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LogoWebsite: http://www.BCWarner.com
Inspector's email: bcwarner@gmail.com
Phone: (937) 423-2949

  

Property Inspection Report

Client(s):  Sample Report
Property address:  123 Sample Street
Dayton, Ohio
Inspection date:  Thursday, August 04, 2016

This report published on Monday, February 13, 2017 9:50:35 PM EST

This is a sample report for reference only. Actual reports will vary in content and descriptions.
How to Read this Report
This report is organized by the property's functional areas.  Within each functional area, descriptive information is listed first and is shown in bold type.  Items of concern follow descriptive information. Concerns are shown and sorted according to these types:
Concern typeSafety ConcernPoses a risk of injury or death, risk to health, or otherwise unsafe condition. Caution should be heeded and improvements are recommended.
Concern typeMajor Defect or Concern ItemSignificant problem or concern exists. Correction likely involves a significant expense which should be reviewed by a qualified professional or specialist for accurate estimates.
Concern typeRepair NecessaryItem was not functioning as designed or intended, or correction likely requires a professional or specialist, and moderate expense.
Concern typeSmall/Light Repair ItemRepair is recommended. Item was broken or needs small repairs. Correction typically involves small expense performed by handyman or knowledgeable person.
Concern typeMinor Repair ItemCourtesy item brought to your attention. Correction typically involves a minor expense and can typically be performed by homeowner, handyman, or other knowledgeable person.
Concern typeMaintainRecommend routine attention and maintenance to keep item in proper working condition.
Concern typeInvestigate FurtherRecommend additional investigation, research, or review by a specialist and/or client
Concern typeMonitorItem or concern is recommended for routine inspection or monitoring in the future, and maintenance or repair as necessary.
Concern typeFunctionalItem or component was in serviceable and functional condition at time of inspection without obvious indications of neglect or concerns.
Concern typeInformational CommentFor your information

Click here for a glossary of building construction terms.Contact your inspector If there are terms that you do not understand, or visit the glossary of construction terms at http://www.reporthost.com/glossary.asp

Table of Contents
General information
Grounds
Exterior and Foundation
Roof
Attic
Garage or Carport
Detached Structure
Crawl space
Electric Service and Equipment
Plumbing and Fuel Systems
Water heater
Well
Heating, Ventilation and Air Condition (HVAC)
Fireplaces, Stoves, Chimneys, and Flues
Kitchen
Bathrooms, Laundry, and Sinks
Interior Rooms, Doors, and Windows

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General information
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Report number: SAMPLE REPORT
Time started: 12:00pm
Time finished: 4:30pm
Present during inspection: Client
Client present for discussion at end of inspection: Yes
Weather conditions at inspection: Partly cloudy
Temperature at start of inspection: 84°F
Recent weather: Dry (no rain)
Ground conditions at inspection: Dry
Type of building: Single family residence
Buildings inspected: House
Approximate construction year of primary residential structure: 1984
Source for primary structure construction year: Municipal records or property listing
Occupied: Yes
Front of building faces: East
Main entrance faces: East
Apparent additions or modifications noted from original construction: back room addition 1995
Source for additions and modifications: Realtor
The following items are excluded from this inspection: Private sewage disposal system, Security system, Swimming pool, Hot tub, Private well

1) Additions, Renovations, Modifications and/or Significant system repairs or upgrades to this property may have been made without the owner(s) having obtained permits and/or inspections from the municipality, based on substandard and/or unconventional construction or installations observed, and/or absence of visible inspection tags. Work may have been performed by someone other than a qualified contractor or person. The client should consult with the property owner about this, and if necessary research building permits and related inspections with the proper authorities.

At worst case, if substantial work was performed without permits and related inspections, this knowledge must be disclosed when the building is sold in the future. This may adversely affect future sales. Also, the local municipality could require costly alterations and/or fines to bring the building into legal compliance, or even require that the additions, upgrades, or modifications be removed.

Grounds
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Limitations: Unless specifically included in the inspection, the following items and any related equipment, controls, electric systems and/or plumbing systems are excluded from this inspection: detached buildings or structures; fences and gates; retaining walls; underground drainage systems, catch basins or concealed sump pumps; swimming pools and related safety equipment, spas, hot tubs or saunas; whether deck, balcony and/or stair membranes are watertight; trees, landscaping, properties of soil, soil stability, erosion and erosion control; ponds, water features, irrigation or yard sprinkler systems; sport courts, playground, recreation or leisure equipment; areas below the exterior structures with less than 3 feet of vertical clearance; invisible fencing; sea walls, docks and boathouses; retractable awnings. Grading and drainage problems cannot adequately be determined during dry weather or even the brief time we are inspecting the property. Any comments made regarding the above items are as a courtesy only.
Fence and gate material: Wood
Driveway material: Asphalt, Poured in place concrete
Deck, porch and/or balcony material: Wood

2) Substandard construction was observed at the deck including over-spanned joists, improper joist and girder attachment, inadequate joist sizing, improper girder to post attachment, incorrect structural fasteners, etc. Potential collapse may occur if the deck is overloaded with occupants and/or furnishings. Recommend qualified contractor repair or replace as necessary and per standard building practices. Significant cost is likely to be incurred. For information on proper deck construction, please visit the American Wood Council document at http://www.awc.org/pdf/codes-standards/publications/dca/AWC-DCA62012-DeckGuide-1405.pdf
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3) One or more sections of wiring that weren't terminated were found (near pool deck). The wiring did not appear to be energized at time of inspection; however, if it were to become energized via switch or other means, this may present a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrical contractor should repair as necessary. For example, cutting the wire to length and terminating the wire with wire nuts in a securely anchored, covered, properly sized junction box, or removing the wiring if it has been abandoned.
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4) The self-closing and/or self-latching devices on one or more gates used with the pool fencing were missing. This is a safety hazard because these devices are intended to control access to areas with a drowning hazard. Recommend that a qualified person repair as necessary and per standard building practices.

5) The gate and/or fencing around the pool was deteriorated. This is a safety hazard because it is intended to control access to areas with a drowning hazard. Fences and gates for this purpose should:
  • Be a minimum of 5 feet (60 inches) in height
  • Not be climbable by children
  • Not have gaps or voids that allow passage of a sphere equal to or greater than 4 inches in diameter
Recommend that a qualified person repair per standard building practices.
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6) Handrails at one or more flights of stairs were loose and/or wobbly. This is a safety hazard. Recommend that a qualified person repair as necessary.
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7) One or more significantly sized depressions were observed in the yard (several locations). These may pose a a safety hazard from tripping or injury. Recommend back-fill depressions as needed.

8) A swimming pool and/or spa was installed on the premises. Pools, spas and related pumps, heaters, filters, electric or gas-fired systems, buildings, decks, landings and stairs are specialty systems and are excluded from this inspection. Comments in this report related to pools, spas and related equipment are made as a courtesy only and are not meant to be a substitute for a full evaluation by a qualified specialist. Many potential safety, maintenance and/or repair issues related to the pool and/or spa may exist. Recommend the following:
  • Have a qualified specialist fully evaluate the pool and/or spa, and related systems as mentioned above
  • Consult with the property owner about past maintenance and repairs, and review available documentation about installed systems
  • Research safety and maintenance issues related to pools and spas
For more information, visit:
http://www.reporthost.com/?POOLSPA

Note:
The pool appears to have been neglected and was missing pump and filtration systems or equipment. Recommend consult with current owners about this. Clients may wish to have pool removed entirely, or consult with qualified pool contractor for cost estimates of returning pool to a usable condition (if feasible). Significant cost is likely to be incurred.
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9) Numerous significantly-sized diseased or dead trees were found on the property grounds, some of which and may pose of risk of damaging building(s). Recommend that such trees be removed by a qualified tree service contractor or certified arborist. Significant cost for professional tree and stump removal is likely to be incurred.
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10) One or more footings for decks were installed on top of the soil grade, or at too shallow a depth. In areas subject to prolonged freezing, footings for structures should be installed below the frost line. When footings are installed above the frost line, the structure may heave upwards during freezing temperatures and be damaged. Heaving and deflection were noted at walking surfaces of the deck. Recommend that a qualified contractor repair per standard building practices for this municipality and climate.
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Heaving deflection visible in decking boards
 

11) Concrete steps at the rear entrance have settled significantly. A qualified contractor should repair or replace as necessary.
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12) The soil or grading sloped down towards building perimeters in one or more areas of the north elevation. This can result in water accumulating around building foundations or underneath buildings. It is a conducive condition for wood-destroying organisms. Recommend grading soil so it slopes down and away from buildings with a slope of at least 1 inch per horizontal foot for at least 6 feet out from buildings.
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13) Wooden deck or porch surfaces and/or railings were overdue for normal maintenance. Recommend that a qualified person clean and preserve as necessary. Where decks have been coated with a finish such as opaque stains or paint, it may be too difficult to strip the finish and apply anything but paint or opaque stain. Where transparent stain or penetrating oil has been applied in the past, recommend that a penetrating oil be used. For more information, visit:
http://www.reporthost.com/?PENOIL
http://www.reporthost.com/?DKMAIN

14) Pavement sloped down towards building perimeters in one or more areas of the south elevation. This may result in water accumulating around building foundations or underneath buildings. Monitor these areas in the future, especially during and after periods of rain. If significant amounts of water are found to accumulate, then recommend that a qualified contractor evaluate and repair as necessary. For example, by installing drain(s) or removing old pavement and installing new.
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15) Significant amounts of debris, stored items and/or junk were found in the yard or around buildings. Refuse can harbor unwanted vermin and pests. Clients may wish to have current owners remove debris.

16) Common cracks were found in the driveway, but no trip hazards or significant displacement were found at time of inspection. The client may wish to have repairs made for cosmetic reasons and as preventive maintenance.

17) Some decks were obscured by carpeting and couldn't be fully evaluated.

18) Some areas of the deck substructure were inaccessible due to limited space below and/or permanently installed skirting. These areas couldn't be evaluated and are excluded from the inspection.

Exterior and Foundation
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Limitations: The inspector performs a visual inspection of accessible components or systems at the exterior. Items excluded from this inspection include below-grade foundation walls and footings; foundations, exterior surfaces or components obscured by vegetation, stored items or debris; wall structures obscured by coverings such as siding or trim. Some items such as siding, trim, soffits, vents and windows are often high off the ground, and may be viewed using binoculars from the ground or from a ladder. This may limit a full evaluation. Regarding foundations, some amount of cracking is normal in concrete slabs and foundation walls due to shrinkage and drying. Note that the inspector does not determine the adequacy of seismic reinforcement.
Apparent wall structure: Wood frame
Wall covering: Wood, Brick veneer
Apparent foundation type: Crawl space
Foundation/stem wall material: Concrete block

19) One or more electric receptacles and/or the boxes they are installed in along the back deck were loose and/or not securely anchored. Wire conductors may be damaged due to repeated movement and/or tension on wires, or insulation may be damaged. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock and fire. A qualified electrical contractor should repair as necessary.
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20) One or more ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) electric receptacles along the back deck did not trip when tested. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrical contractor should repair or replace as necessary.
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21) Electrical conduit was damaged or loose in one or more locations along the back deck. Water intrusion and damage to electrical wiring may occur posing risk of shock and fire. Recommend qualified electrical contractor repair as necessary and per standard building practices.
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22) One or more hornet, bee and/or wasp nests were found (various locations around perimeter). These can pose a safety hazard as the risk of bite or sting is high for home owner, children, and pets. Nest(s) should be removed as necessary. Caution should be heeded if home owner attempts to clear these areas. Recommend hiring qualified pest control contractor to remove nests.

23) The masonry (brick or stone) veneer was deteriorated or damaged in some areas (front entry threshold). Where cracks or openings are exposed, water may enter the wall structure causing mold, fungal growth and structural damage. This is a conducive condition for wood-destroying organisms. Recommend that a qualified contractor repair as necessary. For example, by repointing mortar or replacing broken or missing masonry.
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24) One or more sections of horizontal trim boards had no "Z" flashing installed above them where they met siding. "Z" flashing should be installed above these boards to reduce the chance of leaks and/or water entrapment between the trim and siding. Without this flashing, caulk and paint must be diligently maintained, or water can cause rot and possible structural damage. Recommend that a qualified contractor install flashing above horizontal trim boards where missing and per standard building practices. Note that when trim or siding is removed to install flashing, damaged wood may be found and additional repairs may be needed.
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25) One or more light fixtures were damaged and/or deteriorated. A qualified electrical contractor should repair or replace light fixtures where necessary.
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26) One or more "frost-free" hose bibs were mounted sideways. This is unconventional installation which renders the frost-free or freeze prevention of the faucet assembly ineffective. Recommend qualified person repair per standard building practices and manufacturer installation guidelines.
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27) One or more light fixtures were loose. A qualified person should make repairs as necessary so light fixtures are securely mounted and installed in accordance with the manufacturer's installation instructions.
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28) One or more wall-mounted exterior light fixtures had wiring that's subject to water intrusion due to caulk not being installed around the light fixture's back plate. Caulk should be applied around the perimeter of back plates where missing. A gap should be left at the bottom for condensation to drain out.
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29) The self closing strut at one or more storm doors was missing. High winds may damage the door due to its light weight. Recommend qualified person repair, install, or replace self closing strut.

30) One or more exhaust duct end caps were loose. Their purpose is to prevent unconditioned air from entering the building, and keep out birds, rodents and bugs. Blocked ducts can cause fan motors and/or clothes dryers to overheat and can pose a fire hazard. Recommend that a qualified person repair or replace caps as necessary.
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31) Some sections of siding and/or trim were deteriorated, loose, warped and/or damaged. Recommend that a qualified person repair, replace or install siding or trim as necessary.
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32) Caulk was deteriorated in some areas. For example, around windows, around doors and/or at wall penetrations. Recommend that a qualified person renew or install caulk as necessary. Where gaps are wider than 1/4 inch, an appropriate material other than caulk should be used. For more information, visit:
http://www.reporthost.com/?CAULK

33) Damage and/or decay was found at one or more exterior door jambs. Recommend that a qualified person repair as necessary. All damaged wood should be replaced.
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34) One or more areas were conducive for, or show signs of nesting activities from birds. These may pose a health hazard and/or nuisance. Recommend nests be removed and areas cleaned and sanitized. Preventive measures should be employed to reduce or prevent future nuisance animal activity such as sealing gaps and openings into the attic.
For more information concerning related health risks please visit:
http://www.cdc.gov/hantavirus/hps/index.html
and
http://www.cdc.gov/fungal/diseases/histoplasmosis/index.html

35) Stains were found at one or more soffit boards, but no elevated moisture levels were found (dry conditions during and prior to inspection). Recommend monitor these areas in the future. If moisture is observed, recommend that a qualified contractor evaluate and repair as necessary.
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Roof
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Limitations: Roof problems cannot be adequately determined during dry weather or when covered by layers of snow. Roofs are prone to leaking after extended dry periods due to weathering, drying, and shrinkage of wood components of the roof. Roofs are also prone to leaking after ice thaws and snow melts due to extreme forces exerted on roofing structures by ice, snow, cold, and wind (otherwise known as the winter season). The following items or areas are not included in this inspection: areas that could not be traversed or viewed clearly due to lack of access; solar roofing components. Any comments made regarding these items are made as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not provide an estimate of remaining life on the roof surface material, nor guarantee that leaks have not occurred in the roof surface, skylights or roof penetrations in the past. Regarding roof leaks, only active leaks, visible evidence of possible sources of leaks, and evidence of past leaks observed during the inspection are reported on as part of this inspection. The inspector does not guarantee or warrant that leaks will not occur in the future. Complete access to all roof and attic spaces during all seasons and during prolonged periods of all types of weather conditions (e.g. high wind and rain, melting snow) would be needed to do so. Regarding the roof drainage system, unless the inspection was conducted during and after prolonged periods of heavy rain, the inspector was unable to determine if gutters, downspouts and extensions performed adequately or were leak-free.
Roof inspection method: Traversed
Roof surface material: Asphalt or fiberglass composition shingles
Apparent number of layers of roof surface material: One
Gutter & downspout material: Metal
Roof ventilation type: Ridge vent(s), Box vents (roof jacks), Enclosed soffit vents

36) Kick-out (diverter) flashing was missing at one or more locations. Such flashing should be located at the bottom of slopes where roof surfaces intersect with exterior walls above. It directs rainwater away from exterior walls and into gutters so that rainwater is less likely to run down the front surfaces of siding and veneers, or flow behind siding. Damaged siding was noted in these areas. Recommend that a qualified contractor install kickout (diverter) flashings where missing and per best building practices for improved moisture intrusion resistance of the exterior cladding and performance of roof drainage systems.
For more information visit: http://www.dryflekt.com/
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37) One or more sections of gutters were loose or improperly secured. This can result in water accumulating around the structure's foundation. Accumulated water is a conducive condition to wood destroying insects and organisms, and may also cause the foundation to settle and possibly fail over time. Recommend qualified contractor repair as necessary and per best building practices.
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38) One or more roof penetration flashings were lifting at the base or are improperly installed so that water or vermin intrusion may occur. A qualified contractor should make repairs as necessary, such as permanently fastening down the lifted edge(s), or reinstalling flashings.
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39) Ridge vents were lifted or loose in one or more areas. Additional damage and water intrusion are likely to occur. Recommend qualified contractor repair as necessary.
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40) One or more chimneys had no cricket is installed. A cricket is a small peaked saddle on top of the basic roof and behind the chimney that sheds water off to the sides. Debris such as leaves, needles, moss, etc. is likely to accumulate above the chimney because of the wide chimney. Leaks may occur as a result. These are required for chimneys wider than two feet, but considered best practice for chimneys of any width that can potentially trap debris. The client(s) should monitor this area for accumulated debris in the future. If debris is found to accumulate above the chimney, then a qualified contractor should install a cricket or at the very least one should be installed during the next roof replacement.
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41) Caulk was deteriorated around skylights. Recommend that a qualified person renew or install caulk as necessary. Where gaps are wider than 1/4 inch, an appropriate material other than caulk should be used. For more information, visit:
http://www.reporthost.com/?CAULK
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42) The roof decking was spongy, soft or springy in one or more areas when the inspector walked on those areas. Deteriorated sheathing from moisture related concerns was observed in the attic areas. Typically immediate replacement is not required, but clients should budget for replacement sheathing and install with the next roof covering replacement. Note that contractors needing to access the roof in the future should be warned about these conditions until corrected.

Note: see Attic section of this report fro related concerns.
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43) One or more skylights used single-pane glass or plastic resin. Single-pane glazing is one of the largest sources of heat loss in winter and heat gain in the summer due to the low insulating ability and high air leakage rates. They're estimated to be responsible for 25% to 50% of the energy used to heat and cool homes. Consider replacing single-pane glazing in skylights with new, multi-pane glazing.

Attic
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Limitations: The following items or areas are not included in this inspection: areas that could not be traversed or viewed clearly due to lack of access; areas and components obscured by insulation or stored items. Any comments made regarding these items are made as a courtesy only. The inspector does not determine the adequacy of the attic ventilation system. Complete access to all roof and attic spaces during all seasons and during prolonged periods of all types of weather conditions (e.g. high/low temperatures, high/low humidity, high wind and rain, melting snow) would be needed to do so. The inspector is not a licensed engineer and does not determine the adequacy of roof structure components such as trusses, rafters or ceiling beams, or their spacing or sizing.Attics are very complicated and dangerous environments and can become extremely hot during certain periods of the day. Extremely hot temperatures can cause heat stroke or other health problems if a person is in the attic too long. Recommend always using caution when in an attic. Under such conditions, individuals should never enter the attic alone or when other people are not present in the house. Very rarely is the attic and the related systems and components fully accessible or visible due to insulation; loose wires; storage; blockage by framing components, equipment, gas and water supply lines; heating and ventilation ducts; or dangerous or unsafe conditions. There is always the possibility that problems or defects were present but not visible in areas not accessed; concealed problems or defects are not within the scope of the home inspection. Recommend regular monitoring and maintenance to help detect roofing or drainage problems.
Inspection method: Traversed
Roof structure type: Trusses
Ceiling structure: Trusses
Ceiling insulation material: Fiberglass loose fill
Insulation depth: ~4-8 inches

44) Recessed "can" lights that are not rated for contact with insulation are installed in the ceiling below the attic. One or more of these lights are in contact with insulation. This is a fire hazard. Insulation should be moved, and wells or barriers should be installed or repaired as necessary to keep the insulation away from these lights as per the manufacturer's installation instructions.
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45) Combustibles materials, insulation or other building materials were in contact with or less than one inch from chimney or gas flue pipes in one or more areas. This is a fire hazard and does not comply with manufacturer installation requirements. A qualified contractor should make repairs or modifications as necessary so minimum clearances to combustibles, building materials, and insulation are maintained around all chimney and flue pipes as per the manufacturer's specifications.

46) Wire splices were exposed due to not being contained in a covered junction box. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock and fire. A qualified electrical contractor should make repairs as necessary. For example, install securely mounted junction boxes with cover plates where needed to contain wiring splices.
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47) Staining consistent with microbial growth was visible on roof sheathing in one or more areas of the attic. Corrosion was also noted at exposed nails, and sheathing deteriorated in areas. Such staining usually occurs due to elevated humidity in the attic, and subsequent elevated moisture levels in the sheathing. When humid attic conditions have been corrected, it's likely that such staining will stop growing. However, ongoing ventilation and/or insulation issues can also result in humid conditions. Please note any other comments in this report related to ventilation, insulation and/or contributing moisture levels in the attic, and make any related recommended corrections. After issues related to the moisture conditions have been corrected, the clients may or may not wish to have mitigation work performed for the biological staining.
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Dirty insulation indicates air movement from interior spaces
 

48) One or more areas with attic space were inaccessible due to no visible entry or access point (over hot tub room addition). The inspector was unable to evaluate those attics, and they are excluded from this inspection. Recommend having a qualified contractor install access hatches as necessary and as per standard building practices to allow periodic evaluation of attic spaces.

49) The ceiling insulation in one or more areas of the attic was compacted or uneven, missing and/or inadequate. Heating and cooling costs may be higher due to reduced energy efficiency. Recommend that a qualified person repair, replace or install insulation as necessary and per standard building practices (typically R-38).

50) One or more exhaust fan ducts terminate in attic because no vent cap is installed at the roof or exterior wall surfaces. This is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects and organisms due to increased moisture levels in the attic from the exhaust air. A qualified contractor should install vent caps where missing and as per standard building practices, so all exhaust air is vented outside.
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51) One of the attic exhaust fans was noisy and/or vibrates excessively (blades hitting case). A qualified contractor should make repairs or replace the unit as necessary.

52) One or more exhaust fan ducts were broken and/or have fallen down, or somehow terminate in the attic. This is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects and organisms due to increased moisture levels in the attic from the exhaust air. A qualified person should make permanent repairs as necessary and as per standard building practices, so all exhaust air is vented outside.
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53) One or more attic access hatches or doors had no weatherstripping, or the weatherstripping was substandard. Weatherstripping should be installed around hatches or doors as necessary to prevent heated interior air from entering the attic. For more information, visit:
http://www.reporthost.com/_docs/atticaccess.pdf
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54) Evidence of rodent activity was found in the form of poison and/or rodent trails or tunnels in one or more areas of the attic. Recommend consulting with the property owner about this. While a common nuisance in many homes, uncontrolled rodent activity can pose a health concern to occupants. A qualified person should make repairs to seal openings in the structure, set traps, and clean rodent waste as necessary. Recommend following guidelines in these Center for Disease Control articles:
http://www.cdc.gov/rodents/prevent_infestations/seal_up.html
http://www.cdc.gov/rodents/prevent_infestations/trap_up.html
http://www.cdc.gov/rodents/prevent_infestations/clean_up.html

55) Thermal imaging consistent with air infiltration and/or heat loss was observed at interior walls where they connect to unconditioned attic areas. This is common as interior wall cavities are rarely sealed tight when adjoining attics, allowing for unhindered air movement. While not necessarily an immediate repair item, recommend clients consider future repairs for improved energy efficiency of the home. For more information and appropriate repair suggestions, please visit http://www.buildingscience.com/documents/guides-and-manuals/gm-attic-air-sealing-guide/view
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Garage or Carport
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Limitations: The inspector does not determine the adequacy of firewall ratings. Requirements for ventilation in garages vary between municipalities. Garages are often used for storage. As a result, excessive stored items, furnishings, and/or shelving may prevent full evaluation of perimeter and centers of garages.
Type: Attached

56) One or more electric receptacles and/or the boxes they are installed in were loose and/or not securely anchored. Wire conductors may be damaged due to repeated movement and/or tension on wires, or insulation may be damaged. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock and fire. A qualified electrical contractor should repair as necessary.

57) No photoelectric sensing devices were installed for the vehicle door's electric door opener. They've been required on all vehicle door openers since 1993 and improve safety by triggering the vehicle door's auto-reverse feature without need for the door to come in contact with the object, person or animal that's preventing it from closing. Recommend considering having a qualified contractor install these devices or replace aging opener for improved safety. For more information on garage door safety issues, visit:
http://www.cpsc.gov/cpscpub/pubs/523.pdf
and
http://www.dasma.com/PDF/Publications/TechDataSheets/OperatorElectronics/TDS364.pdf
and
https://www.google.com/search?q=installing+garage+door+sensors

58) One or more automatic door openers were deteriorated, disconnected from the door, and significantly aged. Recommend that a qualified contractor replace opener(s) as necessary.
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59) Stains and elevated levels of moisture were found in one or more wall areas (below mechanical closet). The stain(s) appear to be due to previous plumbing related leak in proximity to damaged areas. A qualified contractor should repair as necessary.
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60) Weatherstrip at the sides and/or bottom of the vehicle door was damaged and/or deteriorated. It should be replaced where necessary to prevent water and vermin intrusion.
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61) The garage-house door wasn't equipped with an automatic closing device such as sprung hinges. This door should close and latch automatically to prevent vehicle fumes from entering living spaces and/or to slow the spread of fire from the garage to living spaces. A qualified contractor should install automatic closing device(s) as necessary, and as per standard building practices, so this door closes and latches automatically.

62) The vehicle door has an electric opener installed, and the manual lock mechanism on the door hasn't been disabled. Damage or injury may occur if the vehicle door opener is operated with the manual lock engaged. A qualified person should disable or remove the lock mechanism. For more information on garage door safety issues, visit: http://www.dasma.com/

63) No ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protected receptacles or circuits appear to be installed. GFCI protected receptacles help prevent electric shocks and injuries in areas that may have water present. GFCI protected circuits have been required in many locations around the home since the 1970's to include exterior, garage, pool, hot tub, unfinished basements, crawl spaces, utility rooms, bathrooms, and kitchens to name a few. Recommend having a qualified electrical contractor install one or more GFCI receptacles or circuit breakers protecting the appropriate branch circuit as a safety upgrade or improvement. For more information about GFCI's and required locations, please visit http://www.cpsc.gov/CPSCPUB/PUBS/099.pdf

Detached Structure
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Limitations: The inspector does not determine the adequacy of firewall ratings. Requirements for ventilation in detached structures (barns or outbuildings) vary between municipalities. Detached structures are often used for storage. As a result, excessive stored items, furnishings, and/or shelving may prevent full evaluation of perimeter and centers of the structure.
Type: Barn/2-story shed
Apparent wall structure: Wood frame
Wall covering: Wood
Roof structure type: Rafters
Roof surface material: Asphalt or fiberglass composition shingles
Roof inspection method: Not inspected
Gutter & downspout material: None

64) One or more hornet, bee and/or wasp nests were found. These can pose a safety hazard as the risk of bite or sting is high for home owner, children, and pets. Nest(s) should be removed as necessary. Caution should be heeded if home owner attempts to clear these areas. Recommend hiring qualified pest control contractor to remove nests.

65) One or more floor joists and/or beams were substandard and undersized for their span. Sagging and/or bouncing floors may result. In extreme circumstances, floors may collapse. A qualified contractor should make repairs as necessary.
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Crawl space
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Limitations: Structural components such as joists and beams, and other components such as piping, wiring and/or ducting that are obscured by under-floor insulation are excluded from this inspection. The inspector does not determine if support posts, columns, beams, joists, studs, trusses, etc. are of adequate size, spanning or spacing. The inspector does not guarantee or warrant that water will not accumulate in the crawl spaces in the future. Complete access to all crawl space areas during all seasons and during prolonged periods of all types of weather conditions (e.g. heavy rain, melting snow) would be needed to do so.The inspector attempts to locate all crawl space access points and areas. Access points may be obscured or otherwise hidden by furnishings or stored items. In such cases, the client should ask the property owner where all access points are that are not described in this inspection, and have those areas inspected. Note that crawl space areas should be checked at least annually for water intrusion, plumbing leaks and pest activity.
Inspection method: Traversed
Insulation material underneath floor above: Fiberglass roll or batt, foam board
Pier or support post material: Masonry, Steel
Beam material: Built up wood
Floor structure above: Solid wood joists
Vapor barrier present: Yes

66) One or more areas or surfaces had severe staining or growth consistent with microbial growth. Depending on the extent, severe organic growth in non-living areas may pose risk to home occupants and result in structural decay. Conducive conditions for high moisture levels and water intrusion should be corrected, and affected areas professionally cleaned and mitigated. Recommend qualified contractor perform repairs as necessary. Significant cost for professional mitigation may be incurred.

67) Substandard shims between piers and the main beam were installed. This is unconventional and may result in sagging floors and cracks in walls and ceilings. Twisting beams were noted in one or more areas. Wood shims were visibly deflected and deteriorated. Recommend qualified contractor repair per best building practices. Typically steel shims are installed in these locations.
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68) Damage, decay, and/or rot was found at one or more sill plates and/or beams. Recommend that a qualified contractor repair as necessary. All damaged wood should be replaced.
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69) One or more notches are cut deeper than 1/6 of the joist depth. This is substandard construction and has damaged the joist(s). A qualified contractor should repair as necessary.
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70) Standing water and/or wet areas were found in one or more sections of the crawl space. Accumulated water is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects and organisms and should not be present in the crawl space. A qualified contractor who specializes in foundation drainage issues should repair as necessary. Typical repairs for preventing water from accumulating in the crawl space include:
  • Excavation, repairing, and sealing of exterior foundation walls
  • Repairing, installing or improving rain run-off systems (gutters, downspouts and extensions or drain lines)
  • Improving perimeter grading
  • Repairing, installing, or improving underground footing and/or curtain drains

Ideally, water should not enter the crawl space. Exterior repairs to foundation and foundation drainage systems are recommended and considered best practice. Commonly prescribed interior repairs or control measures should be avoided as continued deterioration of foundation walls is likely to occur. Interior systems merely control water intrusion symptoms, but do not address the underlying cause(s) or prevent water from entering through the foundation. Significant cost for repairs is likely to be incurred.
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71) Insulation at rim joists and foundation walls in the crawlspace was damaged, deteriorated, or has been removed. A qualified contractor should make repairs as necessary to restore the insulation to its original rating.

72) One or more support posts appear to have been added since the original construction based on the inspector's observations. Such posts may have been added to reduce bounce or sag in floors above. Consult with the property owner about this, or that a qualified contractor evaluate and make permanent repairs per standard building practices if necessary.
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73) The vapor barrier needs repair. Exposed soil was found in some areas. This is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects and organisms due to the likelihood of water evaporating into the structure from the soil. A qualified contractor should make repairs as necessary so no exposed soil exists. Standard building practices require the following:
  • The soil below the vapor barrier should be smooth and free from sharp objects.
  • Seams should overlap a minimum of 12 inches.
  • The vapor barrier should lap up onto the foundation side walls.

  • Better building practices require that:
  • Seams and protrusions should be sealed with a pressure sensitive tape.
  • The vapor barrier should be caulked and attached tightly to the foundation side walls. For example, with furring strips and masonry nails.

74) Water supply pipes were uninsulated. Recommend insulating pipes as necessary for better energy efficiency and to prevent water pipes from freezing.

75) One or more exhaust ducts (e.g. bathroom fan, clothes dryer) in the crawl space have come apart or were loose. This can result in increased moisture levels inside the structure and is a conducive condition for wood-destroying organisms. Recommend that a qualified person make permanent repairs as necessary.
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76) The crawl space areas below the hot tub room addition were excluded from this inspection and report due to limited or no access. Repairs should be made so the crawl space can be accessed easily for periodic inspection.

77) Inspection of some areas of the floor structure and framing was obstructed or concealed by insulation which prevent full evaluation of these areas. These areas are excluded from this inspection.

78) Clients may wish to consider converting the crawl space area into a "conditioned" crawl rather than a "vented" crawl space for energy efficiency and increased comfort levels of rooms above.
For more information regarding conditioned crawl spaces and their benefits, please visit:
http://www.buildingscience.com/documents/bareports/ba-0401-conditioned-crawlspace-construction-performance-and-codes

Electric Service and Equipment
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Limitations: The following items are not included in this inspection: generator systems, transfer switches, surge suppressors, inaccessible or concealed wiring; underground utilities and systems; low-voltage lighting or lighting on timers or sensors. Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not determine the adequacy of grounding or bonding, if this system has an adequate capacity for the client's specific or anticipated needs, or if this system has any reserve capacity for additions or expansion. The inspector does not operate circuit breakers as part of the inspection, and does not install or change light bulbs. The inspector does not evaluate every wall switch or receptacle, but instead tests a representative number of them per various standards of practice. When furnishings, stored items or child-protective caps are present some receptacles are usually inaccessible and are not tested; these are excluded from this inspection. Receptacles that are not of standard 110 volt configuration, including 240-volt dryer receptacles, are not tested and are excluded. Receptacles that were in use at time of inspection were not tested. The inspector attempts to locate and evaluate all equipment service (main) and remote distribution (sub) panels. However, panels are often concealed. If panels are found after the inspection, a qualified electrician should evaluate and repair if necessary. The inspector attempts to determine the overall electrical service size, but such estimates are not guaranteed because the overall capacity may be diminished by lesser-rated components in the system. Any repairs recommended should be made by a qualified electrical contractor.
Primary service type: Overhead service drop
Primary service overload protection type: Circuit breakers
Service amperage (amps): 200
Service voltage (volts): 120/240
Location of main service panel: Laundry room
Location of main disconnect: Breaker at top of main service panel
Main disconnect rating (amps): 200
Service entrance conductor material: Aluminum
Visible system grounding electrodes: Ground rod(s) in soil
Branch circuit wiring type: Non-metallic sheathed, Copper
Solid strand aluminum branch circuit wiring present: None visible in inspected service panel(s)

79) The main service equipment panel appears overcrowded for its size due to limited space for conductors, circuits, wiring, etc. This may pose a safety hazard. Recommend clients consult with qualified electrical contractor for options of upgrading panel per standard building practices as a safety upgrade.

80) One or more overcurrent protection devices (circuit breakers or fuses) are "double tapped", where 2 or more wires are clamped in a terminal designed for only one wire. This is a safety hazard since the bolt or screw may tighten securely against one wire, but leave others loose. Arcing, sparks, and fires may result. A qualified electrical contractor should repair as necessary.
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81) One or more circuit breakers are loose. A qualified electrical contractor should replace circuit breakers or make repairs as necessary.

82) One or more ungrounded (hot) conductors have white, gray, or green insulation. These colors are reserved for identification of neutral or grounding conductors. Standard building practices require that ungrounded conductors be re-identified to a color other than white, gray, or green. Typically black electrical tape, permanent markers, or paint are used to re-identify such wires and should be performed at both terminations of the branch circuit. Recommend qualified electrical contractor perform these repairs.
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83) One or more electrical panels were manufactured by the Federal Pacific Electric company and used "Stab-Lok" circuit breakers. Industry research and evidence indicates that these panels and circuit breakers may have higher failure rates leading to significant fire and safety hazards as compared to other manufacturers. However, in 2011 the Consumer Products Safety Commission (CPSC) closed an investigation into this product because they did not have enough data or financing to establish that the circuit breakers pose a serious risk of injury to consumers.
Conflicting opinions regarding this brand or manufacturer exists throughout the electrical and inspection industries. Some Industry sources consider these panels as obsolete, prone for high failure rates, and safety hazards by today's standards, while others consider them to be a robust and reliable brand panel with no more concerns or failure rates than other commonly encountered brands or manufacturers. Regardless, these panels are commonly found in aging electrical systems and clients should be alerted to potential concerns or hazards. Because these panels and circuit breakers are considered "questionable" in the industry, many lenders and insurance providers have taken issue with them and may deny coverage or financing of homes with these panels installed.
While age and/or brand alone is not considered an inherently significant defect, it should be noted that modern panels may offer more flexibility for newer and safer protective technologies like ground fault circuit interrupters (GFCls) and arc fault circuit interrupters (AFCls), and provide room for expansion to meet growing electrical usage requirements. Clients may wish to consider budgeting for an upgrade to a modern service panel especially if significant concerns or defects were identified in the existing panel and/or noted in this report.
Significant cost for upgrade/replacement can be expected.
For more information on this brand of panels and circuit breakers, please visit:
http://www.inspectapedia.com/fpe/fpepanel.
http://www.reporthost.com/?FP1
http://www.reporthost.com/?FP2
http://www.reporthost.com/?FP3

Please note that because of the design of electrical panels, some alleged concerns with these panels may only be discovered through dismantling of the electric panel. Dismantling equipment and disconnecting power is outside the scope of this inspection. If clients are concerned with potential hidden defects not discovered through this inspection, a qualified electrical contractor should be hired to fully evaluate and dismantle the panel and hidden components.
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84) Evidence of vermin activity was observed inside the main panel. Recommend qualified electrical contractor repair and clean as necessary and perform necessary repairs to prevent future vermin entry into the panel.

85) Branch circuit wiring installed in buildings built prior to the mid 1980s is typically rated for a maximum temperature of only 60 degrees Celsius (140 degrees Fahrenheit). This includes non-metallic sheathed (Romex) wiring, and both BX and AC metal-clad flexible wiring. Knob and tube wiring, typically installed in homes built prior to 1950, may be rated for even lower maximum temperatures. Newer electric fixtures including lighting and fans typically require wiring rated for 90 degrees Celsius (194 degrees Fahrenheit). Connecting newer fixtures to older, 60-degree-rated wiring is a potential fire hazard. Manufacturer warning labels and guidelines are typically included with all new light and fan fixtures. Repairs for such conditions typically involve replacing/splicing the last few feet of wiring to newer fixtures with new 90-degree-rated wire, and installing a junction box to join the old and new wiring. Bulbs used in such fixtures should never exceed the manufacturer listed specifications.

It is beyond the scope of this inspection to determine if such incompatible components are installed, or to determine the extent to which they're installed. Based on the age of this building, the client should be aware of this safety hazard, both for existing fixtures and when planning to upgrade with newer fixtures. Consult with a qualified electrician for repairs as necessary.

Plumbing and Fuel Systems
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Limitations: The following items are not included in this inspection: private/shared wells and related equipment; private sewage disposal systems; hot tubs or spas; main, side and lateral sewer lines; gray water systems; pressure boosting systems; trap primers; incinerating or composting toilets; fire suppression systems; water softeners, conditioners or filtering systems; plumbing and fuel supply components concealed within the foundation or building structure, or in inaccessible areas such as below tubs; underground utilities and systems; overflow drains for tubs and sinks; backflow prevention devices. Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not operate water supply or shut-off valves due to the possibility of valves leaking or breaking when operated. The inspector does not test for lead in the water supply, the water pipes or solder, does not determine if plumbing and fuel lines are adequately sized, and does not determine the existence or condition of underground or above-ground fuel tanks. No attempt was made to locate drainage cleanout caps.
Water service: Private well
Water Pressure: Adequate
Location of main water shut-off: Garage, In mechanical room/closet
Supply pipe material: Copper
Drain pipe material: Plastic
Waste pipe material: Plastic
Vent pipe material: Plastic
Sump pump installed: Yes
Sewage ejector pump installed: No
Visible fuel storage systems: None visible
Fuel type: Natural gas
Fuel supply pipe material(s): Iron or steel (solid piping)
Location of main fuel shut-off valve: At gas meter

86) Corrosion is present at one or more pipes, valves, or fittings in the crawl space. Leaks may be present or occur in the future. Recommend qualified plumber repair or replace corroded components as necessary.
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87) No sediment trap was installed in the gas supply line at the furnace. Sediment traps prevent damage to gas-fired appliances by trapping oil, scale, water condensation and/or debris. Recommend that a qualified contractor install a sediment trap per standard building practices.

88) Steel hangers are used to support copper water supply pipes in the crawl space. This contact between dissimilar metals causes corrosion which may eventually lead to leaks. Although leaks were not readily observed at time of inspection, steel hangers should be replaced with appropriate hangers that won't cause corrosion.
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89) One or more sections of gas supply piping were located less than 6 inches from the soil below. Piping is likely to rust. Recommend that soil be graded or removed as necessary, or that a qualified contractor make repairs or modifications if necessary.
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90) Steel piping for the gas service located in the crawl space was significantly corroded. Gas leaks can result. Recommend evaluation by a qualified contractor to determine if piping needs replacing. If not, then a qualified person should prep and paint lines as necessary with a rust-preventative paint. Very corroded pipes should be replaced by a qualified contractor.
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91) Sump discharge piping was not anchored or properly secured. Damage and leaks may occur due to repeated movement and vibrations. Recommend qualified contractor repair per best building practices.
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92) Based on visible components or information provided to the inspector, this property appeared to have a private sewage disposal (septic) system. These are specialty systems and are excluded from this inspection. Comments in this report related to this system are made as a courtesy only and are not meant to be a substitute for a full evaluation by a qualified specialist. This system was not inspected and inspector makes no effort to approve or disapprove its proper functioning, permits, or compliance with local health codes. Many septic systems have become outdated and are in need of upgrade as a result of neglect and related upkeep costs. Potential for health hazards and significant expense exist if this system has been improperly maintained, neglected, is failing, or has become deteriorated.
Recommend having the tank pumped and inspected prior to close of escrow. Generally, septic tanks should be pumped and inspected every 2-5 years. Depending on the type of system and municipal regulations, inspection and maintenance may be required more frequently. Recommend the following also be performed during your inspection time contingency (consultation with local/county health agency or municipality may be required):
  • Consult with current property owner(s) about this system's maintenance and known concerns
  • Review any documentation, easements, repair history, and service records
  • Review inspection, municipal regulations/compliance, and maintenance requirements and history for this system
  • That a qualified specialist evaluate, perform maintenance, and make repairs if necessary
For more information, visit:
http://www.google.com/search?q=private+septic+systems

93) Specialized inspections to determine the integrity and condition of the drain/waste laterals are outside the scope of this home inspection. Where the domestic water service is functional, the inspector typically operates multiple fixtures simultaneously to observe the functional flow of drain/waste lines. This evaluation is limited and may not adequately reveal hidden concerns or latent defects present in the drain system. Older drain pipes, which include Orangeburg Pipe and clay tile (pipe) commonly fail or collapse. During the evaluation, we do not flush solids such as paper through the drain lines, and water will generally flow freely even when the pipes have substantial root intrusion. Paper products and other solids will accumulate on roots or other obstructions and create severe blockages, which may not become evident until days, weeks, or months, after you have occupied the property. Therefore, clients are strongly encouraged to have the main drain-line video scanned (sewer camera inspection) or other comprehensive testing by a reputable provider during your inspection contingency period to determine the actual condition of the main drain-line and waste laterals, and to ensure they will continue to function adequately.

94) A water softener system was installed on the premises. These are specialty systems and are excluded from this inspection. Comments in this report related to this system are made as a courtesy only and are not meant to be a substitute for a full evaluation by a qualified specialist. Water softeners typically work by removing unwanted minerals (e.g. calcium, magnesium) from the water supply. They prevent build-up of scale inside water supply pipes, improve lathering while washing, and prevent spots on dishes. Recommend consulting with the property owner about this system to determine its condition, required maintenance, age, expected remaining life, etc. For more information, visit:
http://www.reporthost.com/?WTRSFT
http://www.reporthost.com/?HRDWTR

95) Trees or large shrubs were growing over or very near the leach field. Roots may clog or damage drain lines. Recommend further evaluation by checking for roots in distribution boxes. Various root-killing chemicals are avaialable that are said to not harm bacteria in the septic system. Tree removal may also be an option.

96) Water supply pipes in homes built prior to 1986 may be joined with solder that contains lead. Lead is a known health hazard, especially for children. Laws were passed in 1985 prohibiting the use of lead in solder, but prior to that solder normally contained about 50 percent lead. The client(s) should be aware of this, especially if children will be living in this structure. Evaluating for the presence of lead in this structure is not included in this inspection. The client(s) should consider having a qualified lab test for lead, and if necessary take steps to reduce or remove lead from the water supply. Various solutions such as these may be advised:
  • Flush water taps or faucets. Do not drink water that has been sitting in the plumbing lines for more than six hours.
  • Install appropriate filters at points of use.
  • Use only cold water for cooking and drinking. Hot water dissolves lead more quickly than cold water.
  • Use bottled or distilled water.
  • Treat well water to make it less corrosive.
  • Have a qualified plumbing contractor replace supply pipes and/or plumbing components as necessary.

For more information visit some of the web links at: https://www.google.com/search?q=lead+solder+drinking+water

97) Most septic systems require inspections and pumping every 2 to 5 years, though some specialty systems require annual maintenance. Recommend following these general rules when using this system:
  • Conserve water – using too much water or leaky faucets and toilets can overload your system and lead to more maintenance costs and possible failure.
  • Don't dump cooking oil or grease down the drain. Collect it in a can and dispose of it in the garbage.
  • Divert roof drains, basement sump drains and other rainwater or surface water away from your drainfield. Flooding your drainfield can shorten its life and cause potential malfunction of your septic system.
  • Don't use caustic drain openers for a clogged drain. Instead, use boiling water or a drain snake to open clogs.
  • Use moderation with commercial household cleaners and detergents. Baking soda or other mild cleaners often do the job as well and cheaper than common commercial brands.
  • Don't use your septic system like a garbage can. Do not put grease, disposable diapers, sanitary napkins, tampons, condoms, paper towels, plastics, cat litter, latex paint, pesticides, or other hazardous chemicals down the drain.
  • Plant grass or other shallow-rooted plants over and near the septic system. Roots from trees or shrubs can clog and damage your drainfield.
  • Don't drive or park over any part of your septic system. This can compact the soil and crush your system’s components.

98) A food (garbage) disposal was installed in the dwelling. Its use is not recommended with private septic systems installed. If used, certain food items such as eggs, meat and pasta should not be disposed through the disposal. Use of a food disposal may significantly shorten the required interval between septic tank pumpings.

99) A sump pump is installed on the premises. Recommend asking the property owners how often the sump pump operates and for how long at different times of the year. Also, the clients should be aware that the service life of most sump pumps is between five and seven years, and that the pump may need replacing soon depending on its age and how much it operates.

100) Clients are encouraged to consider installation of a backup sump pump system to reduce chances of flooding during a power outage or in event the primary pump fails. For information on different types of backup sump pumps available, please visit http://www.basementwatchdog.com/backup_sump_pump.htm

101) Propane gas piping was present but appears to have been abandoned in favor of natural gas supply. Clients may wish to confirm that the propane gas systems have been properly disabled or abandoned by the current owners.

Water heater
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Limitations: Evaluation of and determining the adequacy or completeness of the following items are not included in this inspection: water recirculation pumps; solar water heating systems; Energy Smart or energy saver controls; catch pan drains. Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not provide an estimate of remaining life on water heaters, does not determine if water heaters are appropriately sized, or perform any evaluations that require a pilot light to be lit or a shut-off valve to be operated.
Type: Tank
Energy source: Electricity
Capacity (in gallons): 50
Manufacturer: Rheem
Model: XE50M09EL55U1
Serial Number: Q301501028
Water Heater Estimated Date of Manufacture: 2015
Water temperature (degrees Fahrenheit): 123

102) Exposed wiring was found for the water heater's power supply. Exposed non-metallic sheathed (Romex) wiring may be subject to damage. Both the insulation and conductors can be damaged by repeated movement or contact with objects such as stored items. A qualified electrical contractor should repair as necessary. Typically, flexible conduit with properly secured bushings is used in this application.
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103) The water heater had no catch pan and drain installed. Recommend having a qualified contractor install a catch pan and drain to prevent water damage to finished interior spaces nearby if/when the water heater develops a leak or is drained.

104) Significant system repair or water heater replacement appears to have been performed after original construction. No municipal inspection tags or documents were located or provided during inspection. Most jurisdictions require homeowners and/or contractors to obtain legal permits and related inspections for significant renovations; major repairs and/or upgrades such as electrical or plumbing improvements; construction work such as additions, roof replacement, or deck construction; and major appliance replacement such as furnace, air conditioner, or water heater. Building compliance inspections are typically performed during and/or after work has been completed, and inspection tags indicating approval or failed inspections are provided. The client(s) should consult with the property owner about this, and if necessary research building permits and related compliance inspections with the proper authorities.

At worst case, if substantial work was performed without permits and related inspections, this knowledge must be disclosed when the building is sold in the future. This may adversely affect future sales. Also, the local municipality could require costly alterations and/or fines to bring the building into legal compliance, or even require that the additions, upgrades, or modifications be removed.

Well
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Limitations: Private well water supplies are specialty systems and are beyond the scope of the standards of practice for home inspections. Comments in this report related to a private well are made as a courtesy only and are not meant to be a substitute for a full evaluation by a qualified well specialist. The inspector does not test private well water for contamination or pollutants, determine if the supply and/or flow are adequate, or provide an estimate for remaining life of well pumps, pressure tanks or equipment. Only visible components are evaluated.
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Type of well: Drilled
Location of well: back yard
Type of pump: Submersible
Location of well equipment: Garage, Mechanical room
Location of tank shut-off valve: Base of tank

105) Client indicates high levels of microbial or bacterial contaminates were found in lab samples of tested well water. Many factors contribute to the quality of private well water, and these pathogens may enter ground water through septic tank overflow or through contaminated runoff from woodlands, pastures and feedlots. Routine testing of private well water and, when needed, chemical disinfection are critical to maintaining a safe private water supply and avoiding the ravages of pathogenic microbes. Clients should consult with local and or state health agencies, or qualified private well water contractor for information and options of disinfecting contaminated water.
For more information, please visit:
http://www.waterandhealth.org/newsletter/private_wells.html
and
http://www.wellowner.org/

106) The private well water system temporarily failed or stopped pumping during inspection. This could be caused by a seized pump, a burned-out motor, no power to the pump or other conditions. The low pressure switch was reset and the pump operated for the remainder of inspection; however, this is no guarantee the pump will continue to function. A qualified well contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary.
Note that a new pressure switch was found near the well equipment. Clients should consult with current owners regarding any knowledge or disclosure of well system problems.
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107) Because this is a specialty system, recommend the following:
  • That a qualified well contractor fully evaluate the well, including a pump/flow test
  • That the well water be tested per the client's concerns (e.g. coliforms, pH, contaminants) by a qualified lab
  • That the client research the well's history (e.g. how/when constructed, how/when maintained or repaired, past performance, past health issues)
  • That that the client document the current well capacity and water quality for future reference
For more information, visit:
http://www.reporthost.com/?WELL

108) The inspector performed a "functional flow test" during the inspection where multiple fixtures were run simultaneously, and found the flow to be adequate. For example, the shower flow didn't decrease substantially when the toilet was flushed. Note that only a functional flow test was preformed by operating multiple fixtures. Actual flow rate, well capacity, and pressure measurements were not measured during inspection.

109) The estimated useful life for most well pumps is 15-20 years. The inspector was unable to determine the age of the pump. The client should be aware that this pump may be near, at, or beyond its useful life and may need replacing at any time. Recommend attempting to determine the pump's age (ask property owner or well contractor), and budgeting for a replacement if necessary.

110) The estimated useful life for most steel pressure tanks is 15-25 years. The inspector was unable to determine the age of the tank. The client should be aware that this tank may be near, at, or beyond its useful life and may need replacing or significant repairs at any time. Recommend attempting to determine the tank's age (ask property owner or service technician), and budgeting for a replacement if necessary.

Heating, Ventilation and Air Condition (HVAC)
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Limitations: The following items are not included in this inspection: humidifiers, dehumidifiers, electronic air filters; solar, coal or wood-fired heat systems; thermostat or temperature control accuracy and timed functions; heating components concealed within the building structure or in inaccessible areas; underground utilities and systems; safety devices and controls (due to automatic operation). Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not provide an estimate of remaining life on heating or cooling system components, does not determine if heating or cooling systems are appropriately sized, does not test coolant pressure, or perform any evaluations that require a pilot light to be lit, a shut-off valve to be operated, a circuit breaker to be turned "on" or a serviceman's or oil emergency switch to be operated. It is beyond the scope of this inspection to determine if furnace heat exchangers are intact and free of leaks. Condensation pans and drain lines may clog or leak at any time and should be monitored while in operation in the future. Where buildings contain furnishings or stored items, the inspector may not be able to verify that a heat source is present in all "livable" rooms (e.g. bedrooms, kitchens and living/dining rooms).
Primary heating system type(s): Forced air, Furnace
Primary heating system fuel type: Natural gas
Primary Heating System Manufacturer: Carrier, Trane
Heat source model number: 58DX060-GG
Heat source serial number: 2089A14670
Primary Heat Source Estimated Date of Manufacture: 1989
Additional Heat Source(s): Furnace
Additional Heat Source Type: Second zone heat source
Additional Heat Source Fuel: Natural Gas
Additional Heating System Model Number: TDD060C936B0
Additional Heating System Serial Number: J39549084
Estimated Date of Manufacture: 1994
Primary Cooling System Type: Split system (outside condenser, inside evaporator)
Cooling System(s) Manufacturer: Trane, Airtron
Heat pump or air conditioner model number: ASH8301CHF
Heat pump or air conditioner serial number: HAC4821
Condenser Estimated Date of Manufacture: unknown
Additional Cooling System Model Number: TTR018C100A1
Additional Cooling System Serial Number: J41222591
Additional Condenser Estimated Date of Manufacture: 1994
General heating distribution type(s): Ducts and registers
Last service date of heating/cooling systems(s): Unknown
Location for forced air filter(s): Inside air handler/top of air handler

111) Significant amounts of debris, dirt and/or dust were visible in one or more sections of supply and/or return air ducts for the heating or cooling system. This can be a health hazard, especially for those with allergies or respiratory problems. The Environmental Protection Association (EPA) recommends considering having ducts professionally cleaned when "ducts are clogged with excessive amounts of dust and debris and/or particles are actually released into the home from your supply registers." At a minimum, the visible debris should be thoroughly cleaned. Recommend that a qualified contractor clean the ducts. For more information on duct cleaning in relation to indoor air quality, visit:
http://www.reporthost.com/?DUCTCLEAN

112) The fan for one or more electric wall heaters was inoperable (master bath). This is a fire hazard due to excessive heat build-up since the fan doesn't blow cool air over the heating element. A qualified electrician should repair or replace heaters as necessary.

113) Due to normal design constraints, the heat exchanger in a hot air furnace is largely obscured and CANNOT be fully assessed within the scope of a standard inspection. Complete heat exchanger evaluation requires use of special equipment and/or dismantling of the furnace.
Independent evaluation by a specialist HVAC contractor is STRONGLY advised DURING your inspection contingency, particularly if unit is older, exhibits wear, and/or the HVAC systems are recommended for ANY type of servicing or maintenance in this report.

114) The primary (older) furnace did not respond to normal controls (thermostat). It appeared to be inoperable. The inspector was only able to perform a limited evaluation. If possible, consult with the property owner and/or review documentation on this system. Recommend that a qualified HVAC contractor evaluate and repair as necessary.

115) Corrosion is visible at the induced draft exhaust fan housing inside the furnace cabinet of the older furnace. This may be an indication of improper drafting or other combustion concerns. Recommend qualified HVAC contractor evaluate further and repair per standard building practices.
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116) The hot tub room addition air conditioning condensing unit did not respond to normal controls (thermostat), and was otherwise inoperable. The inspector was only able to perform a limited visual evaluation. If possible, recommend consult with the property owner about this, and/or review documentation on this system. At minimum a qualified HVAC contractor should investigate and perform maintenance or make repairs as necessary.

117) One or more heating or cooling ducts in an unconditioned space (e.g. crawl space, attic or basement) were not insulated, or the insulation was damaged or deteriorated. This can result in reduced energy efficiency, moisture inside heating ducts, and/or "sweating" on cooling ducts. Recommend that a qualified person repair per standard building practices. For example, by wrapping ducts in insulation with an R-value of R-8.

118) The blower cut-off switch at the older furnace was inoperable or has been disabled. This switch is meant to stop the blower from operating when the blower compartment cover is removed. If the cover is removed and the blower operates, air from the vicinity of the furnace will be drawn into the heating system. In some circumstances, such as when the furnace is located in a garage or if when the furnace is gas or oil-fired, this is a potential safety hazard due to carbon monoxide poisoning. Recommend HVAC contractor repair cut-off switch so it works as intended.
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119) The covers for one or more heating and/or cooling system air filters were missing. Unfiltered air can enter the return air supply and reduce indoor air quality. Recommend that a qualified person repair as necessary.
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120) Some heating or cooling ducts had significant amounts of corrosion or rust. Holes may develop and result in reduced energy efficiency or return air being drawn in from locations other than intended. Recommend that a qualified HVAC contractor repair as necessary. For example, by replacing ducts or sections of ducts.

121) Insulation on the heat pump or air conditioning condensing unit's refrigerant lines was deteriorated or missing in some areas. This may result in reduced efficiency and increased energy costs. Recommend that a qualified person replace or install insulation as necessary.

122) The louvers for the whole house fan were did not open and close properly. A qualified contractor should repair as necessary.
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123) One or more system air filters were dirty. Improperly maintained air filters may result in reduced service life and efficiency of the heating and cooling system as well as air quality concerns. Recommend qualified person replace or clean filter now. Filters should be checked monthly in the future, and cleaned or replaced as necessary. Due to apparent neglected maintenance, complete servicing and cleaning of the heating and cooling system by a qualified contractor is recommended.

124) Gaps were present at the air handler, ducts, and/or plenum. Reduced efficiency may result. Recommend qualified person repair as necessary and per standard building practices.
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125) Common cloth or vinyl backed tape has been used to seal ducts in one or more locations. This is substandard practice as the tape is prone to deterioration where leaks and reduced efficiency may occur. Recommend qualified contractor repair as necessary and per standard building guidelines using approved sealants or metal backed tapes.
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126) The last service date of the heating and cooling systems appears to be more than one year ago based on information obtained from service tags. The client(s) should ask the property owner(s) when the systems were last serviced.
If complete and annual service records for the equipment (including a FULL diagnostic service and inspection performed within the last 12 months) cannot be obtained, inspector STRONGLY recommends a COMPLETE system evaluation by a qualified heating and cooling professional DURING your inspection contingency time period.
For safety reasons, and because the heating system is fueled by gas or oil, this servicing should be performed annually in the future. Any needed repairs noted in this report should be brought to the attention of the HVAC contractor when serviced. For more information visit:
http://www.reporthost.com/?ANFURINSP

127) The estimated typical service design life for most forced air furnaces is 15-20 years. This furnace appeared to be at and/or beyond this age and/or its useful lifespan and may need replacing or significant repairs at any time. Due to the apparent age of the equipment, client(s) should anticipate and budget for repairs and/or replacement in the near future.
If complete and annual service records for the equipment (including a FULL diagnostic service and inspection performed within the last 12 months) cannot be obtained, inspector STRONGLY recommends a COMPLETE system evaluation by a qualified heating and cooling professional DURING your inspection contingency time period.

128) The estimated typical service design life for most heat pumps and air conditioning condensing units is 10-15 years. This unit appeared to be at and/or beyond this age and/or its useful lifespan and may need replacing or significant repairs at any time. Due to the apparent age of the equipment, client(s) should anticipate and budget for repairs and/or replacement in the near future.
If complete and annual service records for the equipment (including a FULL diagnostic service and inspection performed within the last 12 months) cannot be obtained, inspector STRONGLY recommends a COMPLETE system evaluation by a qualified heating and cooling professional DURING your inspection contingency time period.

129) A whole house fan was installed. These fans provide cooling for interior spaces by blowing hot interior air up into the attic and out through attic vents, and by drawing cooler air in from the outside through open windows. They are intented to operate only when the outside temperature is cooler than inside. Multiple windows should be opened to equal or exceed 3 times the area of the fan opening. If air conditioning is installed it should not be operated while the whole house fan is operated. These fans do not dehumidify. They may be noisy during operation.

In some cases, additional attic venting is required for whole house fans to allow blown air to exit the attic. Attic vents should be kept clear at all times. Inadequate attic venting may result in attic air blowing through ceiling penetrations such as lights, or down through wall framing. It's beyond the scope of a home inspection to determine if attic venting is adequate. If concernced, review the fan's documentation and/or consult with a qualified contractor.

Be aware of safety issues related to whole house fans. Injury can occur if people come in contact with fan blades or belts. Louvers should always be open and the area above the fan should be unobstructed during operation, otherwise the fan may overheat and pose a fire hazard. Items should never be stored on top of the fan. Negative interior air pressure can cause gas-fired appliances such as water heaters and clothes dryers to backdraft, or cause flame rollout or pilot lights to blow out. Carbon monoxide and/or fire hazards may result. Children should never be allowed to operate whole house fans.

Whole house fans should be shut down during cooler months when not needed. This includes installing an insulated cover over the fan and turning power off to the the fan.

The client should be aware that some routine maintenance is required for whole house fans such as lubrication, cleaning, and tightening or replacing belts. Consult with a heating and cooling specialist on this. Note also that motors and other components have a limited lifespan.

For more information visit:
http://www.reporthost.com/?WHFAN
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130) Based on its appearance and the age of this house, the whole house fan may be near, at or beyond its service life. Typically such equipment lasts 20-25 years. The client should be aware that even if the fan was operable during the inspection it may need replacing in the near future.

Fireplaces, Stoves, Chimneys, and Flues
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Limitations: The following items are not included in this inspection: coal stoves, gas logs, chimney flues (except where visible). Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not determine the adequacy of drafting or sizing in fireplace and stove flues, and also does not determine if prefabricated or zero-clearance fireplaces are installed in accordance with the manufacturer's specifications. The inspector does not perform any evaluations that require a pilot light to be lit, and does not light fires. The inspector provides a basic visual examination of a chimney and any associated wood burning device. The National Fire Protection Association has stated that an in-depth Level 2 chimney inspection should be part of every sale or transfer of property with a wood-burning device. Such an inspection may reveal defects that are not apparent to the home inspector who is a generalist.
Wood-burning fireplace type: Metal pre-fab
Wood-burning stove type: Freestanding, platform and flue only installed
Chimney type: Metal, with wood enclosure
Gas-fired flue type: B-vent

131) The wood stove metal chimney extended higher than 5 feet above the roof surface, and supports for the flue were missing. This is a potential safety hazard due to the risk of the flue pipe moving and possibly being damaged or becoming loose. Surrounding flashing, roof sheathing and/or roof surface materials may also be over-stressed during chimney movement. Recommend that a qualified person install bracing per standard building practices.
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132) One or more wood-burning fireplaces or stoves were found at the property. When such devices are used, they should be professionally inspected and cleaned annually to prevent creosote build-up and to determine if repairs are needed. The National Fire Protection Association states that a "Level 2" chimney inspection should be performed with every sale or transfer of property with a wood-burning device. Recommend consulting with the property owner about recent and past servicing and repairs to all wood-burning devices and chimneys or flues at this property. Recommend that a qualified specialist evaluate all wood-burning devices and chimneys, and clean and repair as necessary. Note that if a wood stove insert is installed, it may need to be removed for such an evaluation. For more information, search for "chimney inspection" at:
http://www.reporthost.com/?CSIA

133) Most of the chimney flue is obscured from visual examination and only a limited area of the firebox and/or flue was inspected. Evaluation of the entire flue assembly is expressly excluded and outside the scope of this inspection. For safety purposes, recommend that a qualified chimney service contractor perform a Level 2 inspection as per the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) guidelines. If not performed prior to closing, this service should be performed prior to use. For more information on fireplace and chimney safety and maintenance, recommend clients visit the Chimney Safety Institute of America website at http://www.csia.org

134) One or more metal chimney crowns were deteriorated or corroded, and did not fully protect the top edge of the wood sided chase. Crowns are meant to keep water off of the chimney structure and prevent leaks. Recommend that a qualified contractor repair or replace crowns as necessary, and per standard building practices.
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135) The log grate in the fireplace was deteriorated or damaged. Recommend replace as necessary.
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136) The metal fireplace liner was rusty. Significant rust can cause holes in metal. Fireplaces with metal liners typically circulate indoor air behind the firebox and act as a "heatilator" where warmed air is blown or drawn back into the living area. When holes form in liners, smoke and combustion gases can enter the heatilator chamber and living spaces. This is a potential safety hazard. Recommend that a qualified specialist evaluate and repair if necessary.

137) The hot tub room addition has been prepared for a free-standing wood stove, but one was not installed at time of inspection. Clients should consult with qualified contractor for any necessary modifications when a new wood stove is installed. Manufactures have varying requirements for exhaust flue configurations and appliance clearances.

Kitchen
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Limitations: The following items are not included in this inspection: household appliances such as stoves, ovens, cook tops, ranges, warming ovens, griddles, broilers, dishwashers, trash compactors, refrigerators, freezers, ice makers, hot water dispensers and water filters; appliance timers, clocks, cook functions, self and/or continuous cleaning operations, thermostat or temperature control accuracy, and lights. Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not provide an estimate of the remaining life of appliances, and does not determine the adequacy of operation of appliances. The inspector does not note appliance manufacturers, models or serial numbers and does not determine if appliances are subject to recalls. Areas and components behind and obscured by appliances are inaccessible and excluded from this inspection.

138) One or more sections of wiring that weren't terminated were found above kitchen cabinets. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrical contractor should repair as necessary. For example, cutting the wire to length and terminating the wire with wire nuts in a securely anchored, covered, properly sized junction box.
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139) Countertops were cracked and/or broken in one or more areas. A qualified contractor should make repairs as necessary, such as sealing cracks and/or replacing broken sections.
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140) The light in range hood (bottom of microwave) is inoperable. Recommend replacing light bulb(s) or having repairs made by a qualified contractor as necessary.

141) One or more cabinet doors were misaligned. Clients may wish to repair for aesthetic reasons.

142) The cooktop and oven elements were functional at time of inspection.
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Bathrooms, Laundry, and Sinks
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Limitations: The following items are not included in this inspection: overflow drains for tubs and sinks; heated towel racks, saunas, steam generators, clothes washers, clothes dryers. Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not determine the adequacy of washing machine drain lines, washing machine catch pan drain lines, or clothes dryer exhaust ducts. The inspector does not operate water supply or shut-off valves for sinks, toilets, bidets, clothes washers, etc. due to the possibility of valves leaking or breaking when operated. The inspector does not determine if shower pans or tub and shower enclosures are water tight, or determine the completeness or operability of any gas piping to laundry appliances.

143) One or more radiant convectors are obstructed or blocked by the toilet. This may result in uneven heating and uncomfortable room, and may prove a fire hazard for flammable items stored at the back or top of the toilet tank. This also does not comply with recommended clearance for such heaters. Clients should have repairs or modifications performed by a qualified contractor. If modifications are not made, this heater should be disabled to prevent fire from stored items on the toilet tank.
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144) One or more toilets are loose, and evidence of damage or possible damage to the floor structure below was found (hall bathroom). A qualified contractor should remove toilet(s) where necessary for further evaluation and repairs. The floor structure and flooring material below may need repair or replacement. Adequate time should be allowed for enclosed, wet floor structures to dry out after repairs are made and before floor cavities are closed off to prevent mold growth.
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145) One or more plumbing supply lines are not anchored securely to framing inside the wall (shower head tub supply in hall bathroom). Movement from routine use may damage pipes or fittings and cause leaks to occur. Recommend qualified contractor repair as necessary.
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146) One or more sink drains had an active leak (hall bathroom). For example, at pipe fittings and/or junctions between pipe and sink. A qualified plumber should repair as necessary.
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147) One or more vanity counters were not securely fastened to the wall or vanity (master bath). A qualified contractor should repair as necessary.
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148) The shower door for the master bath shower was missing; however, a curtain has been installed. Clients may wish to replace shower door for aesthetic reasons.
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Interior Rooms, Doors, and Windows
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Limitations: The following items are not included in this inspection: security, intercom and sound systems; communications wiring; central vacuum systems; elevators and stair lifts; cosmetic deficiencies such as nail-pops, scuff marks, dents, dings, blemishes or issues due to normal wear and tear in wall, floor and ceiling surfaces and coverings, or in equipment; deficiencies relating to interior decorating; low voltage and gas lighting systems. Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not evaluate any areas or items which require moving stored items, furnishings, debris, equipment, floor coverings, insulation or similar materials. The inspector does not test for asbestos, lead, radon, mold, hazardous waste, urea formaldehyde urethane, or any other toxic substance. Some items such as window, drawer, cabinet door or closet door operability are tested on a sampled basis. The client should be aware that paint may obscure wall and ceiling defects, floor coverings may obscure floor defects, and furnishings may obscure wall, floor and floor covering defects. If furnishings were present during the inspection, recommend a full evaluation of walls, floors and ceilings that were previously obscured when possible. Determining the cause and/or source of odors is not within the scope of this inspection.

149) One or more open ground, three-slot grounding type receptacles were found (master bedroom closet and addition mechanical closet). Open ground three-slot receptacles present a hazard for equipment and occupants. A qualified electrical contractor should make repairs as necessary.

Grounding type receptacles were first required in residential structures during the 1960s. Based on the age of this structure and/or the absence of 2-slot receptacles, repairs should be made by correcting wiring circuits as necessary so all receptacles have a properly installed equipment ground as per standard building practices.

150) One or more electric receptacles, light switches, and/or the boxes they are installed in were loose and/or not securely anchored (various throughout). Wire conductors may be damaged due to repeated movement and/or tension on wires, or insulation may be damaged. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock and fire. A qualified electrical contractor should repair as necessary.

151) Floor guides are missing from one or more sliding closet doors (various throughout). This is a safety hazard especially for small children as the doors can be pulled out or pushed in, and fall from the tracks above. Recommend install floor guides as needed.
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152) One or more interior doors had a keyed lockset or deadbolt installed (middle bedroom). This is a potential safety hazard for small children in the event that they lock themselves in the room, do not know how to unlock the door, and the key is not available. Keyed locksets and/or deadbolts should be replaced as necessary with "privacy" locksets that don't require a key.
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153) Lamp holders or light fixtures with fully or partially exposed bulbs were installed in one or more closets (most closets). This is a safety hazard due to the risk of fire. Flammable stored items may come into contact with hot bulbs, and hot fragments from broken bulbs may fall on combustible materials. Standard building practices require closet lighting to use fluorescent light fixtures, or to use fully enclosed incandescent fixtures. Installing a compact fluorescent lamp in a lamp holder is not an acceptable practice. A qualified electrician should replace closet lights as necessary and as per standard building practices.

154) Crank handles at many windows were missing, stripped and/or broken. Recommend that a qualified person replace handles or make repairs as necessary.
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155) The open-close mechanisms for one or more casement windows were difficult to operate, inoperable or damaged. Recommend that a qualified person repair as necessary.

156) Glass in one or more sliding glass doors was broken and/or damaged. A qualified contractor should replace glass, sash, or window assembly where necessary.

157) Seals between double-pane glass in one or more sliding glass doors appear to have failed based on condensation or stains between the panes of glass. A qualified contractor should replace glass where necessary.

The client(s) should be aware that evidence of broken seals may be more or less visible from one day to the next depending on the temperature, humidity, sunlight, etc. Glass doors or windows other than those that the inspector identified may also have failed seals and need glass replaced too.

158) Several casement windows were deteriorated. Damage and decay was observed in wood components of these windows. Recommend repair or replace as necessary.
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159) The door jamb at the master bedroom was cracked or damaged. Recommend qualified contractor repair or replace.
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160) One or more ceiling fans wobble excessively when operating (master bedroom and dining room). A qualified contractor should repair as necessary. For example, balancing the fan blades.

161) One or more skylight wells (the inside structure around living room skylights) was damaged, possibly by past condensation. Recommend that a qualified person repair as necessary.
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162) One or more interior doors (middle and end bedroom) are damaged and/or deteriorated and should be repaired or replaced by a qualified contractor.

163) One or more doors bind in their jamb and cannot be closed and latched, or are difficult to open and close (dining room double door). A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary. For example, adjusting jambs or trimming doors.

164) One or more closet door guides appear damaged or prevent the door from opening and closing easily. Adjustment or repairs may be required. Recommend qualified person repair or replace doors guides as necessary.
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165) The lock mechanisms on one or more sliding glass doors are inoperable and/or difficult to operate. A qualified contractor should repair as necessary.

166) The handle(s) on one or more sliding glass doors were damaged or broken. Repairs should be made and/or handles replaced as necessary, and by a qualified contractor if necessary.
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167) Screens in one or more sliding doors are torn or have holes in them. Screens should be replaced where necessary.

168) The doorbell button was missing. It should be replaced as necessary, and by a qualified contractor if necessary.
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169) Light bulbs were expired in one or more light fixtures. Recommend replacing bulb(s) and/or consulting with the property owner(s) to determine if switches are inoperable.

170) Privacy locks at one or more interior doors were inoperable. Recommend qualified person repair or replace as necessary.

171) Door latch strike plates were missing at one or more interior doors. Doors may not latch or close properly as a result. Recommend qualified person replace or install strike plates as necessary.
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172) Cover plate(s) were missing at one or more electric boxes, such as for receptacles, switches and/or junction boxes (closet in master bedroom). They are intended to contain fire and prevent electric shock from exposed wires. This is a potential safety hazard due to the risk of fire and shock. Cover plates should be installed where missing especially where children may be present.
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173) Objectionable odors were detected in one or more rooms at time of inspection. There are a host of contaminants, allergens, and odors, as well as odors from household pets, high humidity, hidden moisture intrusion, pest or vermin intrusion, cooking, cigarette smoke, general living habits, etc. that can permeate walls, carpets, heating and air conditioning ducts, and other porous surfaces. These contaminants can negatively affect homes and occupants, and can often be difficult to eradicate without professional remediation. Identification and sources of such contaminants, allergens, and odors fall outside the scope of a general home inspection and are expressly excluded from this report.
Recommend that clients make this determination for existence of objectionable odors for themselves especially if odor masking products were in use during prior visits to the property, and particularly if client or any member of clients family suffers from allergies or asthma. Professional remediation should be performed as may be deemed necessary, before the close of escrow.

174) One or more electric receptacles appeared to have no power (dining room). Recommend asking the property owner(s) about this. Switches may need to be operated to make some receptacles energized. If necessary, a qualified electrician should evaluate and make repairs as necessary.

175) One or more switches were taped so that they're inoperable. Consult with the property owner regarding this. If necessary, recommend that a qualified electrician repair.

176) One or more light fixtures appeared to be malfunctioning (kitchen recessed light). Recommend further evaluation by replacing bulb(s) and/or consulting with the property owner(s). Repairs or replacement of the light fixture(s) by a qualified electrician may be necessary.

177) Patches or evidence of prior repairs were found in one or more walls or ceilings. Recommend asking the property owner about the repairs (e.g. why necessary, whether prior leaks have occurred).

178) Screen(s) in one or more windows were missing or have been removed, and appear to be stored in the Addition mechanical closet. The client(s) should ask the property owner(s) about this and assure all screens are accounted for. Note that a full inventory of screens was not performed by the inspector.

179) The functionality of, power source for and placement of smoke alarms was not determined as part of this inspection. Smoke alarms should be installed in each bedroom, in hallways leading to bedrooms, on each level and in attached garages. They have a limited lifespan and should be replaced every 10 years. Batteries in smoke alarms should be changed when taking occupancy and annually in the future. Ideally it is considered best practice to replace all existing alarms (and install new where missing) regardless of their age upon ownership transfer of the home. Carbon monoxide alarms should be installed near sleeping areas and on each level in homes with a fuel-burning appliance or attached garage. For more information, visit:
http://www.reporthost.com/?SMKALRM
http://www.reporthost.com/?COALRM

180) A hot tub was installed. Hot tubs, related equipment and supply hookups are specialty systems and are excluded from this inspection. Comments in this report related to this system are made as a courtesy only and are not meant to be a substitute for a full evaluation by a qualified specialist. Regular maintenance is required, and safety issues may exist. Recommend that a qualified specialist evaluate and, if needed, maintain or repair.

Note that the hot tub is located inside the home. Significant amounts of moisture are released from these systems which can contribute to moisture related damage throughout the home and attic areas. Numerous concerns or indications of excessive moisture were observed. See Attic section of this report for related concern items.

181)   The closet in the master bedroom was missing drywall materials. Recommend qualified contractor complete construction as necessary and per best building practices.


This is a sample report for reference only. Actual reports will vary in content and descriptions.