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Website: http://www.aboveandbeyondhomes.com
Email: tknipp@aboveandbeyondhomes.com
Phone: (509) 438-2626
2528 W 6th Pl 
Kennewick WA 99336-4729
Inspector: Taylor knipp
WA Licensed Home Inspector # 778
Licensed Structural Pest Inspector # 80842

 

Property Inspection Report
WSDA# 1060BK026
Client(s): Jon Smith
Property address: 1234 Any Rd.
Anytown, Wa 91234
Inspection date: 9/22/2010
This report published on Monday, March 21, 2011 11:35:19 AM PDT

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This report is the exclusive property of this inspection company and the client(s) listed in the report title. Use of this report by any unauthorized persons is prohibited.

A site diagram is NOT prepared as part of a standard home inspection report. However, if wood destroying insects or potential evidence of their activity was seen at the time of the inspection, then a complete wood destroying organism inspection was conducted (WAC 16-228-2045). If such a report was required, a Washington State Department of Agriculture (WSDA) inspection control number will be present, above the client's name, at the top of this report. WAC 16-228-2045 REQUIRES THAT A DIAGRAM BE PREPARED FOR WOOD DESTROYING ORGANISM (WDO) INSPECTION REPORTS. A COPY IS AVAILABLE UPON REQUEST.

A home inspection is visual, not invasive. The inspection is, as dictated by the tight time-lines of real estate transactions, not technically exhaustive and the inspector spends limited time on premises. An inspector is looking for significant issues. Pointing out minor or cosmetic deficiencies is at the discretion of the inspector. Never the less, please understand that some recommendations made on a home inspection report include enhancements that are optional and are, certainly, not "mandatory" repairs. Since the appearance of a home, especially interior decor, is a matter of personal taste, the client is responsible for ascertaining that finish surfaces, colors, cleanliness and design meet his or her expectations. In a related matter, any fog visible inside thermal-pane windows is largely weather dependent and an inspector may not be able to identify glazing problems as a result of variations in temperature, humidity, weather and lighting conditions.

The inspector cannot see through or into walls, siding or wallpaper, concrete or floors, insulation, carpets, ceilings, under roofing materials, down into soil, tight-lines, drains, vent or waste pipes, toilet/floor/sink connections, ducting, gutters or downspouts full of debris or behind creosote or soot. Areas that are not visible due to lack of access as a result of furniture, appliances, storage or other belongings and coverings are excluded. Overflows at sinks and tubs are not tested -- doing so could cause water damage inside wall cavities. A home inspector doesn't guarantee that a roof will withstand a heavy windstorm nor ascertain that it has not leaked in the past nor that it will not leak at some time in the future. In a related matter, gutters may not withstand heavy snowfall or compacted ice. Roofing defects may be concealed by the roof covering. Solar roofing systems, including any components on the roof or in an attic, are excluded.

Procedures: Only normal controls will be operated (thermostats, light switches, faucets, etc). Wood stoves, fireplaces and pilot lights will not be lit. Devices that are not functional will not be plugged-in, nor will circuit breakers, or main shut-off valves be operated. Furniture, storage and appliances will not be moved or dis-assembled during the home inspection -- with the exception of (1) the cover will usually be removed from the electric panel; (2) cover panels may be removed at some HVAC appliances. Care is taken in removing a cover, from an electric panel or opening an attic hatch, but sometimes the procedures can, unavoidably, leave minor cosmetic marks on finished surfaces.

A home inspector makes every effort to perform a thorough inspection, within reasonable time-lines and the limitations specified, but makes no warranties about the home other than reporting on the conditions that were visible and apparent at the time of the inspection. Some defects may have been concealed or intermittent so those problems might go unreported. It is not possible, in the course of an inspection, to check every component at a home. The standards of practice for home inspection state that the inspector shall view, operate or test a representative number of components at the exterior and the interior: readily accessible siding and trim, windows, doors, walls, light switches, receptacles, etc. An inspector does not get up on furniture to view or operate windows or other components. High exterior locations at the home, such as siding, trim or soffit areas below eaves, due to safety and typical access issues, may be viewed from the ground and not from a ladder. High electrical receptacles, under eaves, may not be evaluated. Complex mechanical devices, such as freezer icemakers or fresh water systems are excluded. Washing machines and dryers are excluded. Sewage related septic/private disposal systems including septic tanks, sewage grinders/ejector pumps are usually fully or partially concealed from view or below grade and the components and mechanisms are not opened or inspected for performance or function. The exclusion includes air pumps, ultraviolet systems and all related electronics, alarms and wiring. Remote electric distribution (sub) panels may be concealed from view and may not be apparent to the inspector. If such systems are known to be present, or are later found to be on premises, recommend that the tanks, pumps/grinders, panels and related components be, as required, further evaluated/serviced by qualified professionals.

An inspector is assessing systems or components to determine if they are functional. An inspector will not suggest that a new system or component be installed simply for the sake of updating if it appears that the old system is functional or would be operational if repaired or maintained. It is not reasonable to expect every system or component in every home to be in new or perfect condition. Systems and components age. Older systems are often serviceable -- they operate but they are typical of a home of a given age. In any home, systems and components require at least some ongoing maintenance. Comments or observations involving household appliances are at the discretion of the inspector. The state standards of practice do not require the inspector to report on the condition of household appliances -- exceptions being that the inspector will, when possible, report on the operation of most HVAC equipment and water heaters. Conditions at a home and with appliances can, and will, change from day to day. It is assumed that the buyer wishes to purchase the home and the seller wishes to sell. The inspector must act in an unbiased manner. It is not the role of the inspector to create unreasonable concerns in an effort to influence the negotiations.

Clients ask if service or repairs should be performed prior to, or after, closing. That decision is left to the client. But please realize that the inspection is not exhaustive and the inspector is a generalist and not an expert in other licensed trades. The inspector is looking for clues as to problems and an inspector cannot predict when it might be more practical to replace a problematic component or system. At times a repair can be as expensive as replacement costs and sometimes undetected or hidden damage may lead to unexpected expense. A defect in one component can cause an unanticipated but related problem at another location: a marginal roof or failed sump pump could result in moisture issues and fungal concerns elsewhere. Rot, wood destroying organisms or even a missing, or failed, flashing might lead to concealed damage. Therefore, it is recommended that, prior to closing, client(s) have in hand estimates from qualified professional contractors or specialists for service/repairs or replacement of problematic components or systems. That would include, but is not limited to, decks, siding, structure, rot and wood destroying organisms, roofs, water leaks or water intrusion, drainage, skylights, gutters, chimneys, fireplaces, wood stoves, electrical systems, plumbing and heating.

It is the recommendation of Above & Beyond Inspections, pllc. that all work be completed by qualified and, as applicable, licensed contractors, builders, remodelers, plumbers, pest control applicators, electricians, roofers, HVAC and chimney professionals. Since an inspector cannot foresee the future and will not attempt to predict all of the ramifications or potential costs associated with any given problem, consultation with a qualified specialist is worthwhile. If this protocol is adhered to, the client has more options should the workmanship later be found to be sub-standard. Additionally, I recommended that all qualified parties or specialists, when on-site, be asked to not only make essential repairs but to also further evaluate a system or component and to make recommendations as to other beneficial repairs, improvements or upgrades.

Buyers often allow sellers to make repairs, or the repairs may be deferred until after closing. Those options are at the discretion of the parties involved and any governmental agency that might oversee the process. If repairs are completed in a suitable manner, by qualified parties prior to closing, the client minimizes the chances of unexpected surprises after closing. Regarding buyer or homeowner repairs, it is not the intent of a report to specify the exact means of repair for any given problem. Again, consulting with a qualified professional is required. A client performs, or accepts the work of another non-professional, at his or her own risk. And, of course, all appropriate city, county or municipal building permits should be acquired when work is done.

A home inspection is a practical approach to evaluating visual deficiencies. With few exceptions, the inspector does not know, nor confirm, if prior remodeling or construction work was performed with, or without, building permits. A home inspector is not checking for compliance with codes or verifying compliance with manufacturer's specifications. In fact, codes evolve over the years. For example, in homes that are not of recent construction, escape routes and window sizing may not be in compliance with modern emergency egress requirements. An inspector does not count bolts in the sill plate at any home. It may be unfair, except in the matter of critical safety issues, to expect a home built under previous standards to conform to recent codes. A professional or specialist, when performing service or making other repairs, is in a good position to determine if systems and components are installed per manufacturer's guidelines or the applicable building codes.

Mold, mildew and microbial growths are excluded substances per the standards of practice for home inspection. The inspector is searching for wood destroying organisms (rot) and conducive conditions. Fungus (or yeasts) are common and sometimes present in bathrooms, attics or crawl spaces. However, the report will not identify species of fungus other than visible rot. Microbial growths are the result of excess moisture or a lack of ventilation. Therefore, any fungal issues reported, with the exception of rot, will be referred to as conducive conditions. A client who wishes to have a mold or mildew inspection should, in addition to the standard home inspection, contract with a firm that specializes in locating and/or identifying microbial growths and mold. If remodeling is done, where walls and ceilings are opened, wallpaper removed, homeowners might find concealed issues, related to moisture that will have to be addressed during the remodel. For more information related to the health effects and cleanup of mold please visit. http://www.epa.gov/mold/moldguide.html

This report confines itself to conditions apparent at the time of the inspection. The inspector is not an arborist and is not assessing the condition of trees on the property. Seasonally there may be more ground or runoff water than at other times of the year. It is usually not possible to predict flooding. Therefore, if seasonal moisture problems develop, recommend consultation with a drainage professional. When mechanical means is utilized to control runoff water, the inspector will attempt to locate and view the pump(s) and, if possible, operate them. Inspector does not guarantee the adequacy or performance of any drainage system that might be in place to control flooding or runoff water. It is possible that the inspector will not locate all pumps (sump or ejector) on premises if they are partially covered, submerged and not readily apparent.
Please read the full inspection report, not just the summary. Valuable information is included in the full report text. Your Above & Beyond inspection adheres to the Washington State standards of practice. To read the standards please visit:

http://apps.leg.wa.gov/WAC/default.aspx?cite=308-408C

 
How to Read this Report
This report is organized by the property's functional areas.  Within each functional area, descriptive information is listed first and is shown in bold type.  Items of concern follow descriptive information.
Concerns are shown and sorted according to these types:
SafetyPoses a risk of injury or death 
Repair/ReplaceRecommend repairing or replacing 
Repair/MaintainRecommend repair and/or maintenance 
Minor DefectCorrection likely involves only a minor expense 
MaintainRecommend ongoing maintenance 
EvaluateRecommend evaluation by a specialist 
CommentFor your information 

Wood Destroying Organism Concerns
Concerns relating to wood destroying organisms are shown as follows:
InfestationEvidence of infestation of wood destroying insects or organisms (Live or dead insect bodies, fungal growth, etc.) 
DamageDamage caused by wood decay, fungi, or rot 
Conducive conditionsConditions conducive to decay or deteroration to wood (wood-soil contact, shrubs in contact with siding, roof or plumbing leaks, etc.) 

Click here for a glossary of building construction terms.  Contact your inspector if there are terms that you do not understand, or visit the glossary of construction terms at http://www.reporthost.com/glossary.asp

Table of Contents
General information
Exterior
Roof
Enclosed Patio
Attic
Electric service
Water heater
Heating and cooling
Plumbing and laundry
Fireplaces, woodstoves and chimneys
Basement
Kitchen
Master Bathroom
Basement bathroom
Interior rooms
 
General information Return to table of contents
Report number: 1301
Inspector's name: Taylor Knipp
Structures inspected: single family home
Age of building: 1986
Property owner's name: Jon Smith
Time started: 9:00
Time finished: 1:00
Present during inspection: Property owner
Occupied: Yes
Weather conditions: Clear
Temperature: Warm
Ground condition: Damp
Front of structure faces: West
Main entrance faces: West
Foundation type: Unfinished basement
The following items are excluded from this inspection: Private sewage disposal system, Irrigation system, Private well, Shed, Low voltage outdoor lighting, Outbuildings
 
Exterior Return to table of contents
Footing material: Poured in place concrete
Foundation material: Poured in place concrete
Apparent wall structure: Wood frame
Wall covering: Wood clapboard
Driveway material: Gravelbrick
Sidewalk material: Poured in place concrete
Exterior door material: Solid core wood
1) The deck at the front of the house shows significant signs of decay. The beams and tops of posts where completely deteriorated by water in various locations as well as some rotted deck planks. This could result in premature failure of the structure which could cause serious injury or death. I recommend replacement of deteriorated lumber with new material by a qualified contractor.

Photo 4  
Rot at center post of North side deck

Photo 5  
Rot on deck planks of North deck

Photo 6  
 

2) Flashing is missing from above the deck ledger boards. This can cause moisture to accumulate between the ledger boards and the structure. Rot may result in this area and cause the ledger board fasteners to fail. The deck may separate from the structure. This could pose a significant safety hazard. Even though the deck appears solid there was still some rot present. I recommend upon replacing damaged lumber that a qualified contractor should install flashing above ledger board, where necessary. For more information on installing deck ledger boards visit:
http://www.google.com/search?q=installing+a+ledger+board

And for more information on building safe decks in general, visit:
http://www.google.com/search?q=building+a+safe+deck

Photo 3  
North deck
 

3) The deck ledger boards are nailed to the structure rather than being attached by lag bolts. This poses a significant safety hazard since the ledger boards may separate from the structure, causing the deck to collapse. A qualified contractor should install lag screws or bolts as per standard building practices to securely attach the ledger board(s) to the structure. For more information on installing deck ledger boards visit:
http://www.google.com/search?q=installing+a+ledger+board

And for more information on building safe decks in general, visit:
http://www.google.com/search?q=building+a+safe+deck

Photo 2  
 

4) Gaps larger than four inches were found in all guardrails. This is a safety hazard, especially for small children. A qualified contractor should make modifications as necessary so gaps in guardrails do not exceed four inches. For example, installing additional balusters or railing components.

Photo 12  
 

5) The propane tank in the drive way needs to have a bollard installed in front of it to prevent it from being struck by a motor vehicle. I recommend this be done by a licensed contractor.

Photo 15  
 

6) One or more hornet, bee and/or wasp nests were found under the eves. These can pose a safety hazard. Nests should be removed as necessary.
7) Rot was found on the ends of fascia boards on the Southwest side of the building. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary, replacing all rotten wood.

Photo 10  

Photo 11  

Photo 14  
 

8) The gutters above the porch on the deck are poorly sloped so that significant amounts of water accumulate in them rather than draining through the downspouts. This can cause gutters to overflow, especially when organic debris such as leaves or needles have accumulated in them. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary, such as correcting the slope in gutters or installing additional downspouts and extensions if necessary.

Photo 37  
 

9) A few gutters were leaking above the deck during the inspection. This has resulted in water damage to the deck. Accumulated water is a conducive condition to rot and wood destroying insects/organisms. A qualified contractor should replace or repair gutters where necessary.

Photo 9  
 

10) Vines are in contact with the structure's exterior at the southwest corner. Vegetation can serve as a conduit for wood destroying insects and may retain moisture against the exterior after it rains. Vegetation should be pruned and/or removed as necessary to maintain a one foot clearance between it and the structure's exterior.

Photo 16  
 

11) One downspouts is loose on the Northwest corner. This can result in water accumulating around the structure's foundation, or in basements and crawl spaces if they exist. Accumulated water is a conducive condition to wood destroying insects and organisms, and may also cause the foundation to settle and possibly fail over time. Repairs should be made as necessary so downspouts are securely anchored and functional.

Photo 13  
 

12) The exterior finish on the south side is failing in a few areas. A qualified contractor should prep (pressure wash, scrape, sand, prime caulk, etc.) and repaint or restain areas as needed.

Photo 17  
 

13) The concrete patio at the west side under the deck has two large cracks present. This could lead to water intrusion which could cause further cracking. I recommend that the cracks be sealed as necessary.

Photo 7  
 

14)   Handrails at deck stairs are ungraspable and are a safety hazard. Handrails should be sized and shaped so your hand can encircle them. A qualified contractor should make repairs or modifications as necessary. For example, replacing existing handrails or installing additional handrails.

Photo 8  
 
 
Roof Return to table of contents
Roof inspection method: Traversed
Roof type: Gable
Roof covering: Asphalt or fiberglass composition shingles
Estimated age of roof: 2 years
Gutter & downspout material: Steel
Roof ventilation: Inadequate
15) There was one piece of flashing for the chimney of the gas fireplace that was reused during the last re-roof. The flashing appears to be a potential leak. I viewed the area from the attic access door and was able to see daylight through. It did not seem to be leaking, but I recommend that this be sealed.

Photo 43  

Photo 44  

16) There is an exposed nail head at the west side of the roof. This could cause water to enter the roof system. I recommend that the nail be sealed by a roofing contractor.

Photo 36  
 

17) A few composition shingles have raised, most likely due to nails that have loosened. Leaks may occur as a result. A qualified roofing contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary, such as reseating nails.

Photo 38  
Near the chimney
 
 
Enclosed Patio Return to table of contents

18) An open ground, three-pronged electric receptacles was found that the garage fridge plugged into. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate and make repairs as necessary. For example, replacing receptacles or correcting wiring circuits.

Grounding type receptacles began being required in residential structures during the 1960s. However the following appliances require grounding type receptacles:

  • Computer hardware
  • Refrigerators
  • Freezers
  • Air conditioners
  • Clothes washers
  • Clothes dryers
  • Dishwashers
  • Kitchen food waste disposers
  • Information technology equipment
  • Sump pumps
  • Electrical aquarium equipment
  • Hand-held motor-operated tools
  • Stationary and fixed motor-operated tools
  • Light industrial motor-operated tools
  • Hedge clippers
  • Lawn mowers

    This list is not exhaustive. Grounded circuits and receptacles should be installed in locations where such appliances will be used.
    19) Wire splices in the garage are exposed due to not being contained in a covered junction box. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock and fire. A qualified electrician should evaluate and make repairs as necessary. For example, install securely mounted junction boxes with cover plates where needed to contain wiring splices.

    Photo 39  

    Photo 40  
     
    Attic Return to table of contents
    Inspection method: Viewed from hatch. The attic did not have enough overhead clearance and 18 inches of blown in insulation was present. The inability to traverse the attic diminished the scope of the inspection of the attic.
    Roof structure type: Trusses
    Ceiling structure: Trusses
    Insulation material: Fiberglass loose fill
    Insulation depth: 18 inches
    20) The bathroom exhaust fan is routed through a flexible plastic vent towards the gable. This should be properly terminated out through the roof. This is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects and organisms due to increased moisture levels in the attic from the exhaust air. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make permanent repairs as necessary and as per standard building practices, so all exhaust air is vented outside.

    Photo 41  

    Photo 42  
     
    Electric service Return to table of contents
    Primary service type: Underground
    Primary service overload protection type: Circuit breakers
    Service amperage (amps): 200
    Service voltage (volts): 120/240
    Location of main service switch: In panel and at exterior panel
    Location of main disconnect: Breaker at top of main service panel
    Service entrance conductor material: Aluminum
    System ground: Ground rod(s) in soil
    Main disconnect rating (amps): 200
    Branch circuit wiring type: Copper
    Solid strand aluminum branch circuit wiring present: no
    Smoke detectors present: No some were present but not in each bedroom
     
    Water heater Return to table of contents
    Estimated age: 2002
    Type: Tank
    Energy source: Electricity
    Capacity (in gallons): 40
    Manufacturer: Whirlpool
    Model: e1f40rd045v
    Water temperature (degrees Fahrenheit): 116 F
    21) The water heater does not have seismic straps or struts installed. This is a potential safety hazard since movement can cause leaks in the gas supply lines or damage wiring. Leaks may also occur in water supply pipes. A qualified contractor should install seismic straps or struts as necessary and as per standard building practices.
    22) No drain line is installed for the temperature-pressure relief valve. This is a potential safety hazard due to the risk of scalding if someone is standing next to the water heater when the valve opens. A qualified plumber should install a drain line as per standard building practices. For example, extending to 6 inches from the floor, or routed so as to drain outside.
     
    Heating and cooling Return to table of contents
    Estimated age: 1986
    Primary heating system energy source: Electric
    Primary heat system type: Forced air
    Distribution system: Sheet metal ducts, Metal pipe
    Manufacturer: Trane
    Model: BEVO36A100A0
    Filter location: In return air duct below furnace
    23) Air handler filters are dirty and should be washed now. They should be checked monthly in the future and washed as necessary.
    24)   The unit does not appear to have been serviced recently. The blower motor and inside of the unit looked to be very dirty. I recommend having the unit cleaned and serviced by a licensed HVAC contractor.
     
    Plumbing and laundry Return to table of contents
    Water pressure (psi): 52 psi
    Water service: Private
    Service pipe material: Copper
    Supply pipe material: Copper
    Vent pipe material: Plastic
    Drain pipe material: Plastic
    Waste pipe material: Plastic
    25) The clothes dryer is equipped with a vinyl or foil, accordion-type, flexible exhaust duct. The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission considers these types of ducts to be unsafe, and a fire hazard. These types of ducts can trap lint and are susceptible to kinks or crushing, which can greatly reduce the air flow. This duct should be replaced with a rigid or corrugated semi-rigid metal duct, and by a qualified contractor if necessary. Most clothes dryer manufacturers specify the use of a rigid or corrugated semi-rigid metal duct. For more information, visit:
    http://www.cpsc.gov/CPSCPUB/PUBS/5022.html

    Photo 33  
     

    26) The clothes dryer exhaust duct appears to need cleaning. Significant amounts of lint build up was found. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of fire from decreased air flow and intrusion point for pests. This duct should be cleaned now and annually, or more often if necessary in the future.

    Photo 1  
     

    27) Neither the clothes washer nor dryer were operated or evaluated. They are excluded from this inspection.
     
    Fireplaces, woodstoves and chimneys Return to table of contents
    Fireplace type: propane log
    Woodstove type: Metal
    28) The chimney flues for the wood stove did not have a rainproof cover installed. They prevent the following:

  • Rainwater entering flues and mixing with combustion deposits, creating caustic chemicals which can corrode flues
  • Rainwater entering flues and causing damage to terracotta flue tiles from freeze-thaw cycles

    A qualified chimney service contractor should install rainproof cover(s) where missing.

    Photo 34  
     

    29) All solid fuel burning appliances (woodstoves and fireplaces, etc.) should be inspected annually by a qualified chimney service contractor, cleaned and repaired as necessary. At this time I recommend servicing of gas stove in basement by a licensed contractor.
    30)   There are a few cracks present on both chimneys. This could allow water penetration into the structure resulting in further cracking. I recommend that these cracks be sealed at time of next chimney service

    Photo 35  
     
     
    Basement Return to table of contents
    Insulation material underneath floor above: None visible
    Pier or support post material: Wood
    Beam material: Laminated wood
    Floor structure above: Solid wood joists
    31) Most of the three-pronged electric receptacles were found to be ungrounded. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate and make repairs as necessary. For example, replacing receptacles or correcting wiring circuits.

    Grounding type receptacles began being required in residential structures during the 1960s. However the following appliances require grounding type receptacles:

  • Computer hardware
  • Refrigerators
  • Freezers
  • Air conditioners
  • Clothes washers
  • Clothes dryers
  • Dishwashers
  • Kitchen food waste disposers
  • Information technology equipment
  • Sump pumps
  • Electrical aquarium equipment
  • Hand-held motor-operated tools
  • Stationary and fixed motor-operated tools
  • Light industrial motor-operated tools
  • Hedge clippers
  • Lawn mowers

    This list is not exhaustive. Grounded circuits and receptacles should be installed in locations where such appliances will be used.
    32) The handrail at basement stairs should have a return towards the wall to prevent clothing from getting caught during an emergency.

    Photo 26  
     

    33) The window at the southwest corner had vegetation up against it. There was past moisture staining present at the sill. I recommend having the vegetation removed to a 1 foot clearance from building.

    Photo 27  
     

    34)   There is inadequate overhead clearance at the stairs to basement. This could result in personal injury to anybody taller than 72 inches. I recommend Have a licensed contractor assess and determine the necessary fix, or at the very least owner should inform people, unfamiliar with the house, to be aware of the condition

    Photo 25  
     

    35)   The closet under tthe stairs needs to be properly firestopped. A fire started in the basement could easily move to the upstairs through this area. I recommend that this area be enclosed in 5/8 fire rated drywall by a licensed contractor.

    Photo 28  
     
     
    Kitchen Return to table of contents

    36) The electric receptacles that serve countertop surfaces within six feet of a sink appear to have no ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate to determine if GFCI protection exists, and if not, repairs should be made so that all receptacles that serve countertop surfaces within six feet of sinks have GFCI protection. For example, install GFCI receptacles or circuit breakers as needed.
    37) The range can tip forward, and no anti-tip bracket appears to be installed. This is a safety hazard since the range may tip forward when weight is applied to the open door, such as when a small child climbs on it, or if heavy objects are dropped on it. Anti-tip brackets have been sold with all free standing ranges since 1985. An anti-tip bracket should be installed to eliminate this safety hazard. For more information, visit:
    http://www.google.com/search?q=range+anti+tip+device

    38) The cover plates are missing from the receptacle under the kitchen sink. They are intended to contain fire and prevent electric shock from exposed wires. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of fire and shock. Cover plates should be installed where missing.

    Photo 18  
     

    39) The range hood fan vents into the kitchen rather than outdoors. Ventilation may be inadequate and moisture may accumulate indoors. I recommend installing a charcoal type filter or having a qualified contractor make modifications as necessary as per standard building practices so the range hood fan vents outdoors.
    40) Caulk is missing and/or deteriorated where countertops meet backsplashes in wet areas, such as around sinks. Caulk should be replaced where deteriorated and/or applied where missing to prevent water damage.
     
    Master Bathroom Return to table of contents

    41) The grout around the bathtub is damaged or deteriorated. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair the grout as necessary.

    Photo 23  
     

    42) Caulk is missing where the tub surround meets the tub. It should be replaced where deteriorated and/or applied where missing to prevent water intrusion and damage to the wall structure.

    Photo 22  

    Photo 24  
     
    Basement bathroom Return to table of contents

    43) An open ground, three-pronged electric receptacles was found. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate and make repairs as necessary. For example, replacing receptacles or correcting wiring circuits.

    Grounding type receptacles began being required in residential structures during the 1960s. However the following appliances require grounding type receptacles:

  • Computer hardware
  • Refrigerators
  • Freezers
  • Air conditioners
  • Clothes washers
  • Clothes dryers
  • Dishwashers
  • Kitchen food waste disposers
  • Information technology equipment
  • Sump pumps
  • Electrical aquarium equipment
  • Hand-held motor-operated tools
  • Stationary and fixed motor-operated tools
  • Light industrial motor-operated tools
  • Hedge clippers
  • Lawn mowers

    This list is not exhaustive. Grounded circuits and receptacles should be installed in locations where such appliances will be used.
    44) There was a small leak at the water supply lines under the sink. A qualified plumber should evaluate and repair as necessary.
    45) The bathroom with a shower did not have an exhaust fan installed. Moisture accumulation will occur and may damage the structure. Even if the bathroom has a window that opens, it likely does not provide adequate ventilation, especially during cold weather when the window is closed. A qualified contractor should install exhaust fans as per standard building practices where missing in bathrooms with showers.
    46) The sink is clogged or drains slowly. Drains should be cleared as necessary, and by a qualified plumber if necessary.
    47) The tub surround has excessive caulk along with mildew, mold and deterioration. This could cause further mold issues and water damage. I recommend having the tub surround replaced and caulked by a licensed contractor.

    Photo 29  

    Photo 30  

    48) The sink stopper mechanism is missing and the connection to the drain under the sink is cracked. It was not leaking at the time of inspection. Stopper mechanisms should be installed where missing and/or repairs should be made so sink stoppers open and close easily.

    Photo 31  
     

    49) The toilet did not have caulk around the base. This could result in a leak from the fixture. I recommend having caulking installed by a qualified party.

    Photo 32  
     
     
    Interior rooms Return to table of contents

    50) An insufficient number of smoke alarms are installed. Additional smoke alarms should be installed as necessary so a functioning one exists in each hallway leading to bedrooms, and in each bedroom. For more information, visit http://www.cpsc.gov/cpscpub/pubs/5077.html
    51) There are a number of nail pops present throughout the house. These are mainly a cosmetic issue. I recommend having them repaired at the owners discrection.

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    Thank you for choosing Above & Beyond Inspections. pllc. We work hard to make your real estate transaction go as smoothly as possible. If you have any questions or concerns please contact us and we would be happy to anwser any questions you might have. If you are happy with Above & Beyond Inspections please refer us to anyone, who might benefit from our services.