Surety Inspection Service

Website: http://www.suretyinspectionservice.com
Email: jim@suretyinspectionservice.com
Phone: (252) 209-4464
FAX: (252) 544-5179
838 NC Highway 461 
Ahoskie NC 27910
Inspector: James Sullins
North Carolina License #3118

 

Property Inspection Report
Client(s): John and Mary Doe
Property address: 1110 Neighborhood Drive
Northeast, NC 00000
Inspection date: 10/9/2012
This report published on Tuesday, October 23, 2012 11:03:13 AM EDT

View report summary

This report is the exclusive property of Surety Inspection Service and the Client(s) listed in the report title. Use of this report by any unauthorized persons is prohibited.

 
How to Read this Report
This report is organized by the property's functional areas.  Within each functional area, descriptive information is listed first and is shown in bold type.  Items of concern follow descriptive information.
Concerns are shown and sorted according to these types:
SafetySafety issue. Be careful. 
Major DefectCorrection likely involves significant expense 
Minor DefectCorrection likely involves minor expense 
MaintainRecommend maintenance 
RepairSuggest repairing or replacing 
MonitorRecommend monitoring for changes in condition or maintenance needs 
EvaluateSuggest evaluation by a qualified specialist 
ServiceableItem or component is working as intended 
CommentFor your information. 
Hire A ProThis work is best performed by a trained professional. 

Wood Destroying Organism Concerns
Concerns relating to wood destroying organisms are shown as follows:
InfestationEvidence of infestation of wood destroying insects or organisms (Live or dead insect bodies, fungal growth, etc.) 
DamageDamage caused by wood destroying insects or organisms (Rot, carpenter ant galleries, etc.) 
Conducive conditionsConditions conducive for wood destroying insects or organisms (Wood-soil contact, shrubs in contact with siding, roof or plumbing leaks, etc.) 

Click here for a glossary of building construction terms. Contact your inspector if there are terms that you do not understand, or visit the glossary of construction terms at http://www.reporthost.com/glossary.asp

Table of Contents
Introductory Remarks
General Information
Grounds
Exterior / Foundation
Roof / Attic
Electric
Plumbing / Fuel Systems
Water Heater
Cooling / Heat Pump
Kitchen
Bathrooms / Laundry / Sinks
Interior Rooms / Areas
Wood Destroying Organism Findings
 
Introductory Remarks Return to table of contents

1) There are no major defects listed in this report.
2) Home inspections focus on the problems in a building, both significant and insignificant. Sometimes, a report full of minor problems (common in older homes) creates negative concern in the Client's mind that is greater than it needs to be.

Often, problems mentioned in the report are found in most homes of a similar age. In our reports, these are labeled as "minor defects," and shouldn't be cause for alarm as to the worthiness of the home, although they should be remediated, because minor defects unattended can become major defects.

If a "major defect" is identified, it is labeled as such and should be a consideration for the client in finalizing the negotiations. Sellers should disclose such a condition when listing the property for sale; so, its presence in a report won't be a surprise to the buyers, who've made their offer to purchase with the defect in mind.

Buyers make buying decisions based on positive things, such as the location, the floorplan, the yard, the amenities, the price. You didn't do this lightly. You evidently saw something right about the property and envisioned yourself a sastisfied owner.

When weighing the impact of this report on your buying decision, it's important to keep this in mind.

3) Older structures, such as this one, have been constructed, remodeled, updated and maintained using a variety of methods, by workers whose skills varied and under building codes that changed over time.

We know more now than previously about construction techniques and materials, as to their strength, durability and safety. Older homes are rarely up to today's building code standards; yet, they continue to serve their useful function of providing reliable housing.

The inspector is obligated to form judgments consistent with current knowledge and to err on the side of caution in preparing this report. If any language in this report causes you concern, please contact the inspector for personal consultation.

4) Photo captions in this report might contain information not found elsewhere in the report. Be sure to read all photo captions. Photos with no captions are either explained in the accompanying text or are for illustrative purposes.
5) Language in this report is in either the past or present tense. Regardless of the tense, the text always refers to the subject condition at the time of the inspection and not to any subsequent condition.
6) To satisfy the requirements of law and to maintain the highest levels of integrity, the inspector must prepare the most complete possible disclosure of a property's condition. The intent is not to create or suggest contract requirements between the buyer and seller. Findings in this report do not become part of the real estate sales contract, unless such a condition has been agreed to by the parties to the real estate contract, in writing.

This report places legal and contractual requirements only on the parties to the Contract for Home Inspection, that is, the Client and Surety Inspection Service.

7) The summary is not the entire report. The complete report may include additional information of interest or concern to you. It is strongly recommended that you promptly read the complete report. For information regarding the negotiability of any item in this report under the Real Estate Purchase Contract, contact your North Carolina real estate agent or an attorney. This statement is required by North Carolina General Statute 143-151.58 (a1).

This home inspection was performed in accordance with the Standards of Practice of the NC Home Inspector Licensure Board. A copy of these standards may be accessed at: http://www.suretyinspectionservice.com/Standards_of_Practice.pdf
 
General Information Return to table of contents
Report number: 12-066
Time started: 9:45 a.m.
Time finished: 12:25 p.m.
Present during inspection: Client, Realtor
Client present for discussion at end of inspection: Yes
Weather conditions: Clear
Temperature: Cool
Ground condition: Dry
Inspection fee: $350
Type of building: Single family
Age of building(s): 38
Source for building age: Realtor
Front of building faces: Southeast
Main entrance faces: Southeast
Occupied: No
Property owner's name: entered here.
 
Grounds Return to table of contents
Limitations: These items are not included in this inspection: swimming pool, spa, hot tub, water features and related equipment; playground, recreation or leisure equipment; landscape lighting; areas below exterior structures with less than three feet of vertical clearance; irrigation system; invisible fencing; sea wall, dock and boathouse. Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. The inspector does not test or determine the adequacy of drainage systems for grounds, walkways, below-grade stairs and roof downspouts. The inspector does not provide an evaluation of geological conditions or site stability, compliance with jurisdictional requirements of pool or spa fencing, or determination that deck, balcony or stair membranes are watertight.
The following items are excluded from this inspection: Outbuildings
Site profile: Level
Condition of driveway: Appeared serviceable
Driveway material: Unpaved
Condition of sidewalks and patios: Appeared serviceable
Condition of deck, patio and/or porch covers: Appeared serviceable
Condition of decks, porches and/or balconies: Appeared serviceable
Condition of exterior stairs: Required repairs, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Exterior stair material: Masonry
8) Handrails at one or more flights of stairs are missing.

Standard building practice requires that handrails be:
a. Installed at stairs with four or more risers;
b. Sized and shaped so a hand can encircle them;
c. Permanently and securely attached and able to withstand a 200-pound force in any direction at any point;
d. Continuous and extend for the entire flight of the stairs; and
e. Installed between 30-38 inches above the leading edge of the stair treads.

Also, missing bricks should be replaced where missing at the ends of the treads.

A qualified person should repair, replace or install per standard building practice.

Photo 27  

Photo 35  
 
Exterior / Foundation Return to table of contents
Limitations: These items are not included in this inspection: below-grade foundation walls and footings, or those obscured by vegetation or building components; exterior building surfaces or components obscured by vegetation, stored items or debris. Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Some amount of cracking is normal in concrete slabs and foundation walls due to shrinkage and drying. The inspector does not determine the adequacy of sump pumps, seismic reinforcement, nor determine if support posts, columns, beams, joists, studs, trusses, etc. are of adequate size, spanning or spacing.
Condition of wall covering: Appeared serviceable
Apparent wall structure: Wood frame
Wall covering: Brick veneer
Condition of foundation and footings: Appeared serviceable
Foundation type: Crawlspace
Foundation material: Concrete block
Footing material: Poured in place concrete
Condition of floor substructure: Appeared serviceable
Pier or support post material: Masonry
Beam material: Solid wood
Floor structure: Solid wood joists
Condition of crawl space: Appeared serviceable
Crawl space inspection method: Partially traversed
Insulation material underneath floor above: Fiberglass roll or batt
Ventilation: Appears serviceable
Vapor barrier present: Yes
9) The vapor barrier in the crawl space is missing in some areas. This is a conducive condition for wood destroying organisms, due to the likelihood of water evaporating into the structure from the soil. A qualified person should evaluate and replace or repair sections as necessary.

Standard building practice requires:
a. The soil below the vapor barrier should be smooth and free from sharp objects;
b. Seams should overlap a minimum of 12-inches; and
c. The vapor barrier should lap up onto the foundation side walls.

Photo 32  
 

10) The floor insulation in some areas of the crawl space is falling down. This may result in increased heating or cooling costs, due to decreased energy efficiency. A qualified person should repair, replace or install insulation.

For more information, visit:
http://www.eere.energy.gov/consumer/tips/insulation.html

Photo 30  

Photo 31  

11) Some crawl space sections were not evaluated due to lack of access, because ducts or pipes are blocking.
 
Roof / Attic Return to table of contents
Limitations: These items or areas are not included in this inspection: areas that could not be traversed or viewed clearly due to lack of access; areas and components obscured by insulation; solar roofing components. Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. The inspector does not determine if rafters, trusses, joists or beams are of adequate size, spanning or spacing. The inspector does not provide an estimate of remaining roof surface life, does not determine that the roof has no leaks at the time of the inspection, and does not determine that the roof won't leak in the future. Only active leaks and evidence of past leaks observed during the inspection are reported on as part of this inspection. To determine than no leaks exist, complete access to all roof structure areas must be viewed during a wide variety of weather conditions, including prolonged heavy rain, high wind from varying directions, heavy accumulations of snow and/or ice, and melting snow and ice.
Condition of roof structure: Appeared serviceable
Roof type: Gable
Age of roof surface(s): 6
Source for building age: Realtor
Roof inspection method: Viewed from ground with binoculars
Condition of shingle and/or shake roof surface materials: Appeared serviceable
Roof surface material: Asphalt or fiberglass composition shingles
Apparent number of layers of roof surface material: One
Condition of exposed flashings: Appeared serviceable
Condition of gutters, downspouts and extensions: Appeared serviceable
Gutter and downspout material: Metal
Gutter and downspout installation: Full
Condition of attic: Appeared serviceable
Attic inspection method: Viewed from hatch(es)
Roof structure type: Rafters
Ceiling structure: Ceiling beams
Ceiling insulation material: Fiberglass loose fill
Ceiling insulation depth: 8 inches
Ceiling insulation rating: R-20
Vapor retarder: None visible
Roof ventilation: Appears serviceable
12) Some composition shingles are lifting in some areas. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair, if needed.

Photo 29  
 

13) The pull down stairs are poorly insulated and no weatherstrip is installed around the perimeter. Insulation and weatherstrip should be installed around hatches to prevent heated or cooled interior air from entering the attic.

For more information, visit:
http://www.reporthost.com/_docs/atticaccess.pdf
 
Electric Return to table of contents
Limitations: These items are not included in this inspection: generator systems, surge suppressors, inaccessible or concealed wiring; underground utilities and systems; low voltage lighting or lighting on timers or sensors. Comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. The inspector does not determine the adequacy of grounding or bonding, does not determine if the system has an adequate capacity for the client's specific needs, nor determine if the system has any reserve capacity for additions or expansion. The inspector does not operate circuit breakers as part of the inspection, install or change light bulbs, nor determine the operability of every wall switch.
Electric service condition: Appeared serviceable
Primary service type: Underground
Number of service conductors: 3
Service voltage (volts): 120-240
Service amperage (amps): 200
Primary service overload protection type: Circuit breakers
Service entrance conductor material: Aluminum
Main disconnect rating (amps): 200
System ground: Ground rod(s) in soil
Condition of main service panel: Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Location of main service panel #A: Laundry room
Location of main disconnect: Breaker at top of main service panel
Branch circuit wiring type: Non-metallic sheathed
Condition of branch circuit wiring: Serviceable
Solid strand aluminum branch circuit wiring present: None visible
Condition of smoke detectors: Near, at or beyond service life
Smoke detectors present: Yes
Carbon monoxide detectors present: No
Smoke detector power source: Not determined
14) One circuit breaker in panel A is "double tapped," meaning two or more wires are clamped in a terminal designed for one wire. This is a safety issue, because the bolt or screw may tighten securely against one wire, but leave others loose. Arcing, sparks and fires can result. A qualified electrician should evaluate and repair.

Photo 26  
 

15) Although not required when this home was built, one or more receptacle cover plates used at the building exterior are not weatherproof. This is a potential safety issue. A qualified electrician should evaluate and repair.

Waterproof covers recommended.

16) Based on the age of this structure and the appearance of existing smoke detectors, the alarms may have been installed more than ten years ago. According to National Fire Protection Association, aging smoke alarms don't operate as efficiently and often are the source for nuisance alarms. Early smoke alarms are estimated to have a 30% probability of failure within the first ten years. Newer smoke alarms are better, but should be replaced after ten years. Unless you know that the smoke alarms are new, replacing them when moving into a new residence is recommended by NFPA.

For more information, visit:
http://www.google.com/search?q=old+smoke+alarms

Photo 18  
 

17) Dryer lint were found in panel A. Continued accumulation will result in a fire hazard. The inspector knows of no approved method for cleaning contaminants from panel interiors or components such as bus or terminal bars. Any cleaning should be done by a qualifed person.

Photo 25  
 

18) Branch circuit wiring installed in buildings built prior to the mid-1980s is usually rated for a maximum temperature of 60 degrees Centigrade. This includes non-metallic sheathed (Romex) wiring, and both BX and AC metal clad flexible wiring. Knob and tube wiring, installed in homes built before 1950, may be rated for even lower maximum temperatures.

Newer electric fixtures, including lighting and fans, usually require wiring rated for 90 degrees Centigrade. Connecting older, 60 degree-rated wiring to newer fixtures is a potential safety hazard, due to the risk of fire.

It is beyond the scope of this inspection to determine if such incompatible components are installed, or to determine the extent to which they're installed. Based on the age of this building, the client should be aware that this safety hazard may be present. Client may want to consider consulting with the property owner to determine if newer fixtures were installed or have a qualified electrician evaluate and repair per standard building practice.

19) Although not required when this home was built, one or more electric receptacles at the kitchen, bathrooms have no visible ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. Recommend having a qualified electrician evaluate to determine if GFCI protection exists, and if not, install it.

For more information, visit:
http://www.mikeholt.com/documents/nec/pdf/GFCI_requirement_page2.pdf

20) This light fixture isn't working. It could be only bad bulbs. A qualified person should evaluate and repair or replace.

Photo 19  
 

21) The cover door to panel A is not installed. A qualified person should re-install it..

Photo 23  

Photo 24  
 
Plumbing / Fuel Systems Return to table of contents
Limitations: These items are not included in this inspection: private wells and sewage disposal systems; main, side and lateral sewer lines; "gray water" systems; pressure boosting systems; incinerating or composting toilets; fire suppression sprinkler systems; water softeners, conditioners or filtering systems; plumbing components concealed within the foundation or building structure, or inaccessible areas such as below tubs; underground utilities and systems; overflow drains for tubs and sinks; backflow prevention devices. Comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. The inspector does not operate water supply or shut-off valves, due to the possibility of valves leaking or breaking when operated. The inspector does not test for lead in the water supply, the water pipes or solder, does not determine if plumbing and fuel lines are adequately sized and does not determine the existence or condition of underground or above-ground fuel tanks.
Condition of service and main line: Appeared serviceable
Location of main water meter: At road, northeast corner of lot
Location of main water shut: At meter and in crawl space
Water service: Public
Water pressure (psi): Satisfactory
Service pipe material: Not determined
Condition of supply lines: Appeared serviceable
Supply pipe material: Copper
Condition of drain pipes: Appeared serviceable
Drain pipe material: Plastic
Condition of waste lines: Appeared serviceable
Waste pipe material: Plastic
Vent pipe condition: Appeared serviceable
Vent pipe material: Plastic
22) Insulation on some water supply pipes in the crawl space is missing, although most are insulated. A qualified person should replace or install insulation per standard building practice for better energy efficiency and to prevent water pipes from freezing.
23) One or more outside faucets are missing backflow prevention devices. These devices reduce the likelihood of polluted or contaminated water entering the potable water supply. This condition occurs when an outside faucet is left in the "on" position, with a hose connected and the sprayer head turned off. As a consequence, pressure in the system fluctuates and water can be drawn back into the building's water supply pipes. If a chemical sprayer is being used with the hose, the chemicals can enter the water supply pipes. Recommend installing backflow prevention devices on all exterior hose bibs. They are available at most home improvement stores and are easily installed.
24) Copper water supply pipes in buildings built before 1986 might be joined with solder that contains lead. Lead is a known health hazard, especially for children. Laws were passed in 1985, prohibiting the use of lead in solder, but before that solder contained about 50% lead. The client should be aware of this, especially if children will be living in this structure. Evaluating for the presence of lead in this structure is not included in this inspection. The client should consider having a qualified lab test for lead, and if necessary take steps to reduce or remove lead from the water supply. Reliable do-it-yourself lead test kits can be purchased on line.

Various solutions such as these may be advised:
a. Flush water taps or faucets. Do not drink water that has been sitting in the plumbing lines for more than six hours;
b. Install appropriate filters at points of use;
c. Use only cold water for cooking and drinking, because hot water dissolves lead more quickly than cold water;
d. Use bottled or distilled water;
e. Treat well water to make it less corrosive; and
f. Have a qualified plumbing contractor replace supply pipes and/or plumbing components.

For more information visit:
http://www.epa.gov/safewater/lead/index.html

25) Suggest having the septic tank inspected by a qualified specialist and repaired, if necessary. Suggest having the tank pumped if it was last pumped more than 3-years ago.
 
Water Heater Return to table of contents
Limitations: These items are not included in this inspection: solar water heating systems; circulation systems. Comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. The inspector does not provide an estimate of remaining life on water heaters, does not determine if water heaters are appropriately sized or perform evaluations that require a pilot light to be lit.
Condition of water heater: Appeared serviceable
Type: Tank
Estimated age: 13
Energy source: Electricity
Capacity (in gallons): 40
Manufacturer: Whirlpool
Model: EE2H40RD045V
Location of water heater: Laundry
Water temperature (degrees Fahrenheit): 107.5
26) Wiring for the water heater's power supply is non-metallic sheathed wiring which is exposed and subject to damage. Standard building practice calls for such wiring to be protected with BX armored conduit. A qualified contractor should repair per standard building practice.

Photo 12  
 

27) A water heater is installed at the same level as finished living space and has no catch pan and drain. Client may want to consider having a qualified contractor install a catch pan and drain, to prevent water damage to finished interior spaces, in the event the water heater develops a leak or is drained.

Photo 13  
 

28) The estimated useful life for most water heaters is 8-12 years. The water heater appears to be at this age.
 
Cooling / Heat Pump Return to table of contents
Limitations: These items are not included in this inspection: humidifiers, dehumidifiers, electronic air filters; thermostat or temperature control accuracy and timed functions; cooling components concealed within the building structure or in inaccessible areas; underground utilities and systems; safety devices and controls (due to automatic operation). Comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. The inspector does not provide an estimate of remaining life of the cooling system components, does not determine if cooling systems are appropriately sized, and does not test coolant pressure. Condensation pans and drain lines may clog or leak at any time and should be monitored while in operation.
Condition of cooling system and/or heat pump: Appeared serviceable
Location: Crawl space / outside
Type: Split system, Heat pump
Estimated age: 5
Approximate tonnage: 3.0
Manufacturer: Comfortmaster
Condition of distribution system: Appeared serviceable
Condition of controls: Appeared serviceable
Condition of air filters: Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Location of air filters: Behind return air grill
29) The condensate drain line in the crawl space isn't properly supported and has a slight bow in it, where water can accumulate. Equipment damage or water damage to surrounding structures may occur. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair.
30) Insulation for the outside condensing unit's refrigerant lines is deteriorated in some areas. This will result in reduced efficiency and increased energy costs. A qualified person should replace insulation.

Photo 33  
 

31) The air filter is dirty. A qualified person should replace the filter and it should be checked monthly and maintained.

Suggest buying a dozen once a year, so they'll be on-hand when needed monthly.

32)  

Photo 34  
Air handler label, in crawl space.

Photo 36  
 
Kitchen Return to table of contents
Limitations: These items are not included in this inspection: free-standing or portable appliances such as dishwashers, trash compactors, refrigerators, freezers, ice makers; specialty appliances such as hot water dispensers, water filters and trash compactors; appliance timers, clocks, cook functions, self-cleaning or continuous cleaning operations, thermostat or temperature control accuracy and lights. Comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. The inspector does not provide an estimate of the remaining life of appliances, and does not determine the adequacy of operation of appliances such as dishwashers, garbage disposers, trash compactors, ovens or broilers.
Condition of counters: Appeared serviceable
Condition of cabinets: Appeared serviceable
Condition of sinks and related plumbing: Appeared serviceable
Condition of dishwasher: Appeared serviceable
Condition of range, cooktop: Appeared serviceable
Condition of refrigerator: Not determined
33) Leaking or dripping was found at the kitchen sink spout. Repair might be as simple as cleaning the spout screen. A qualified person should evaluate and repair.

Photo 2  
 

34) The flow from the kitchen sink's sprayer water supply is low. A qualified person should evaluate and repair.
35) This kitchen cabinet drawer is damaged. A qualified person should repair it.

Photo 1  
This door bottom is coming loose and needs repair by a qualified person.
 
 
Bathrooms / Laundry / Sinks Return to table of contents
Limitations: These items are not included in this inspection: overflow drains for tubs and sinks; bidets, heated towel racks, saunas, steam generators, clothes washers, clothes dryers. Comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. The inspector does not determine the adequacy of washing machine drain lines, washing machine catch pan drain lines, or clothes dryer exhaust ducts. The inspector does not operate water supply or shut-off valves for sinks, toilets, bidets or clothes washers, due to the possibility of valves leaking or breaking when operated. The inspector does not determine if shower pans or tub and shower enclosures are water tight, or determine the completeness or operability of gas piping to the laundry appliances.
Location #A: Hall
Location #B: Master
Location #C: Laundry
Condition of counters: Appeared serviceable
Condition of cabinets: Appeared serviceable
Condition of sinks and related plumbing: Appeared serviceable
Condition of toilets: Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Condition of ventilation systems: Appeared serviceable
Condition of laundry facilities: Appeared serviceable
Gas supply for laundry equipment present: No
240 volt receptacle for laundry equipment present: Yes
36) Leaking or dripping was found at the bathtub supply valves at location A, B. A qualified plumber should evaluate and repair.

Photo 6  

Photo 10  

37) There is low water flow from the hot and cold water faucet in the shower at location A. A qualified person should evaluate and repair.

Photo 7  
 

38) No exhaust fan is installed in the laundry area. Exhaust fans in wet areas prevent moisture from accumulating, and help prevent mold growth and damage to building components. They are especially important in the relatively airtight houses that are now built. Client may want to consider having a qualified contractor install an exhaust fan per standard building practice. Recommend that a switch with a built-in timer be installed to control it.
39) Caulk is deteriorated at location A. A qualified person should repair.

Photo 4  
 

40) Corrosion was found at one or more water supply valves for the sink at location A. Corroded valves should be monitored as they approach their maximum service life. A qualified plumber should evaluate and repair or replace.

Photo 5  
 

41) The toilet at location C has no water supply and could not be fully evaluated. The valve may be turned off or repairs may be necessary. The client should ask the property owner about this and have a qualified plumber evaluate and repair, if necessary.

Photo 8  

Photo 9  

42) The clothes dryer is equipped with a foil, accordion-type, flexible exhaust duct. These types of ducts can trap lint and are susceptible to kinks or crushing, which can greatly reduce the air flow, so close monitoring is necessary to be sure they remain clean and unobstructed.

Photo 11  
 
 
Interior Rooms / Areas Return to table of contents
Limitations: These items are not included in this inspection: security, intercom and sound systems; communications wiring; central vacuum systems; elevators and stair lifts; sources of obnoxious odors; cosmetic deficiencies due to normal wear and tear in wall, floor and ceiling surfaces and coverings or in equipment; deficiencies relating to interior decorating; low voltage and gas lighting systems. Comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. The inspector does not evaluate areas or items that require moving stored items, furnishings, debris, equipment, floor coverings, insulation or similar materials. The inspector does not test for asbestos, lead, radon gas, mold, hazardous waste, urea formaldehyde, urethane or any other toxic substance. Some items such as window operability are tested on a sampled basis. Paint may obscure wall and ceiling defects. Floor coverings may obscure floor defects and furnishings may obscure wall, floor and floor covering defects. If furnishings were present during the inspection, we recommend, when possible, a full evaluation of walls, floors and ceilings that were previously obscured. Determining the cause of odors is not within the scope of this inspection.
Exterior door material: Wood, Metal
Condition of exterior entry doors: Appeared serviceable
Condition of interior doors: Appeared serviceable
Type of windows: Vinyl, Multi, Double hung
Condition of windows: Appeared serviceable
Wall type or covering: Drywall
Condition of walls: Appeared serviceable
Ceiling type or covering: Drywall, Tiles
Condition of ceilings: Appeared serviceable
Flooring type or covering: Carpet, Vinyl
Condition of flooring: Appeared serviceable
43) The jamb around the front exterior door is damaged. A qualified person should repair.

Photo 17  
 

44) The sliding screen door at the garage end of the house is loose. A qualified person should evaluate and repair or replace.

Photo 21  
 

45) The bedroom doors have no air gap at the floor, or have a gap substantially less than 1-inch. The building has a forced air heating system with a centrally located return air duct. When bedroom doors are closed, the only effective path for return air from bedrooms is under the doors. A minimum gap of 1-inch below bedroom doors is recommended to allow adequate flow for return air. Recommend trimming the bottoms of bedroom doors, so each door has a 1-inch gap at its base.

Photo 14  
 

46) The illustrated section of vinyl flooring has significant deterioration or damage. Loose edges were found. A qualified person should replace or repair flooring.

Photo 22  
 

47) A bedroom bifold closet door is off its tracks. The kitchen pantry bifold needs adjustment, so both sides will close. A qualified person should repair.

Photo 3  

Photo 16  

48) Minor cracks or holes were found in walls. They don't appear to be a structural concern, but may need repair for aesthetic reasons.
49) Minor cracks or holes were found in ceilings in one or more areas. They don't appear to be a structural concern, but the client may wish to repair these for aesthetic reasons.

Photo 15  

Photo 20  

50) Some ceiling areas in this structure have tiles that might have been installed before 1980. This material might contain asbestos, poses a health hazard. Laws were passed in the United States in 1978, prohibiting use of asbestos in residential structures, but stocks of existing materials might have been used thereafter. The client may wish to have the ceiling material tested by a qualified lab to determine if it contains asbestos.

In most cases, when the material is intact and in good condition, keeping it encapsulated with paint and not otherwise disturbing it may reduce or effectively eliminate the health hazard. If the client wishes to remove the material, or plans to disturb it through remodeling, it should be tested by a qualified lab or by consultation with a qualified industrial hygienist or asbestos abatement specialist.

For more information, visit:
http://www.cpsc.gov/CPSCPUB/PUBS/453.html
 
Wood Destroying Organism Findings Return to table of contents
Limitations: This report includes findings only from accessible and visible areas on the day of the inspection. In addition to the inaccessible areas documented in this report, examples of other inaccessible areas include: areas less than 18-inches in height; attic areas less than five feet in height, areas blocked by ducts, pipes or insulation; areas where locks or permanently attached covers prevent access; areas where insulation would be damaged if traversed; areas obscured by vegetation. All inaccessible areas are subject to infestation or damage from wood destroying organisms. The inspector does not move furnishings, stored items, debris, floor or wall coverings, insulation, or other materials as part of the inspection, nor perform destructive testing. Wood destroying organisms may infest, re-infest or become active at any time. No warranty is provided as part of this inspection.
Visible evidence of active wood destroying insects: No
Visible evidence of active wood decay fungi: No
Visible evidence of past wood destroying insects: No
Visible evidence of past wood decay fungi: No
Visible evidence of damage by wood destroying insects: No
Visible evidence of damage by wood decay fungi: No
Visible evidence of conditions conducive to wood destroying organisms: No
 
Member - InterNational Association of Certified Home Inspectors