View as PDF

View summary

Logo

Cornerstone Building Analysis


Email: lalo2838@yahoo.com
Inspector's email: lalo2838@yahoo.com
Phone: (562) 587-8511
Inspector's phone: (562) 587-8511
14461 E. Oak Canyon Dr. 
Hacienda Heights, Ca. 91745
Inspector: Edward Rodriguez , Jr.
Certified member of InterNACHI #NACHI11012201

Click the following link to verify:
http://www.nachi.org/verify.php?nachiid=NACHI11012201

  

Property Inspection Report

Client(s):  Prospect Buyers
Property address:  1234 Ocean Blvd
Corona Del Mar CA 92625-2830
Inspection date:  Tuesday, November 05, 2013

This report published on Friday, May 23, 2014 9:57:59 PM PDT

Dear Customer:

Thank you for choosing Cornerstone Building Analysis to perform the following inspection on the property you wish to purchase. This report is the exclusive property of Cornerstone Building Analysis and the individual(s) paying for the inspection fee and report. Use of this report by any unauthorized persons is prohibited.

All findings should be made to Cornerstone Building Analysis.

This report represents our professional opinion of the condition of the inspected elements of the subject property, determine during a limited time inspection. This inspection was performed, where applicable, in a manner consistent with the standards of the home inspection industry, terms and conditions of the inspection agreement and limitations noted in the inspection agreement. Information contained herein was prepared exclusively for the named client and their authorized representatives.

We have inspected the subject property and must report to you exactly what we found. Because of the age, design and location of the home, we might find some hairline cracks on driveways or walls, see paint peeling off walls, cracks on tiles, chipped bathtubs or some cracks over windows and doors. These are normal and cosmetic conditions.

While due care was exercised in the performance of this inspection, the company makes no representations or guarantees with respect to latent deficiencies or future conditions as part of the inspection or this report. This report is valid only for a period of thirty (30) days from the date of the inspection. This report, including any attachments, should be reviewed in its entirety. Any questions about the inspection or report should be resolved prior to title transfer.

This inspection report was prepared in a format specifically for the individual/s paying for the inspections fee and report and such transfer does not cover all potential areas of concern a third party may have. This report is transferable only with the consent of the individual/s paying for inspections fee and report and such transfer does not imply any warranty or guarantee regarding the report by inspection firm.

No warranty, guarantee, or insurance by Cornerstone Building Analysis is expressed or implied. This report does not include inspection for wood destroying insects, mold, lead or asbestos. A representative sampling of the building components is viewed in areas that are accessible at the time of the inspection. No destructive testing or dismantling of components is performed. Not all defects will be identified during this inspection. Unexpected repairs should be anticipated.

The person conducting your inspection is not a licensed structural engineer or other professional whose license authorizes the rendering of an opinion as to the structural integrity of a building or its other component parts.

You are advised to seek two professional opinions and acquire estimates of repair as to any defects, comments, improvements or recommendations mentioned in this report. We recommend that the professional making any repairs inspect the property further, in order to discover and repair related problems that were not identified in the report. We recommend that all repairs, corrections, and cost estimates be completed and documented prior to closing or purchasing the property. Feel free to hire other professionals to inspect the property prior to closing, including HVAC professionals, electricians, plumbers, engineers, or roofers.

If you have any questions regarding this report, please feel free to call us.
How to Read this Report
This report is organized by the property's functional areas.  Within each functional area, descriptive information is listed first and is shown in bold type.  Items of concern follow descriptive information. Concerns are shown and sorted according to these types:
Concern typeSafetyPoses a safety hazard
Concern typeMajor defectCorrection likely involves a significant expense
Concern typeRepair/ReplaceRecommend repairing or replacing
Concern typeRepair/MaintainRecommend repair and/or maintenance
Concern typeMinor defectCorrection only involves a minor expense
Concern typeMaintainRecommend ongoing maintenance
Concern typeEvaluateRecommend evaluation by a specialist
Concern typeServiceableItem or component is in serviceable condition
Concern typeCommentFor your information
Concern typeDamageDamage caused by wood destroying insects or organisms (Rot, carpenter ant galleries, etc.)
Concern typeConducive conditionsConditions conducive for wood destroying insects or organisms (Wood-soil contact, shrubs in contact with siding, roof or plumbing leaks, etc.)

Click here for a glossary of building construction terms.Contact your inspector If there are terms that you do not understand, or visit the glossary of construction terms at http://www.reporthost.com/glossary.asp

Table of Contents
General information
Exterior
Roof
Garage
Attic
Electric service
Water heater
Heating and cooling
Plumbing and laundry
Crawl space
Kitchen
Bathrooms
Interior rooms


General information
Return to table of contents

Report number: 260892625
Inspector's name: Edward Rodriguez, RHI
Structures inspected: Residential
Type of building: Single Family
Age of building: 1982
Property owner's name: Prospect Buyer(s)
Time started: 2:05pm
Time finished: 5:50pm
Inspection Fee: $250.00
Payment method: Check
Present during inspection: Client(s), Property owner(s), Realtor(s)
Occupied: Yes
Weather conditions: Clear
Temperature: Warm
Ground condition: Damp
Front of structure faces: South
Main entrance faces: South
Foundation type: Crawlspace
The following items are excluded from this inspection: Security system, Irrigation system, Low voltage outdoor lighting
1) This property has one or more fuel burning appliances, and no carbon monoxide alarms are visible. This is a safety hazard. Recommend installing one or more carbon monoxide alarms as necessary and as per the manufacturer's instructions. For more information, visit http://www.cpsc.gov/CPSCPUB/PREREL/prhtml05/05017.html

One on each floor


2) Some wall, floor and/or ceiling surfaces were obscured by furniture and/or stored items. Some areas couldn't be evaluated.
Photo
Photo 2-1
Photo
Photo 2-2
Photo
Photo 2-3
Photo
Photo 2-4
Photo
Photo 2-5
Photo
Photo 2-6
Photo
Photo 2-7
Photo
Photo 2-8
Photo
Photo 2-9
 

3)  

What Really Matters



by Nick Gromicko (Founder of InterNACHI)

Buying a home? The process can be stressful. A home inspection is supposed to give you peace of mind, but often has the opposite effect. You will be asked to absorb a lot of information in a short time. This often includes a written report, a checklist, photographs, environmental reports, and what the inspector himself says during the inspection. All this, combined with the seller's disclosure and what you notice yourself, makes the experience even more overwhelming. What should you do?

Relax. Most of your inspection will be maintenance recommendations, life expectancies for various systems and components, and minor imperfections. These are useful to know about. However, the issues that really matter will fall into four categories:

1. major defects. An example of this would be a structural failure;
2. things that lead to major defects, such as a small roof-flashing leak, for example;
3. things that may hinder your ability to finance, legally occupy, or insure the home; and
4. safety hazards, such as an exposed, live buss bar at the electrical panel.

Anything in these categories should be addressed. Often, a serious problem can be corrected inexpensively to protect both life and property (especially in categories 2 and 4).
Most sellers are honest and are often surprised to learn of defects uncovered during an inspection. Realize that sellers are under no obligation to repair everything mentioned in the report. No home is perfect. Keep things in perspective. Do not kill your deal over things that do not matter. It is inappropriate to demand that a seller address deferred maintenance, conditions already listed on the seller's disclosure, or nit-picky items.
Photo
Photo 3-1
 

4)  

Now that you've had a home inspection, below are some useful links for Prospective Buyers:



http://frugalliving.about.com/od/homemaintenancerepair/a/Home-Maintenance-Checklist.htm
http://frugalliving.about.com/od/homemaintenancerepair/Home_MaintenanceRepair.htm
Exterior
Return to table of contents

Limitations: The following items are not included in this inspection: below-grade foundation walls and footings, or those obscured by vegetation or building components; exterior building surfaces or components obscured by vegetation, stored items or debris. Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Some amount of cracking is normal in concrete slabs and foundation walls due to shrinkage and drying. Note that the inspector does not determination the adequacy of sump pumps, seismic reinforcement, nor determine if support posts, columns, beams, joists, studs, trusses, etc. are of adequate size, spanning or spacing.
In addition, the following items are not included in this inspection: water features and related equipment; playground, recreation or leisure equipment; landscape lighting; areas below exterior structures with less than three feet of vertical clearance; irrigation systems; invisible fencing; sea walls, docks and boathouses. Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not test or determine the adequacy of drainage systems for grounds, walkways, below-grade stairs and roof downspouts. The inspector does not provide an evaluation of geological conditions and/or site stability, compliance of pool or spa fencing with municipal requirements, or determination that deck, balcony and/or stair membranes are watertight.
Footing material: Poured in place concrete
Foundation material: Poured in place concrete, Post and pier
Apparent wall structure: Wood frame
Wall covering: Wood shakes
Driveway material: Poured in place concrete
Sidewalk material: Poured in place concrete, Brick
Exterior door material: Sliding glass, Wood panel
5) Guardrails are loose and/or wobbly in one or more areas. This is a safety hazard. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary, such as installing new fasteners or hardware, installing additional fasteners and/or installing additional railing components as necessary so they are securely attached.
Photo
Photo 5-1
 

6) One or more electric receptacles and/or the boxes they are installed in are loose and/or not securely anchored. Wire conductors may be damaged due to repeated movement and/or tension on wires, or insulation may be damaged. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock and fire. A qualified electrician should evaluate and repair as necessary.
Photo
Photo 6-1
 

7) One or more outdoor electric receptacles appear to have no ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate to determine if GFCI protection exists, and if not, repairs should be made so that all outdoor receptacles within six feet six inches of ground level have GFCI protection. For example, install GFCI receptacles or circuit breaker(s) as needed.
Photo
Photo 7-1
Photo
Photo 7-2
Photo
Photo 7-3
 

8) One or more flights of stairs with more than two risers have no handrail installed. This is a safety hazard. A qualified contractor should install graspable handrails that your hand can completely encircle at stairs where missing, and as per standard building practices.
Photo
Photo 8-1
Photo
Photo 8-2

9) Waterproof cover(s) over one or more electric receptacles are damaged or broken. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock and fire. Damaged covers should be replaced where necessary.
Photo
Photo 9-1
Photo
Photo 9-2

10) One or more wall-mounted exterior light fixtures have wiring that's subject to water intrusion due to caulk not being installed around the light fixture's back plate. Caulk should be applied around the perimeter of back plates where missing. A gap should be left at the bottom for condensation to drain out.
Photo
Photo 10-1
Photo
Photo 10-2

11) One or more outside faucets are missing backflow prevention devices. These devices reduce the likelihood of polluted or contaminated water entering the potable water supply. This condition can occur when an outside faucet is left in the "on" position with a hose connected and the sprayer head turned off. When pressure in the system fluctuates, water can be drawn back into the water supply pipes from the house. If a chemical sprayer is being used with the hose, those chemicals can enter the water supply pipes.

Recommend installing backflow prevention devices on all exterior hose bibs where missing. They are available at most home improvement stores and are easily installed. For more information, visit:
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/AE113
Photo
Photo 11-1
Photo
Photo 11-2
Photo
Photo 11-3
Photo
Photo 11-4

12) DamageConducive conditions Soil is in contact with or less than six inches from siding and/or trim. This is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects and organisms. Wood siding and/or trim is rotten in some areas as a result. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary, replacing all rotten wood. Also, the soil should be graded and/or removed as necessary so there are at least six inches of space between the siding and trim and the soil below.
Photo
Photo 12-1
Photo
Photo 12-2

13) Fences and/or gates are damaged and/or deteriorated in some areas. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs or replace sections as necessary.
Photo
Photo 13-1
Photo
Photo 13-2

14) Conducive conditions One or more crawlspace vents are below or near grade with no well to prevent rainwater from entering. This can lead to water entering and accumulating in the crawl space, and is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects and organisms. A qualified contractor should install wells where necessary.
Photo
Photo 14-1
Photo
Photo 14-2

15) One or more large trees are very to the crawlspace access. Recommend having a qualified tree service contractor or arborist remove or prune trees as necessary to allow periodic access to the crawl space areas .
Photo
Photo 15-1
 

16) One or more crawl space vent screens are inadequate. Animals such as vermin or pets may enter the crawl space and nest, die and/or leave feces and urine. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary.
Photo
Photo 16-1
Photo
Photo 16-2

17) Gaps exist at one or more openings around the exterior, such as those where outside faucets, refrigerant lines, and/or gas supply pipes penetrate the exterior. Gaps should be sealed as necessary to prevent moisture intrusion and entry by vermin.
Photo
Photo 17-1
Photo
Photo 17-2
Photo
Photo 17-3
Photo
Photo 17-4
Photo
Photo 17-5
 

18) Conducive conditions Vegetation such as trees, shrubs and/or vines are in contact with or less than one foot from the structure's exterior. Vegetation can serve as a conduit for wood destroying insects and may retain moisture against the exterior after it rains. Vegetation should be pruned and/or removed as necessary to maintain a one foot clearance between it and the structure's exterior.
Photo
Photo 18-1
 

19) The exterior paint appeared to be in serviceable condition, but it appeared that the masking tape had been left on in one or more areas.
Photo
Photo 19-1
Photo
Photo 19-2
Photo
Photo 19-3
Photo
Photo 19-4
Photo
Photo 19-5
 

20) Conducive conditions Caulk is missing or deteriorated in some areas and should be replaced and/or applied where necessary. For more information on caulking, visit:
The Ins and Outs of Caulking.
Photo
Photo 20-1
Photo
Photo 20-2
Photo
Photo 20-3
Photo
Photo 20-4
Photo
Photo 20-5
Photo
Photo 20-6
Photo
Photo 20-7
 

21) One or more light fixtures appear to be inoperable. Recommend further evaluation by replacing bulb(s) and/or consulting with the property owner(s). Repairs or replacement of the light fixture(s) by a qualified electrician may be necessary.
Photo
Photo 21-1
Photo
Photo 21-2

22) Minor cracks were found in the driveway. However they don't appear to be a structural concern and no trip hazards were found. No immediate action is recommended, but the client(s) may wish to have repairs made or have cracked sections replaced for aesthetic reasons.
Photo
Photo 22-1
Photo
Photo 22-2

23) Minor cracks were found in one or more sidewalk or patio sections. However they don't appear to be a structural concern and no trip hazards were found. No immediate action is recommended, but the client(s) may wish to have repairs made or have cracked sections replaced for aesthetic reasons.
Photo
Photo 23-1
Photo
Photo 23-2
Photo
Photo 23-3
Photo
Photo 23-4
Photo
Photo 23-5
Photo
Photo 23-6

24)   Insulation for the exterior supply lines is damaged, deteriorated and/or missing in one or more areas. A qualified person should evaluate and repair insulation as necessary.
Photo
Photo 24-1
Photo
Photo 24-2
Photo
Photo 24-3
Photo
Photo 24-4

Roof
Return to table of contents

Limitations: The following items or areas are not included in this inspection: areas that could not be traversed or viewed clearly due to lack of access; areas and components obscured by insulation; solar roofing components; any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not determination if rafters, trusses, joists, beams, etc. are of adequate size, spanning or spacing. The inspector does not provide an estimate of remaining roof surface life, does not determine that the roof has absolutely no leaks at the time of the inspection, and does not determine that the roof won't leak in the future. Only active leaks and evidence of past leaks observed during the inspection are reported on as part of this inspection. To absolutely determine that no leaks exist, complete access to all roof structure areas must be available during a wide variety of weather conditions, including prolonged heavy rain, high wind from varying directions, heavy accumulations of snow and/or ice, and melting snow and ice.
Roof type: Flat
Roof covering: Rolled
Gutter & downspout material: Aluminum
Roof ventilation: Adequate
25)

At the time of inspection the roofing material appeared to be in serviceable condition, as viewed from the eaves on the ladder

Photo
Photo 25-1
Photo
Photo 25-2
Photo
Photo 25-3
Photo
Photo 25-4
Photo
Photo 25-5
Photo
Photo 25-6
Photo
Photo 25-7
Photo
Photo 25-8
Photo
Photo 25-9
Photo
Photo 25-10
Photo
Photo 25-11
Photo
Photo 25-12
Photo
Photo 25-13
Photo
Photo 25-14

26) Because of the roof covering type and/or the configuration of the roof, the inspector was unable to traverse the roof and wasn't able to fully evaluate the entire roof.
Garage
Return to table of contents


27) One or more garage electric receptacles appear to have no ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate to determine if GFCI protection exists, and if not, repairs should be made so that all garage receptacles, except for one for use with a refrigerator or freezer, have GFCI protection. For example, install GFCI receptacles or circuit breaker(s) as needed.
Photo
Photo 27-1
Photo
Photo 27-2
Photo
Photo 27-3
Photo
Photo 27-4
Photo
Photo 27-5
Photo
Photo 27-6

28) The weatherstrip around one or more exterior entry doors is missing and/or deteriorated. Weatherstrip should be installed where missing and/or replaced where deteriorated, and by a qualified contractor if necessary.
Photo
Photo 28-1
 

29)

At the time of inspection the vehicle garage door(s), opener(s) and/or safety components were tested and appeared to be operational and in serviceable condition, except as noted.

Photo
Photo 29-1
Photo
Photo 29-2
Photo
Photo 29-3
Photo
Photo 29-4

30) The interior perimeter of the garage is excluded from this inspection due to lack of access from stored items.
Photo
Photo 30-1
 

Attic
Return to table of contents


31) No accessible attic spaces were found or inspected at this property.
Electric service
Return to table of contents

Limitations: The following items are not included in this inspection: generator systems, surge suppressors, inaccessible or concealed wiring; underground utilities and systems; low voltage lighting or lighting on timers or sensors. Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not determine the adequacy of grounding or bonding, does not determine if this system has an adequate capacity for the client's specific needs, nor determine if this system has any reserve capacity for additions or expansion. The inspector does not operate circuit breakers as part of the inspection, install or change light bulbs, nor determine the operability of every wall switch.
Service amperage (amps): 200
Service voltage (volts): 120/240
Location of main service switch: West
Service entrance conductor material: Copper
System ground: Copper
Main disconnect rating (amps): 200
Branch circuit wiring type: Non-metallic sheathed
32) Exposed wiring and/or bus bars exist in the main service panel due to closure covers missing (slots where circuit breakers fit through the panel cover). This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. Closure covers should be installed where missing to eliminate exposed wiring, and by a qualified electrician if necessary.
Photo
Photo 32-1
Photo
Photo 32-2
Photo
Photo 32-3
Photo
Photo 32-4
Photo
Photo 32-5
Photo
Photo 32-6

33) One or more screws are missing from the main service panel cover and should be replaced. Because energized wiring may exist behind the holes with the missing screws, recommend that a qualified, licensed electrician replace these screws, or that care be taken to ensure that the new screws do not come in contact with wiring inside the panel when they are installed. Stock screws from the panel manufacturer should be used, or their equivalent.
Photo
Photo 33-1
 

34)

At the time of inspection the main service and/or sub panel(s) appeared to be in serviceable condition, except as noted.

Photo
Photo 34-1
Photo
Photo 34-2

Water heater
Return to table of contents

Limitations: The following items are not included in this inspection: solar water heating systems; circulation systems. Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not provide an estimate of remaining life on water heaters, does not determine if water heaters are appropriately sized, or perform any evaluations that require a pilot light to be lit.
Estimated age: 2008
Type: Tank
Energy source: Natural gas
Capacity (in gallons): 75
Manufacturer: Bradford White
35) Based on the water heater's size it appears the seismic straps or struts are substandard. For example, they may allow significant movement or have an insufficient amount of strap(s). This may be a potential safety hazard since movement can cause leaks in the gas supply lines or damage wiring. Leaks may also occur in water supply pipes. A qualified contractor should evaluate and either repair existing straps or install new straps or struts as necessary and as per standard building practices. For more information, visit: http://www.documents.dgs.ca.gov/dsa/pubs/waterheaterbracing_11_30_05.pdf#search=water%20heater%20straps&view=FitH&pagemode=none
Photo
Photo 35-1
 

36) Conducive conditions A water heater does not have a catch pan and drain installed. Recommend having a qualified contractor install a catch pan and drain to prevent water damage to finished spaces below if/when the water heater develops a leak or is drained.
Photo
Photo 36-1
 

37) No drip leg is installed on the water heater gas supply line. Drip legs are intended to trap oil, scale, water condensation and/or debris from the gas supply lines before they reach and damage the water heater components. A qualified contractor should install a drip leg as per standard building practices.
Photo
Photo 37-1
 

38) A circulating pump is installed for the hot water supply. It is intended to make hot water immediately available when faucets are turned on. Timers are typically integrated with these pumps, and should be configured so water circulates only at desired times for better energy efficiency. The client(s) should familiarize themselves with the timer's operation and configure it as needed.
Photo
Photo 38-1
 

39)

At the time of inspection the water heater appeared to be functional, except as noted.

Photo
Photo 39-1
  • Manufactured: 2008
 

Heating and cooling
Return to table of contents

Limitations: The following items are not included in this inspection: humidifiers, dehumidifiers, electronic air filters; solar, coal or wood fired heat systems; thermostat or temperature control accuracy and timed functions; heating components concealed within the building structure or in inaccessible areas; underground utilities and systems; safety devices and controls (due to automatic operation). Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not provide an estimate of remaining life on heating system components, does not determine if heating systems are appropriately sized, or perform any evaluations that require a pilot light to be lit. It is beyond the scope of this inspection to determine if furnace heat exchangers are intact and free of leaks.
In addition, the following items are not included in this inspection: Cooling components concealed within the building structure or in inaccessible areas; underground utilities and systems; safety devices and controls (due to automatic operation). Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not provide an estimate of remaining life on cooling system components, does not determine if cooling systems are appropriately sized, and does not test coolant pressure. Condensation pans and drain lines may clog or leak at any time and should be monitored while in operation in the future.
Estimated age: 2003-Heater / AC-2002
Primary heating system energy source: Natural gas
Primary heat system type: Forced air
Primary A/C energy source: Electric
Primary Air conditioning type: Split system
Distribution system: Flexible ducts
Manufacturer: Bryant, Payne
Filter location: Behind return air grill
40) The last service date of this system appears to be more than one year ago, or the inspector was unable to determine the last service date. The client(s) should ask the property owner(s) when it was last serviced. If unable to determine the last service date, or if this system was serviced more than one year ago, a qualified heating and cooling contractor should inspect, clean, and service this system, and make repairs if necessary. For safety reasons, and because this system is fueled by gas or oil, this servicing should be performed annually in the future. For more information visit:
http://www.cpsc.gov/CPSCPUB/PREREL/prhtml05/05017.html
Photo
Photo 40-1
Photo
Photo 40-2
  • Manufactured in 2003 (The estimated useful life for most forced air furnaces is 15 to 20 years)

41) The estimated useful life for air conditioning compressors is 8 to 15 years. This unit appears to have exceeded this age and may need replacing at any time. Recommend budgeting for a replacement in the near future.
Photo
Photo 41-1
  • Manufactured in 2002
 

42) The outside condensing unit and/or pad located below is not securely anchored to the floor. Damage to equipment may occur as a result. A qualified heating and cooling contractor should evaluate and/or repair as necessary.
Photo
Photo 42-1
 

43) No drip leg is installed on the furnace or boiler gas supply line. Drip legs are intended to trap oil, scale, water condensation and/or debris from the gas supply lines before they reach and damage the furnace or boiler components. A qualified contractor should install a drip leg as per standard building practices.
Photo
Photo 43-1
 

44) The last service date of this system appears to be more than one year ago, or the inspector was unable to determine the last service date. The client(s) should ask the property owner(s) when it was last serviced. If unable to determine the last service date, or if this system was serviced more than one year ago, a qualified heating and cooling contractor should inspect, clean, and service this system, and make repairs if necessary. This servicing should be performed annually in the future.
Photo
Photo 44-1
 

45)

At the time of inspection the heating and/or cooling systems were tested and appeared to be functional, except as noted.

Photo
Photo 45-1
  • Heating temperature at the time of inspection
Photo
Photo 45-2
  • Cooling temperature at the time of inspection

Plumbing and laundry
Return to table of contents

Limitations: The following items are not included in this inspection: private wells and sewage disposal systems; main, side and lateral sewer lines; gray water systems; pressure boosting systems; incinerating or composting toilets; fire suppression sprinkler systems; water softeners, conditioners or filtering systems; plumbing components concealed within the foundation or building structure, or in inaccessible areas such as below tubs; underground utilities and systems; overflow drains for tubs and sinks; backflow prevention devices. Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not operate water supply or shut-off valves due to the possibility of valves leaking or breaking when operated, does not determine the adequacy of washing machine drain lines, washing machine catch pan drain lines, or clothes dryer exhaust ducts. The inspector does not test for lead in the water supply, the water pipes or solder, does not determine if plumbing and fuel lines are adequately sized, and does not determining the existence or condition of underground or above-ground fuel tanks.
Water pressure (psi): 75psi
Location of main water shut-off valve: West
Location of main water meter: North
Location of main fuel shut-off: West
Water service: Public
Service pipe material: Galvanized steel
Supply pipe material: Copper
Vent pipe material: Galvanized steel
Drain pipe material: Galvanized steel
Waste pipe material: Galvanized steel
46)
Photo
Photo 46-1
  • Water pressure (psi): 75psi
Photo
Photo 46-2
  • Location of main water shut-off valve: West
Photo
Photo 46-3
  • Location of main fuel shut-off: West
Photo
Photo 46-4
  • Location of main water meter: North

Crawl space
Return to table of contents

Inspection method: Traversed
Insulation material underneath floor above: Fiberglass roll or batt
Pier or support post material: Wood, Concrete, Masonry
Beam material: Solid wood
Floor structure above: Solid wood joists
Vapor barrier present: No
47) Conducive conditions The crawl space ventilation appeared substandard, due to the elevated levels of moisture observed on the crawl space soil at the time of inspection. This is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects and organisms due to the likelihood of water evaporating into the structure from the soil. A qualified contractor specializing in crawl spaces should evaluate and install a vapor barrier and/or a dehumidification system if necessary.

For more information, visit: https://www.google.com/search?sourceid=navclient&aq=&oq=crawlspace+moisure&ie=UTF-8&rlz=1T4GGLS_enUS542US542&q=crawl+space+moisture+control&gs_l=hp..1.0l4.0.0.0.9233...........0.&pbx=1

Standard building practices for the vapor barrier require the following:
Photo
Photo 47-1
Photo
Photo 47-2
Photo
Photo 47-3
Photo
Photo 47-4
Photo
Photo 47-5
Photo
Photo 47-6

48) One or more masonry blocks supporting one or more areas of the patio are appear to be substandardly installed where the holes should be facing vertically as opposed to horizontally. Recommend having a qualified contractor evaluate and/or repair as necessary.
Photo
Photo 48-1
 

49) Insulation under the floor in the crawlspace is damaged, deteriorated, or has fallen down. A qualified contractor should make repairs as necessary to restore the insulation to its original rating.
Photo
Photo 49-1
Photo
Photo 49-2
Photo
Photo 49-3
Photo
Photo 49-4
Photo
Photo 49-5
Photo
Photo 49-6
Photo
Photo 49-7
Photo
Photo 49-8
Photo
Photo 49-9
 

50) Some crawl space areas were inaccessible due to low height (less than 18 inches), ductwork or pipes blocking, standing water, and/or stored items. These areas are excluded from this inspection.
Kitchen
Return to table of contents

Limitations: The following items are not included in this inspection: free-standing or portable appliances such as dishwashers, trash compactors, refrigerators, freezers, ice makers; specialty appliances such as hot water dispensers, water filters and trash compactors; appliance timers, clocks, cook functions, self and/or continuous cleaning operations, thermostat or temperature control accuracy, and lights. Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not provide an estimate of the remaining life of appliances, and does not determine the adequacy of operation of appliances such as dishwashers, garbage disposals, trash compactors, ovens, broilers, etc.
51) One or more electric receptacles that serve countertop surfaces within six feet of a sink appear to have no ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate to determine if GFCI protection exists, and if not, repairs should be made so that all receptacles that serve countertop surfaces within six feet of sinks have GFCI protection. For example, install GFCI receptacles or circuit breaker(s) as needed.
Photo
Photo 51-1
Photo
Photo 51-2

52) The oven light is inoperable. Recommend replacing bulb or having repairs made if necessary by a qualified appliance technician.
Photo
Photo 52-1
 

53)

At the time of inspection the kitchen appliances, flooring, countertops and cabinets pictured below were evaluated and appeared to be in serviceable condition, except as noted.

Photo
Photo 53-1
Photo
Photo 53-2
Photo
Photo 53-3
Photo
Photo 53-4
Photo
Photo 53-5
Photo
Photo 53-6
Photo
Photo 53-7
Photo
Photo 53-8
Photo
Photo 53-9
Photo
Photo 53-10
Photo
Photo 53-11
 

Bathrooms
Return to table of contents

Limitations: The following items are not included in this inspection: overflow drains for tubs and sinks; bidets, heated towel racks, saunas, steam generators, clothes washers, clothes dryers. Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. The inspector does not operate water supply or shut-off valves for sinks, toilets, bidets, clothes washers, etc. due to the possibility of valves leaking or breaking when operated. The inspector does not determine if shower pans or tub and shower enclosures are water tight, or determine the completeness or operability of any gas piping to laundry appliances.
54) One or more electric receptacles that serve countertop surfaces within six feet of a sink appear to have no ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate to determine if GFCI protection exists, and if not, repairs should be made so that all receptacles that serve countertop surfaces within six feet of sinks have GFCI protection. For example, install GFCI receptacles or circuit breaker(s) as needed.

Downstairs bathroom

Photo
Photo 54-1
 

55) Cover plate(s) are missing or loose from one or more electric boxes, such as for receptacles, switches and/or junction boxes. They are intended to contain fire and prevent electric shock from exposed wires. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of fire and shock. Cover plates should be installed where missing or repaired where loose.
Photo
Photo 55-1
Photo
Photo 55-2

56) Conducive conditions One or more sink drains have an active leak. For example, at pipe fittings and/or junctions between pipe and sink. A qualified plumber should evaluate and repair as necessary.

Downstairs bathroom

Photo
Photo 56-1
Photo
Photo 56-2

57) Conducive conditions One or more toilets are loose. A qualified contractor should remove the toilet(s) for further evaluation and repairs if necessary. A new wax ring should be installed and toilet(s) should be securely anchored to the floor to prevent movement and leaking.
Photo
Photo 57-1
Photo
Photo 57-2

58) One or more sink stopper mechanisms are missing, or need adjustment or repair. Stopper mechanisms should be installed where missing and/or repairs should be made so sink stoppers open and close easily.
Photo
Photo 58-1

Downstairs bathroom

 

59) One or more light fixtures appear to be inoperable. Recommend further evaluation by replacing bulb(s) and/or consulting with the property owner(s). Repairs or replacement of the light fixture(s) by a qualified electrician may be necessary.

Master bathroom

Photo
Photo 59-1
 

60)

At the time of inspection the bathroom fixtures, flooring, countertops and cabinets pictured below were evaluated and appeared to be in serviceable condition, except as noted.

Photo
Photo 60-1
Photo
Photo 60-2
Photo
Photo 60-3
Photo
Photo 60-4
Photo
Photo 60-5
Photo
Photo 60-6
Photo
Photo 60-7
Photo
Photo 60-8
Photo
Photo 60-9
Photo
Photo 60-10
Photo
Photo 60-11
Photo
Photo 60-12

Interior rooms
Return to table of contents

Limitations: The following items are not included in this inspection: security, intercom and sound systems; communications wiring; central vacuum systems; elevators and stair lifts; sources of obnoxious odors; cosmetic deficiencies due to normal wear and tear in wall, floor and ceiling surfaces and coverings, or in equipment; deficiencies relating to interior decorating; low voltage and gas lighting systems. Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not evaluate any areas or items which require moving stored items, furnishings, debris, equipment, floor coverings, insulation or similar materials. The inspector does not test for asbestos, lead, radon, mold, hazardous waste, urea formaldehyde urethane, or any other toxic substance. Some items such as window operability are tested on a sampled basis. The client should be aware that paint may obscure wall and ceiling defects, floor coverings may obscure floor defects, and furnishings may obscure wall, floor and floor covering defects. If furnishings were present during the inspection, recommend a full evaluation of walls, floors and ceilings that were previously obscured when possible. Determining the cause of odors is not within the scope of this inspection.
61) An insufficient number of smoke alarms are installed. Additional smoke alarms should be installed as necessary so a functioning one exists in each hallway leading to bedrooms, and in each bedroom. For more information, visit http://www.cpsc.gov/cpscpub/pubs/5077.html

Downstairs


62) Screen(s) in one or more windows are missing. The client(s) should ask the property owner(s) about this. Screens are often removed for window cleaning and they may be stored somewhere. If not, then recommend installing screens where missing.
Photo
Photo 62-1
 

63) One or more doors will not latch. Repairs should be made as necessary, and by a qualified contractor if necessary.
Photo
Photo 63-1
Photo
Photo 63-2

64) One or more locksets are damaged and/or deteriorated. Locksets should be replaced as necessary.
Photo
Photo 64-1
Photo
Photo 64-2

65) Carpeting in one or more rooms is soiled and/or stained. Recommend having carpeting professionally cleaned as necessary.
Photo
Photo 65-1
Photo
Photo 65-2
Photo
Photo 65-3
 

66) One or more light fixtures appear to be inoperable. Recommend further evaluation by replacing bulb(s) and/or consulting with the property owner(s). Repairs or replacement of the light fixture(s) by a qualified electrician may be necessary.
Photo
Photo 66-1
Photo
Photo 66-2
  • Kitchen
Photo
Photo 66-3
  • Kitchen
Photo
Photo 66-4
  • Under staircase
Photo
Photo 66-5
  • Next to the garage-house door
 

1.1. A Home Inspection is a non-invasive, visual examination of a residential dwelling, performed for a fee, which is designed to identify observed material defects within specific components of said dwelling. Components may include any combination of mechanical, structural, electrical, plumbing, or other essential systems or portions of the home, as identified and agreed to by the Client and Inspector, prior to the inspection process.

I. A home inspection is intended to assist in evaluation of the overall condition of the dwelling. The inspection is based on observation of the visible and apparent condition of the structure and its components on the date of the inspection, and not the prediction of future conditions.

II. A home inspection will not reveal every concern that exists or ever could exist, but only those material defects observed on the day of the inspection.

III. A home inspection can include a survey and/or analysis of energy flows and usage in a residential property if the client requests it.
1.2. A Material Defect is a condition of a residential real property, or any portion of it, that would have a significant, adverse impact on the value of the real property, or that involves an unreasonable risk to people on the property. The fact that a structural element, system or subsystem is near, at or beyond the end of the normal useful life of such a structural element, system or subsystem is not by itself a material defect.

1.3. An Inspection Report shall describe and identify, in written format, the inspected systems, structures, and components of the dwelling, and shall identify material defects observed. Inspection reports may contain recommendations regarding conditions reported or recommendations for correction, monitoring or further evaluation by professionals, but this is not required.

This inspection was performed in accordance with the current Standards of Practice and Code of Ethics of the International Association of Certified Home Inspectors (InterNACHI). The Standards contain certain and very important limitations, exceptions, and exclusions to the inspection. A complete copy of the STANDARDS OF PRACTICE we adhere to can be found at the following link: http://www.nachi.org/sop.htm