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alicantehomeinspections@gmail.com
(949) 283-5013
5075 Warner Ave Ste 207 
Huntington Beach CA 92649-4000
Inspector: Alan A. Alicante
InterNACHI Certified Inspector: #1411616
FAA Certified Remote Pilot: #3927142

Summary

Client(s):  Sample Report - Single Family Residence
Property address:  12345 Single Family Residence
Huntington Beach Ca, 92649
Inspection date:  Tuesday, December 1, 2020

This report published on Sunday, December 6, 2020 7:09:31 AM PST

This report is the exclusive property of this inspection company and the client(s) listed in the report title. Use of this report by any unauthorized persons is prohibited.

Concerns are shown and sorted according to these types:
Concern typeSafetyPoses a safety hazard
Concern typeMajor DefectCorrection likely involves a significant expense
Concern typeRepair/ReplaceRecommend repairing or replacing
Concern typeRepair/MaintainRecommend repair and/or maintenance
Concern typeMinor DefectCorrection likely involves only a minor expense
Concern typeMaintainRecommend ongoing maintenance
Concern typeEvaluateRecommend evaluation by a specialist
Concern typeMonitorRecommend monitoring in the future
Concern typeServiceableItem or component is in serviceable condition
Concern typeCommentFor your information


General Information
1) Structures built prior to the mid 1980s may contain lead and/or asbestos. Lead is commonly found in paint and in some plumbing components. The EPA does not recognize newer coats of paint as encapsulating older coats of lead-based paint. Asbestos is commonly found in various building materials such as insulation, siding, and/or floor and ceiling tiles. Laws were passed in 1978 to prohibit usage of lead and asbestos, but stocks of materials containing these substances remained in use for a number of years thereafter. Both lead and asbestos are known health hazards. Evaluating for the presence of lead and/or asbestos is beyond the scope of this inspection. Any mention of these materials in this report is made as a courtesy only, and meant to refer the client to a specialist. Consult with specialists as necessary, such as industrial hygienists, professional labs and/or abatement specialists for this type of evaluation. For information on lead, asbestos and other hazardous materials in homes, visit:

https://buyersask.com/interior/asbestos/identifying-asbestos-in-a-home/
2) Substandard construction was observed on the atrium cover. This work may have been made without the owner having attained permits or inspections from the municipality. Work may have been performed by someone other than a qualified contractor or person. Consult with the property owner about this, and if necessary research permits.

At worst case, if substantial work was performed without permits, this knowledge must be disclosed when the building is sold in the future. This can adversely affect future sales. Also, the local municipality could require costly alterations to bring the building into legal compliance or even require that the additions or modifications be removed.
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Photo 2-1 Atrium cover is not properly installed, recommend that a licensed contractor intall per standard codes.
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Photo 2-2 
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Photo 2-3 Joists supporting atrium cover rest directly on roofing shingles and are not correctly supported.
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Photo 2-4 Joists are rotted at the ends.
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Photo 2-5 
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Photo 2-6 

Grounds
3) Uneven stepping stones located in the front entryway could result in a potential trip hazard. Recommend that a qualified contractor make modifications as necessary to mitigate risk.
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Photo 3-1 
4) Significant amounts of standing water or evidence of past accumulated water were found at one or more locations in the yard or landscaped areas, and no drain was visible. If evidence of past water was found (e.g. silt accumulation or staining), monitor these areas in the future during periods of heavy rain. If standing water exists, recommend that a qualified person repair as necessary. For example, installing one or more drains, or grading soil.
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Photo 4-1 Water could be coming from overflow of sprinklers in combination with leak at pool pump motor. Adjust sprinklers and check for leaks at pump.

Exterior and Foundation
6) Wood rot/termite damage was found at some sections of exterior siding, trim, and/or soffits. Conducive conditions for rot should be corrected. Recommend that a qualified contractor repair as necessary. All rotten wood should be replaced.
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Photo 6-5 
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Photo 6-6 Joists supporting atrium cover rest directly on roofing shingles and are not correctly supported.
7) Stains were found at one or more soffit areas, but no elevated moisture levels were found and the wood appeared to be in good condition. Based on the inspector's findings, these stains may be from past leaks. Monitor these areas in the future. If moisture is observed, recommend that a qualified contractor evaluate and repair as necessary.
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Photo 7-1 

Roof
9) Significant amounts of debris have accumulated in one or more gutters or downspouts. Gutters can overflow and cause water to come in contact with the building exterior, or water can accumulate around the foundation. This is a conducive condition for wood-destroying organisms. Recommend cleaning gutters and downspouts now and as necessary in the future.
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Attic and Roof Structure
12) The ceiling insulation installed in the attic was substandard and appeared to have an R rating that's significantly less than current standards (R-38). Heating and cooling costs will likely be higher due to poor energy efficiency. Recommend that a qualified contractor install insulation for better energy efficiency and per standard building practices.
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Photo 12-1 
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13) Open alarm or CCTV box in attic. Recommend closing lid.
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Photo 13-1 

Garage
16) One or more holes and/or areas with missing or substandard surface materials were found in the attached garage ceiling and attic space that connects to the attic space above the interior of the house. Current standard building practices call for wooden-framed ceilings and walls that divide the house and garage to provide limited fire-resistance rating to prevent the spread of fire from the garage to the house. Recommend that a qualified person repair per standard building practices. For example, by patching openings or holes, firestopping holes or gaps with fire-resistant caulking, and installing a fire-resistant wall covering (e.g. Type X drywall) in the attic to divide both spaces. For more information, visit:
https://www.reporthost.com/?AGFR
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Photo 16-1 Attic wall that leads to house has a breached fire wall.
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Photo 16-2 Holes in garage ceiling is cosmetic only
17) The door knob for the garage side door was loose. Recommend tightening it.
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Photo 17-1 
18) Some floor and wall areas were obscured by stored items and couldn't be fully evaluated.
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Photo 18-1 

Electric
20) One or more electric receptacles at the kitchen, garage, and exterior had no visible ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection. If not GFCI-protected, receptacles in wet areas pose a shock hazard. Recommend that a qualified electrician evaluate and install GFCI protection if necessary and per standard building practices. General guidelines for GFCI-protected receptacles include the following locations:
  • Outdoors (since 1973)
  • Bathrooms (since 1975)
  • Garages (since 1978)
  • Kitchens (since 1987)
  • Crawl spaces and unfinished basements (since 1990)
  • Wet bar sinks (since 1993)
  • Laundry and utility sinks (since 2005)
For more information, visit:
https://buyersask.com/electrical/outlets-gfci/gfci-outlets/
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Photo 20-1 Exterior:
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Photo 20-2 Garage:
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Photo 20-3 
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Photo 20-4 Kitchen island:
21) Based on the age of this structure and the yellowed appearance of one or more existing smoke alarms, the alarm(s) may have been installed more than 10 years ago. According to National Fire Protection Association, aging smoke alarms don't operate as efficiently and often are the source for nuisance alarms. Older smoke alarms are estimated to have a 30% probability of failure within the first 10 years. Newer smoke alarms do better, but should be replaced after 10 years. Unless you know that the smoke alarms are new, replacing them when moving into a new residence is also recommended by NFPA. For more information, visit:
https://www.reporthost.com/?SMKALRMLS
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Photo 21-1 
22) Smoke/carbon monoxide alarms were missing from the hallway leading to the bedrooms. Smoke/CO alarms should be installed as necessary so a functioning alarm exists in the hallway outside the direct vicinity of the bedrooms.
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Photo 22-1 
23) One or more electric receptacles were loose and/or not securely anchored. Wire conductors can be damaged due to repeated movement and tension on wires. This is a potential shock and fire hazard. Recommend that a qualified electrician repair as necessary.
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Photo 23-1 Garage outlet:
24) Some covers for light fixtures were missing. Recommend replacing as necessary to avoid exposed bulbs. With attic lighting or where flammable stored objects are near light fixtures, missing covers can be a fire hazard.
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25) A photovoltaic solar energy system was installed. Evaluating these systems is beyond the scope of a home inspection. Its condition is unknown, and it is excluded from this inspection. Recommend that a qualified electrician review this system and make repairs if necessary.
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Plumbing / Fuel Systems
28) Highly recommend installing an earthquake valve although this may not be a requirement. The earthquake valve or seismic valve is an automatic way to shut off the low pressure regulated gas supply to a structure during a major earthquake
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Photo 28-1 
29) PEX piping is highly susceptible to damage by sunlight. If exposed to sunlight, the molecular structure can disintegrate. This causes the piping to become brittle and/or rupture. PEX installations require a covered environment. Recommend that a licensed plumber repair per standard building practice.

https://www.sharkbite.com/resources/faqs/pex-faqs
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Photo 29-1 
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30) If this property was unoccupied and the plumbing system has not been in continuous operation recently. It's possible for plumbing leaks to exist but not be apparent. Leaks can be small and take time to become visible. The inspector normally operates all accessible and operable plumbing fixtures, but this limited inspection may not reveal small leaks that only become visible after constant use of the plumbing system. After taking occupancy, monitor the plumbing system for leaks that may become apparent. Areas below the house should be evaluated after plumbing has been operated to check for leaks. Any problems that are found should be repaired by a qualified plumber.
31) A water filtration system was installed on the premises. These are specialty systems and are excluded from this inspection. Comments in this report related to this system are made as a courtesy only and are not meant to be a substitute for a full evaluation by a qualified specialist. Filter cartridges typically need replacing periodically. Cleaning and other maintenance may also be needed. Recommend consulting with the property owner about this system to determine its condition, required maintenance, age, expected remaining life, etc. For more information, visit:
https://www.reporthost.com/?WTRFLTR
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Photo 31-1 

Heating, Ventilation and Air Condition (HVAC)
34) Possible asbestos wrap was found on ducts for the heating system. It was significantly deteriorated in some areas. Asbestos may pose a health hazard when airborne. If this is asbestos, it may pose a health hazard and require abatement. Recommend that this material be tested by a qualified specialist. If the material is found to contain asbestos, the client should consult with a qualified asbestos abatement specialist or industrial hygienist. For information on asbestos hazards in the home, visit:
https://www.reporthost.com/?AITH

Note that evaluating for the presence of asbestos is beyond the scope of this inspection. Any mention in this report of these materials is made as a courtesy only, and is meant to refer the client to a specialist.
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Photo 34-1 This location was just above the attic hatch in the laundry room.
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Photo 34-2 
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Photo 34-3 This looks like leftover from the original ducting. Could be asbestos.
35) Recommend replacing or washing HVAC filters upon taking occupancy depending on the type of filters installed. Regardless of the type, recommend checking filters monthly in the future and replacing or washing them as necessary. How frequently they need replacing or washing depends on the type and quality of the filter, how the system is configured (e.g. always on vs. "Auto"), and on environmental factors (e.g. pets, smoking, frequency of house cleaning, number of occupants, the season).
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Photo 35-1 
36) Air filters for the HVAC system were missing at one or more locations where they should have been installed. Indoor air quality will be reduced as a result. Recommend installing good quality filters at intended locations (e.g. in or at the air handler, behind return air grills). Filters should be sized correctly to minimize air gaps. Many types of filters are available. Recommend installing pleated filters or better rather than the cheapest disposable kind. For more information, visit:
https://www.reporthost.com/?FLTRTPS
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Photo 36-1 

Fireplaces and Chimneys
39) No spark screen or rain cap was installed at one or more chimney flue terminations. Spark screens reduce the chance of embers exiting the flue and causing fires. They also prevent wildlife (e.g. birds, rodents, raccoons) from entering flues. Rain caps prevent water from entering flues, mixing with combustion deposits and creating caustic chemicals which can corrode flues. They also prevent damage to masonry from freeze-thaw cycles and prevent metal components (e.g. dampers, metal firebox liners) from rusting. Recommend that a qualified person install rain caps with spark screens per standard building practices where missing.
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40) One or more fireplaces equipped with a gas burner has a damper that can be closed. This is a safety hazard due to the possibility of burner or pilot light exhaust gases entering living spaces. A qualified chimney service contractor should make repairs as necessary so the damper is made permanently open. Typically a bracket or bolt is installed for this purpose.

https://buyersask.com/furnaces-acs-fireplaces/fireplace/damper-not-fixed-in-an-open-position/
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Photo 40-1 

Kitchen
42) The trash compactor was inoperable when tested. Furthermore the door was loose on the top right corner. Recommend that a qualified person repair or replace the compactor as necessary.
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Photo 42-1 Inoperable when tested:
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Photo 42-2 Loose door:
43) No exhaust hood, ceiling or wall-mounted exhaust fan or downdraft exhaust system was found for the cooktop or range. This can be a nuisance for odor and grease accumulation. Where a gas-fired range or cooktop is installed, carbon monoxide and excessive levels of moisture can accumulate in living spaces. Recommend that a qualified contractor install a venting system per standard building practices.
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Photo 43-1 

Bathrooms, Laundry and Sinks
45) The sink in bathroom #B drained slowly. Recommend clearing drain with a house hold drain cleaner and/or having a qualified plumber repair if necessary.
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Photo 45-1 
46) Caulk around the base of the toilet at locations #A and #B was missing. Modern standards require caulk to be installed around the entire toilet base where it meets the floor for sanitary reasons. Without it, soiled water can soak into flooring and sub-floor materials if the toilet overflows. Condensation from the toilet can also soak into the flooring. Recommend that a qualified person caulk around toilet bases per standard building practices.
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47) The sink faucet in bathroom #B was loose. Recommend tightening set screw.
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Photo 47-1 

Interior, Doors and Windows
49) Some ceilings in this structure had "popcorn" ceiling texture possibly installed prior to the mid-1980s. This material may contain asbestos, which is a known health hazard. Laws were passed in the United States in 1978 prohibiting use of asbestos in residential structures, but stocks of existing materials were used for some time thereafter. The client may wish to have this ceiling material tested by a qualified lab to determine if it does contain asbestos.

In most cases, when the material is intact and in good condition, keeping it encapsulated with paint and not disturbing it may reduce or effectively eliminate the health hazard. If the client wishes to remove the material, or plans to disturb it through remodeling, they should have it tested by a qualified lab and/or consult with a qualified industrial hygienist or asbestos abatement specialist. For more information, visit:
https://www.reporthost.com/?AITH
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Photo 49-1 
50) Some interior doors were rubbing on the floor, sticking in the door jamb and/or were difficult to latch. Recommend that a qualified person repair as necessary. For example, by adjusting hardware such as hinges, strike plates, and/or trimming doors if necessary.
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Photo 50-1 Doors bind in the jambs:
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Photo 50-3 Base of doors rubbing on flooring:
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Photo 50-5 Loose hinges:
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Photo 50-7 Strike plate protruding, needs adjustment:
51) A bifold closet door in the master bedroom was off its track. Recommend that a qualified person repair as necessary.
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Photo 51-1 
52) Pulls were missing from some interior storage cabinets. Were operation is difficult, recommend installing handles/pulls.
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Photo 52-1 

Swimming Pool
55) The pool pump appeared to have a leak. A qualified person should evaluate and repair or replace valves or components as necessary.
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56) The plaster surface of the body had some moderate wear marks in some areas, but appeared to be in serviceable condition. Concrete pools or spas should be re-plastered every 10 to 15 years. For more information, visit:
https://www.reporthost.com/?POOLPLASTER
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