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Website: http://www.SignatureMORE.com
Email: signaturehw@gmail.com
Phone: (888) 860-2688
FAX: (877) 310-4267
PO Box 390081 
Mountain View CA 94039-0081
Inspector: Scott Knudson
NACHI ID NUMBER: NACHI09070813

      

Home Inspection Report
Client(s): Fred Kruger
Property address: 1234 Elm Street
Any Town, USA
Inspection date: 10/10/2010
This report published on Saturday, February 11, 2012 1:09:41 PM PST

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Dear Fred,

Signature Home Services is pleased to submit the enclosed report.
This report is a professional opinion based on a visual inspection of the accessible
components of the home. This report is not an exhaustive technical evaluation.
An evaluation of this nature would cost many times more.

Please understand that there are limitations to this inspection. Many
components of the home are not visible during the inspection and very little
historical information is provided in advance of the inspection. While we can
reduce your risk of purchasing a home, we cannot eliminate it, nor can we assume
it. Even the most comprehensive inspection cannot be expected to reveal every
condition you may consider significant to ownership. In addition to those
improvements recommended in our report, we recommend that you budget for
unexpected repairs. On average, we have found that setting aside roughly one
percent of the value of the home on an annual basis is sufficient to cover
unexpected repairs.

Your attention is directed to your copy of the Inspection Agreement. It more
specifically explains the scope of the inspection and the limit of our liability
in performing this inspection. The Standards of Practice prohibits us from
making any repairs or referring any contractors.

We are not associated with any other party to the transaction of this property,
except as may be disclosed to you. The information provided in this report is
solely for your use. Signature Home Services will not release a copy of this
report without your written consent.

Thank you for selecting our company. We appreciate the opportunity to be of
service. Should you have any questions about the general condition of the house
in the future, we would be happy to answer these. There is no fee for this
telephone consulting. Our fees are based on a single visit to the property. If
additional visits are required for any reason, additional fees may be assessed.

Best Regards,


Scott Knudson
Signature Home Services
1-801-860-7268 - Utah
1-415-690-5537 - California
1-877-310-3723 - Fax
www.SignatureMORE.com

This report meets or exceeds the National Association of Home Inspectors standard of practices. (http://nachi.org/sop.htm)

Please feel free to visit our repair cost estimate sheet at http://www.reporthost.com/windriver/RepairCostEstimate.pdf

 
How to Read this Report
This report is organized by the property's functional areas.  Within each functional area, descriptive information is listed first and is shown in bold type.  Items of concern follow descriptive information.
Concerns are shown and sorted according to these types:
SafetyPoses a risk of injury or death 
Repair/ReplaceRecommend repairing or replacing 
Repair/MaintainRecommend repair and/or maintenance 
Minor DefectCorrection likely involves only a minor expense 
MaintainRecommend ongoing maintenance 
EvaluateRecommend evaluation by a specialist 
MonitorRecommend monitoring in the future 
CommentFor your information 

Click here for a glossary of building construction terms. Contact your inspector if there are terms that you do not understand, or visit the glossary of construction terms at http://www.reporthost.com/glossary.asp

Table of Contents
General information
Exterior
Roof
Garage
Attic
Electric service
Water heater
Heating and cooling
Plumbing and laundry
Fireplaces, woodstoves and chimneys
Kitchen
Bathrooms
Interior rooms
 
General information Return to table of contents
Report number: 3810
Inspector's name: Scott Knudson
Type of building: Single family
Age of building: 1917
Time started: 10:00 am
Time finished: 1:00 pm
Inspection Fee: $350.00
Payment method: Invoiced PayPal
Occupied: No
Weather conditions: Partly cloudy
Temperature: Cool
Ground condition: Dry
Front of structure faces: North
Main entrance faces: North
Foundation type: Finished basement
The following items are excluded from this inspection: Security system, Irrigation system, Playground equipment, Low voltage outdoor lighting, Water filtration system, Water softener system, Outbuildings, Humidifier
1) Safety, Comment - Structures built prior to 1979 may contain lead-based paint and/or asbestos in various building materials such as insulation, siding, and/or floor and ceiling tiles. Both lead and asbestos are known health hazards. Evaluating for the presence of lead and/or asbestos is not included in this inspection. The client(s) should consult with specialists as necessary, such as industrial hygienists, professional labs and/or abatement contractors for this type of evaluation. For information on lead, asbestos and other hazardous materials in homes, visit these websites:
  • The Environmental Protection Association (http://www.epa.gov)
  • The Consumer Products Safety Commission (http://www.cpsc.gov)
  • The Center for Disease Control (http://www.cdc.gov)
     
    Exterior Return to table of contents
    Footing material: Poured in place concrete
    Foundation material: Poured in place concrete
    Apparent wall structure: Wood frame
    Wall covering: Composition wood panels, Stucco
    Driveway material: Poured in place concrete
    Sidewalk material: Poured in place concrete
    Exterior door material: Solid core wood, Glass panel
    2) Safety, Minor Defect - One or more outside faucets (east) are missing backflow prevention devices. These devices reduce the likelihood of polluted or contaminated water entering the potable water supply. This condition can occur when an outside faucet is left in the "on" position with a hose connected and the sprayer head turned off. When pressure in the system fluctuates, water can be drawn back into the water supply pipes from the house. If a chemical sprayer is being used with the hose, those chemicals can enter the water supply pipes.

    Recommend installing backflow prevention devices on all exterior hose bibs where missing. They are available at most home improvement stores and are easily installed. For more information, visit:
    http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/AE113

    Photo 6  
     

    3) Repair/Replace, Evaluate - One or more gutters (north east corner) are poorly sloped so that significant amounts of water accumulate in them rather than draining through the downspouts. This can cause gutters to overflow, especially when organic debris such as leaves or needles have accumulated in them. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary, such as correcting the slope in gutters or installing additional downspouts and extensions if necessary.

    Photo 21  
     

    4) Repair/Replace, Evaluate - One or more light fixtures (rear) are damaged and/or deteriorated. A qualified electrician should evaluate and repair or replace light fixtures where necessary.

    Photo 18  
     

    5) Repair/Maintain - Soil is in contact with or less than six inches from siding and/or trim (rear deck). This is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects and organisms. Soil should be graded and/or removed as necessary so there are at least six inches of space between the siding and trim and the soil below.

    Photo 9  
     

    6) Maintain - A qualified contractor should prep (pressure wash, scrape, sand, prime caulk, etc.) and repaint or restain areas (rear door trim) as needed and as per standard building practices.

    Photo 20  
     

    7) Comment - Minor cracks were found in the driveway. However they don't appear to be a structural concern and no trip hazards were found. No immediate action is recommended, but the client(s) may wish to have repairs made or have cracked sections replaced for aesthetic reasons.
    8) Comment - Minor cracks were found in one or more sidewalk or patio sections. However they don't appear to be a structural concern and no trip hazards were found. No immediate action is recommended, but the client(s) may wish to have repairs made or have cracked sections replaced for aesthetic reasons.
    9) Comment - The substructure of the deck is excluded from the inspection due to limited access because of the low height.
     
    Roof Return to table of contents
    Roof inspection method: Traversed
    Roof type: Gable
    Roof covering: Asphalt or fiberglass composition shingles
    Estimated age of roof: 0 to 5 years old
    Gutter & downspout material: Aluminum
    Roof ventilation: Adequate
    10) Repair/Replace, Evaluate - One or more sections of flashing at the chimneys are deteriorated and/or substandard. Leaks may occur as a result. A qualified roofing contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary.

    Photo 13  

    Photo 14  

    Photo 15  

    Photo 16  

    11) Maintain - Debris has accumulated in one or more gutters. This is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects since gutters may overflow and cause water to come in contact with the structure's exterior or make water accumulate around the foundation. Gutters should be cleaned now and as necessary in the future.
     
    Garage Return to table of contents

    12) Repair/Replace, Evaluate - One or more garage vehicle door openers are inoperable (button must be held down to close door). A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary.
    13) Comment - The interior perimeter of the garage is excluded from this inspection due to lack of access from stored items.

    Photo 17  
    Garage
     
     
    Attic Return to table of contents
    Inspection method: Viewed from hatch
    Roof structure type: Rafters
    Ceiling structure: Ceiling beams
    Insulation material: Fiberglass loose fill, Fiberglass roll or batt
    Insulation depth: 4 to 8 inches
    Insulation estimated R value: 30
    14) Safety, Minor Defect - Cover plate(s) are missing from one or more electric boxes, such as for receptacles, switches and/or junction boxes. They are intended to contain fire and prevent electric shock from exposed wires. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of fire and shock. Cover plates should be installed where missing.

    Photo 44  
     

    15) Repair/Replace - Ceiling insulation is missing in some areas. Recommend installing insulation where missing for better energy efficiency.

    Photo 45  

    Photo 47  

    Photo 46  
    Attic 2
     

    16) Repair/Replace - Insulation on water pipes is damaged, deteriorated and/or missing in one or more areas (south attic). Recommend repairing or installing insulation on water pipes where necessary for better energy efficiency and to prevent water pipes from freezing.

    Photo 34  
     

    17) Minor Defect - No insulation is installed over the attic access hatches. Recommend installing insulation above hatch for better energy efficiency.
    18) Minor Defect - No weatherstrip is installed around the attic access hatches. Weatherstrip should be installed around the hatch to prevent heated interior air from entering attic.

    Photo 35  
     

    19) Comment - Some attic areas were inaccessible due to lack of permanently installed walkways, the possibility of damage to insulation, low height and/or stored items. These areas are excluded from this inspection.

    Photo 42  
    Attic
     
     
    Electric service Return to table of contents
    Primary service type: Overhead
    Primary service overload protection type: Circuit breakers
    Service amperage (amps): 125
    Service voltage (volts): 120/240
    Location of main service switch: South side of home
    Location of sub panels: Basement
    Location of main disconnect: Breaker at top of main service panel
    Service entrance conductor material: Aluminum
    System ground: Ground rod(s) in soil, Copper
    Main disconnect rating (amps): 125
    Branch circuit wiring type: Copper
    Solid strand aluminum branch circuit wiring present: No
    Smoke detectors present: Yes
    20) Safety, Repair/Replace, Evaluate - This property has "knob and tube" wiring, which was commonly installed prior to 1950. It is ungrounded, and considered unsafe by today's standards. Over time, the wire's insulation may become brittle and fall apart or wear thin, resulting in exposed conductors and a risk of shock and/or fire. This wiring is also easily damaged by covering it with insulation (a common practice), and incorrectly tapping new wiring into it.

    The inspector did not find any energized knob and tube wiring during the inspection. However this is no indication that all the knob and tube wiring has been abandoned. It is not within the scope of this inspection to determine what percentage of this property's wiring is of the knob and tube type, or to determine what percentage of the knob and tube wiring is energized vs. abandoned. A qualified electrician should evaluate this wiring and make repairs or replace wiring as necessary.

    Note that some insurance companies may be unwilling to offer homeowner's insurance for properties with knob and tube wiring. Recommend that the client(s) consult with their insurance carrier regarding this.

    Photo 33  

    Photo 43  

    21) Safety, Repair/Replace - The main service panel inside cover is missing or not installed. Exposed, energized wiring and equipment exists as a result and is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. The panel cover should be reinstalled or replaced, and by a qualified electrician if necessary.

    Photo 19  
     

    22) Safety, Minor Defect - One or more screws are missing from the main service panel cover and should be replaced. Because energized wiring may exist behind the holes with the missing screws, recommend that a qualified, licensed electrician replace these screws, or that care be taken to ensure that the new screws do not come in contact with wiring inside the panel when they are installed. Stock screws from the panel manufacturer should be used, or their equivalent.
    23) Comment - Electrical Photos.

    Photo 11  
    Electrical service entry panel

    Photo 51  

    Photo 52  
    Electrical sub-panel

    Photo 53  
    Electrical sub-panel view 2
     
    Water heater Return to table of contents
    Estimated age: 0 to 5 years old
    Type: Tank
    Capacity (in gallons): 50
    Manufacturer: Rheem
    Model: 22V50F1
    Water temperature (degrees Fahrenheit): 115
    24) Safety, Repair/Replace - The outer cover for the water heater combustion chamber is missing, loose, or improperly fitted. This is a potential fire hazard. Repairs should be made as necessary, and by a qualified contractor if necessary, to replace, reinstall or repair the flame shield as necessary.

    Photo 56  
    Water heater

    Photo 57  
     
    Heating and cooling Return to table of contents
    Estimated age: 0 to 5 years old
    Primary heating system energy source: Natural gas
    Primary heat system type: Forced air
    Primary A/C energy source: Electric
    Primary Air conditioning type: Split system
    Distribution system: Sheet metal ducts, Flexible ducts
    Manufacturer: Lennox and Ducane
    Model: Furnace - G50UH-60C-110-10, A/C - AC12B4B
    Filter location: In return air duct above furnace, At the base of the furnace
    Last service date: Unknown
    25) Repair/Replace - Drywall dust, and construction debris such as sawdust usually accumulates in heating/cooling ducts during new construction. The drywall dust in particular can reduce the life of the furnace or air handler if left to circulate. Recommend having a qualified contractor clean the ducts.
    26) Repair/Maintain, Evaluate - The last service date of this system appears to be more than two years ago, or the inspector was unable to determine the last service date. The client(s) should ask the property owner(s) when it was last serviced. If unable to determine the last service date, or if this system was serviced more than two years ago, a qualified heating and cooling contractor should inspect, clean, and service this system, and make repairs if necessary. This servicing should be performed every few years in the future, or as per the contractor's recommendations.

    Photo 58  
    Furnace
     

    27) Maintain - Air handler filter(s) are dirty and should be replaced now. They should be checked monthly in the future and replaced as necessary.
    28) Maintain - Air handler filter(s) should be checked monthly in the future and replaced or washed as necessary.
    29) Comment - The outdoor air temperature was below 60 degrees Fahrenheit during the inspection. Because of this, the inspector was unable to operate and fully evaluate the cooling system.

    Photo 5  
    A/C - Air Conditioner
     
     
    Plumbing and laundry Return to table of contents
    Water pressure (psi): 115
    Location of main water shut-off valve: Front wall of basement
    Location of main water meter: Front yard
    Location of main fuel shut-off: West side of home
    Water service: Public
    Service pipe material: Copper
    Supply pipe material: Copper Plastic
    Vent pipe material: Plastic, Cast iron
    Drain pipe material: Plastic, Cast iron
    Waste pipe material: Plastic, Cast iron
    30) Safety, Comment - Copper water supply pipes in homes built prior to 1986 may be joined with solder that contains lead. Lead is a known health hazard, especially for children. Laws were passed in 1985 prohibiting the use of lead in solder, but prior to that solder normally contained about 50 percent lead. The client(s) should be aware of this, especially if children will be living in this structure. Evaluating for the presence of lead in this structure is not included in this inspection. The client(s) should consider having a qualified lab test for lead, and if necessary take steps to reduce or remove lead from the water supply. Various solutions such as these may be advised:

  • Flush water taps or faucets. Do not drink water that has been sitting in the plumbing lines for more than six hours.
  • Install appropriate filters at points of use.
  • Use only cold water for cooking and drinking. Hot water dissolves lead more quickly than cold water.
  • Use bottled or distilled water.
  • Treat well water to make it less corrosive.
  • Have a qualified plumbing contractor replace supply pipes and/or plumbing components as necessary.

    For more information visit:
    http://www.cpsc.gov/CPSCPUB/PUBS/5056.html
    http://www.epa.gov/safewater/lead/index.html
    31) Comment - Plumbing Photos.

    Photo 4  
    Main gas meter

    Photo 55  
    Main water shut-off valve
     
    Fireplaces, woodstoves and chimneys Return to table of contents
    Fireplace type: Masonry, Metal prefabricated
    Chimney type: Masonry, Metal
    32) Safety, Repair/Replace - One or more chimney flues do not have a screened cover installed. Screened covers prevent the following:

  • Fire hazard from wood fire sparks and embers exiting flues
  • Wildlife (birds, rodents, raccoons, etc.) entering flues
  • Rainwater entering flues and mixing with combustion deposits, creating caustic chemicals which can corrode flues
  • Rainwater entering flues and causing damage to terracotta flue tiles from freeze-thaw cycles

    A qualified chimney service contractor should install screened cover(s) where missing. Screens should have holes 1/4 inch or larger.

    Photo 12  
     

    33) Repair/Replace, Monitor - Minor cracks, pitting and/or deterioration were found in some fireplace firebrick (north). However the bricks were not loose and appear to be serviceable. The clients should monitor the condition of the firebricks in the fireplace's firebox in the future. If significant deterioration occurs or if bricks become loose, then a qualified chimney service contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary.

    Photo 23  
    North fireplace

    Photo 31  

    34) Comment - The gas supply for one or more gas fireplaces and/or stoves was turned off. As per the Standards of Practice for both the National Association of Certified Home Inspectors (NACHI) and the American Society of Home Inspectors (ASHI) the inspector does not operate gas shut off valves or light pilot lights during inspections. These appliances were not fully evaluated.
    35) Comment - All solid fuel burning appliances (woodstoves and fireplaces, etc.) should be inspected annually by a qualified chimney service contractor, cleaned and repaired as necessary.

    Photo 26  
    South fireplace
     
     
    Kitchen Return to table of contents

    36) Safety, Repair/Replace, Evaluate - One or more open ground, three-pronged grounding type receptacles (right of microwave) were found. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate and make repairs as necessary.

    Grounding type receptacles were first required in residential structures during the 1960s. Based on the age of this structure and/or the absence of 2-pronged receptacles, repairs should be made by correcting wiring circuits as necessary so all receptacles are grounded as per standard building practices. Replacement of three-pronged receptacles with 2-pronged receptacles is not an acceptable solution.

    37) Safety, Repair/Replace, Evaluate - One or more ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) electric receptacles (right of microwave) did not trip when tested with the inspector's test instrument. These devices should trip when tested with a test instrument in addition to tripping via the test buttons on the receptacles. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate and repair as necessary.
    38) Repair/Replace, Evaluate - The water supply to the dishwasher appears to be inoperable. The shut-off valve may be turned off. The inspector was unable to fully evaluate the dishwasher and its drain system. The client(s) should ask the property owner(s) about this, and if necessary, a qualified plumber or appliance technician should evaluate and repair.
    39) Repair/Replace, Evaluate - One or more electric receptacles (fridge) appear to have no power. Recommend asking the property owner(s) about this. Switches may need to be operated to make some receptacles energized. If necessary, a qualified electrician should evaluate and make repairs as necessary.

    Photo 27  
    Kitchen
     
     
    Bathrooms Return to table of contents

    40) Repair/Replace - One or more sink drains use flexible drain pipe. This type of drain pipe is more likely to clog than smooth wall pipe. Recommend having a qualified plumber replace this pipe with standard plumbing components (smooth wall pipe) to prevent clogged drains.

    Photo 29  

    Photo 48  

    Photo 54  
     

    41) Comment - Bathroom Photos.

    Photo 38  
    Bathroom 2

    Photo 39  
    Bathroom 2

    Photo 40  
    Laundry area

    Photo 49  
    Bathroom 3

    Photo 50  
    Bathroom 3
     
     
    Interior rooms Return to table of contents

    42) Safety, Repair/Replace, Evaluate - One or more open ground, three-pronged grounding type receptacles (basement den/office) were found. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate and make repairs as necessary.

    Grounding type receptacles were first required in residential structures during the 1960s. Based on the age of this structure and/or the absence of 2-pronged receptacles, repairs should be made by correcting wiring circuits as necessary so all receptacles are grounded as per standard building practices. Replacement of three-pronged receptacles with 2-pronged receptacles is not an acceptable solution.

    43) Safety, Repair/Replace, Evaluate - One or more sections of wiring that weren't terminated were found (upstairs west bedroom closet light). This is a potential safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate and repair as necessary. For example, cutting the wire to length and terminating the wire with wire nuts in a securely anchored, covered, properly sized junction box.

    Photo 41  
     

    44) Safety, Repair/Replace, Evaluate - One or more guardrails are too low. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of falling. Standard building practices require that guardrails above drop-offs be 36 inches high. A qualified contractor should evaluate and modify or replace guardrails where necessary, and especially above drop-offs higher than 30 inches.

    Photo 36  

    Photo 37  

    45) Safety, Minor Defect - Cover plate(s) are missing from one or more electric boxes, such as for receptacles, switches and/or junction boxes. They are intended to contain fire and prevent electric shock from exposed wires. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of fire and shock. Cover plates should be installed where missing.
    46) Safety, Maintain - Batteries in all the smoke alarms should be replaced after taking occupancy, and annually in the future. "Chirping" noises emitted from smoke alarms typically indicate that batteries need replacing. For more information, visit:
    http://www.cpsc.gov/cpscpub/pubs/5077.html

    47) Safety, Comment - This structure was built prior to 1979 and may contain lead paint. Laws were enacted in 1978 in the US preventing the use of lead paint in residential structures. Lead is a known safety hazard, especially to children but also to adults. The paint found in and around this structure appeared to be intact and may be encapsulated by more recent layers of paint that are not lead-based. Regardless, recommend following precautions as described in the following links to Consumer Products Safety Commission website articles regarding possible lead paint.

    What You Should Know About Lead Based Paint in Your Home: Safety Alert - CPSC Document #5054

    CPSC Warns About Hazards of "Do lt Yourself" Removal of Lead Based Paint: Safety Alert - CPSC Document #5055

    48) Repair/Replace, Evaluate - One or more electric receptacles appear to have no power (hallway outside main floor bathroom). Recommend asking the property owner(s) about this. Switches may need to be operated to make some receptacles energized. If necessary, a qualified electrician should evaluate and make repairs as necessary.
    49) Repair/Replace, Evaluate - Screen(s) in one or more windows are missing. The client(s) should ask the property owner(s) about this. Screens are often removed for window cleaning and they may be stored somewhere. If not, then recommend installing screens where missing.
    50) Repair/Replace, Evaluate - One or more doors (basement den/office) bind in their jamb and cannot be closed and latched, or are difficult to open and close. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary. For example, adjusting jambs or trimming doors.
    51) Repair/Replace - One or more windows (main floor bathroom) that were built to open, will not open, or open only minimally due to their being painted shut, damaged and/or deteriorated in some way. Repairs should be made as necessary, and by a qualified contractor if necessary so windows open fully, and open and close easily.

    Photo 28  
    Bathroom 1
     

    52) Repair/Replace - Lock mechanisms/hardware missing on one or more windows (north east bedroom and formal dining room) are missing and/or damaged so that they are inoperable. Repairs should be made by a qualified contractor or service technician so that windows lock and unlock easily.

    Photo 30  

    Photo 32  

    53) Comment - Interior Photos.

    Photo 22  
    Living area

    Photo 24  
    Formal dining area

    Photo 25  
    Family area
     

     
    HOME MAINTENANCE CHECK LIST

    Monthly:

    1. Clean dishwasher filter(if provided), usually at lower spray arm.
    2. Purge garbage disposal by first filling kitchen sink with clean water, then turn on food disposer until water is drained through.
    3. Change/clean air conditioning return filters monthly. This will help keep your air cleaner and system running more efficiently. Clogged air filters will make your system operate longer than required, thereby increasing your monthly bills.
    4. Wash refrigerator/freezer interior walls and door liner with solution of 1 quart warm water: 2 tablespoons of baking soda, and wipe dry.
    5. Vacuum and clean all return air ducts/grills.
    6. Inspect lighting fixtures and replace blown light bulbs.
    7. Clean clothes drier lint traps and or ducts to reduce fire risk.
    8. Clean toaster oven crumb tray.

    Quarterly:

    1. Inspect exterior doors to ensure they are weather tight. Adjust or replace weather stripping as needed.
    2. Service doors(incl. garage doors) and drawers, clean and lubricate latches, hinges and guides.
    3. Inspect and repair exterior caulking around windows, doors, and siding.
    4. Replace/clean central heating system(furnace) filters.
    5. Re-tighten knobs on kitchen cabinets, don't overtighten.

    Semi-Annually:

    1. Have heating and air conditioning systems inspected and serviced by licensed contractor.
    2. Inspect and test smoke alarms and carbon monoxide detectors and replace back up batteries.
    3. Check (GFCI)ground fault interrupted circuits. Test if grounded and correct polarity.
    4. Inspect and maintain proper drainage around home. Clean gutters and down-pipes and ensure water is flowing away from your home.
    5. Inspect home for rodent droppings or other pests. Have home treated as needed.
    6. Test sump pump for reliable operation, especially before any rainy season.
    7. Wash fan housing and metal filter connected to range hood exhaust fans. These can be safely washed by placing them inside the dishwasher.
    8. Vacuum coils behind refrigerator/freezer to remove dust, this will improve efficiency of unit.
    9. Tap off a bucket of water from the hot water heater until it runs clean.

    Annually:

    1. Inspect and repair settling cracks (if necessary).
    2. Inspect and lubricate garage door tracks.
    3. Inspect exterior paint for cracking and wear. Repaint or seal as needed.
    4. Drain and refill water heater.
    5. Trip main breaker on electric panel.
    6. Inspect all electric cords and replace if necessary.
    7. Inspect attic for water damage, birds, and rodents.
    8. Inspect all electrical cords and replace if necessary.
    9. Inspect basement for moisture/mold and wood rot.
    10. Inspect attic for signs of roof leaks or water damage, bird nests, rodent or squirrel nests, and clean if necessary.
    11. Change water filters and have water softeners serviced.
    12. Inspect roof flashings, chimney caps, shingles(for mold and damage) and caulking for possible damage.
    13. Pressure wash deck, walkways and driveway.
    14. Reseal wood decks with preservative and inspect and secure nails that may be protruding out. Nails have a tendency to pop out after very cold weather conditions.
    15. Clean or replace oil filter(oil fired burner only).
    16. Inspect outside electrical service feeder for exposed bare wires and tree interference.
    17. Inspect basement/crawl space area for signs of termites and/or other wood-boring insects.
    18. Use hose to wash off dirt from coil and fan in heat pump/condenser locate outside of house.
    19. Inspect all hoses(and replace if necessary) connected to laundry washer unit.
    20. Clean and seal ceramic tile grout lines in bathrooms/toilets/kitchen.
    21. Check caulking at tub and shower, and replace if necessary.
    22. Wash and blow clean bathroom exhaust fan grill and fan blades.
    23. Wash windows(exterior and interior), screens, seals and ledges. Repair if necessary.
    24. Clean and lubricate sliding glass door tracks and window tracks.
    25. Check stucco joints around doors and windows.
    26. Inspect the dishwasher's motor motor spin seal, and replace if necessary.
    27. Inspect laundry washer water fill hoses for cracks, blisters, corroded fittings and leaks.
    28. Place beeswax or paraffin on built-in kitchen cabinets that have wooden guides.
    29. Inspect for creosote deposits in the fireplace flue liner, these are black or brown residue of combustion that collects on the inner surfaces. If the build up is more than 1/8 inch, remove it.
    30. Vacuum around the gas hot water heater(especially near furnace) to remove dirt and grime.

    Tips for clogged drains:

    Keeping the Drains Clear:
    1. By pouring a pot of hot water down the drain once a week will melt away any fat or grease that may have built up in the drain line or P-trap.
    2. If you have a clogged drain, just pour a 1/2 cup of baking soda and 1/2 cup of white vinegar down the drain. Cover the drain and let the mixture sit for a few minutes, then pour a pot of hot water down the drain. This will break down fats and also keep the drains smelling fresh.
    3. Every six months, keep your drains clean by using a copper sulfide or sodium hydroxide-based drain cleaner, or other recommended drain cleaner available from your local store.

    Other safety tips:

    Ensure that you know where the following items are located:
    1. Emergency contact telephone numbers.
    2. Fire extinguishers and water hose pipes.
    3. Heating gas/fuel main shutoff valve.
    4. Main electrical disconnect circuit breaker(breaker box/service panel).
    5. Main drain line clean-out.
    6. Main water shut off valve.
    7. All window and door exits.

    In addition to the above, carry out the following monthly safety checks:
    Some of these items may have already be included in the home maintenance list, but these monthly safety checks are advisable for safety reasons:
    1. Test ground fault circuit interrupter receptacles(GFCI's).
    2. Test smoke and carbon monoxide alarms, replace batteries if necessary.
    3. Inspect and lubricate (if necessary) all emergency exits, including windows and doors.
    4. Inspection of heating unit and water heater for visual integrity.

    Home appliance estimated life spans:

    1. Dishwasher water valves: 3-7 years
    2. Range and oven: 18-20 years
    3. Garbage disposal: 10 years
    4. Microwave: 10 years
    5. Refrigerator: 18-20 years
    6. Laundry washer: 14 years
    7. Laundry dryer: 14 years
    8. Refrigerator/Freezer: 18-20 years
    9. Central air conditioner system: 15 years
    10. Window mounted air conditioning system: 8 years
    11. Bathtub/Sink: 50 years
    12. Garage door opener: 10 years
    13. Laundry water fill hoses: 3-5 years
    14. Trash compactor: 10 years

    Energy saving web-sites:

    Perhaps you never thought of your home as a likely place to save you a lot of money, but it is. Most homes are far from being energy-efficient. That means if you are using more energy than you have to, you are also paying higher monthly bills than necessary. By checking out the following energy saving web-sites, you will be able to gain some wise energy saving ideas that you will be able to put to use right away. You can do many of them yourself, others may require the services of a licensed contractor:

    http://www.eere.energy.gov/buildings/building_america
    http://www.aceee.org/consumerguide
    http://www.efficientwindows.org

    PLEASE READ CAREFULLY

    All of our inspections require a signed inspection agreement signed by the client. If this agreement is not signed prior to your receiving the report, it is important to understand that we take no liability whatsoever for information contained in this report. Our legal responsibilities and liabilities are described within the inspection agreement and only apply once the agreement is signed and we have a copy in our office. THIS REPORT IS NOT VALID UNLESS SIGNATURE HOME SERVICES HAS SIGNED AGREEMENT ON FILE IN ITS OFFICE. All components designated for inspection in the NACHI Standards of Practice are inspected, except as may be noted in the “Limitations of Inspection” sections within this report. It is the goal of the inspection to put a home buyer in a better position to make a buying decision. Not all improvements will be identified during this inspection. Unexpected repairs should still be anticipated. The inspection should not be considered a guarantee or warranty of any kind. This inspection is visual only. A representative sample of building components are viewed in areas that are accessible at the time of the inspection. No destructive testing or dismantling of building components is performed. Please refer to the pre-inspection contract for a full explanation of the scope of the inspection.

    ____________________________________________________________

    SCOPE AND LIMITATIONS OF THIS INSPECTION

    This inspection is limited to a visual observation of the exposed and readily accessible areas of the home. The concealed and inaccessible areas are not included. The following locations are considered inaccessible due to limited height and excluded from this inspection unless otherwise stated:

    * Crawl space areas less than 18 inches in height
    * Attic spaces less than 5 feet in height
    * Spaces under outdoor decks less than 5 feet high

    Observation includes operation of the systems or components by means of the normal user controls. Dismantling of equipment, and destructive testing is not included. Some specific items are also excluded, and these are listed in the following section. If you feel there is a need for evaluation of any of these items, then you will need to arrange for specific inspections.

    Items not Included

    1. Recreational, leisure, playground or decorative equipment or appliances including but not limited to pools, hot tubs, saunas, steam baths, landscape lighting, fountains, shrubs, trees, and tennis courts;
    2. Cosmetic conditions (wallpapering, painting, carpeting, scratches, scrapes, dents, cracks, stains, soiled or faded surfaces on the structure or equipment, soiled, faded, torn, or dirty floor, wall or window coverings etc.);
    3. Noise pollution or air quality in the area;
    4. Earthquake hazard, liquefaction, flood plain, soil, slide potential or any other geological conditions or evaluations;
    5. Engineering level evaluations on any topic;
    6. Existence or non-existence of solder or lead in water pipes, asbestos, hazardous waste, radon, urea formaldehyde urethane, lead paint or any other environmental, flammable or toxic contaminants or the existence of water or airborne diseases or illnesses and all other similar or potentially harmful substances (although the inspector may note the possible existence of asbestos in ceiling texture and furnace duct tape);
    7. Zoning or municipal code (e.g. building, fire, housing (existing buildings), mechanical, electrical, plumbing, etc. code) restrictions or other legal requirements of any kind;
    8. Any repairs which relate to some standard of interior decorating;
    9. Cracked heat exchangers or similar devices in furnaces;
    10. Any evaluation which requires the calculation of the capacity of any system or item that is expected to be part of the inspection. Examples include but are not limited to the calculation of appropriate wattage or wiring of kitchen appliances, appropriate sizing of flues or chimneys, appropriate ventilation to combustion-based items (e.g. furnaces, water heaters, fireplaces etc.), appropriate sizing, spacing and spanning of joists, beams, columns, girders, trusses, rafters, studs etc., appropriate sizing of plumbing and fuel lines, etc.;
    11. Washers and dryers;
    12. Circuit breaker operation;
    13. Specialty evaluations such as private sewage, wells, solar heating systems, alarms, intercom systems, central vacuum systems, wood and coal stoves, pre-fab and zero clearance fireplaces, space heaters, sprinkler systems, gas logs, gas lights, elevators and common areas unless these have been specifically added to the inspection description above but only to the degree that the inspector is capable of evaluating these items;
    14. Items that are not visible and exposed including but not limited to concealed wiring, plumbing, water leaks, under bathtubs and shower stalls due to faulty pans or otherwise, vent lines, duct work, exterior foundation walls (below grade or covered by shrubs or wall/paneling, stored goods etc.) and footings, underground utilities, and systems and chimney flues;
    15. Evaluations involving destructive testing;
    16. Evaluation which requires moving personal goods, debris, furniture, equipment, floor covering, insulation or like materials;
    17. Design problems and adequacy or operational capacity, quality or suitability;
    18. Fireplace drafting;
    19. To prevent damages to units, air conditioning when outside temperature below 60 degrees F or if the unit has not been warmed up or on for at least 24 hours prior to inspection;
    20. Any evaluation which would involve scraping paint or other wall coverings;
    21. Heating system accessories (e.g. humidifiers, electronic air cleaners etc.);
    22. Legal description of property such as boundaries, egress/ingress, etc.;
    23. Quality of materials;
    24. Conformance with plan specifications or manufacturers specifications;
    25. Flood conditions or plains;
    26. Any other characteristics or items which are generally not included in a building inspection report on a regular basis.

    As a part of our service, we sometimes provide approximate, cost of repair estimates for particular items. These estimates should be considered as background information only. It is beyond the scope of this inspection and report to supply you with accurate repair costs. Such estimates should be supplied by contractors who specialize in this type of work. Our estimates should be used only as guidelines. If you intend to negotiate the price of this property based on defects found during this inspection, we strongly suggest you obtain one or more written bids from a licensed contractor(s). It is a conflict of interest for Signature Home Services to recommend any specific contractor.

    Evaluations are made as to the present age, and remaining economic life of an item, i.e. water heaters, roofs, plumbing, furnaces, etc. These evaluations are based on visual observation, industry averages and prior experience. THEY ARE NOT OFFERED AS A WARRANTY OR CERTIFICATION OF REMAINING LIFE.

    Disclaimer
    In some cases we may recommend your consulting a specialist such as a structural engineer or licensed electrician. Hiring a specialist can be a prudent means of providing some protection of your financial investment in this property. WE DO NOT MAKE ANY TYPE OF WARRANTY OR GUARANTEE AS TO THE CONDITION OF THE PROPERTY. SOME THINGS MAY REMAIN HIDDEN OR BECOME DEFECTIVE AFTER THE INSPECTION. IT IS NOT POSSIBLE TO DETECT EVERY DEFECT WITHIN A BUILDING DURING THE COURSE OF A GENERAL INSPECTION. THIS REPORT SHOULD BE USED IN CONJUNCTION WITH, AND NOT A REPLACEMENT FOR , A PRE-CLOSING WALK-THROUGH BY THE CLIENT.
    THIS INSPECTION IS NOT AN INSURANCE POLICY AGAINST HIDDEN DEFECTS, OR CONDITIONS THAT ARE NOT VISIBLE AND READILY APPARENT AT THE TIME OF INSPECTION.

    THE COST OF THIS INSPECTION DOES NOT ENTITLE YOU TO ANY TYPE OF PROTECTION FROM HIDDEN FLAWS AND DEFECTS. THIS INSPECTION DOES NOT TRANSFER YOUR ULTIMATE RESPONSIBILITY TO SIGNATURE HOME SERVICES.