View as PDF

View summary

Logo

CM Home Inspections

P.O. Box 426 
Tualatin, OR 97062
Inspector: Joe Mahon
CCB 217212
OCHI 2086

Property Inspection Report

Client(s):  Phanikiran Vabbina
Property address:  18230 SW Monte Verdi Blvd
Beaverton, OR 97007
Inspection date:  Sunday, December 1, 2019

This report published on Sunday, December 1, 2019 10:50:00 PM PST

This report is the exclusive property of this inspection company and the client(s) listed in the report title. Use of this report by any unauthorized persons is prohibited.

How to Read this Report
This report is organized by the property's functional areas.  Within each functional area, descriptive information is listed first and is shown in bold type.  Items of concern follow descriptive information. Concerns are shown and sorted according to these types:
Concern typeSafetyPoses a safety hazard
Concern typeMajor DefectCorrection likely involves a significant expense
Concern typeRepair/ReplaceRecommend repairing or replacing
Concern typeRepair/MaintainRecommend repair and/or maintenance
Concern typeMinor DefectCorrection likely involves only a minor expense
Concern typeMaintainRecommend ongoing maintenance
Concern typeEvaluateRecommend evaluation by a specialist
Concern typeMonitorRecommend monitoring in the future
Concern typeCommentFor your information

Click here for a glossary of building construction terms.Contact your inspector If there are terms that you do not understand, or visit the glossary of construction terms at https://www.reporthost.com/glossary.asp

Table of Contents

General Information
Grounds
Exterior and Foundation
Roof
Attic and Roof Structure
Garage or Carport
Electric
Plumbing / Fuel Systems
Water Heater
Heating, Ventilation and Air Condition (HVAC)
Fireplaces, Stoves, Chimneys and Flues
Kitchen
Bathrooms, Laundry and Sinks
Interior, Doors and Windows
Wood Destroying Organism Findings

View summary

General Information
Table of contents
Report number: S19120101
Time started: 1400
Present during inspection: Client, Realtor
Client present for discussion at end of inspection: Yes
Weather conditions during inspection: Dry (no rain)
Temperature during inspection: Cool
Type of building: Single family
Buildings inspected: One house
Number of residential units inspected: 1
Age of main building: 1978
Source for main building age: Municipal records or property listing
Front of building faces: North
Main entrance faces: North
Occupied: Yes
1) Structures built prior to the mid 1980s may contain lead and/or asbestos. Lead is commonly found in paint and in some plumbing components. The EPA does not recognize newer coats of paint as encapsulating older coats of lead-based paint. Asbestos is commonly found in various building materials such as insulation, siding, and/or floor and ceiling tiles. Laws were passed in 1978 to prohibit usage of lead and asbestos, but stocks of materials containing these substances remained in use for a number of years thereafter. Both lead and asbestos are known health hazards. Evaluating for the presence of lead and/or asbestos is beyond the scope of this inspection. Any mention of these materials in this report is made as a courtesy only, and meant to refer the client to a specialist. Consult with specialists as necessary, such as industrial hygienists, professional labs and/or abatement specialists for this type of evaluation. For information on lead, asbestos and other hazardous materials in homes, visit:
http://www.reporthost.com/?EPA
http://www.reporthost.com/?CPSC
http://www.reporthost.com/?CDC
2) Microbial growths were found at one or more locations in interior rooms. It is beyond the scope of this inspection to identify what substance or organism this staining is. However such staining is normally caused by excessively moist conditions, which in turn can be caused by plumbing or building envelope leaks and/or substandard ventilation. These conducive conditions should be corrected before making any attempts to remove or correct the staining. Normally affected materials such as drywall are removed, enclosed affected spaces are allowed to dry thoroughly, a mildewcide may be applied, and only then is drywall reinstalled. For evaluation and possible mitigation, consult with a qualified industrial hygienist or mold/moisture mitigation specialist. For more information, visit:
http://www.reporthost.com/?MOLDCDC
http://www.reporthost.com/?MOLDEPA
Photo
Photo 2-1 
Photo
Photo 2-2 
3) Many areas and items at this property were obscured by furniture and/or stored items. This often includes but is not limited to walls, floors, windows, inside and under cabinets, under sinks, on counter tops, in closets, behind window coverings, under rugs or carpets, and under or behind furniture. Areas around the exterior, under the structure, in the garage and in the attic may also be obscured by stored items. The inspector in general does not move personal belongings, furnishings, carpets or appliances. When furnishings, stored items or debris are present, all areas or items that are obscured, concealed or not readily accessible are excluded from the inspection. The client should be aware that when furnishings, stored items or debris are eventually moved, damage or problems that were not noted during the inspection may be found.
Limitations: Unless specifically included in the inspection, the following items and any related equipment, controls, electric systems and/or plumbing systems are excluded from this inspection: detached buildings or structures; fences and gates; retaining walls; underground drainage systems, catch basins or concealed sump pumps; swimming pools and related safety equipment, spas, hot tubs or saunas; whether deck, balcony and/or stair membranes are watertight; trees, landscaping, properties of soil, soil stability, erosion and erosion control; ponds, water features, irrigation or yard sprinkler systems; sport courts, playground, recreation or leisure equipment; areas below the exterior structures with less than 3 feet of vertical clearance; invisible fencing; sea walls, docks and boathouses; retractable awnings. Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only.
Site profile: Moderate slope
Condition of driveway: Appeared serviceable
Driveway material: Asphalt
Condition of sidewalks and/or patios: Appeared serviceable
Condition of decks, porches and/or balconies: Required repairs, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Deck, porch and/or balcony material: Wood
Condition of stairs, handrails and guardrails: Required repairs, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Exterior stair material: Wood
4) One or more decks or porches were unstable due to missing or substandard bracing, or lack of attachment to main structure. This is a safety hazard since severe movement may cause the decks or porches to collapse. A qualified contractor should repair as necessary.
Photo
Photo 4-1 
Photo
Photo 4-2 
5) Ledger boards for one or more decks, balconies or porches appeared to be attached with nails only. This method of attachment is substandard and may result in such structures separating from the main building. This is a potential safety hazard. Modern standards call for ledger boards to be installed with 1/2 inch lag screws or bolts into solid backing, and brackets such as Simpson Strong Tie DTT2 brackets and threaded rod, connecting interior and exterior joists. Recommend that a qualified contractor repair per standard building practices. For more information, visit:
http://www.reporthost.com/?LB
http://www.reporthost.com/?SD
Photo
Photo 5-1 
Photo
Photo 5-2 
6) Handrails at one or more flights of stairs were missing. This is a potential fall hazard. Handrails should be installed at stairs with four or more risers or where stairs are greater than 30 inches high. Recommend that a qualified contractor install handrails where missing and per standard building practices.
Photo
Photo 6-1 
7) One or more treads at exterior stairs were loose and/or flexed under load. This is a potential fall hazard. Recommend that a qualified person repair as necessary.
Photo
Photo 7-1 
Photo
Photo 7-2 
Photo
Photo 7-3 
8) Handrails at one or more flights of stairs were loose. This is a safety hazard. Recommend that a qualified person repair as necessary.
Photo
Photo 8-1 
Photo
Photo 8-2 
9) Guardrails at one or more locations with drop-offs higher than 30 inches were loose and/or wobbly, and pose a fall hazard. Recommend that a qualified person repair guardrails as necessary.
Photo
Photo 9-1 
Photo
Photo 9-2 
10) Fungal rot was found in support posts at one or more decks or porches. Recommend that a qualified contractor evaluate and repair as necessary. All rotten wood should be replaced.
Photo
Photo 10-1 
11) Fasteners for the deck, porch or balcony support post brackets were missing and/or substandard. Approved fasteners such as Teco nails should be installed in every nail hole in such hardware. Recommend that a qualified person install approved fasteners where necessary.
Photo
Photo 11-1 
Photo
Photo 11-2 
12) Deck structure was leaning significantly. Recommend further evaluation and any necessary repairs by a qualified person
Photo
Photo 12-1 
Photo
Photo 12-2 
Photo
Photo 12-3 
Photo
Photo 12-4 
13) Retaining wall was rotting and or failing. Recommend further evaluation and any necessary repairs by a qualified person
Photo
Photo 13-1 
Photo
Photo 13-2 
14) Wooden deck or porch surfaces were overdue for normal maintenance. Recommend that a qualified person clean and preserve as necessary. Where decks have been coated with a finish such as opaque stains or paint, it may be too difficult to strip the finish and apply anything but paint or opaque stain. Where transparent stain or penetrating oil has been applied in the past, recommend that a penetrating oil be used. For more information, visit:
http://www.reporthost.com/?PENOIL
http://www.reporthost.com/?DKMAIN
Photo
Photo 14-1 
Photo
Photo 14-2 
15) The soil or grading sloped down towards building perimeters in one or more areas. This can result in water accumulating around building foundations or underneath buildings. At a minimum, monitor these areas, and areas under the structure in the future for accumulated water. If water does accumulate, recommend grading soil so it slopes down and away from buildings with a slope of at least 1 inch per horizontal foot for at least 6 feet out from buildings.
Photo
Photo 15-1 
16) This property was accessed by a driveway or private road shared with nearby properties. Shared driveways or private roads are excluded from this inspection. Comments in this report related to them are made as a courtesy only and are not meant to be a substitute for a evaluation by a specialist if repairs are needed. Recommend that the client review the recorded agreements regarding the driveway, the deeds of the property owners involved, and easements permitting access to, use of, and maintenance of the driveway.
Photo
Photo 16-1 
Exterior and Foundation
Table of contents
Limitations: The inspector performs a visual inspection of accessible components or systems at the exterior. Items excluded from this inspection include below-grade foundation walls and footings; foundations, exterior surfaces or components obscured by vegetation, stored items or debris; wall structures obscured by coverings such as siding or trim. Some items such as siding, trim, soffits, vents and windows are often high off the ground, and may be viewed using binoculars from the ground or from a ladder. This may limit a full evaluation. Regarding foundations, some amount of cracking is normal in concrete slabs and foundation walls due to shrinkage and drying. Note that the inspector does not determine the adequacy of seismic reinforcement.
Wall inspection method: Viewed from ground
Condition of wall exterior covering: Required repairs, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Apparent wall structure: Wood frame
Wall covering: Wood
Condition of foundation and footings: Appeared serviceable
Apparent foundation type: Concrete slab on grade
17) A significant amount of the siding was warped and/or swelling. This could be due to water entering behind the siding causing it to swell. All or part of the sheathing may be damaged as a result. Recommend further evaluation and any necessary repairs by a qualified person
Photo
Photo 17-1 
Photo
Photo 17-2 
18) Fungal rot was found at one or more sections of siding or trim. Conducive conditions for rot should be corrected (e.g. wood-soil contact, reverse perimeter slope). Recommend that a qualified contractor repair as necessary. All rotten wood should be replaced.
Photo
Photo 18-1 
Photo
Photo 18-2 
Photo
Photo 18-3 
19) One or more sections of horizontal trim boards had no "Z" flashing installed above them where they met siding. "Z" flashing should be installed above these boards to reduce the chance of leaks between the trim and siding. Without this flashing, caulk and paint must be diligently maintained, or water can enter wall cavities and cause rot and possible structural damage. Recommend that a qualified contractor install flashing above horizontal trim boards where missing and per standard building practices. Note that when trim or siding is removed to install flashing, damaged wood may be found and additional repairs may be needed.
Photo
Photo 19-1 
Photo
Photo 19-2 
Photo
Photo 19-3 
20) Many sections of siding and/or trim were deteriorated, split, warped, damaged and/or substandard. Recommend that a qualified person repair, replace or install siding or trim as necessary.
Photo
Photo 20-1 
Photo
Photo 20-2 
Photo
Photo 20-3 
Photo
Photo 20-4 
Photo
Photo 20-5 
Photo
Photo 20-6 
Photo
Photo 20-7 
Photo
Photo 20-8 
21) Fence(s) were attached to or in contact with the building exterior. Such attachments can serve as a pathway for wood-destroying insects and can retain moisture against the exterior after it rains. This is a conducive condition for wood-destroying organisms. Recommend that a qualified person repair as necessary so there is at least a 2-inch gap between fences and building exteriors.
Photo
Photo 21-1 
22) Some nail heads at the wood siding were protruding from the wood, or had been nailed in so as to break the surface of the siding, and caulk was missing. Most manufacturers of wood siding specify that nail heads should be flush with the surface, and that the surface of the siding should not be broken. If broken, then caulk should be applied to the nail heads to prevent water penetration and subsequent deterioration of the siding. Recommend that a qualified person repair per the siding manufacturer's specifications.
Photo
Photo 22-1 
Photo
Photo 22-2 
23) One or more holes or gaps were found in siding or trim. Vermin, insects or water may enter the structure. Recommend that a qualified person repair as necessary.
Photo
Photo 23-1 
24) Vegetation such as trees, shrubs and/or vines was in contact with or close to the building exterior. Vegetation can serve as a pathway for wood-destroying insects and can retain moisture against the exterior after it rains. This is a conducive condition for wood-destroying organisms. Recommend pruning, moving or removing vegetation as necessary to maintain at least 6 inches of space between it and the building exterior. A 1-foot clearance is better.
Photo
Photo 24-1 
25) Trees were in contact with or were close to the building at one or more locations. Damage to the building can occur, especially during high winds, or may have already occurred (see other comments in this report). Recommend that a qualified tree service contractor or certified arborist remove trees as necessary to prevent damage to the building exterior.
Photo
Photo 25-1 
26) The paint or stain finish in some areas was failing (e.g. peeling, faded, worn, thinning). Siding and trim with a failing finish can be damaged by moisture. Recommend that a qualified contractor prep (e.g. clean, scrape, sand, prime, caulk) and repaint or restain the building exterior where necessary and per standard building practices. Any repairs needed to the siding or trim should be made prior to this.
Photo
Photo 26-1 
27) Some areas of the exterior paint or stain finish were incomplete and/or substandard (e.g. primed only, too few coats). Recommend that a qualified contractor prep (e.g. clean, scrape, sand, prime, caulk) and repaint or restain the exterior where necessary and per standard building practices. Any repairs needed to the siding or trim should be made prior to this.
Photo
Photo 27-1 
Photo
Photo 27-2 
Photo
Photo 27-3 
Photo
Photo 27-4 
Limitations: The following items or areas are not included in this inspection: areas that could not be traversed or viewed clearly due to lack of access; solar roofing components. Any comments made regarding these items are made as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not provide an estimate of remaining life on the roof surface material, nor guarantee that leaks have not occurred in the roof surface, skylights or roof penetrations in the past. Regarding roof leaks, only active leaks, visible evidence of possible sources of leaks, and evidence of past leaks observed during the inspection are reported on as part of this inspection. The inspector does not guarantee or warrant that leaks will not occur in the future. Complete access to all roof and attic spaces during all seasons and during prolonged periods of all types of weather conditions (e.g. high wind and rain, melting snow) would be needed to do so. Occupants should monitor the condition of roofing materials in the future. For older roofs, recommend that a professional inspect the roof surface, flashings, appurtenances, etc. annually and maintain/repair as might be required. If needed, the roofer should enter attic space(s). Regarding the roof drainage system, unless the inspection was conducted during and after prolonged periods of heavy rain, the inspector was unable to determine if gutters, downspouts and extensions perform adequately or are leak-free.
Roof inspection method: Traversed
Condition of roof surface material: Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Roof surface material: Asphalt or fiberglass composition shingles
Roof type: Gable
Apparent number of layers of roof surface material: One
Condition of exposed flashings: Appeared serviceable
Condition of gutters, downspouts and extensions: Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
28) One or more gutters and/or downspouts were corroded and/or Substandard. Rainwater can come in contact with the building exterior or accumulate around the building foundation as a result. This is a conducive condition for wood-destroying organisms. Recommend that a qualified person repair as necessary.
Photo
Photo 28-1 
Photo
Photo 28-2 
29) Significant amounts of debris such as leaves, needles, seeds, etc. have accumulated on the roof surface. Water may not flow easily off the roof, and can enter gaps in the roof surface. Leaks can occur as a result. This is a conducive condition for wood-destroying organisms. Recommend cleaning debris from the roof surface now and as necessary in the future.
Photo
Photo 29-1 
30) Moss was growing on the roof. As a result, shingles can lift or be damaged. Leaks can result and/or the roof surface can fail prematurely. Efforts should be made to kill the moss during its growing season (wet months). Typically, zinc or phosphate-based chemicals are used for this and must be applied periodically. For information on various moss treatment products and their pros and cons, visit:
http://www.reporthost.com/?MOSS
Photo
Photo 30-1 
Photo
Photo 30-2 
31) Nail heads were exposed at one or more shingles. More than just a few exposed nail heads may indicate a substandard roof installation. Recommend applying an approved sealant over exposed nail heads now and as necessary in the future to prevent leaks.
Photo
Photo 31-1 
Photo
Photo 31-2 
Attic and Roof Structure
Table of contents
Limitations: The following items or areas are not included in this inspection: areas that could not be traversed or viewed clearly due to lack of access; areas and components obscured by insulation. Any comments made regarding these items are made as a courtesy only. The inspector does not determine the adequacy of the attic ventilation system. Complete access to all roof and attic spaces during all seasons and during prolonged periods of all types of weather conditions (e.g. high/low temperatures, high/low humidity, high wind and rain, melting snow) would be needed to do so. The inspector is not a licensed engineer and does not determine the adequacy of roof structure components such as trusses, rafters or ceiling beams, or their spacing or sizing.
Attic inspection method: Viewed from hatch(es)
Condition of roof structure: Appeared serviceable
Roof structure type: Trusses
Ceiling structure: Trusses
Condition of insulation in attic (ceiling, skylight chase, etc.): Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Ceiling insulation material: Fiberglass loose fill
Approximate attic insulation R value (may vary in areas): R-11
Vermiculite insulation present: None visible
Vapor retarder: None visible
Condition of roof ventilation: Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Roof ventilation type: Box vents (roof jacks), Open soffit vents
32) The ceiling insulation installed in the attic was substandard and appeared to have an R rating that's significantly less than current standards (R-38). Heating and cooling costs will likely be higher due to poor energy efficiency. Recommend that a qualified contractor install insulation for better energy efficiency and per standard building practices.
Photo
Photo 32-1 
Photo
Photo 32-2 
33) One or more exhaust fan ducts terminated at a soffit vent rather than at a dedicated hood or cap. Soffit vents are designed to allow cool air to be drawn into the attic, and to prevent excess moisture from accumulating in the attic. When such ducts are routed to terminate at soffit vents, the moist exhaust air may flow back into the attic and the soffit venting will be reduced. Recommend that a qualified contractor repair per standard building practices. For example, by installing approved hoods or caps at the roof surface or exterior wall(s), and permanently securing exhaust ducts to them.
Photo
Photo 33-1 
Garage or Carport
Table of contents
Limitations: The inspector cannot reasonably determine the integrity of all elements of limited fire resistance at residential construction or verify firewall ratings at multi unit construction. Requirements for ventilation in garages vary between municipalities.
Type: Attached
Condition of door between garage and house: Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Condition of garage vehicle door(s): Appeared serviceable
Type of garage vehicle door: Sectional
Number of vehicle doors: 1
Condition of automatic opener(s): Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Mechanical auto-reverse operable (reverses when meeting reasonable resistance during closing): Yes
Condition of garage floor: Appeared serviceable
Condition of garage interior: Appeared serviceable
34) The door between the garage and the house has been modified with a pet door, and is no longer fire-resistant. This is a potential safety hazard. House to garage doors, to prevent fire and fumes from spreading from the garage into interior living space, should be constructed of fire-resistant materials. Doors, generally considered to be suitable for the purpose, are solid core wood, steel, honeycomb steel or a door that has been factory labeled as fire rated. Recommend that a qualified contractor replace or repair the door and, at that time, make any other corrections that might be required to provide suitable fire resistance between the garage and the dwelling per standard building practices. For more information, visit:
http://www.reporthost.com/?AGFR
Photo
Photo 34-1 
35) One or more garage vehicle doors had an automatic opener installed, and the manual lock mechanism on the door hadn't been permanently disabled. The automatic opener can be damaged, or injury can occur if the automatic door opener is operated with the manual lock engaged. A qualified person should disable or remove the lock mechanism per standard building practices.
Photo
Photo 35-1 
36) One or more automatic vehicle door openers were inoperable. Recommend that a qualified contractor evaluate and repair or replace opener(s) as necessary.
Photo
Photo 36-1 
37) Minor cracks were found in the concrete slab floor. These are common and appeared to be only a cosmetic issue.
Photo
Photo 37-1 
Limitations: The following items are not included in this inspection: generator systems, transfer switches, surge suppressors, inaccessible or concealed wiring; underground utilities and systems; low-voltage lighting or lighting on timers or sensors. Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not determine the adequacy of grounding or bonding, if this system has an adequate capacity for the client's specific or anticipated needs, or if this system has any reserve capacity for additions or expansion. The inspector does not operate circuit breakers as part of the inspection, and does not install or change light bulbs. The inspector does not evaluate every wall switch or receptacle, but instead tests a representative number of them per various standards of practice. When furnishings, stored items or child-protective caps are present some receptacles are usually inaccessible and are not tested; these are excluded from this inspection. Receptacles that are not of standard 110 volt configuration, including 240-volt dryer receptacles, are not tested and are excluded. The functionality of, power source for and placement of smoke and carbon monoxide alarms is not determined as part of this inspection. Upon taking occupancy, proper operating and placement of smoke and carbon monoxide alarms should be verified and batteries should be changed. These devices have a limited lifespan and should be replaced every 10 years. The inspector attempts to locate and evaluate all main and sub-panels. However, panels are often concealed. If panels are found after the inspection, a qualified electrician should evaluate and repair if necessary. The inspector attempts to determine the overall electrical service size, but such estimates are not guaranteed because the overall capacity may be diminished by lesser-rated components in the system. Any repairs recommended should be made by a licensed electrician.
Electric service condition: Appeared serviceable
Primary service type: Underground
Number of service conductors: 3
Service voltage (volts): 120-240
Estimated service amperage: 200
Primary service overload protection type: Circuit breakers
Service entrance conductor material: Stranded aluminum
Main disconnect rating (amps): Not applicable, no single main disconnect
System ground: Cold water supply pipes
Condition of main service panel: Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Location of main service panel #A: Garage
Location of main disconnect: No single main disconnect, use all breakers in main service panel
Condition of branch circuit wiring: Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Branch circuit wiring type: non-metallic sheathed, armor clad (AC), metal clad (MC) or flexible metal conduit (FMC)
Solid strand aluminum branch circuit wiring present: None visible
Ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection present: Yes
Arc fault circuit interrupter (AFCI) protection present: No
38) Panel(s) #A were manufactured by the Federal Pacific Electric company and used "Stab-Lok" circuit breakers. There is significant evidence that both double and single pole versions of these circuit breakers fail by not tripping when they are supposed to. However, in 2011 the Consumer Products Safety Commission (CPSC) closed an investigation into this product because they did not have enough data to establish that the circuit breakers pose a serious risk of injury to consumers. Regardless, and due to other evidence of safety issues, recommend that a qualified electrician carefully evaluate all Federal Pacific panels and make repairs as necessary. Consider replacing Federal Pacific panels with modern panels that offer more flexibility for new, safer protective technologies like ground fault circuit interrupters (GFCls) and arc fault circuit interrupters (AFCls). For more information, visit:
http://www.reporthost.com/?FP1
http://www.reporthost.com/?FP2
http://www.reporthost.com/?FP3
Photo
Photo 38-1 
39) One or more ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) devices protecting receptacles at the kitchen, wet bar and/or exterior wouldn't trip when tested. This is a potential shock hazard. Recommend that a qualified electrician evaluate and repair as necessary.
Photo
Photo 39-1 
Photo
Photo 39-2 
Photo
Photo 39-3 
40) One or more circuit breakers in panel(s) #A were "double tapped," where two or more wires were installed in the breaker's lug. Most breakers are designed for only one wire to be connected. This is a safety hazard since the lug bolt can tighten securely against one wire but leave other(s) loose. Arcing, sparks and fires can result. Recommend that a qualified electrician repair as necessary. For more information, visit:
http://www.reporthost.com/?DBLTAP
Photo
Photo 40-1 
41) Non-metallic sheathed wiring was installed at one or more locations, and was subject to damage such as on easily accessible wall or ceiling surfaces. The insulation can be damaged by objects coming in contact with it, resulting in exposed, energized wires. Also, copper conductors can break after being repeatedly moved or bent. This is a potential shock or fire hazard. Recommend that a qualified electrician repair per standard building practices. For example, by installing protective conduit or re-routing wires through walls or ceilings.
Photo
Photo 41-1 
42) Non-metallic sheathed wiring in the attic was routed on surfaces within 6 feet of one or more access hatches or doors, and was subject to damage. Wiring can be damaged when hatches are lifted and set aside, when stored items are moved into or out of the attic, etc. This is a potential shock and/or fire hazard. Recommend that a qualified electrician repair per standard building practices.
Photo
Photo 42-1 
43) One or more receptacles were worn. Worn receptacles can work intermittently or when the plug is wiggled. They can overheat or arc and spark due to loose connections. This is a potential fire hazard. Recommend that a qualified electrician replace such receptacles as necessary.
Photo
Photo 43-1 
44) One or more cover plates installed outside were not rated for exterior use. This is a potential shock and fire hazard. Recommend that a qualified electrician repair per standard building practices.
Photo
Photo 44-1 
45) One or more sections of outdoor wiring were exposed and subject to damage. This is a potential shock hazard. Recommend that a qualified electrician repair per standard building practices. For example, by installing conduit, re-routing wires or replacing wiring.
Photo
Photo 45-1 
Photo
Photo 45-2 
Photo
Photo 45-3 
Photo
Photo 45-4 
46) One or more cover plates for switches, receptacles or junction boxes were missing or broken. These plates are intended to contain fire and prevent electric shock from occurring due to exposed wires. Recommend that a qualified person install cover plates where necessary.
Photo
Photo 46-1 
47) One or more exterior receptacle covers were broken or damaged. This is a potential shock hazard. Recommend that a qualified person replace covers where necessary.
Photo
Photo 47-1 
48) Branch circuit wiring installed in buildings built prior to the mid 1980s is typically rated for a maximum temperature of only 60 degrees Celsius. This includes non-metallic sheathed (Romex) wiring, and both BX and AC metal-clad flexible wiring. Knob and tube wiring, typically installed in homes built prior to 1950, may be rated for even lower maximum temperatures. Newer electric fixtures including lighting and fans typically require wiring rated for 90 degrees Celsius. Connecting newer fixtures to older, 60-degree-rated wiring is a potential fire hazard. Repairs for such conditions may involve replacing the last few feet of wiring to newer fixtures with new 90-degree-rated wire, and installing a junction box to join the old and new wiring.

It is beyond the scope of this inspection to determine if such incompatible components are installed, or to determine the extent to which they're installed. Based on the age of this building, the client should be aware of this safety hazard, both for existing fixtures and when planning to upgrade with newer fixtures. Consult with a qualified electrician for repairs as necessary.
49) One or more wall switches were broken or damaged. Recommend that a qualified electrician replace wall switches as necessary.
Photo
Photo 49-1 
50) One or more light fixtures were inoperable (didn't turn on when nearby switches were operated). Recommend further evaluation by replacing bulbs and/or consulting with the property owner. If replacing bulbs doesn't work and/or no other switch(es) can be found, then recommend that a qualified electrician evaluate and repair or replace light fixtures as necessary.
Photo
Photo 50-1 
Plumbing / Fuel Systems
Table of contents
Limitations: The following items are not included in this inspection: private/shared wells and related equipment; private sewage disposal systems; hot tubs or spas; main, side and lateral sewer lines; gray water systems; pressure boosting systems; trap primers; incinerating or composting toilets; fire suppression systems; water softeners, conditioners or filtering systems; plumbing components concealed within the foundation or building structure, or in inaccessible areas such as below tubs; underground utilities and systems; overflow drains for tubs and sinks; backflow prevention devices. Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not operate water supply or shut-off valves due to the possibility of valves leaking or breaking when operated. The inspector does not test for lead in the water supply, the water pipes or solder, does not determine if plumbing and fuel lines are adequately sized, and does not determine the existence or condition of underground or above-ground fuel tanks.
Condition of service and main line: Appeared serviceable
Water service: Public
Water pressure (psi): 63
Location of main water shut-off: Basement
Condition of supply lines: Appeared serviceable
Supply pipe material: Copper
Condition of drain pipes: Appeared serviceable
Drain pipe material: Plastic
Waste pipe material: Plastic
Vent pipe condition: Appeared serviceable
Vent pipe material: Plastic
Sump pump installed: None visible
Sewage ejector pump installed: None visible
Type of irrigation system supply source: Public
Condition of fuel system: Appeared serviceable
Location of main fuel shut-off valve: At gas meter
Water Heater
Table of contents
Limitations: Evaluation of and determining the adequacy or completeness of the following items are not included in this inspection: water recirculation pumps; solar water heating systems; Energy Smart or energy saver controls; catch pan drains. Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not provide an estimate of remaining life on water heaters, does not determine if water heaters are appropriately sized, or perform any evaluations that require a pilot light to be lit or a shut-off valve to be operated.
Condition of water heater: Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below), Near, at or beyond service life
Type: Tank
Energy source: Natural gas
Estimated age: 2009
Capacity (in gallons): 50
Temperature-pressure relief valve installed: Yes
Hot water temperature tested: Yes
Water temperature (degrees Fahrenheit): 130
Condition of burners: Appeared serviceable
Condition of venting system: Appeared serviceable
51) The water heater did not have earthquake straps installed. This is a potential safety hazard in the event of an earthquake due to the risk of the water heater tipping over, gas lines breaking if it's gas-fired, or electric wiring being damaged if powered by electricity. Leaks may also occur in water-supply pipes or fittings. Recommend that a qualified person install earthquake straps per standard building practices.
Photo
Photo 51-1 
52) The hot water temperature was greater than 120 degrees Fahrenheit. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of scalding. The thermostat should be adjusted so the water temperature doesn't exceed 120 degrees. If the water heater is powered by electricity, a qualified person should perform the adjustment, since covers that expose energized equipment normally need to be removed. For more information on scalding dangers, visit:
http://www.reporthost.com/?SCALD
Photo
Photo 52-1 
Heating, Ventilation and Air Condition (HVAC)
Table of contents
Limitations: The following items are not included in this inspection: humidifiers, dehumidifiers, electronic air filters; solar, coal or wood-fired heat systems; thermostat or temperature control accuracy and timed functions; heating components concealed within the building structure or in inaccessible areas; underground utilities and systems; safety devices and controls (due to automatic operation). Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not provide an estimate of remaining life on heating or cooling system components, does not determine if heating or cooling systems are appropriately sized, does not test coolant pressure, or perform any evaluations that require a pilot light to be lit, a shut-off valve to be operated, a circuit breaker to be turned "on" or a serviceman's or oil emergency switch to be operated. It is beyond the scope of this inspection to determine if furnace heat exchangers are intact and free of leaks. Condensation pans and drain lines may clog or leak at any time and should be monitored while in operation in the future. Where buildings contain furnishings or stored items, the inspector may not be able to verify that a heat source is present in all "liveable" rooms (e.g. bedrooms, kitchens and living/dining rooms).
General heating system type(s): Forced air, Furnace
General heating distribution type(s): Ducts and registers
Last service date of primary heat source: 2017
Source for last service date of primary heat source: Label
Condition of forced air heating/(cooling) system: Appeared serviceable
Forced air heating system fuel type: Natural gas
Estimated age of forced air furnace: 2017
Location of forced air furnace: Utility room
Forced air system capacity in BTUs or kilowatts: 80000
Condition of furnace filters: Required replacement
Location for forced air filter(s): At base of air handler
Condition of forced air ducts and registers: Appeared serviceable
Condition of burners: Appeared serviceable
Type of combustion air supply: Intake duct
Condition of venting system: Appeared serviceable
Condition of cooling system and/or heat pump: Near, at or beyond service life
Cooling system and/or heat pump fuel type: Electric
Type: Split system
Condition of controls: Appeared serviceable
53) The last service date of the gas or oil-fired forced air furnace appeared to be more than 1 year ago, or the inspector was unable to determine the last service date. Ask the property owner when it was last serviced. If unable to determine the last service date, or if this system was serviced more than 1 year ago, recommend that a qualified HVAC contractor inspect, clean, and service this system, and make repairs if necessary. For safety reasons, and because this system is fueled by gas or oil, this servicing should be performed annually in the future. Any needed repairs noted in this report should be brought to the attention of the HVAC contractor when it's serviced. For more information visit:
http://www.reporthost.com/?ANFURINSP
54) The estimated useful life for most heat pumps and air conditioning condensing units is 10-15 years. This unit appeared to be beyond this age and/or its useful lifespan and may need replacing or significant repairs at any time. Recommend budgeting for a replacement in the near future.
Photo
Photo 54-1 
55) Recommend that home buyers replace or clean HVAC filters upon taking occupancy depending on the type of filters installed. Regardless of the type, recommend checking filters monthly in the future and replacing or cleaning them as necessary. How frequently they need replacing or cleaning depends on the type and quality of the filter, how the system is configured (e.g. always on vs. "Auto"), and on environmental factors (e.g. pets, smoking, frequency of house cleaning, number of occupants, the season).
56) The outdoor air temperature was below 65 degrees Fahrenheit during the inspection. Air conditioning systems can be damaged if operated during such low temperatures. Because of this, the inspector was unable to operate and fully evaluate the cooling system.
Fireplaces, Stoves, Chimneys and Flues
Table of contents
Limitations: The following items are not included in this inspection: coal stoves, gas logs, chimney flues (except where visible). Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not determine the adequacy of drafting or sizing in fireplace and stove flues, and also does not determine if prefabricated or zero-clearance fireplaces are installed in accordance with the manufacturer's specifications. The inspector does not perform any evaluations that require a pilot light to be lit, and does not light fires. The inspector provides a basic visual examination of a chimney and any associated wood burning device. The National Fire Protection Association has stated that an in-depth Level 2 chimney inspection should be part of every sale or transfer of property with a wood-burning device. Such an inspection may reveal defects that are not apparent to the home inspector who is a generalist.
Condition of gas-fired fireplaces or stoves: Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Condition of chimneys and flues: Appeared serviceable
Gas-fired flue type: B-vent
57) The gas fireplace or stove was not fully evaluated because the pilot light was off or a lighting procedure was required. The inspector only operates normal controls (e.g. on/off switch or thermostat) and does not light pilot lights or operate gas shut-off valves. Recommend that the client review all documentation for such gas appliances and familiarize themselves with the lighting procedure. If necessary, a qualified specialist should assist in lighting such appliances, and make any needed repairs.
Photo
Photo 57-1 
Limitations: The following items are not included in this inspection: household appliances such as stoves, ovens, cook tops, ranges, warming ovens, griddles, broilers, dishwashers, trash compactors, refrigerators, freezers, ice makers, hot water dispensers and water filters; appliance timers, clocks, cook functions, self and/or continuous cleaning operations, thermostat or temperature control accuracy, and lights. Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not provide an estimate of the remaining life of appliances, and does not determine the adequacy of operation of appliances. The inspector does not note appliance manufacturers, models or serial numbers and does not determine if appliances are subject to recalls. Areas and components behind and obscured by appliances are inaccessible and excluded from this inspection.
Condition of counters: Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Condition of cabinets: Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Condition of sinks and related plumbing: Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Condition of under-sink food disposal: Appeared serviceable
Condition of dishwasher: Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Condition of ranges, cooktops and/or ovens: Appeared serviceable
Range, cooktop, oven type: Electric
Type of ventilation: Hood or built into microwave over range or cooktop
Condition of refrigerator: Not determined
Condition of built-in microwave oven: Appeared serviceable
58) The flow from the sink's hot and/or cold water supply was low or inoperable. Recommend that a qualified person evaluate and repair as necessary. Shut-off valves may be partially or fully closed. Note that the inspector does not operate shut-off valves. If repairs are needed, a qualified plumber should make them.
Photo
Photo 58-1 
59) The inspector was unable to determine if the dishwasher's drain line had a high loop or air gap (e.g. drain line not visible). A high loop is created by routing the drain line up to the bottom surface of the counter top above and securely fastening it to that surface. An air gap is a device that makes the drain line non-continuous. Both of these prevent waste-water backflow from entering the dishwasher, and possibly flooding out of the dishwasher if/when a siphon occurs. Some newer dishwashers have these devices built in. Recommend reviewing the dishwasher's installation instructions, consulting with the property owner and/or having a qualified contractor evaluate further to determine if a high loop and air gap are installed or needed. If not installed, and none is built into the dishwasher, then recommend that a qualified contractor install a high loop and air gap per standard building practices.
Photo
Photo 59-1 
60) Countertops and/or backsplashes were damaged or deteriorated. Recommend repairing or replacing as necessary.
Photo
Photo 60-1 
61) One or more cabinets, drawers and/or cabinet doors were deteriorated and/or loose. Recommend that a qualified person repair or replace as necessary.
Photo
Photo 61-1 
Photo
Photo 61-2 
Photo
Photo 61-3 
62) Water damage was found in shelving or cabinets below the sink. Recommend that a qualified contractor repair as necessary after any plumbing leaks have been repaired. If moisture is present then concealed areas should be dried thoroughly.
Photo
Photo 62-1 
63) Gaps, no caulk, or substandard caulking were found between countertops and backsplashes. Water may penetrate these areas and cause damage. Recommend that a qualified person repair as necessary. For example, by installing caulk.
Photo
Photo 63-1 
Photo
Photo 63-2 
Bathrooms, Laundry and Sinks
Table of contents
Limitations: The following items are not included in this inspection: overflow drains for tubs and sinks; heated towel racks, saunas, steam generators, clothes washers, clothes dryers. Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not determine the adequacy of washing machine drain lines, washing machine catch pan drain lines, or clothes dryer exhaust ducts. The inspector does not operate water supply or shut-off valves for sinks, toilets, bidets, clothes washers, etc. due to the possibility of valves leaking or breaking when operated. The inspector does not determine if shower pans or tub and shower enclosures are water tight, or determine the completeness or operability of any gas piping to laundry appliances.
Location #A: Master bath, second floor
Location #B: Full bath, second floor
Location #C: Full bath, first floor
Location #D: Laundry room/area, first floor
Condition of counters: Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Condition of cabinets: Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Condition of flooring: Appeared serviceable
Condition of sinks and related plumbing: Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Condition of toilets: Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Condition of bathtubs and related plumbing: Appeared serviceable
Condition of shower(s) and related plumbing: Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Condition of ventilation systems: Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Bathroom and laundry ventilation type: Spot exhaust fans, with individual ducts
Gas supply for laundry equipment present: No
240 volt receptacle for laundry equipment present: Yes
64) The toilet at location(s) #A, B and C was loose where it attached to the floor. Leaks can occur. Flooring, the sub-floor or areas below may get damaged. Sewer gases can enter living spaces. Recommend that a qualified contractor remove the toilet(s) for further evaluation and repair if necessary. A new wax ring should be installed and toilet(s) should be securely anchored to the floor to prevent movement and leaking.
Photo
Photo 64-1 
Photo
Photo 64-2 
Photo
Photo 64-3 
65) The toilet at location(s) #A didn't flush or had a weak flush. Recommend that a qualified plumber evaluate and repair or replace the toilet as necessary.
Photo
Photo 65-1 
66) The shower enclosure at location(s) #A was deteriorated, damaged or substandard. Water can damage the wall structure as a result. Recommend that a qualified contractor repair or replace the surround as necessary.
Photo
Photo 66-1 
67) One or more cabinets, drawers and/or cabinet doors at location(s) #B were deteriorated. Recommend that a qualified person repair or replace as necessary.
Photo
Photo 67-1 
Photo
Photo 67-2 
68) The exhaust fan at location(s) #A was weak or slow. Moisture may accumulate and result in mold, bacteria or fungal growth. Recommend that a qualified person clean, repair or replace fans as necessary.
Photo
Photo 68-1 
69) Gaps, no caulk, or substandard caulking were found between countertops and backsplashes at location(s) #A and B. Water can penetrate these areas and cause damage. Recommend that a qualified person repair as necessary. For example, by installing or replacing caulk.
Photo
Photo 69-1 
Photo
Photo 69-2 
Photo
Photo 69-3 
70) The sink at location(s) #A and D drained slowly. Recommend clearing drain and/or having a qualified plumber repair if necessary.
Photo
Photo 70-1 
Photo
Photo 70-2 
Interior, Doors and Windows
Table of contents
Limitations: The following items are not included in this inspection: security, intercom and sound systems; communications wiring; central vacuum systems; elevators and stair lifts; cosmetic deficiencies such as nail-pops, scuff marks, dents, dings, blemishes or issues due to normal wear and tear in wall, floor and ceiling surfaces and coverings, or in equipment; deficiencies relating to interior decorating; low voltage and gas lighting systems. Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not evaluate any areas or items which require moving stored items, furnishings, debris, equipment, floor coverings, insulation or similar materials. The inspector does not test for asbestos, lead, radon, mold, hazardous waste, urea formaldehyde urethane, or any other toxic substance. Some items such as window, drawer, cabinet door or closet door operability are tested on a sampled basis. The client should be aware that paint may obscure wall and ceiling defects, floor coverings may obscure floor defects, and furnishings may obscure wall, floor and floor covering defects. If furnishings were present during the inspection, recommend a full evaluation of walls, floors and ceilings that were previously obscured when possible. Carpeting and flooring, when installed over concrete slabs, may conceal moisture. If dampness wicks through a slab and is hidden by floor coverings that moisture can result in unhygienic conditions, odors or problems that will only be discovered when/if the flooring is removed. Determining the cause and/or source of odors is not within the scope of this inspection.
Condition of exterior entry doors: Appeared serviceable
Exterior door material: Wood
Condition of interior doors: Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Condition of windows and skylights: Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Type(s) of windows: Metal
Condition of walls and ceilings: Required repairs, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Condition of flooring: Required repairs, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Condition of stairs, handrails and guardrails: Appeared serviceable
71) This structure appears to have settled, or was leaning significantly based on the presence of cracks in walls, ceilings or junctions between them, or numerous door frames not being square, or numerous doors binding in jambs. Recommend that a qualified contractor and/or engineer evaluate further. Significant repairs may be needed. If so, a qualified contractor should make repairs.
Photo
Photo 71-1 
Photo
Photo 71-2 
Photo
Photo 71-3 
Photo
Photo 71-4 
Photo
Photo 71-5 
Photo
Photo 71-6 
72) Squeaking or creaking noises occur when walking on one or more sections of flooring. This is usually caused by substandard construction practices where the sub-floor decking is not adequately fastened to the framing below. For example, not enough glue was used and/or nails were used rather than screws. In most cases, this is only an annoyance rather than a structural problem. Various solutions such as Squeeeeek No More and Counter Snap fasteners exist to correct this. Repairs to eliminate the squeaks or creaks may be more or less difficult depending on the floor covering and the access to the underside of the sub-floor. Recommend that a qualified contractor evaluate and repair as necessary. For more information, visit:
http://www.reporthost.com/?SQUEAK
Photo
Photo 72-1 
73) One or more interior doors were missing and/or Substandard. Recommend that a qualified person replace or repair doors as necessary.
Photo
Photo 73-1 
Photo
Photo 73-2 
74) Some interior door hardware (Handles) were loose. Recommend that a qualified person repair or replace as necessary.
Photo
Photo 74-1 
75) One or more walls and/or Trim were damaged and/or Were missing. Recommend that a qualified person repair as necessary.
Photo
Photo 75-1 
Photo
Photo 75-2 
Photo
Photo 75-3 
76) One or more doors were sticking in the door jamb and were difficult to operate. Recommend that a qualified person repair as necessary. For example, by trimming doors.
Photo
Photo 76-1 
Photo
Photo 76-2 
Photo
Photo 76-3 
77) Tile, stone and/or grout in the flooring in one or more areas was deteriorated (e.g. loose or cracked tiles, missing grout) or substandard. If in a wet area, water can damage the sub-floor. Recommend that a qualified contractor repair as necessary.
Photo
Photo 77-1 
Photo
Photo 77-2 
78) Minor cracks, nail pops and/or blemishes were found in walls and/or ceilings in one or more areas. Cracks and nail pops are common, are often caused by lumber shrinkage or minor settlement, and can be more or less noticeable depending on changes in humidity. They did not appear to be a structural concern, but the client may wish to repair these for aesthetic reasons. For recurring cracks, consider using an elastic crack covering product:
http://www.reporthost.com/?ECC
Photo
Photo 78-1 
Photo
Photo 78-2 
Photo
Photo 78-3 
Photo
Photo 78-4 
Photo
Photo 78-5 
79) Carpeting in one or more areas was significantly stained or soiled. Recommend having carpeting professionally cleaned as necessary.
Photo
Photo 79-1 
Photo
Photo 79-2 
Photo
Photo 79-3 
Photo
Photo 79-4 
80) Stains were found in one or more ceiling areas. However, no elevated levels of moisture were found. The stain(s) may be due to past roof and/or plumbing leaks.Consult with the property owner and monitor the stained area(s) in the future, especially after heavy or prolonged rain. If elevated moisture is found in the future, then recommend that a qualified contractor evaluate and repair as necessary.
Photo
Photo 80-1 
81) Screens were missing from many windows. These windows may not provide ventilation during months when insects are active.
Photo
Photo 81-1 
Photo
Photo 81-2 
Wood Destroying Organism Findings
Table of contents
Limitations: This report only includes findings from accessible and visible areas on the day of the inspection. In addition to the inaccessible areas documented in this report, examples of other inaccessible areas include: sub areas less than 18 inches in height; attic areas less than 5 feet in height, areas blocked by ducts, pipes or insulation; areas where locks or permanently attached covers prevent access; areas where insulation would be damaged if traversed; areas obscured by vegetation. All inaccessible areas are subject to infestation or damage from wood-destroying organisms. The inspector does not move furnishings, stored items, debris, floor or wall coverings, insulation, or other materials as part of the inspection, nor perform destructive testing. Wood-destroying organisms may infest, re-infest or become active at any time. No warranty is provided as part of this inspection.
Visible evidence of active wood-destroying insects: No
Visible evidence of active wood decay fungi: No
Visible evidence of past wood-destroying insects: No
Visible evidence of past wood decay fungi: No
Visible evidence of damage by wood-destroying insects: No
Visible evidence of damage by wood decay fungi: No
Visible evidence of conditions conducive to wood-destroying organisms: Yes

This inspection was performed in accordance with the Oregon Home Inspection standards of practice, set forth in Division 8 of OAR chapter 812. A copy of these standards were provided to you at the time of the inspection. Home inspections are essentially visible in nature, and do not include the dismantling of equipment, or defacing of the property to inspect. The purpose of this inspection is to identify any defects that would require evaluation by a specialist. No ancillary inspections were performed, such as testing air quality, radon testing, mold, etc.