditions.

II. A home inspection will not reveal every concern that exists or ever could exist, but only those material defects observed on the day of the inspection.

III. A home inspection can include a survey and/or analysis of energy flows and usage in a residential property if the client requests it.
1.2. A Material Defect is a condition of a residential real property, or any portion of it, that would have a significant, adverse impact on the value of the real property, or that involves an unreasonable risk to people on the property. The fact that a structural element, system or subsystem is near, at or beyond the end of the normal useful life of such a structural element, system or subsystem is not by itself a material defect.

1.3. An Inspection Report shall describe and identify, in written format, the inspected systems, structures, and components of the dwelling, and shall identify material defects observed. Inspection reports may contain recommendations regarding conditions reported or recommendations for correction, monitoring or further evaluation by professionals, but this is not required.

This inspection was performed in accordance with the current Standards of Practice and Code of Ethics of the International Association of Certified Home Inspectors (InterNACHI). The Standards contain certain and very important limitations, exceptions, and exclusions to the inspection. A complete copy of the STANDARDS OF PRACTICE we adhere to can be found at the following link: http://www.nachi.org/sop.htm