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http://www.acloserlookhi.vpweb.com/
tom_rees@yahoo.com
(801) 674-4994
1042 Quail Vista Court #C  
Salt Lake City UT 84117-4873

Inspector: Tom Rees

 

Property Inspection Report

Client(s):  Mr. and Mrs. Smith
Property address:  123 Main Street
Salt Lake City, Utah 84000
Inspection date:  Wednesday, August 9, 2017

This report published on Friday, June 29, 2018 5:01:20 PM MDT

International Association of Certified Home Inspectors
It was my pleasure working with you and inspecting your property. After carefully reviewing the following report you can now make an informed decision regarding this property. The following is a narrative report of the conditions that need to be addressed at the above referenced property. At any point in this report where the inspector has recommended repairs, replacement or evaluation of any nature, it is our strong recommendation that the client secure three estimates for these repairs or replacement and have evaluations done before proceeding with any type of sales transaction. In many cases the true extent of a defect cannot be fully indentified until the components have been dismantled, this type of invasive investigation is beyond the scope of this inspection.
This report is the exclusive property of this inspection company and the client(s) listed in the report title. Use of this report by any unauthorized persons is prohibited.

This inspection was conducted by guidelines set forth by "The International Standards of Practice for Performing a General Home Inspection". These standards may be viewed at:
http://www.nachi.org/sop.htm
How to Read this Report
This report is organized by the property's functional areas.  Within each functional area, descriptive information is listed first and is shown in bold type.  Items of concern follow descriptive information. Concerns are shown and sorted according to these types:
Concern typeSafetyPoses a safety concern
Concern typeRepair/ReplaceRecommend repairing or replacing
Concern typeRepair/MaintainRecommend repair and/or maintenance
Concern typeMinor DefectCorrection likely involves only a minor expense
Concern typeMaintainRecommend ongoing maintenance
Concern typeEvaluateRecommend evaluation by a specialist
Concern typeMonitorRecommend monitoring in the future
Concern typeSummary Page ItemThis concern will appear in Summary Page
Concern typeCommentFor your information
Concern typeDamageDamage caused by wood destroying insects or organisms (Rot, carpenter ant galleries, etc.)
Concern typeConducive conditionsConditions conducive for wood destroying insects or organisms (Wood-soil contact, shrubs in contact with siding, roof or plumbing leaks, etc.)

Click here for a glossary of building construction terms.Contact your inspector If there are terms that you do not understand, or visit the glossary of construction terms at https://www.reporthost.com/glossary.asp

Table of Contents
General information
Exterior
Roof
Garage
Attics (2)
Electric service
Water heater
Heating and cooling
Plumbing and laundry
Woodstove and chimney
Kitchen
Bathrooms
Interior rooms

View summary


General information
Table of contents

Report number: Sample
Inspector: Tom Rees
Structures inspected: House
Type of building: Single family
Age of building: 1987
Time started: 8:45
Time finished: 12:45
Inspection Fee: $350.00
Payment method: Credit card
Present during inspection: Client
Occupied: No
Weather conditions: Clear
Temperature: Cool
Ground condition: Damp
Front of structure faces: West
Main entrance faces: West
Foundation type: Finished basement
The following items are excluded from this inspection: Irrigation system, Shed, Low voltage outdoor lighting

1) Radon is a cancer-causing radioactive gas. The U.S. Surgeon General has warned that radon is the second leading cause of lung cancer in the United States, next to smoking. Radon is estimated to cause thousands of deaths in the U.S. each year. Watch the following radon video: https://youtu.be/TOcFmv58v04
The Inspector strongly recommends that the client have the home tested for radon levels. The only way to know if you have high levels of radon in your home is to test. You can order a Short Term Radon Test Kit (2-4 days) or Long Term Radon Test Kit (91-365 days) online at: http://drhomeair.com/utah/ (price includes lab analysis fee).
*For more information on radon visit the following site: http://www.radon.utah.gov/

Exterior
Table of contents

Footing material: Not visible
Foundation material: Poured in place concrete
Apparent wall structure: Wood frame
Wall covering: Brick veneer, Metal
Driveway material: Poured in place concrete
Sidewalk material: Poured in place concrete
Patio material: Poured in place concrete
Exterior door material: Metal, Sliding glass

2) Damage Wooden timbers in rear retaining wall and stairs are rotten. A qualified contractor should evaluate and replace all rotten timbers.
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3) Wood fences are damaged and posts are rotted at base. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs and replace posts as necessary. The south side fence gate latch is damaged. Repairs should be made so gate operates easily.
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4) Conducive conditions The downspout at northeast corner of house has no extension. This has resulted in water accumulating around the structure's foundation. Accumulated water is a conducive condition to wood destroying insects and organisms, and may also cause the foundation to settle and possibly fail over time. Repairs should be made as necessary, such as installing an extension so rain water is carried at least several feet away from the structure to soil that slopes down and away from the structure.
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5) Gaps larger than 4 inches were found in guardrails. Many older homes were built with guardrail gaps that do not comply with today's codes. Because many homes were built many years prior to today’s requirements, the guardrails do not have to be replaced. It would not be fair to the homeowner to require replacement meeting today’s standards. With that said I still inform my clients when I see guardrails not meeting today's requirements. Ideally a qualified contractor should make modifications as necessary so gaps in guardrails do not exceed 4 inches. At a minimum, the clients should be aware of this hazard, especially when children are present.
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6) Conducive conditions Recommend cleaning the underground drain lines from downspouts. Blocked drain lines can cause water to accumulate around the stucture. Accumulated water is a conducive condition to wood destroying insects and organisms, and may also cause the foundation to settle and possibly fail over time.
*Visit the following link: https://www.thisoldhouse.com/ask-toh/backed-downspouts
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7) Conducive conditions Debris at base of window wells should be removed to prevent water penetration into basement.
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8) The exterior gas lines have some corrosion. Gas meters and gas piping often have rust on them. The meters and piping are often exposed to the weather or a corrosive environment and therefore will need occasional maintenance. In some areas the gas company will do this for you, in other areas the owner is responsible for the painting maintenance. A qualified painting contractor should prep and repaint the pipes as per standard building practices. Visit the following link: https://www.hunker.com/13414885/what-kind-of-paint-to-use-on-an-outdoor-gas-pipe
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Roof

Roof inspection method: Viewed from eaves on ladder, Viewed from ground with binoculars, Viewed from windows
Roof type: Gable
Roof covering: Asphalt or fiberglass composition shingles
Estimated age of roof: New-2017
Gutter & downspout material: Aluminum
Roof ventilation: Adequate

9) There is heat tape installed at front roof, gutter and downspout. This is an indication that there has been some ice damming or ice build up at roof and gutters at one time. Recommend that the clients ask the seller about past ice damming and/or water leaks at roof area. It is recommended that the clients familiarize themselves with the operation of the heat tape and monitor this area in future. It may be necessary to have a contractor evaluate and repair or replace heat tape.
*Visit the following links: http://www.buildingscience.com/documents/digests/bsd-135-ice-dams & http://bct.eco.umass.edu/publications/by-title/preventing-ice-dams/
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Photo 9-3 Install In-Use cover
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Photo 9-4 Label breaker

10) Conducive conditions The front upper gutter terminates above the roof surface rather than being routed to gutter below. This is very common, but it can reduce the life of roof surface materials below due to large amounts of water frequently flowing over the roof surface. Granules typically are washed off of composition shingles as a result, and leaks may occur. Recommend having a qualified contractor install an extension as necessary so the gutter doesn't terminate above the roof surface.
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11) Conducive conditions Debris has accumulated in gutters. This is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects since gutters may overflow and cause water to come in contact with the structure's exterior or make water accumulate around the foundation. Gutters should be cleaned now and as necessary in the future.
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Garage


12) The electric receptacles at garage ceiling have no ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should install GFCI receptacles as needed.
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13) The garage-house wall has a pet door installed in it. These surfaces are intended to prevent vehicle fumes from entering living spaces, and to slow the spread of fire from the garage to living spaces. A qualified contractor should repair the wall as necessary. Visit the following site: https://www.nachi.org/attached-garage-fire-hazards.htm?loadbetadesign=0
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14) The infrared "photo eye" devices that trigger the vehicle door opener's auto-reverse feature are located higher than 6 inches from the floor. This is a potential safety hazard. The photo eyes should not be installed higher than six inches above the garage floor. If the eyes are installed higher, a person or pet could get under the beam and not be detected by the photo eyes. A qualified contractor should relocate these devices so they're no higher than 6 inches from the floor. For more information on installation location of photoelectric sensors visit: http://www.dasma.com/PDF/Publications/TechDataSheets/OperatorElectronics/TDS364.pdf
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15) One or more garage vehicle door roller hinges are loose. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair the door hardware as necessary.
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Attics (2)

Inspection method: Viewed from hatch
Roof structure type: Trusses
Ceiling structure: Trusses
Insulation material: Fiberglass loose fill
Insulation depth: 11 inches
Insulation estimated R value: R-30

16) Insulation is in contact with a gas flue pipe in lower attic. This is a fire hazard. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs or modifications as necessary so minimum clearances to insulation are maintained around all flue pipes as per the manufacturer's specifications. Visit the following site: attic insulation shield
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17) Ceiling insulation is uneven and substandard in some areas. Recommend installing additional insulation where necessary to restore the R rating to R-38. Contact Questar: http://www.thermwise.com/home/Weatherization.php and Rocky Mountain Power:http://homeenergysavings.net/homeowner/category/weatherization/in/utah/insulation?region=utah for information on rebate programs.
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Electric service

Primary service type: Underground
Primary service overload protection type: Circuit breakers
Service amperage (amps): 100
Service voltage (volts): 120/240
Location of sub panel: Basement
Location of main service panel: Exterior (see below)
Location of main disconnect: Breaker at main service panel (see below)
Service entrance conductor material: Aluminum
System ground: Cold water supply pipes
Main disconnect rating (amps): 100
Branch circuit wiring type: Non-metallic sheathed, Copper
Solid strand (120 V) aluminum branch circuit wiring present: No
Smoke detectors present: Yes (see "Interior rooms" section)

18) The circuit breaker installed at the basement sub panel for the exterior A/C compressor/condenser unit is incompatible with the manufacturers label. The wires for the A/C also appear to be undersized for their overcurrent protection device (circuit breaker). This is a safety hazard. A qualified electrician should evaluate and replace the breaker as necessary.
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Photo 18-3 Undersized wires

19) Loose conductors in the basement sub panel have bare ends and are not connected to an overcurrent protection device (circuit breaker). This is a safety hazard due to the risk of fire if the bare conductors come into contact with other components in the panel. A qualified electrician should evaluate and repair as necessary. For example, removing wires that aren't terminated or installing wire nuts.
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20) Neutral wires (white) are doubled or bundled together on the neutral bus bar. This is unsafe due to the need to turn off multiple circuit breakers to work on any of the circuits using these wires (this was often done this way prior to 2002 but is no longer allowed by the NEC). A qualified electrician should evaluate and repair as necessary. For more information visit: http: Bundled Neutrals
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21) The legend for overcurrent protection devices (breakers) in the basement sub panel is inaccurate and incomplete. Recommend updating and correcting the legend as necessary so it's accurate. Evaluation by a qualified electrician may be necessary.
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22) Location of main service panel and main disconnect at south side of house.
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Water heater

Estimated age: 2010
Type: Tank
Energy source: Natural gas
Capacity (in gallons): 50
Manufacturer: Rheem
Water temperature (degrees Fahrenheit): 117

23) The water heater does not have seismic straps or struts installed. This is a potential safety hazard since movement can cause leaks in the gas supply lines or damage wiring. Leaks may also occur in water supply pipes. A qualified contractor should install seismic straps or struts as necessary and as per standard building practices.
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24) The water heater thermostat should be kept adjusted so the water temperature doesn't exceed 120 degrees to prevent scalding. Visit the following site: http://www.safetypolicy.org/pm/scald.htm
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25) Water heater TPR valve should be reinspected at least once every three years by a licensed plumbing contractor to ensure that the water ways are clear. Certain naturally occurring mineral deposits may adhere to the valve, rendering it inoperative. *WARNING* When manually operating the lever, water will discharge and precautions must be taken to avoid contact with hot water and to avoid water damage if valve becomes stuck. The inspector does not operate this valve. A qualified plumber should test now and at least once every three years and replace as necessary. Failure to reinspect this valve as directed could result in unsafe temperature or pressure build-up which can result in serious injury or death and/or severe property damage. See following link for more information on TPR valves: http://www.ashireporter.org/HomeInspection/Articles/The-Temperature-Pressure-Relief-Valve/1568

Heating and cooling

Estimated age: 2012
Primary heating system energy source: Natural gas
Primary heat system type: Forced air, Up draft, Medium efficiency
Primary A/C energy source: Electric
Primary Air conditioning type: Split system
Distribution system: Sheet metal ducts
Manufacturer: Rheem
Filter location: In return air duct at side of furnace
Last service date: ?

26) The last service date of the furnace appears to be more than one year ago, or the inspector was unable to determine the last service date. The clients should ask the property owner when it was last serviced. If unable to determine the last service date, or if this system was serviced more than one year ago, a qualified HVAC contractor should inspect, clean, and service this system, and make repairs if necessary. For safety reasons, and because this system is fueled by gas, this servicing should be performed annually in the future. For more information visit: http://www.cpsc.gov/en/Newsroom/News-Releases/2002/CPSC-Urges-Seasonal-Furnace-Inspection-to-Prevent-CO-Poisonings/
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27) The condensate line is not discharging to an approved plumbing fixture or disposal area. If discharged into the drainage system, equipment shall drain by means of an indirect waste pipe. To clarify, an indirect waste pipe is something that is upstream of a trap. That means you cannot dump into anything downstream of a trap, that would include the main plumbing vent stack. A qualified HVAC contractor or plumber should repair as necessary.
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28) The outdoor air temperature was below 60 degrees Fahrenheit during the inspection. Because of this, the inspector was unable to operate and fully evaluate the cooling system. A qualified HVAC contractor should inspect, clean, and service this system, and make repairs if necessary. The evaporator coil (cooling coil at furnace) and condensate pan/line should be cleaned when furnace is serviced. Some sources claim that energy efficiency is degraded by about five percent each year as the coils get dirtier due to accumulated dust and grime. Visit the following links for information on cleaning an evaporator coil: https://www.handymanhowto.com/how-to-clean-air-conditioner-evaporator-coils-part-1/ & https://www.handymanhowto.com/how-to-clean-air-conditioner-evaporator-coils-part-2/

29) There is a humidifier installed on furnace. The inspector does not open these units or test for operation. Humidifiers require monthly cleaning to remove mineral buildup and bacteria. The client should read the manual for the humidifier and review it's operation, proper cleaning and water pad replacement schedule. The humidifier should never be used in the summer when the A/C is being used as this will reduce the efficiency of the A/C. Watch the following video on humidifier maintenance: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DJEvNet5kno
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Photo 29-3 Replacement water pad
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Photo 29-4 Winter-summer bypass damper

30) The air handler filter is dirty and should be replaced now. It should be checked monthly in the future and replaced as necessary.
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Plumbing and laundry

Water pressure (psi): 110
Location of main water shut-off valve: Basement (see below)
Location of main water meter: Front park strip (see below)
Location of main fuel shut-off: Gas meter at south side of house
Water service: Public
Service pipe material: Copper
Supply pipe material: Copper
Vent pipe material: Plastic
Drain pipe material: Plastic
Waste pipe material: Plastic

31) The clothes dryer is equipped with a foil, accordion-type, flexible exhaust duct. The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission considers these types of ducts to be unsafe, and a fire hazard. These types of ducts can trap lint and are susceptible to kinks or crushing, which can greatly reduce the air flow. This duct should be replaced with a rigid or corrugated semi-rigid metal duct, and by a qualified contractor if necessary. Most clothes dryer manufacturers specify the use of a rigid or corrugated semi-rigid metal duct. For more information on dryer safety visit the following site: http://www.cpsc.gov//PageFiles/118931/5022.pdf
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32) Recommend that the dryer vent be cleaned now and annually. Some chimney sweeps or heating/cooling duct cleaners perform this service. Dryer fires can be prevented with proper dryer vent maintenance. When a dryer vent gets clogged with lint, it becomes inefficient, resulting in longer drying times and higher cost. Dryer lint is very combustible. In 1997 there were an estimated 16,700 dryer fires…resulting in 30 deaths, 430 injuries and over $84.4 million in property damage. Visit the following site for information on dryer safety: https://www.cpsc.gov//PageFiles/118931/5022.pdf

33) The water supply pressure is greater than 80 psi (110 psi). Pressures above 80 psi may void warranties for some appliances such as water heaters or washing machines. Flexible supply lines to washing machines are more likely to burst with higher pressures. A qualified plumber should evaluate and make modifications to reduce the pressure below 80 psi. A pressure reducing valve is installed on the main service pipe, it should be adjusted for lower pressures or replaced as necessary.
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Photo 33-1 Pressure 110 psi
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Photo 33-2 Pressure reducing valve

34) No expansion tank is installed on this structure's water supply system. Expansion tanks are recommended when a property is on a public water supply system and the property's water system is "closed" via a pressure reducing valve (PRV), check valve, or backflow preventer. No room for expansion of water exists in this type of system. Thermal expansion occurs when water is heated during non-use periods. In a closed system with no provision for expansion, its effects may include:
  • Backflow into the water main
  • Damage to water heater connections, gas water heater flue tubes and pumps serving washers and dishwashers
  • Leaking faucets
  • "Weeping" of water through the water heater temperature-pressure relief (TPR) valve
  • Noisy water hammer in the pipes.

Expansion tanks can eliminate these problems by giving water a place to go when thermal expansion occurs. When a water heating cycle ends, or when any fixture is opened within the system, the impact of thermal expansion is reduced, and water drains out of the expansion tank back into the system. Recommend having a qualified plumber install an expansion tank as per standard building practices. For more info visit: http://www.watts.com/pages/learnAbout/thermalExpansion.asp?catId=64

35) The clients are strongly advised to have the main sewer line visually inspected before the expiration of your Inspection Objection Deadline. An In-line sewer inspection is the only way to be sure your lines are free from obstructions and are in serviceable condition. Note that repairing or replacing this line can be very expensive. Based on the age of this pipe it is highly recommended that the client secure insurance to cover the cost of replacing the pipe in case of failure. HomeServeUSA offers this coverage: http://www.homeserveusa.com/

36) Neither the clothes washer nor dryer were operated or evaluated. They are excluded from this inspection.

37) Location of main water shut off valve in basement.
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38) Location of main water meter at front park strip.
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Woodstove and chimney

Woodstove type: Metal
Chimney type: Metal

39) The fan on the basement woodstove did not respond when it's controls were operated. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair or replace the fan as necessary. All solid fuel burning appliances (woodstoves and fireplaces, etc.) should be inspected annually by a qualified chimney service contractor, cleaned and repaired as necessary.
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Kitchen


40) Electric receptacles that serve countertop surfaces have no ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should install GFCI receptacles or circuit breaker(s) as needed.
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41) Conducive conditions The dishwasher's door seal is deteriorated and does not seal well. Water was found beneath the dishwasher, indicating a possible active leak. A qualified plumber or appliance technician should evaluate and repair as necessary.
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42) The dishwasher drain line is not configured with a "high loop". A high loop is created by routing the drain line up to the bottom surface of the counter top above, and securely fastening it to that surface. It is meant to prevent water from siphoning out of the dishwasher, and to prevent water from the sink drain or food disposal from entering the dishwasher. Some dishwashers have a built-in high loop where one is not required to be configured in the drain line. The clients should try to determine if a high loop is required for this brand and model of dishwasher (review installation instructions, etc.). If one is required, or it cannot be determined if one is not required, then a qualified contractor should install a high loop as per standard building practices. Visit the following link: High Loop
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43) Standard building practices require that brackets or corbels be installed every 30 inches beneath stone/marble countertops (depending on the manufacturers installation specifications), where the cantilevered section overhangs by 8-12 inches or more, to properly support the granite. A qualified contractor should evaluate and install additional supports if required. Visit the following site for examples of brackets and corbels: http://www.corbels.com/corbels-and-brackets.html
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44) No water or ice was dispensed from the refrigerator door. The water line to refrigerator appears to be disconnected in basement mechanical room ceiling. Repairs may be necessary for these features to work.
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45) The lights at base of microwave are inoperable. Recommend replacing light bulbs or having repairs made by a qualified contractor as necessary.
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Bathrooms


46) Conducive conditions Caulk is deteriorated at basement shower surround. There appears to be some damage to the wall behind the surround due to the deteriorated caulking.
This inspection is non invasive. In many cases the true extent of a defect cannot be fully identified until the components have been dismantled, this type of invasive investigation is beyond the scope of this inspection. A qualified contractor familiar with moisture intrusion should evaluate the damaged area and repair as necessary. All components significantly damaged should be removed and replaced.
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47) The master bathroom exhaust fan is excessively noisy. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair or replace the fan as necessary.
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48) Conducive conditions The master bathroom toilet is loose at floor. A qualified contractor should remove the toilet for further evaluation and repairs if necessary. A new wax ring should be installed and the toilet should be securely anchored to the floor to prevent movement and leaking. Care should be taken not to overtighten the bolts as you could crack the porcelain. Visit the following link: https://www.thisoldhouse.com/ask-toh/rocking-toilets
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49) Conducive conditions Recommend installing splash guards at bathtub to prevent water damage at wall and floor below. Visit the following video for installation: https://www.bing.com/videos/search?q=insatll+splash+guard+at+bathtub&view=detail&mid=F4BA7B2AB94F8D8CABA3F4BA7B2AB94F8D8CABA3&FORM=VIRE
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50) Conducive conditions Caulk is deteriorated at first floor common bathtub. For example, where the tub surround meets the tub, and around the base of the tub spout. Caulk should be replaced where deteriorated to prevent water intrusion and damage to the wall structure.
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51) Conducive conditions Caulk is deteriorated at master shower. Caulk should be replaced where deteriorated to prevent water intrusion and damage to the floor structure.
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Interior rooms


52) One or more ceiling fans are installed less than seven feet from the floor below. This is a safety hazard. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary. For example, remove fans, or move them as necessary to maintain a seven foot clearance below. Ideally ceiling fans should be installed at least eight to nine feet above the floor for optimal air flow.
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53) One or more handrails are not continuous for the entire length of the flight of stairs. This is a safety hazard. Handrails should be continuous, and extend the full length of flights of stairs. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary.
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54) An insufficient number of smoke alarms are installed. Additional smoke alarms should be installed as necessary so a functioning one exists in each hallway leading to bedrooms, and in each bedroom. For more information, visit: Smoke Alarms

55) This property has one or more fuel burning appliances, and no carbon monoxide alarms are visible. This is a safety hazard. Recommend installing one or more carbon monoxide alarms as necessary and as per the manufacturer's instructions. For more information, visit: http://www.pro-spex.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/08/Carbon-Monoxide.pdf Visit the following site for information on carbon monoxide detector placement: http://www.kidde.com/home-safety/en/us/co-safety/placement-of-CO-alarms/

56) Gaps larger than 4 inches were found in guardrails. Many older homes were built with guardrail gaps that do not comply with today's codes. Because many homes were built many years prior to today’s requirements, the guardrails do not have to be replaced. It would not be fair to the homeowner to require replacement meeting today’s standards. With that said I still inform my clients when I see guardrails not meeting today's requirements. Ideally a qualified contractor should make modifications as necessary so gaps in guardrails do not exceed 4 inches. At a minimum, the clients should be aware of this hazard, especially when children are present.
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Photo 56-1 

58) Conducive conditions Minor damage and elevated levels of moisture were found in the kitchen ceiling area. This appears to be due to an active roof leak. Moisture can exist without mold and if no visible signs of mold are present, then the issue is to find the source of the moisture and repair it before mold forms. Mold can form after the inspection on items that were recently wet but conditions did not allow the inspector to see any mold at time of inspection. A qualified contractor familiar with moisture intrusion should evaluate and repair the damaged area. A qualified roofing contractor should evaluate the roof for the source of the leak and repair as necessary.
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59) Water stains and minor damage were found in ceiling areas in the basement family room, mechanical room and garage. However, no elevated levels of moisture were found. The stains appear to be due to past plumbing leaks. Recommend asking the property owner about this, and monitoring the stained areas in the future. If elevated moisture is found in the future, a qualified contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary. The damaged area in family room should be evaluated and repaired by a qualified contractor.
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It is very important that if you do not understand how to read this report or do not understand any of the conditions found that you please contact me for a consultation before proceeding with any sales transaction. It is important that you read and understand the full report. Reports "expire" automatically 120 days after they're published but remain archived on a server indefinitely. Reports can be restored by contacting A Closer Look Home Inspection and once restored become viewable again for 120 more days. It is recommended that the client download a copy for future reference.