View as PDF

View report

Aardvark Home Inspection & Services


12001 S Highway 125 
Miami OK 74354-5172 
License #70001738
Inspector: John Klinglesmith

 

Summary

Client(s):  Home owner
Property address:  1234 HWY. Anywhere
Anytown, OK 77777
Inspection date:  Wednesday, June 28, 2017

This report published on Wednesday, July 05, 2017 3:11:12 PM CDT

This report is the exclusive property of this inspection company and the client(s) listed in the report title. Use of this report by any unauthorized persons is prohibited.

Concerns are shown and sorted according to these types:
Concern typeSafetyPoses a safety hazard
Concern typeMajor DefectCorrection likely involves a significant expense
Concern typeRepair/ReplaceRecommend repairing or replacing
Concern typeRepair/MaintainRecommend repair and/or maintenance
Concern typeMinor DefectCorrection likely involves only a minor expense
Concern typeMaintainRecommend ongoing maintenance
Concern typeEvaluateRecommend evaluation by a specialist
Concern typeMonitorRecommend monitoring in the future
Concern typeCommentFor your information


Grounds
1 - Hand Rail on rear porch seems to have rotted wood and has separated from the stairs. As per IRC and local standards handrails are required when there are 4 or more risers including the bottom and top risers.

2 - Cracks, holes, settlement, heaving and/or deterioration resulting in trip hazards were found in the sidewalks or patios. For safety reasons, recommend that a qualified contractor repair as necessary to eliminate trip hazards.

3 - evidence of standing water along the perimeter of the foundation wall. water infiltration into the basement/crawl space is possible.

Exterior and Foundation
4 - Major cracks (more than 3/4-inch wide) and/or leaning was found in the foundation. These appear to be a structural concern and may indicate that settlement is ongoing. Recommend hiring qualified contractors and/or engineers as necessary for further evaluation. Such contractors may include:Repairs should be made by a qualified contractor.

5 - the concrete block foundation Has cracked and has begun a differential settling on the lower south side of the fireplace.

Roof
7 - The roof surface appeared to be near the end of its service life and will likely need replacing in the near future even if repairs are made now. Recommend discussing replacement options with a qualified contractor, and budgeting for a replacement roof surface in the near future. The client may also wish to consider having a qualified contractor attempt to issue a "5 year roof certificate."

8 - areas of the roof are missing shingles with edges of the deck exposed.

9 - Flashings at the base of one or more chimneys were loose and/or damaged. Leaks can occur as a result. This is a conducive condition for wood-destroying organisms. Recommend that a qualified contractor evaluate and repair as necessary.

10 - Many composition shingles were missing. Leaks can occur as a result. This is a conducive condition for wood-destroying organisms. Recommend that a qualified contractor repair as necessary. For example, by replacing shingles.

11 - Extensions such as splash blocks or drain pipes for one or more downspouts were damaged. Water can accumulate around the building foundation or inside crawl spaces or basements as a result. Recommend that a qualified person install, replace or repair extensions as necessary so rainwater drains away from the structure.

12 - counter flashing has pulled away from the chimney.

13 - the gutter has pulled away from the fascia board with spikes and ferrells hanging.

14 - One or more gutters and/or downspouts were loose and/or damaged. Rainwater can come in contact with the building exterior or accumulate around the building foundation as a result. This is a conducive condition for wood-destroying organisms. Recommend that a qualified person repair as necessary.

Attic and Roof Structure
15 - The ceiling insulation in one or more areas of the attic was compacted or uneven, missing and/or substandard. Heating and cooling costs may be higher due to reduced energy efficiency. Recommend that a qualified person repair, replace or install insulation as necessary and per standard building practices (typically R-38).

16 - One or more attic access hatches or doors were not insulated, or had substandard insulation. Recommend installing insulation as necessary and per current standards at hatches or doors for better energy efficiency. For more information, visit:
http://www.reporthost.com/?ATTACC

17 - One or more attic or roof vent screens were clogged with paint. This can reduce air flow through the roof structure or attic and result in reduced service life for the roof surface materials because of high temperatures. Moisture from condensation is also likely to accumulate in the roof structure and/or attic. Recommend that a qualified person repair as necessary so air flows freely through all vents. For example, by cleaning screens or replacing screens with 1/8-inch to 1/4-inch wire mesh.

Garage or Carport
21 - The frame of the exterior wall shows signs of weathering and water damage. The siding has deteriorated to the point of allowing pests and vermin to infiltrate the space.

22 - The carport structure was unstable due to missing or substandard bracing or attachment to the main building. This is a potential safety hazard since severe movement may cause it to collapse. A qualified contractor should repair as necessary.

23 - One or more garage vehicle doors weren't balanced. The door(s) wouldn't stay in place when opened half-way, and fell to the ground instead. This is a potential safety hazard since the door(s) can fall when open and cause injury. A qualified contractor should repair as necessary. For more information on garage door safety issues, visit:
http://www.reporthost.com/?GDBAL

Electric
24 - One or more electric receptacles at the kitchen, bathroom(s) and/or laundry area had no visible ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection, or the inspector was unable to determine if GFCI protection was present. If not GFCI-protected, receptacles in wet areas pose a shock hazard. Recommend that a qualified electrician evaluate and install GFCI protection if necessary and per standard building practices. General guidelines for GFCI-protected receptacles include the following locations:For more information, visit:
http://www.reporthost.com/?GFCI

25 - One or more receptacles were worn. Worn receptacles can work intermittently or when the plug is wiggled. They can overheat or arc and spark due to loose connections. This is a potential fire hazard. Recommend that a qualified electrician replace such receptacles as necessary.

26 - The light fixture at one or more sets of stairs with living spaces at both ends was controlled by a single switch at one end. This is a safety hazard due to inadequate lighting. The light should be controlled by 3-way switches at the top and bottom of the stairs so it can be easily operated on both floors. Recommend that a qualified electrician repair per standard building practices.

27 - One or more electric receptacles at the bedroom(s), kitchen, family room, dining room, living room, hallway(s) and/or laundry area had no visible arc fault circuit interrupter (AFCI) protection, or the inspector was unable to determine if AFCI protection was present. This is a potential safety hazard. Recommend that a qualified electrician evaluate and install AFCI protection if necessary and per standard building practices. General guidelines for AFCI-protected receptacles include the following locations:For more information, visit:
http://www.reporthost.com/?AFCI

28 - Smoke alarms were missing from one or more bedrooms. Smoke alarms should be installed as necessary so a functioning alarm exists in each hallway leading to bedrooms, in each bedroom, on each level and in any attached garage. For more information, visit:
http://www.reporthost.com/?SMKALRM

29 - One or more cover plates for switches, receptacles or junction boxes were missing or broken. These plates are intended to contain fire and prevent electric shock from occurring due to exposed wires. Recommend that a qualified person install cover plates where necessary.

Plumbing / Fuel Systems
30 - Insulation for one or more water supply pipes in the crawl space and/or basement was missing. Recommend replacing or installing insulation on pipes per standard building practices to prevent them from freezing during cold weather, and for better energy efficiency with hot water supply pipes.

31 - The inspector heard gurgling sounds when plumbing fixtures (e.g. faucets, tubs, showers) were operated. Venting may be substandard or missing. Adequate venting is required to allow waste materials and water to drain freely, and to allow sewer gases to escape from the system. Recommend that a qualified plumber evaluate and repair if necessary.

32 - The sump pump appeared to be inoperable. Water may accumulate in the building substructure during periods of heavy rain. Recommend that a qualified contractor evaluate and repair or replace the sump pump as necessary.

33 - One or more plastic PVC or CPVC water supply pipes had substandard support or were loose. Leaks may occur as a result. PVC and CPVC supply pipes should have supports every 4 feet. Special hangers that allow movement from expansion and that won't damage the soft plastic piping should be used. Recommend that a qualified person install supports or secure pipes per standard building practices.

Heating, Ventilation and Air Condition (HVAC)
36 - The estimated useful life for most heat pumps and air conditioning condensing units is 10-15 years. This unit appeared to be near this age and/or its useful lifespan and may need replacing or significant repairs at any time. Recommend budgeting for a replacement in the near future.

37 - The last service date of the forced air heating/cooling system appeared to be more than 1 year ago, or the inspector was unable to determine the last service date. Ask the property owner when it was last serviced. If unable to determine the last service date, or if this system was serviced more than 1 year ago, recommend that a qualified HVAC contractor service this system and make repairs if necessary. Because this system has a compressor and refrigerant system, this servicing should be performed annually in the future. Any needed repairs noted in this report should be brought to the attention of the contractor when it's serviced.

38 - ducts are compressed in the attic laying on top of each other.

39 - One or more sections of flex duct used for heating or cooling were sagging or had substandard support. Energy efficiency can be reduced due to restricted flow. Manufacturers typically recommend that flex duct be supported with the following guidelines:Recommend that a qualified person repair per the manufacturer's specifications.

40 - Insulation on the heat pump or air conditioning condensing unit's refrigerant lines was deteriorated or missing in some areas. This may result in reduced efficiency and increased energy costs. Recommend that a qualified person replace or install insulation as necessary.

Fireplaces, Stoves, Chimneys and Flues
41 - One or more solid fuel-burning fireplaces or stoves were found at the property. When such devices are used, they should be professionally inspected and cleaned annually to prevent creosote build-up and to determine if repairs are needed. The National Fire Protection Association states that a "Level 2" chimney inspection should be performed with every sale or transfer of property with a wood-burning device. Recommend consulting with the property owner about recent and past servicing and repairs to all wood-burning devices and chimneys or flues at this property. Recommend that a qualified specialist evaluate all solid fuel-burning devices and chimneys, and clean and repair as necessary. Note that if a wood stove insert is installed, it may need to be removed for such an evaluation. For more information, search for "chimney inspection" at:
http://www.reporthost.com/?CSIA

42 - Soot deposits were found above the fireplace. This often indicates an inadequate draw, and can be caused by a variety of problems including an incorrect chimney configuration or a chimney blocked by creosote or debris. Recommend that a qualified chimney service contractor evaluate and repair or perform maintenance as necessary.

43 - Mortar at the brick chimney was deteriorated (e.g. loose, missing, cracked). As a result, water is likely to infiltrate the chimney structure and cause further damage. Recommend that a qualified contractor repair as necessary. For example, by repointing the mortar.

Bathrooms, Laundry and Sinks
44 - Gaps, no caulk, or substandard caulking were found between the bathtub and the walls at location(s) #A and B. Water may penetrate these areas and cause damage. Recommend that a qualified person re-caulk or install caulking as necessary.

45 - Gaps, no caulk, or substandard caulking were found between the shower enclosure and the floor and/or walls at location(s) #A. Water can penetrate these areas and cause damage. Recommend that a qualified person re-caulk or install caulking as necessary.

46 - Caulk around the base of the toilet at location(s) #A and B was missing, substandard and/or deteriorated. Modern standards require caulk to be installed around the entire toilet base where it meets the floor for sanitary reasons. Without it, soiled water can soak into flooring and sub-floor materials if the toilet overflows. Condensation from the toilet can also soak into the flooring. Recommend that a qualified person caulk around toilet bases per standard building practices.

Interior, Doors and Windows
49 - Condensation or staining was visible between multi-pane glass in one or more windows. This usually indicates that the seal between the panes of glass has failed or that the desiccant material that absorbs moisture is saturated. As a result, the view through the window may be obscured, the window's U-value will be reduced, and accumulated condensation may leak into the wall structure below. Recommend that a qualified contractor evaluate and repair windows as necessary. Usually, this means replacing the glass in window frames.

Be aware that evidence of failed seals or desiccant may be more or less visible depending on the temperature, humidity, sunlight, etc. Windows or glass-paneled doors other than those that the inspector identified may also have failed seals and need glass replaced. It is beyond the scope of this inspection to identify every window with failed seals or desiccant.

old aluminum windows.

50 - One or more entry doors wouldn't latch when closed. This is a security concern if no deadbolt is installed. A qualified person should repair as necessary.

51 - Some exterior door hardware, including locksets and/or deadbolts were inoperable. Recommend that a qualified person repair or replace as necessary.

52 - One or more window screens were damaged or deteriorated. These window(s) may not provide ventilation during months when insects are active. Recommend replacing window screens as necessary.

53 - One or more interior doors wouldn't latch or were difficult to latch. Recommend that a qualified person repair as necessary. For example, by adjusting latch plates or locksets.

54 - Minor cracks, nail pops and/or blemishes were found in walls and/or ceilings in one or more areas. Cracks and nail pops are common, are often caused by lumber shrinkage or minor settlement, and can be more or less noticeable depending on changes in humidity. They did not appear to be a structural concern, but the client may wish to repair these for aesthetic reasons. For recurring cracks, consider using an elastic crack covering product:
http://www.reporthost.com/?ECC

55 - Carpeting in one or more areas was significantly stained or soiled. Recommend having carpeting professionally cleaned as necessary.

General Information
57 - Structures built prior to the mid 1980s may contain lead and/or asbestos. Lead is commonly found in paint and in some plumbing components. The EPA does not recognize newer coats of paint as encapsulating older coats of lead-based paint. Asbestos is commonly found in various building materials such as insulation, siding, and/or floor and ceiling tiles. Laws were passed in 1978 to prohibit usage of lead and asbestos, but stocks of materials containing these substances remained in use for a number of years thereafter. Both lead and asbestos are known health hazards. Evaluating for the presence of lead and/or asbestos is beyond the scope of this inspection. Any mention of these materials in this report is made as a courtesy only, and meant to refer the client to a specialist. Consult with specialists as necessary, such as industrial hygienists, professional labs and/or abatement specialists for this type of evaluation. For information on lead, asbestos and other hazardous materials in homes, visit:
http://www.reporthost.com/?EPA
http://www.reporthost.com/?CPSC
http://www.reporthost.com/?CDC

Crawl Space
60 - One or more support posts appear to have been added since the original construction based on the inspector's observations. Such posts may have been added to reduce bounce or sag in floors above. Consult with the property owner about this, or have a qualified contractor evaluate and make repairs if necessary.

61 - No under-floor insulation was installed in the crawl space and/or unheated basement. Recommend that a qualified person install insulation for better energy efficiency and per standard building practices. Typically this is R-19 rated fiberglass batt with the attached facing installed against the warm (floor) side.

62 - The vapor barrier in many areas of the crawl space was missing. Soil was exposed as a result and will allow water from the soil to evaporate up into the structure. This is a conducive condition for wood-destroying organisms. A 6 mil black plastic sheet should be placed over all exposed soil with seams overlapped to 24 inches, and not in contact with any wood structural components. The sheeting should be held in place with bricks or stones, not wood. Recommend that a qualified person replace or repair the vapor barrier where necessary and per standard building practices.

63 - No vapor barrier was installed in the crawl space. This is a conducive condition for wood-destroying organisms due to the likelihood of water evaporating from the soil below up into the structure. A 6 mil black plastic sheet should be placed over all exposed soil with seams overlapped to 24 inches, and not in contact with any wood structural components. The sheeting should be held in place with bricks or stones, not wood. Recommend that a qualified contractor install a vapor barrier per standard building practices.

64 - One or more exhaust ducts (e.g. bathroom fan, clothes dryer) in the attic were not insulated. This can result in moisture forming inside the duct or "sweating" on the outside of the duct depending on the surrounding air temperature and the exhaust air temperature. Recommend that a qualified person install insulation on exhaust ducts per standard building practices (typically R-4 rating), or replace uninsulated ducts with insulated ducts.

Basement
68 - one of the support piers is tilted and appears to be absent of a concrete footing under the piers.

69 - The ceiling height over stairs at one or more locations was too low and poses a safety hazard, especially for tall people. Ceilings over stairs should be at least 6 feet 8 inches high. At a minimum, be aware of this hazard, especially when guests who are not familiar with the stairs are present. Recommend that a qualified contractor repair per standard building practices.

70 - sections of the crawl space were sealed off from view due to the foundation vents being sealed and access doors being locked.

71 - Evidence of prior water intrusion was found in one or more sections of the basement. For example, water stains or rust at support post bases, efflorescence on the foundation, etc. Accumulated water is a conducive condition for wood-destroying organisms and should not be present in the basement. Recommend reviewing any disclosure statements available and ask the property owner about past accumulation of water in the basement. The basement should be monitored in the future for accumulated water, especially after heavy and/or prolonged periods of rain. If water is found to accumulate, then recommend that a qualified contractor who specializes in drainage issues evaluate and repair as necessary. Typical repairs for preventing water from accumulating in basements include:Ideally, water should not enter basements, but if water must be controlled after it enters the basement, then typical repairs include installing a sump pump.

72 - Fungal rot was found at one or more sill plates and/or joists. Recommend that a qualified contractor evaluate and repair as necessary. All rotten wood should be replaced.

73 - One or more support posts were not positively secured to the beam above. While this is common in older homes, current standards require positive connections between support posts and beams above for earthquake reinforcement. Recommend that a qualified contractor repair per standard building practices. For example, by installing metal plates, plywood gussets or dimensional lumber connecting posts and beams.

74 - The basement floor drain appeared to be clogged. Water may accumulate in the basement as a result. This is a conducive condition for wood-destroying organisms. Recommend that a qualified person evaluate and clean, repair or replace as necessary.

75 - One or more support posts appear to have been added since the original construction based on the inspector's observations. Such posts may have been added to reduce bounce or sag in floors above. Consult with the property owner about this, or have a qualified contractor evaluate and make repairs if necessary.