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Sugar Maple Home Inspection Service LLC


Email: sugarmapleHIS@gmail.com
Phone: (802) 770-8829
999 Briar Hill Rd 
West Pawlet VT 05775-9786
Inspector: Gardiner Charlton
Vermont Property Inspector License # 143.0132395

 

Property Inspection Report

Client(s):  Linus & Lucy Van Pelt
Property address:  4 Pine Tree Drive
Pinetree Corners, Vermont 05774
Inspection date:  Saturday, November 11, 2017

This report published on Tuesday, December 19, 2017 5:44:01 PM EST

This report is the exclusive property of Sugar Maple Home Inspection Service LLC and the client(s) listed in the report title. Use of this report by any unauthorized persons is prohibited.

PURPOSE AND SCOPE
This inspection was conducted in accordance with the State of Vermont Administrative-Rules-for-Property-Inspectors Part 3.2 Standards of Practice, most current edition, it shall define the standard of duty and the conditions, limitations, and exclusions of the inspection and are incorporated by reference herein. Copies of these standards are available upon request or can be viewed here https://www.sec.state.vt.us/media/685490/Administrative-Rules-for-Property-Inspectors.pdf

A standard Home Inspection Report is based on a visual assessment of the condition of the accessible features of the residence at the time of inspection. The inspection and inspection report are offered as an opinion only. Although every reasonable effort is made to discover and correctly interpret indications of previous or ongoing defects that may be present, no guarantee is implied nor responsibility assumed by the inspector or inspection company, for the actual condition of the building or property being examined.

This report will also contain items to alert or advise you of common things which a homeowner may want or need to know. These may include information on specific location of meters, shut-off switches, turn-off valves and other data which will help the owner better understand the items, systems or mechanics of the home.
How to Read this Report
This report is organized by the property's functional areas.  Within each functional area, descriptive information is listed first and is shown in bold type.  Items of concern follow descriptive information. Concerns are shown and sorted according to these types:
Concern typeSafetyPoses a safety hazard
Concern typeMajor DefectCorrection likely involves a significant expense
Concern typeRepair/ReplaceRecommend repairing or replacing
Concern typeRepair/MaintainRecommend repair and/or maintenance
Concern typeMinor DefectCorrection likely involves only a minor expense
Concern typeMaintainRecommend ongoing maintenance
Concern typeEvaluateRecommend evaluation by a specialist
Concern typeMonitorRecommend monitoring in the future
Concern typeCommentFor your information

Click here for a glossary of building construction terms.Contact your inspector If there are terms that you do not understand, or visit the glossary of construction terms at http://www.reporthost.com/glossary.asp

Table of Contents
General Information
Grounds
Exterior and Foundation
Roof
Garage or Carport
Crawl Space
Attic and Roof Structure
Basement
Electric
Plumbing / Fuel Systems
Water Heater
Heating, Ventilation and Air Condition (HVAC)
Fireplaces, Stoves, Chimneys and Flues
Kitchen
Bathrooms, Laundry and Sinks
Interior, Doors and Windows
Wood Destroying Organism Findings


General Information
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Report number: 20171111-1
Time started: 9:00am
Time finished: 1:20pm
Present during inspection: Client, Realtors
Client present for discussion at end of inspection: Yes
Weather conditions during inspection: Rain, Heavy rain
Temperature during inspection: Cool, 61
Inspection fee: 000.00
Payment method: Check
Type of building: Single family, Detached garage
Buildings inspected: One house, One detached garage
Number of residential units inspected: 1
Age of main building: 55
Source for main building age: Property listing
Front of building faces: North
Main entrance faces: East
Occupied: No

1) Structures built prior to the mid 1980s may contain lead and/or asbestos. Lead is commonly found in paint and in some plumbing components. The EPA does not recognize newer coats of paint as encapsulating older coats of lead-based paint. Asbestos is commonly found in various building materials such as insulation, siding, and/or floor and ceiling tiles. Laws were passed in 1978 to prohibit usage of lead and asbestos, but stocks of materials containing these substances remained in use for a number of years thereafter. Both lead and asbestos are known health hazards. Evaluating for the presence of lead and/or asbestos is beyond the scope of this inspection. Any mention of these materials in this report is made as a courtesy only, and meant to refer the client to a specialist. Consult with specialists as necessary, such as industrial hygienists, professional labs and/or abatement specialists for this type of evaluation. For information on lead, asbestos and other hazardous materials in homes, visit:
http://www.reporthost.com/?EPA
http://www.reporthost.com/?CPSC
http://www.reporthost.com/?CDC

2) Evidence of rodent infestation was found in the form of feces, poison and/or damaged insulation in the attic and/or basement. Consult with the property owner about this. A qualified person should make repairs to seal openings in the structure, set traps, and clean rodent waste as necessary. Recommend following guidelines in these Center for Disease Control articles:
http://www.reporthost.com/?SEALUP
http://www.reporthost.com/?TRAPUP
http://www.reporthost.com/?CLEANUP

Grounds
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Limitations: Unless specifically included in the inspection, the following items and any related equipment, controls, electric systems and/or plumbing systems are excluded from this inspection: detached buildings or structures; fences and gates; retaining walls; underground drainage systems, catch basins or concealed sump pumps; swimming pools and related safety equipment, spas, hot tubs or saunas; whether deck, balcony and/or stair membranes are watertight; trees, landscaping, properties of soil, soil stability, erosion and erosion control; ponds, water features, irrigation or yard sprinkler systems; sport courts, playground, recreation or leisure equipment; areas below the exterior structures with less than 3 feet of vertical clearance; invisible fencing; sea walls, docks and boathouses; retractable awnings. Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only.
Site profile: Level
Condition of driveway: Appeared serviceable
Driveway material: Gravel
Condition of sidewalks and/or patios: Required repairs, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Sidewalk material: Gravel
Condition of deck, patio and/or porch covers: Near, at or beyond service life
Deck, patio, porch cover material and type: Open
Condition of decks, porches and/or balconies: Required repairs, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Deck, porch and/or balcony material: Wood
Condition of stairs, handrails and guardrails: Required repairs, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Exterior stair material: Wood

3) Fungal rot was found at one or more guardrail posts and/or top rails. Recommend that a qualified person evaluate and repair as necessary. All rotten wood should be replaced.
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Photo 3-1
 

4) Flashing appeared to be missing from above one or more deck or porch ledger boards, or could not be verified. Missing flashing at this location can cause moisture to accumulate between the ledger boards and the building. Fungal rot may occur in this area and cause the ledger board fasteners to fail. The deck may separate from the building in this event. This is a potential safety hazard. Recommend that a qualified contractor install flashing above ledger boards per standard building practices. For more information, visit:
http://www.reporthost.com/?LB
http://www.reporthost.com/?SD
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Photo 4-1
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Photo 4-2

5) Risers for stairs at one or more locations were higher than 7 3/4 inches and posed a fall or trip hazard. Risers should be 7 3/4 inches or shorter. At a minimum, be aware of this hazard, especially when guests who are not familiar with the stairs are present. Recommend that a qualified contractor repair per standard building practices.
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Photo 5-1
 

6) Treads for stairs at one or more locations were less than 10 inches deep and pose a fall or trip hazard. Stair treads should be at least 10 inches deep. At a minimum, be aware of this hazard, especially when guests who are not familiar with the stairs are present. Recommend that a qualified contractor repair per standard building practices.

7) The risers for stairs at one or more locations varied in height and pose a fall or trip hazard. Risers within the same flight of stairs should vary by no more than 3/8 inch. At a minimum, be aware of this hazard, especially when guests who are not familiar with the stairs are present. Recommend that a qualified contractor repair per standard building practices.

8) Handrails at one or more flights of stairs were missing. This is a potential fall hazard. Handrails should be installed at stairs with three or more risers or where stairs are greater than 30 inches high. Recommend that a qualified contractor install handrails where missing and per standard building practices.

9) Guardrails at one or more locations with drop-offs higher than 30 inches had gaps that were too large. This poses a safety hazard for children (e.g. falling, getting stuck in railing). Guardrails should not have gaps or voids that allow passage of a sphere equal to or greater than 4 inches in diameter, or 6 inches in diameter at triangular spaces between stair edges and guardrails. At a minimum, the client should be aware of this hazard. Recommend that a qualified contractor repair or replace guardrails per standard building practices.

10) Cracks, holes, settlement, heaving and/or deterioration resulting in trip hazards were found in the sidewalks or patios. For safety reasons, recommend that a qualified contractor repair as necessary to eliminate trip hazards.
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Photo 10-1
 

11) One or more deck, patio and/or porch covers were unstable due to substandard bracing, lack of diagonal bracing, or lack of attachment to the main building. This is a safety hazard since severe movement may cause the cover to collapse. A qualified contractor should repair as necessary.

12) One or more treads at exterior stairs were deteriorated. This is a potential fall hazard. Recommend that a qualified person repair as necessary.

13) Guardrails at one or more locations with drop-offs higher than 30 inches were loose, wobbly, deteriorated and/or missing components, and pose a fall hazard. Recommend that a qualified person repair guardrails as necessary.

14) Fungal rot was found in decking boards and/or support posts at one or more decks or porches. Recommend that a qualified contractor evaluate and repair as necessary. All rotten wood should be replaced.

15) The waterproof membrane at one or more decks, porches and/or balconies was substandard. Recommend that a qualified contractor evaluate and repair or replace membrane sections as necessary. Further evaluation may reveal damage due to water intrusion. Additional and/or structural repairs may be needed.

16) Fungal rot was found in support posts at one or more sets of exterior stairs. Fungal rot in some stair components may pose a safety hazard. Recommend that a qualified person evaluate and repair as necessary. All rotten wood should be replaced.
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Photo 16-1
 

17) The wood decking below the deck or porch's waterproof membrane was soft in one or more areas. It's likely that the decking is damaged by fungal rot. Recommend that a qualified contractor evaluate and repair as necessary. For example, by removing the waterproof membrane, replacing all rotten wood and reinstalling the membrane or installing a new membrane. All rotten wood should be replaced.

18) Fungal rot was found in decking boards at one or more decks or porches. The boards were generally in serviceable condition during the inspection, but it's likely that the fungal rot will spread and require all boards to be replaced. Boards with significant rot should be replaced now and in the future until the deck or porch is rebuilt. Recommend budgeting for replacement decking in the near future. Note that when decking boards are replaced, other structural repairs may be needed.

19) Significant amounts of standing water or evidence of past accumulated water were found at one or more locations in the yard, driveway or landscaped areas, and no drain was visible. If evidence of past water was found (e.g. silt accumulation or staining), monitor these areas in the future during periods of heavy rain. If standing water exists, recommend that a qualified person repair as necessary. For example, installing one or more drains, or grading soil.

20) Soil was in contact with or too close to wooden deck, porch or balcony substructure components. This is a conducive condition for wood-destroying organisms. Clearances to soil should be as follows:
  • 12 inches below beams
  • 18 inches below joists
  • 6 inches below support post bases and other wood components
Pressure treated wood is typically rated for 25 year contact with soil, but the cut ends hidden below grade may not have been treated and can rot quickly. Support posts should be elevated above grade on concrete piers or footings, and be separated from the concrete by metal brackets or an impermeable membrane such as shingle scraps. For other components, soil should be graded and/or removed to maintain these clearances if possible. Otherwise, replacing non-treated wood with treated wood, or installing borate-based products such as Impel rods may help to prevent infestation and damage. For more information, visit:
http://www.reporthost.com/?IMPEL

21) Soil was in contact with or close to wooden stairs at one or more locations. This is a conducive condition for wood-destroying organisms. Soil should be graded and/or removed so no wood-soil contact is present, if possible. Otherwise, installing products such as borate-based Impel rods may help to prevent infestation and damage. For more information, visit:
http://www.reporthost.com/?IMPEL

22) Cracks, holes, settlement, heaving and/or deterioration were found in sidewalks and/or patios. Recommend that qualified contractor repair as necessary.
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Photo 22-1
 

23) Soil was in contact with one or more wooden deck, porch or balcony support posts. This is a conducive condition for wood destroying organisms. Even if posts are made of treated wood, the cut ends below soil may not have been field treated. Recommend grading soil or repairing as necessary to prevent wood-soil contact.
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Photo 23-1
 

24) Decking boards were installed with little or no gap between them. Organic debris such as leaves or evergreen needles may accumulate in between the boards will likely cause rot or deterioration. This is a conducive condition for wood-destroying organisms. At a minimum, keep decking boards clean in the future. Ideally boards should be reinstalled with a 3/8 inch gap between them.

25) The gravel driveway was in poor condition. Recommend that a qualified person repair as necessary. For example, by filling holes, grading and spreading new gravel.
Photo
Photo 25-1
 

26) Wooden deck or porch surfaces and/or railings were overdue for normal maintenance. Recommend that a qualified person clean and preserve as necessary. Where decks have been coated with a finish such as opaque stains or paint, it may be too difficult to strip the finish and apply anything but paint or opaque stain. Where transparent stain or penetrating oil has been applied in the past, recommend that a penetrating oil be used. For more information, visit:
http://www.reporthost.com/?PENOIL
http://www.reporthost.com/?DKMAIN

Exterior and Foundation
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Limitations: The inspector performs a visual inspection of accessible components or systems at the exterior. Items excluded from this inspection include below-grade foundation walls and footings; foundations, exterior surfaces or components obscured by vegetation, stored items or debris; wall structures obscured by coverings such as siding or trim. Some items such as siding, trim, soffits, vents and windows are often high off the ground, and may be viewed using binoculars from the ground or from a ladder. This may limit a full evaluation. Regarding foundations, some amount of cracking is normal in concrete slabs and foundation walls due to shrinkage and drying. Note that the inspector does not determine the adequacy of seismic reinforcement.
Wall inspection method: Viewed from ground, from a ladder
Condition of wall exterior covering: Appeared serviceable
Apparent wall structure: Wood frame
Wall covering: Vinyl
Condition of foundation and footings: Appeared serviceable
Apparent foundation type: Unfinished basement
Foundation/stem wall material: Poured in place concrete
Footing material (under foundation stem wall): Poured in place concrete

27) Flashing at one or more locations was missing and/or damaged. Leaks can occur as a result. Recommend that a qualified person repair, replace or install flashing as necessary, and per standard building practices.

28) Some sections of siding and/or trim were deteriorated, warped and/or damaged. Recommend that a qualified person repair, replace or install siding or trim as necessary.

29) Fungal rot was found at one or more sections of siding or trim, window sills, window frames and/or fascia. Conducive conditions for rot should be corrected (e.g. wood-soil contact, reverse perimeter slope). Recommend that a qualified contractor repair as necessary. All rotten wood should be replaced.

30) Soil was in contact with or less than 6 inches from siding or trim. Regardless of what material is used for siding, it should not be in contact with the soil. If made of wood, siding or trim will eventually rot. For other materials, ground or surface water can infiltrate siding or trim and cause damage to the wall structure. Wood-destroying insects are likely to infest and damage the wall structure. This is a conducive condition for wood-destroying organisms. Recommend grading or removing soil as necessary to maintain a 6-inch clearance. Note that damage from fungal rot and/or insects may be found when soil is removed, and repairs may be necessary.

31) One or more minor cracks (1/8 inch or less) were found in the foundation. These didn't appear to be a structural concern, but recommend sealing them to prevent water infiltration and monitor them in the future. Numerous products exist to seal such cracks including hydraulic cement, non-shrinking grout, resilient caulks and epoxy sealants.
Photo
Photo 31-1
 

32) "Honeycombing" was found in one or more sections of the concrete foundation. This occurs when aggregate and sand in the concrete mixture bunches into clusters and fails to mix with the cement paste. This can be caused because the concrete mix was too stiff, by inadequate consolidation (insufficient use of a mechanical concrete vibrator) and/or pouring the concrete from too high of an elevation. In many cases honeycombing is only a cosmetic issue, but it does make concrete susceptible to water infiltration. Where honeycombing is accessible, recommend that a qualified person fill voids with an approved material such as hydraulic cement or non-shrinking grout.

When honeycombing is visible, it may also exist in hidden areas. Honeycombing can result in mold growth in absorbent flooring materials (e.g. carpeting and mortar joints), and can cause rigid flooring materials to warp and buckle.

33) The paint or stain finish in some areas was failing (e.g. peeling, faded, worn, thinning). Siding and trim with a failing finish can be damaged by moisture. Recommend that a qualified contractor prep (e.g. clean, scrape, sand, prime, caulk) and repaint or restain the building exterior where necessary and per standard building practices. Any repairs needed to the siding or trim should be made prior to this.

34) Caulk was missing and/or deteriorated in some areas. For example, around windows and/or around doors. Recommend that a qualified person renew or install caulk as necessary. Where gaps are wider than 1/4 inch, an appropriate material other than caulk should be used. For more information, visit:
http://www.reporthost.com/?CAULK

Roof
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Limitations: The following items or areas are not included in this inspection: areas that could not be traversed or viewed clearly due to lack of access; solar roofing components. Any comments made regarding these items are made as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not provide an estimate of remaining life on the roof surface material, nor guarantee that leaks have not occurred in the roof surface, skylights or roof penetrations in the past. Regarding roof leaks, only active leaks, visible evidence of possible sources of leaks, and evidence of past leaks observed during the inspection are reported on as part of this inspection. The inspector does not guarantee or warrant that leaks will not occur in the future. Complete access to all roof and attic spaces during all seasons and during prolonged periods of all types of weather conditions (e.g. high wind and rain, melting snow) would be needed to do so. Occupants should monitor the condition of roofing materials in the future. For older roofs, recommend that a professional inspect the roof surface, flashings, appurtenances, etc. annually and maintain/repair as might be required. If needed, the roofer should enter attic space(s). Regarding the roof drainage system, unless the inspection was conducted during and after prolonged periods of heavy rain, the inspector was unable to determine if gutters, downspouts and extensions perform adequately or are leak-free.
Roof inspection method: Partially traversed, Viewed from eaves on ladder
Condition of roof surface material: Near, at or beyond service life
Roof surface material: Asphalt or fiberglass composition shingles
Roof type: Gable
Apparent number of layers of roof surface material: One
Condition of exposed flashings: Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Condition of gutters, downspouts and extensions: Near, at or beyond service life

35) The roof surface was significantly deteriorated and appeared to be at or beyond its service life. It needs replacing now. This is a conducive condition for wood-destroying organisms. Consult with a qualified contractor to determine replacement options. Note that some structural repairs are often needed after old roof surfaces are removed and the structure becomes fully visible. Related roofing components such as flashings and vents should be replaced or installed as needed and per standard building practices.
Photo
Photo 35-1
 

36) Flashings at the base of one or more chimneys were deteriorated. Leaks can occur as a result. This is a conducive condition for wood-destroying organisms. Recommend that a qualified contractor evaluate and repair as necessary.
Photo
Photo 36-1
 

37) Fungal rot or significant water damage was found at one or more roof areas at soffits. Recommend that a qualified contractor repair as necessary. For example, by replacing all rotten wood, priming and painting new wood and installing flashing.

38) Many composition shingles were cracked, broken, missing, loose and/or damaged. Leaks can occur as a result. This is a conducive condition for wood-destroying organisms. Recommend that a qualified contractor repair as necessary. For example, by replacing shingles.

39) One or more gutters had a substandard slope so that significant amounts of water accumulate in them rather than draining through the downspouts. This can cause gutters to overflow, especially when debris such as leaves or needles has accumulated in them. Rainwater can come in contact with the building exterior or accumulate around the foundation as a result. This is a conducive condition for wood-destroying organisms. Recommend that a qualified person repair as necessary. For example, by correcting the slope in gutters or installing additional downspouts and extensions.

40) Extensions such as splash blocks or drain pipes for one or more downspouts were missing. Water can accumulate around the building foundation or inside crawl spaces or basements as a result. Recommend that a qualified person install, replace or repair extensions as necessary so rainwater drains away from the structure.

41) One or more roof flashings were loose. Leaks can occur as a result. This is a conducive condition for wood-destroying organisms. Recommend that a qualified person repair as necessary.

42) One or more gutters and/or downspouts were incomplete, missing, leaking and/or damaged. Rainwater can come in contact with the building exterior or accumulate around the building foundation as a result. This is a conducive condition for wood-destroying organisms. Recommend that a qualified person repair as necessary.

43) One or more roofing nails or staples were loose, resulting in holes in shingles, loose shingles or lifting shingles. Leaks may occur and can be a conducive condition for wood-destroying organisms. Recommend that a qualified contractor repair as necessary.

44) One or more roof flashings were substandard. Leaks can occur as a result. This is a conducive condition for wood-destroying organisms. Recommend that a qualified person repair as necessary.
Photo
Photo 44-1
 

45) Nail heads were exposed at one or more shingles. More than just a few exposed nail heads may indicate a substandard roof installation. Recommend applying an approved sealant over exposed nail heads now and as necessary in the future to prevent leaks.

46) Additional Roof Photographs
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Photo 46-1
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Photo 46-2
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Photo 46-3
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Photo 46-4
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Photo 46-5
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Photo 46-6
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Photo 46-7
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Photo 46-8
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Photo 46-9
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Photo 46-10

Garage or Carport
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Limitations: The inspector cannot reasonably determine the integrity of all elements of limited fire resistance at residential construction or verify firewall ratings at multi unit construction. Requirements for ventilation in garages vary between municipalities.
Type: Detached
Condition of garage vehicle door(s): Appeared serviceable
Type of garage vehicle door: Sectional
Number of vehicle doors: 2
Condition of garage floor: Appeared serviceable
Condition of garage interior: Appeared serviceable

47) One of the windows on the back of the garage appeared to have been removed and a door way cut away to provide a stable area for a horse.
Recommend further evaluation and repiar by a qualified contractor.
Photo
Photo 47-1
Photo
Photo 47-2

48) The pull-down attic stairs installed in the garage ceiling were damaged, the stair portion was missing. Recommend that a qualified person repair / replace the pulled-down stairs.

Crawl Space
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Limitations: Structural components such as joists and beams, and other components such as piping, wiring and/or ducting that are obscured by under-floor insulation are excluded from this inspection. The inspector does not determine if support posts, columns, beams, joists, studs, trusses, etc. are of adequate size, spanning or spacing.

The inspector does not guarantee or warrant that water will not accumulate in the crawl spaces in the future. Complete access to all crawl space areas during all seasons and during prolonged periods of all types of weather conditions (e.g. heavy rain, melting snow) would be needed to do so.

The inspector attempts to locate all crawl space access points and areas. Access points may be obscured or otherwise hidden by furnishings or stored items. In such cases, the client should ask the property owner where all access points are that are not described in this inspection, and have those areas inspected. Note that crawl space areas should be checked at least annually for water intrusion, plumbing leaks and pest activity.
Crawl space inspection method: Not inspected
Condition of crawl space ventilation: Required repairs, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Ventilation type: Unconditioned space

49) Ventilation for the crawl space appeared to be substandard. There were no vents visible. This can result in high levels of moisture in the crawl space and is a conducive condition for wood-destroying organisms. One square foot of vent area should be installed for 150 square feet of crawl space. Vents should be evenly distributed and within a few feet of corners to promote air circulation. Recommend that a qualified contractor install or improve venting per standard building practices.

Attic and Roof Structure
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Limitations: The following items or areas are not included in this inspection: areas that could not be traversed or viewed clearly due to lack of access; areas and components obscured by insulation. Any comments made regarding these items are made as a courtesy only. The inspector does not determine the adequacy of the attic ventilation system. Complete access to all roof and attic spaces during all seasons and during prolonged periods of all types of weather conditions (e.g. high/low temperatures, high/low humidity, high wind and rain, melting snow) would be needed to do so. The inspector is not a licensed engineer and does not determine the adequacy of roof structure components such as trusses, rafters or ceiling beams, or their spacing or sizing.
Attic inspection method: Traversed
Condition of roof structure: Appeared serviceable
Roof structure type: Rafters
Ceiling structure: Ceiling joists
Condition of insulation in attic (ceiling, skylight chase, etc.): Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Ceiling insulation material: Fiberglass roll or batt
Approximate attic insulation R value (may vary in areas): R-19
Vermiculite insulation present: None visible
Vapor retarder: Installed, None in some areas
Condition of roof ventilation: Appeared serviceable
Roof ventilation type: Ridge vent(s), Gable end vents, soffit vents

50) The attic access hatch, door or stairs was located or configured so that it posed a safety hazard for falling when attempting to enter the attic. Recommend that a qualified contractor relocate or reconfigure the access per standard building practices to eliminate this hazard.
The attic access is located in the hall closet on the north end of the hallway
Photo
Photo 50-1
Looking down from the attic
Photo
Photo 50-2
Looking up from the hallway

51) One or more indoor attic access hatch covers or doors were missing, damaged and/or substandard. When located indoors, conditioned air can enter the attic. Energy efficiency can be reduced, moisture can form in the attic, attic air laden with insulation fibers can enter living spaces, and/or pets can enter the attic . This is also a fire hazard as attic access hatch covers and doors are meant to stop or slow the spread of fire into the attic. A qualified person should replace, install or repair hatches or doors as necessary and per standard building practices. Each access point should be insulated and sealed with weatherstripping. For more information, visit:
http://www.reporthost.com/?ATTACC

52) One or more recessed lights in the attic that had no visible rating for contact with insulation were in contact with insulation. If lights are not "IC" rated then this is a fire hazard. Recommend that a qualified person make permanent repairs as necessary. For example, by installing shields around lights or moving insulation.

53) One or more recessed lights were installed in the attic and were in contact with insulation. The inspector was unable to find a label or markings that indicated that these lights are designed to be in contact with insulation. If lights are not "IC" rated then this is a fire hazard. Recommend further evaluation by a qualified contractor to determine if these lights are rated for contact with insulation. If they aren't, or if their rating can't be determined, then recommend that a qualified person make permanent repairs as necessary. For example, by installing shields around lights or moving insulation.

54) Roof sheathing (plywood or oriented strand board) was sagging in some areas and no panel edge clips ("H clips") were installed. These should be installed when truss or rafter spacing is 24 inches o.c. or more and with 3/8-inch sheathing. These clips help support the edges of the sheathing, and sagging can result if they're not installed. This may also void the warranty on some brands of shingles. Recommend that a qualified contractor evaluate and repair per standard building practices.
Photo
Photo 54-1
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Photo 54-2

55) One or more attic access hatches or doors were too small to allow easy access. Such hatches should be at least 22 x 30 inches in size, and in safely accessed areas. Recommend that a qualified person modify attic access points per standard building practices.

56) The ceiling insulation installed in the attic was substandard and appeared to have an R rating that's significantly less than current standards (R-38). Heating and cooling costs will likely be higher due to poor energy efficiency. Recommend that a qualified contractor install insulation for better energy efficiency and per standard building practices.
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Photo 56-1
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Photo 56-2

57) One or more attic access hatches or doors were not insulated, or had substandard insulation. Weatherstripping was also missing or substandard. Recommend installing weatherstripping and insulation per current standards at hatches or doors for better energy efficiency. For more information, visit:
http://www.reporthost.com/?ATTACC

58) The ceiling insulation in one or more areas of the attic was compacted or uneven, missing and/or substandard. Heating and cooling costs may be higher due to reduced energy efficiency. Recommend that a qualified person repair, replace or install insulation as necessary and per standard building practices (typically R-38).

59) One or more exhaust ducts (e.g. bathroom fan, clothes dryer) in the attic have come apart, were loose or have fallen down. This can result in increased moisture levels inside the structure and is a conducive condition for wood-destroying organisms. Recommend that a qualified person make permanent repairs as necessary.
Photo
Photo 59-1
 

60) One or more soffit vents were blocked by insulation. This can reduce air flow through the roof structure or attic and result in reduced service life for the roof surface materials because of high temperatures. Moisture from condensation is also likely to accumulate in the roof structure and/or attic and can be a conducive condition for wood-destroying organisms. Recommend that a qualified person repair as necessary so air flows freely through all vents. For example, by moving or removing insulation and installing cardboard baffles.

61) No accessible attic spaces were found or inspected to the area above the addition on the south west side of the home. The inspector attempts to locate attic access points and evaluate attic spaces where possible. When a home is occupied, such access points may be obscured by stored items or furnishings. Home inspection standards of practice do not require inspectors to move stored items, furnishings or personal belongings. If such access points are found in the future and/or made accessible, a qualified person should fully evaluate those attic spaces and roof structures.

Basement
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Limitations: Structural components such as joists and beams, and other components such as piping, wiring and/or ducting that are obscured by under-floor insulation are also excluded from this inspection. Note that the inspector does not determine if support posts, columns, beams, joists, studs, trusses, etc. are of adequate size, spanning or spacing.

The inspector does not guarantee or warrant that water will not accumulate in the basement in the future. Access to the basement during all seasons and during prolonged periods of all types of weather conditions (e.g. heavy rain, melting snow) would be needed to do so. The inspector does not determine the adequacy of basement floor or stairwell drains, or determine if such drains are clear or clogged.

Note that all basement areas should be checked periodically for water intrusion, plumbing leaks and pest activity.
Condition of floor substructure above: Appeared serviceable
Floor structure above: Solid wood joists
Condition of insulation underneath floor above: Not applicable, none installed
Beam material: Solid wood

62) There was no lighting over the basement stairs observed at the time of the inspection. Where the stairway between floor levels has six risers or more, a wall switch must be located at each floor level and at each landing level that includes an entryway to control the illumination for the stairway. All interior and exterior stairways should have a means to illuminate the stairs, including landings and treads. Interior stairways should have a light located at each landing, except when a light is installed directly over each stairway section.
Recommend further evaluation and correction by a qualified electrician.

63) Risers for stairs at one or more locations were higher than 7 3/4 inches and posed a fall or trip hazard. Risers should be 7 3/4 inches or shorter. At a minimum, be aware of this hazard, especially when guests who are not familiar with the stairs are present. Recommend that a qualified contractor repair per standard building practices.
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Photo 63-1
 

64) The risers for stairs at one or more locations varied in height and pose a fall or trip hazard. Risers within the same flight of stairs should vary by no more than 3/8 inch. At a minimum, be aware of this hazard, especially when guests who are not familiar with the stairs are present. Recommend that a qualified contractor repair per standard building practices.

65) The ceiling height over stairs at one or more locations was too low and poses a safety hazard, especially for tall people. Ceilings over stairs should be at least 6 feet 8 inches high. At a minimum, be aware of this hazard, especially when guests who are not familiar with the stairs are present. Recommend that a qualified contractor repair per standard building practices.

66) The 3-way light switches for the basement at the top of the stairs and in the basement "playroom" appeared to be incorrectly wired. The basement lights do not turn on and off correctly from both switches. This may be a safety hazard due to inadequate lighting. Recommend further evaluation by a qualified electrician.

67) The only entrance/exit to the basement appeared to be the basement stairs. While this is common in older homes, modern standards require a secondary escape for use in the event of fire or an emergency. Such entrances/exits should allow entry by emergency personnel and their equipment. It is beyond the scope of this inspection to verify compliance with the current codes, and codes are generally not retroactive. Consult with a window/door contractor and/or the local municipal building officials regarding egress guidelines.

68) Fungal rot was found at one or more sill plates, joists and/or sections of floor sheathing. Recommend that a qualified contractor evaluate and repair as necessary. All rotten wood should be replaced.

This area was under the french doors in the kitchen area to the deck on the south side of the house, It was raining at the time of the inspection.
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Photo 68-1
 

69) Standing water was found in one or more sections of the basement. Accumulated water can be a conducive condition for wood-destroying organisms and should not be present in the basement. Review any disclosure statements available and ask the property owner about past accumulation of water in the crawl space. Recommend that a qualified contractor who specializes in drainage issues evaluate and repair as necessary. Typical repairs for preventing water from accumulating in basements include:
  • Repairing, installing or improving rain run-off systems (gutters, downspouts and extensions or drain lines)
  • Improving perimeter grading
  • Repairing, installing or improving underground footing and/or curtain drains
Ideally, water should not enter basements, but if water must be controlled after it enters the basement, then typical repairs include installing a sump pump.
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Photo 69-1
It was observed at the time of the inspection that the water appeared to come from a leak at the kitchen sink above.
 

70) One or more joists were notched or had holes cut in them in such a way as to significantly weaken the joist(s). General guidelines for modifying joists made of dimensional lumber include these restrictions:
  • Notches at ends should not exceed 1/4 of the joist's depth.
  • Other notches should not exceed 1/6 of the joist's depth.
  • Notches should not be cut in the middle 1/3 of the joist's span.
  • Notches should not be longer than 1/3 of the joist's depth.
  • Holes must be 2 inches or more from the joist's edge.
  • The maximum hole diameter is 1/3 of the depth of the joist.
Recommend that a qualified contractor evaluate and repair as necessary, and per standard building practices.
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Photo 70-1
 

71) It appeared at the time of the inspection that some / many of the Cross Bracing of the Floor Joists had come loose.
Cross bracing floor joists, or cross bridging, is commonly done for stiffening up floors. Cross bracing helps to transfer heavy loads between adjacent floor joists so that vertical deflection and twisting of them is minimized. Cross bracing floor joists also helps to prevent squeaky floors.

Recommend that a qualified contractor evaluate and repair as necessary, and per standard building practices.
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Photo 71-1
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Photo 71-2

72) One or more of the basement windows appeared to have been blocked off. One or more of the basement windows would benefit from have window wells installed.
Recommend further evaluation and installation by a qualified contractor.
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Photo 72-1
One or more of the basement windows appeared to have been blocked off
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Photo 72-2
Recommend window well be installed

Electric
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Limitations: The following items are not included in this inspection: generator systems, transfer switches, surge suppressors, inaccessible or concealed wiring; underground utilities and systems; low-voltage lighting or lighting on timers or sensors. Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not determine the adequacy of grounding or bonding, if this system has an adequate capacity for the client's specific or anticipated needs, or if this system has any reserve capacity for additions or expansion. The inspector does not operate circuit breakers as part of the inspection, and does not install or change light bulbs. The inspector does not evaluate every wall switch or receptacle, but instead tests a representative number of them per various standards of practice. When furnishings, stored items or child-protective caps are present some receptacles are usually inaccessible and are not tested; these are excluded from this inspection. Receptacles that are not of standard 110 volt configuration, including 240-volt dryer receptacles, are not tested and are excluded. The functionality of, power source for and placement of smoke and carbon monoxide alarms is not determined as part of this inspection. Upon taking occupancy, proper operating and placement of smoke and carbon monoxide alarms should be verified and batteries should be changed. These devices have a limited lifespan and should be replaced every 10 years. The inspector attempts to locate and evaluate all main and sub-panels. However, panels are often concealed. If panels are found after the inspection, a qualified electrician should evaluate and repair if necessary. The inspector attempts to determine the overall electrical service size, but such estimates are not guaranteed because the overall capacity may be diminished by lesser-rated components in the system. Any repairs recommended should be made by a licensed electrician.
Electric service condition: Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Primary service type: Overhead
Number of service conductors: 3
Service voltage (volts): 120-240
Estimated service amperage: 100
Primary service overload protection type: Circuit breakers
Service entrance conductor material: Stranded aluminum
Main disconnect rating (amps): 100
System ground: Ground rod(s) in soil
Condition of main service panel: Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Condition of sub-panel(s): Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Location of main service panel #A: Basement
Location of sub-panel #C: Basement
Location of sub-panel #D: Garage
Condition of branch circuit wiring: Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Branch circuit wiring type: non-metallic sheathed
Ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection present: No
Arc fault circuit interrupter (AFCI) protection present: No
Smoke alarms installed: Yes, but not tested
Carbon monoxide alarms installed: Yes, but not tested

73) One or more electric receptacles at the laundry area, garage, exterior and/or basement had no visible ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection, or the inspector was unable to determine if GFCI protection was present. If not GFCI-protected, receptacles in wet areas pose a shock hazard. Recommend that a qualified electrician evaluate and install GFCI protection if necessary and per standard building practices. General guidelines for GFCI-protected receptacles include the following locations:
  • Outdoors (since 1973)
  • Bathrooms (since 1975)
  • Garages (since 1978)
  • Kitchens (since 1987)
  • Crawl spaces and unfinished basements (since 1990)
  • Wet bar sinks (since 1993)
  • Laundry and utility sinks (since 2005)
For more information, visit:
http://www.reporthost.com/?GFCI

74) One or more circuit breakers in panel(s) #A and C were "double tapped," where two or more wires were installed in the breaker's lug. Most breakers are designed for only one wire to be connected. This is a safety hazard since the lug bolt can tighten securely against one wire but leave other(s) loose. Arcing, sparks and fires can result. Recommend that a qualified electrician repair as necessary. For more information, visit:
http://www.reporthost.com/?DBLTAP
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Photo 74-1
 

75) Neutral wires were doubled or bundled together under the same lug on the neutral bus bar in panel(s) #A and C. This is a potential safety hazard in the event that one of the circuits needs to be isolated during servicing. For one neutral to be disconnected, other neutrals from energized circuits sharing the same lug will be loosened. Power surges may result on the energized circuits and result in damage or fire. Also, multiple wires under the same lug may not be secure, resulting in loose wires, arcing, sparks and fire. Recommend that a qualified electrician repair per standard building practices. For more information, visit:
http://www.reporthost.com/?DTNB

76) Neutral and equipment ground wires were bonded (connected) at sub-panel(s) # C. This should only occur in the main service panel, not sub-panels, and is a shock hazard. Neutral wires should be attached to a "floating" neutral bar not bonded to the panel, and grounding wires should be attached to a separate grounding bar bonded to the sub-panel. Recommend that a qualified electrician repair per standard building practices. For more information, visit:
http://www.reporthost.com/?SUBGRND
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Photo 76-1
 

77) The neutral bus bar at sub-panel(s) # C appeared to be bonded (connected) to the panel, and should instead be "floating" or insulated from the panel. This is a shock hazard. Recommend that a qualified electrician repair per standard building practices. For more information, visit:
http://www.reporthost.com/?SUBGRND

78) Non-metallic sheathed wiring was installed at one or more locations, and was subject to damage such as on easily accessible wall or ceiling surfaces. The insulation can be damaged by objects coming in contact with it, resulting in exposed, energized wires. Also, copper conductors can break after being repeatedly moved or bent. This is a potential shock or fire hazard. Recommend that a qualified electrician repair per standard building practices. For example, by installing protective conduit or re-routing wires through walls or ceilings.

79) Non-metallic sheathed wiring in the attic was routed on surfaces within 6 feet of one or more access hatches or doors, and was subject to damage. Wiring can be damaged when hatches are lifted and set aside, when stored items are moved into or out of the attic, etc. This is a potential shock and/or fire hazard. Recommend that a qualified electrician repair per standard building practices.
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Photo 79-1
Attic Access Hatch
 

80) Non-metallic sheathed wiring was loose, unsupported, or inadequately supported at one or more locations. Such wiring should be trimmed to length if necessary and attached to runners or to solid backing with fasteners at intervals of 4 1/2 feet or less. Fasteners should be installed within 12 inches of all enclosures. Recommend that a qualified electrician repair per standard building practices.

81) Bare wire ends, or wires with a substandard termination, were found at one or more locations. This is a potential shock hazard. Recommend that a qualified electrician repair as necessary. For example, by cutting wires to length and terminating with wire nuts in a permanently mounted, covered junction box.
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Photo 81-1
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Photo 81-2

82) Wire splices were exposed and were not contained in a covered junction box. This is a potential shock or fire hazard. Recommend that a qualified electrician repair per standard building practices. For example, by installing permanently mounted junction boxes with cover plates where needed to contain wiring splices.
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Photo 82-1
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Photo 82-2

83) One or more receptacles were worn. Worn receptacles can work intermittently or when the plug is wiggled. They can overheat or arc and spark due to loose connections. This is a potential fire hazard. Recommend that a qualified electrician replace such receptacles as necessary.

84) One or more electric receptacles and/or the boxes in which they were installed were loose and/or not securely anchored. Wire conductors can be damaged due to repeated movement and/or tension on wires, or insulation can be damaged. This is a shock and fire hazard. Recommend that a qualified electrician repair as necessary.

85) One or more electric receptacles had reverse-polarity wiring, where the hot and neutral wires were reversed. This is a shock hazard. Recommend that a qualified electrician repair as necessary. For more information, visit:
http://www.reporthost.com/?RPR
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Photo 85-1
Living Room Exterior Wall outlets
 

86) One or more electric boxes installed outside were loose and/or deteriorated. This is a potential shock and/or fire hazard. Recommend that a qualified electrician repair as necessary.

87) A separate electric breaker box with one breaker was noted mounted above the basement sub-panel, there was a cable entering on one side of the box but no cable exiting on the other side.
Recommend that a qualified electrician evaluate and repair per standard building practices.
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Photo 87-1
 

88) One or more bushings were missing or loose from where wires enter holes in panel(s) #A and C. This is a potential safety hazard because the wiring insulation can be cut or abraded on the metal edge of the hole(s). Recommend that a qualified electrician install or repair bushings where necessary.

89) One or more wires inside panel(s) #A and C were loose, and were not terminated. This poses a safety hazard for shock and/or fire. Recommend that a qualified electrician remove any abandoned wiring or repair as necessary. For example, by trimming wires to length and installing wire nuts.

90) One or more cover plates for switches, receptacles or junction boxes were missing or broken. These plates are intended to contain fire and prevent electric shock from occurring due to exposed wires. Recommend that a qualified person install cover plates where necessary.

91) One or more exterior receptacle covers were broken. This is a potential shock hazard. Recommend that a qualified person replace covers where necessary.

92) Branch circuit wiring installed in buildings built prior to the mid 1980s is typically rated for a maximum temperature of only 60 degrees Celsius. This includes non-metallic sheathed (Romex) wiring, and both BX and AC metal-clad flexible wiring. Knob and tube wiring, typically installed in homes built prior to 1950, may be rated for even lower maximum temperatures. Newer electric fixtures including lighting and fans typically require wiring rated for 90 degrees Celsius. Connecting newer fixtures to older, 60-degree-rated wiring is a potential fire hazard. Repairs for such conditions may involve replacing the last few feet of wiring to newer fixtures with new 90-degree-rated wire, and installing a junction box to join the old and new wiring.

It is beyond the scope of this inspection to determine if such incompatible components are installed, or to determine the extent to which they're installed. Based on the age of this building, the client should be aware of this safety hazard, both for existing fixtures and when planning to upgrade with newer fixtures. Consult with a qualified electrician for repairs as necessary.

93) An exterior lamp post was observed in the driveway area. The lamp post appeared to be leaning and possibly damaged. The light switch for the exterior lamp post appeared to be located in the hallway under the thermostat on the left. There was a instruction sticker on the switch plate cover for the operation of the light controls.
Recommend that a qualified electrician evaluate and repair per standard building practices.
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Photo 93-1
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Photo 93-2

94) The inspector did not open and evaluate panel(s) #D due to the cover plate being attached with non-standard hardware. The condition of these panel(s) is unknown and they are excluded from this inspection. Repairs may be needed. Recommend that a qualified person correct conditions, or that a qualified contractor make repairs if necessary so panels can be opened, and that a qualified person fully evaluate panel(s).

95) One or more 3-way light switches appeared to be incorrectly wired, so the light didn't turn on and off correctly from both switches. This may be a safety hazard due to inadequate lighting. Recommend that a qualified electrician repair as necessary.
Basement lights - top of stairs and basement play room

96) The legend for circuit breakers or fuses in panel(s) #A, C and D was missing, incomplete, illegible or confusing. This is a potential shock or fire hazard in the event of an emergency when power needs to be turned off. Recommend correcting the legend so it's accurate, complete and legible. Evaluation by a qualified electrician may be necessary.

97) The electric service to this property appeared to have a Dual Meter Socket at service entry, Only one appeared to be used. Recommend further evaluation by a qualified electrician.
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Photo 97-1
 

98) The electric service to this property appeared to be rated at substantially less than 200 amps and may be inadequate. Depending on the client's needs, recommend consulting with a qualified electrician about upgrading to a 200 amp service. Note that the electric service's rating is based on the lowest rating for the meter base, the service conductors, the main service panel and the main disconnect switch. One or more of these components may need replacing to upgrade.

99) The electric service to this property appeared to have a splice in the service drop about half way to the house over the driveway.
Recommend monitoring and further evaluation by a qualified electrician.
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Photo 99-1
 

100) The Main Power shut off Breaker is located on the north wall in the basement, at the top of the panel on the right.
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Photo 100-1
 

Plumbing / Fuel Systems
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Limitations: The following items are not included in this inspection: private/shared wells and related equipment; private sewage disposal systems; hot tubs or spas; main, side and lateral sewer lines; gray water systems; pressure boosting systems; trap primers; incinerating or composting toilets; fire suppression systems; water softeners, conditioners or filtering systems; plumbing components concealed within the foundation or building structure, or in inaccessible areas such as below tubs; underground utilities and systems; overflow drains for tubs and sinks; backflow prevention devices. Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not operate water supply or shut-off valves due to the possibility of valves leaking or breaking when operated. The inspector does not test for lead in the water supply, the water pipes or solder, does not determine if plumbing and fuel lines are adequately sized, and does not determine the existence or condition of underground or above-ground fuel tanks.
Condition of service and main line: Appeared serviceable
Water service: Private well
Water pressure (psi): 55 psi
Location of main water shut-off: Basement
Condition of supply lines: Appeared serviceable
Supply pipe material: Copper
Condition of drain pipes: Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Drain pipe material: Plastic
Condition of waste lines: Appeared serviceable
Waste pipe material: Plastic
Vent pipe condition: Appeared serviceable
Vent pipe material: Plastic
Sump pump installed: None visible
Sewage ejector pump installed: No
Condition of fuel system: Appeared serviceable
Visible fuel storage systems: oil tank, in basement
Location of main fuel shut-off valve: At oil tank, By furnace

101) Corrugated stainless steel gas piping was installed at the building exterior and was located less than 6 feet above grade. This is considered subject to damage and is a potential safety hazard. Standard building practices call for this type of piping to be protected from damage when located less than 6 feet above grade. A qualified contractor should repair per standard building practices.
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Photo 101-1
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Photo 101-2
Propane tank located on south side of the home.

102) The well casing was observed at the north east corner of the home. The soil around the well casing was at or above the well cap. This could possibly allow surface water penetration into the well. Recommend further evaluation by a qualified contractor and grading around the well casing to divert surface water away.
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Photo 102-1
 

103) One or more Hose Bibbs were observed missing a non-removable hose Bibb type backflow preventer, vacuum breaker, or an atmospheric vacuum breaker.
These devices help prevent cross connections between any potable (drinkable) water supply and any source of contamination or pollution. Recommend further evaluation by a qualified contractor and installation of one of these devices.

104) One or more sections of corrugated stainless steel gas supply piping had substandard support or were loose. Gas leaks can occur as a result. This piping generally should have approved hangers every 6-8 feet, but requirements may vary depending on the manufacturer. Recommend that a qualified person install hangers or secure pipes per the manufacturer's specifications.

105) Significant corrosion was found in some water supply pipes or fittings. Leaks can occur as a result. Recommend that a qualified plumber evaluate and replace components as necessary.
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Photo 105-1
 

106) There appeared to be some fuel oil residue present on the fill pipe below the coupling at the oil tank. No oil was observed on the tank at the time of the inspection. Recommend monitoring this area when the tank is being filled.
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Photo 106-1
 

107) One or more copper water supply pipes had substandard support or were loose. Leaks can occur as a result. Copper supply pipes should have approved hangers every 6-8 feet. If hangers are in contact with the copper pipe, they should be made of a material that doesn't cause the pipes or hangers to corrode due to contact of dissimilar metals. Recommend that a qualified person install hangers or secure pipes per standard building practices.

108) One or more plastic PVC or CPVC water supply pipes had substandard support or were loose. Leaks may occur as a result. PVC and CPVC supply pipes should have supports every 4 feet. Special hangers that allow movement from expansion and that won't damage the soft plastic piping should be used. Recommend that a qualified person install supports or secure pipes per standard building practices.

109) Significant corrosion or rust was found at one or more water supply valves. This can indicate past leaks, or that leaks are likely to occur in the future. Recommend that a qualified plumber repair as necessary. For example, by replacing valves or fittings.

110) One or more drain and/or waste pipes had a substandard slope. Clogging or leaks can occur as a result. Drain and waste pipes should be sloped 1/4 inch per foot of length if less than 3 inches in diameter, or 1/8 inch per foot of length for larger diameters. Recommend that a qualified plumber repair per standard building practices.

111) One or more ABS or PVC plastic drain pipes had substandard support or were loose. Leaks can occur as a result. Such pipes should have hangers every 4 feet when run horizontally. Recommend that a qualified person install hangers or secure pipes per standard building practices.

112) Based on visible components or information provided to the inspector, this property appeared to have a private sewage disposal (septic) system. These are specialty systems and are excluded from this inspection. Comments in this report related to this system are made as a courtesy only and are not meant to be a substitute for a full evaluation by a qualified specialist. Generally, septic tanks should be pumped and inspected every 3 years. Depending on the type of system and municipal regulations, inspection and maintenance may be required more frequently, often annually. Recommend the following:
  • Consult with the property owner about this system's maintenance and repair history
  • Review any documentation available for this system
  • Review inspection and maintenance requirements for this system
  • That a qualified specialist evaluate, perform maintenance and make repairs if necessary
For more information, visit:
http://www.reporthost.com/?SEPTIC

113) Based on visible equipment or information provided to the inspector, the water supply to this property appeared to be from a private well. Private well water supplies are specialty systems and are excluded from this inspection. Comments in this report related to this system are made as a courtesy only and are not meant to be a substitute for a full evaluation by a qualified specialist. The inspector does not test private well water for contamination or pollutants, determine if the supply and/or flow are adequate, or provide an estimate for remaining life of well pumps, pressure tanks or equipment. Only visible and accessible components are evaluated. Recommend the following:
  • That a qualified well contractor fully evaluate the well, including a pump/flow test
  • That the well water be tested per the client's concerns (coliforms, pH, contaminants, etc.)
  • Research the well's history (how/when constructed, how/when maintained or repaired, past performance, past health issues)
  • Document the current well capacity and water quality for future reference
For more information, visit:
http://www.reporthost.com/?WELL

114) Recommend buying oil storage tank replacement insurance available from many full-service oil providers. This can cover up to 100% of the replacement costs of a tank and usually costs less than a few dollars per month.

Also recommend buying pollution liability insurance for oil spills, if available. Some states provide this for free (Washington state), and it may be available from other sources. For more information, visit:
http://www.reporthost.com/?OILSPILL
http://www.reporthost.com/?OILTANKINS

115) The Main water shut off is located in the north east corner of the basement at the well pressure tank.
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Photo 115-1
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Photo 115-2

116) The oil shut off is located at the oil tank near the filter, and at the boiler.
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Photo 116-1
 

117) The Main gas (propane) shut off is located on the south exterior of the home at the propane tank.
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Photo 117-1
 

Water Heater
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Limitations: Evaluation of and determining the adequacy or completeness of the following items are not included in this inspection: water recirculation pumps; solar water heating systems; Energy Smart or energy saver controls; catch pan drains. Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not provide an estimate of remaining life on water heaters, does not determine if water heaters are appropriately sized, or perform any evaluations that require a pilot light to be lit or a shut-off valve to be operated.
Condition of water heater: Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Type: Tank
Energy source: Electricity
Estimated age: 3 years old(2014)
Capacity (in gallons): 30
Temperature-pressure relief valve installed: Yes
Location of water heater: Basement
Hot water temperature tested: No

118) The temperature-pressure relief valve drain line was too short. This is a potential safety hazard due to the risk of scalding if someone is standing next to the water heater when the valve opens. Recommend that a qualified plumber repair per standard building practices. For example, by extending the drain line to within 6 inches of the floor, or routing it to drain outside. For more information, visit:
http://www.reporthost.com/?TPRVALVE
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Photo 118-1
 

119) No water shut-off valve was visible for the water heater. A shut-off valve allows the water supply to be turned off when the water heater needs repair or replacement, while allowing the remainder of the plumbing system to be operable (e.g. toilets, sinks). Recommend that a qualified plumber install a local shut-off valve per standard building practices.
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Photo 119-1
 

120) The water heater was installed in an unheated space on a concrete floor and was not resting on an insulated pad. The bottom of the casing is likely to rust, and energy efficiency may be reduced. Recommend installing an insulated pad under the water heater.
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Photo 120-1
 

121) The water heater's electricity supply was off. The water heater and hot water supply system (e.g. faucets, controls) were not fully evaluated because of this. Recommend that a full evaluation be made by a qualified person when conditions have been corrected so the water heater is operable. Note that per the standards of practice for various professional home inspection organizations, the inspector does not operate shut-off valves, pilot lights or over-current protection devices, or any controls other than "normal controls."

122) Based on the capacity of the water heater, the number of bedrooms in this structure and the number of occupants expected to live in this structure, this water heater may be undersized. Consult with a qualified plumber or water heater distributor for more information, and may wish to upgrade the size of the water heater.

Heating, Ventilation and Air Condition (HVAC)
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Limitations: The following items are not included in this inspection: humidifiers, dehumidifiers, electronic air filters; solar, coal or wood-fired heat systems; thermostat or temperature control accuracy and timed functions; heating components concealed within the building structure or in inaccessible areas; underground utilities and systems; safety devices and controls (due to automatic operation). Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not provide an estimate of remaining life on heating or cooling system components, does not determine if heating or cooling systems are appropriately sized, does not test coolant pressure, or perform any evaluations that require a pilot light to be lit, a shut-off valve to be operated, a circuit breaker to be turned "on" or a serviceman's or oil emergency switch to be operated. It is beyond the scope of this inspection to determine if furnace heat exchangers are intact and free of leaks. Condensation pans and drain lines may clog or leak at any time and should be monitored while in operation in the future. Where buildings contain furnishings or stored items, the inspector may not be able to verify that a heat source is present in all "liveable" rooms (e.g. bedrooms, kitchens and living/dining rooms).
General heating system type(s): Furnace
General heating distribution type(s): Pipes and radiators
Last service date of primary heat source: 5-26-2010
Source for last service date of primary heat source: Label - Service Tag on Boiler
Condition of hydronic or steam heat system: Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Type of hydronic or steam heat: Hydronic (hot water), Circulating pump
Hydronic or steam heat fuel type: Oil
Condition of burners: Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Type of combustion air supply: No dedicated source visible, uses room air
Condition of venting system: Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Condition of controls: Appeared serviceable

123) Some / many of the single-wall metal flue vent connectors for the boiler were damaged and some sections of the metal flue vent connectors had significant corrosion. (see the chimney/flue section) This may result in improper drafting and is a potential safety hazard. Recommend that a qualified heating contractor evaluate and repair as necessary.

124) The boiler emergency off switch located at the top of the basement stairs was in the off position at the time of the inspection. With the switch in the off position the boiler was operating. Recommend further evaluation / repair by a qualified contractor.
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Photo 124-1
Boiler emergency off switch
 

125) The automatic pressure-reducing water feeder valve on a boiler appeared to have significant corrosion and may not be functioning properly. An automatic water feeder is often a bell-shaped device which opens and sends makeup water into the heating boiler and its piping whenever the heating system's internal water pressure falls below a normal level (typically 12 psi). Recommend further evaluation by a qualified contractor.

126) The boiler backflow preventer valve installed on the water supply line to the boiler appeared to have significant corrosion and may not be functioning properly. A hot water heating system backflow preventer check valve is used to keep hot, high pressure water in the hydronic heating system from flowing backwards through a boiler water feed line into the building water supply - a sanitation concern.
Recommend further evaluation by a qualified contractor.

127) The automatic air bleeder valve on the boiler appeared to be leaking and have significant corrosion, this may prevent it from functioning properly.
Recommend further evaluation by a qualified contractor.
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Photo 127-1
 

128) Corrosion or rust was found in one or more distribution supply pipes, valves and/or fittings. This can indicate past leaks, or that leaks are likely to occur in the future. Recommend that a qualified heating contractor or plumber evaluate and repair as necessary.
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Photo 128-1
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Photo 128-2

129) The boiler's temperature-pressure relief valve piping was leaking. This can be due to excessive pressure in the system, or a defective valve. Recommend that a qualified heating contractor or plumber evaluate and repair as necessary.
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Photo 129-1
 

130) One or more sections of distribution pipes for the heating system were loose or had substandard support. Recommend that a qualified contractor repair per standard building practices.

131) One or more baseboard heaters were damaged. Recommend that a qualified electrician repair or replace as necessary.

132) The boiler temperature and pressure readings on the tridicator appeared to be higher than the expected typical operating range. The typical boiler temperature is between 140 to 180 degrees F and the typical boiler pressure is between 12 - 15 psi for a single story home.
Recommend further evaluation by a qualified contractor.
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Photo 132-1
 

133) The thermostat cover was missing.
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Photo 133-1
 

134) One or more baseboard heaters were loose. Recommend that a qualified person repair as necessary.

135) The last service date of primary heat source was noted as 5/26/2010.
Recommend boiler be evaluated and serviced by a qualified contractor.

Fireplaces, Stoves, Chimneys and Flues
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Limitations: The following items are not included in this inspection: coal stoves, gas logs, chimney flues (except where visible). Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not determine the adequacy of drafting or sizing in fireplace and stove flues, and also does not determine if prefabricated or zero-clearance fireplaces are installed in accordance with the manufacturer's specifications. The inspector does not perform any evaluations that require a pilot light to be lit, and does not light fires. The inspector provides a basic visual examination of a chimney and any associated wood burning device. The National Fire Protection Association has stated that an in-depth Level 2 chimney inspection should be part of every sale or transfer of property with a wood-burning device. Such an inspection may reveal defects that are not apparent to the home inspector who is a generalist.
Condition of chimneys and flues: Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Wood-burning chimney type: Masonry

136) A "direct vent" type gas vent may have been improperly installed through the wall. The venting appears to be inadequately supported. There is also significant soot build up on the soffit and siding around the exhaust.
Recommend that a qualified contractor make repairs or modifications per standard building practices.
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Photo 136-1
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Photo 136-2
mounting plate appeared not to be properly fastened to the wall.

137) One or more sections of metal flue pipe had a substandard rise or reverse slope. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of exhaust gases entering living spaces. Flue pipes should have a minimum rise of 1/4 inch per foot of length to ensure safe venting and to minimize accumulation of corrosive condensation. Recommend that a qualified contractor repair per standard building practices.
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Photo 137-1
 

138) One or more flue pipe sections or connections were significantly corroded and/or poorly supported. This is a potential safety hazard due to the risk of exhaust gases entering living spaces. A qualified person should repair per standard building practices.
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Photo 138-1
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Photo 138-2
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Photo 138-3
Significant corrosion was observed
 

139) One or more chimneys for wood-burning devices and/or flues for gas-fired appliances terminated less than 4 feet from a building opening such as a door or window. Such flues should terminate more than 4 feet from building openings to prevent exhaust gases from entering living spaces. This is a potential safety hazard. Recommend that a qualified contractor repair per standard building practices.
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Photo 139-1
 

140) The brick chimney was moderately and/or severely deteriorated. For example, loose or missing mortar, cracked, broken, loose or spalled bricks. Loose bricks can pose a safety hazard, and deteriorated masonry can allow water to infiltrate the chimney structure and cause further damage. Recommend that a qualified contractor repair as necessary.
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Photo 140-1
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Photo 140-2
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Photo 140-3
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Photo 140-4

141) One or more masonry chimney crowns were cracked and/or deteriorated. Crowns are meant to keep water off of the chimney structure and prevent damage from freeze-thaw cycles. Chimney crowns are commonly constructed by mounding concrete or mortar on the top chimney surface, however this is substandard. A properly constructed chimney crown should:
  • Be constructed using either precast concrete slabs, cast-in-place steel reinforced concrete, solid stone, or metal
  • Be sloped down from the flue a minimum of 3 inches of fall per foot of run
  • Extend a minimum of 2 1/2 inches beyond the face of the chimney on all sides
  • Not directly contact the flue liner (if installed), with the gap filled with flexible caulk
  • Have flashing installed between the bottom of the crown and the top of the brick chimney
Recommend that a qualified contractor repair or replace crowns as necessary, and per standard building practices.
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Photo 141-1
 

142) Single-wall metal stove pipe was installed upside-down. Creosote, condensation and dust may leak, rather than fall down the pipe. Recommend that a qualified contractor repair per standard building practices.

143) Soot or scorch marks were visible on the outside of the exterior wall above one or more gas fireplace or stove direct vent terminations. This indicates incomplete combustion and may be caused by soot deposits on the ceramic logs or by the ceramic logs' burner ports being clogged. Recommend that a qualified specialist evaluate and perform maintenance or make repairs as necessary. The ceramic logs may need cleaning and/or repositioning. The soot on on the walls can usually be removed by washing with soap and water.
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Photo 143-1
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Photo 143-2

Kitchen
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Limitations: The following items are not included in this inspection: household appliances such as stoves, ovens, cook tops, ranges, warming ovens, griddles, broilers, dishwashers, trash compactors, refrigerators, freezers, ice makers, hot water dispensers and water filters; appliance timers, clocks, cook functions, self and/or continuous cleaning operations, thermostat or temperature control accuracy, and lights. Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not provide an estimate of the remaining life of appliances, and does not determine the adequacy of operation of appliances. The inspector does not note appliance manufacturers, models or serial numbers and does not determine if appliances are subject to recalls. Areas and components behind and obscured by appliances are inaccessible and excluded from this inspection.
Condition of counters: Appeared serviceable, Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Condition of cabinets: Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Condition of sinks and related plumbing: Appeared serviceable
Condition of under-sink food disposal: N/A (none installed)
Condition of dishwasher: Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Condition of ranges, cooktops and/or ovens: Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Range, cooktop, oven type: Propane
Type of ventilation: Hood or built into microwave over range or cooktop
Condition of refrigerator: N/A (none installed)
Condition of built-in microwave oven: Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)

144) The range could tip forward. An anti-tip bracket may not be installed. This is a potential safety hazard since the range can tip forward when weight is applied to the open door, such as when a small child climbs on it or if heavy objects are dropped on it. Anti-tip brackets have been sold with all free-standing ranges since 1985. Recommend installing an anti-tip bracket to eliminate this safety hazard. For more information, visit:
http://www.reporthost.com/?ATB

145) The dishwasher was inoperable. Recommend that a qualified specialist evaluate and repair or replace as necessary.

146) The dishwasher's drain line appeared to be missing a high loop or air gap. A high loop is created by routing the drain line up to the bottom surface of the counter top above and securely fastening it to that surface. An air gap is a device that makes the drain line non-continuous. Both of these prevent waste-water backflow from entering the dishwasher, and possibly flooding out of the dishwasher if/when a siphon occurs. Some newer dishwashers have these devices built in. Recommend reviewing the dishwasher's installation instructions, consulting with the property owner and/or having a qualified contractor evaluate further to determine if a high loop and air gap are installed or needed. If not installed, and none is built into the dishwasher, then recommend that a qualified contractor install a high loop and air gap per standard building practices.
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Photo 146-1
 

147) The exhaust fan over the range recirculated the exhaust air back into the kitchen. This may be due to no duct being installed, baffles not being installed, or problems with duct work. This can be a nuisance for odor and grease accumulation. Where a gas-fired range or cook top is installed, carbon monoxide and excessive levels of moisture can accumulate in living spaces. Recommend that a qualified contractor evaluate and repair as necessary so exhaust air is ducted outdoors.

148) The microwave oven was inoperable. Recommend that a qualified person evaluate and repair or replace as necessary.

149) One or more cabinets, drawers and/or cabinet doors were damaged, deteriorated, loose and/or missing. Recommend that a qualified person repair or replace as necessary.

150) Water damage was found in shelving or cabinets below the sink. Recommend that a qualified contractor repair as necessary after any plumbing leaks have been repaired. If moisture is present then concealed areas should be dried thoroughly.

151) 1 cooktop burner(s) were inoperable. Recommend that a qualified person repair as necessary.

Right front failed to light
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Photo 151-1
 

152) Gaps, no caulk, or substandard caulking were found between countertops and backsplashes and/or around the sink. Water may penetrate these areas and cause damage. Recommend that a qualified person repair as necessary. For example, by installing caulk.

153) One or more cabinet drawers were difficult to open or close and/or damaged. Recommend that a qualified person repair as necessary.

154) One or more sink drains were leaking. A qualified plumber should repair as necessary.
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Photo 154-1
A leak was observed at the sink strainer gasket
 

155) The sink drained slowly. Recommend clearing drain and/or having a qualified plumber repair if necessary.
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Photo 155-1
It took several minutes for the water to drain out of the sink
 

156) The sink had minor wear, blemishes or deterioration.

157) The microwave oven didn't have or was missing a built-in turntable. The client may want to purchase a manually wound turntable such as a "Micro-go-round" for better cooking performance.
For more information, visit:
http://www.reporthost.com/?MGR

Bathrooms, Laundry and Sinks
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Limitations: The following items are not included in this inspection: overflow drains for tubs and sinks; heated towel racks, saunas, steam generators, clothes washers, clothes dryers. Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not determine the adequacy of washing machine drain lines, washing machine catch pan drain lines, or clothes dryer exhaust ducts. The inspector does not operate water supply or shut-off valves for sinks, toilets, bidets, clothes washers, etc. due to the possibility of valves leaking or breaking when operated. The inspector does not determine if shower pans or tub and shower enclosures are water tight, or determine the completeness or operability of any gas piping to laundry appliances.
Location #A: Full bath
Location #B: 3/4 bath
Condition of counters: Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Condition of cabinets: Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Condition of flooring: Appeared serviceable
Condition of sinks and related plumbing: Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Condition of toilets: Appeared serviceable
Condition of bathtubs and related plumbing: Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Condition of ventilation systems: Appeared serviceable
Bathroom and laundry ventilation type: Windows, Spot exhaust fans
Gas supply for laundry equipment present: Yes
240 volt receptacle for laundry equipment present: Yes

158) The inspector was unable to verify that the glass used in one or more windows by the bathtub and/or shower at location(s) #A was approved safety glass. Glazing that is not approved safety glass located in areas subject to human impact is a potential safety hazard. Standard building practices require that approved safety glass be used in enclosures for bathtubs, showers, spas, saunas and steam rooms, and in windows where the bottom edge of the window is less than 60 inches above the drain inlet or standing surface. Wire-reinforced glass is not acceptable. Recommend that a qualified contractor evaluate further to determine if glazing is approved safety glass, and replace glass if necessary, and per standard building practices.
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Photo 158-1
 

159) Countertops and/or backsplashes at location(s) #A were damaged or deteriorated. Recommend repairing or replacing as necessary.
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Photo 159-1
 

160) One or more cabinets, drawers and/or cabinet doors at location(s) #A were deteriorated. Recommend that a qualified person repair or replace as necessary.

161) Water damage was found in shelving or cabinet components below one or more sinks at location(s) #A. Recommend that a qualified contractor repair as necessary after any plumbing leaks have been repaired. If moisture is present then concealed areas should be dried thoroughly.

162) The sink at location(s) #A was damaged or significantly deteriorated. Recommend that a qualified contractor replace the sink.

163) One or more bathtub faucet handles at location(s) #A were loose. Recommend that a qualified person repair or replace handles as necessary.

164) One or more handles controlling water flow to the shower at location(s) #A and B were loose. Recommend that a qualified person repair or replace handles as necessary.

165) Caulk was missing around the base of the bathtub spout, or there was a gap behind it, at location(s) #A. Water may enter the wall structure behind the bathtub. Recommend that a qualified person repair as necessary to eliminate the gap. For example, by installing or replacing caulk if the gap is small enough. For larger gaps, a shorter spout nipple or an escutcheon plate can be installed.

166) Gaps, no caulk, or substandard caulking were found between the bathtub and the floor and/or walls at location(s) #A. Water may penetrate these areas and cause damage. Recommend that a qualified person re-caulk or install caulking as necessary.

167) Tile and/or grout in the bathtub surround at location(s) #A was deteriorated (e.g. loose or cracked tiles, missing grout) or substandard. Water can damage the wall structure as a result. Recommend that a qualified contractor repair as necessary.

168) Gaps, no caulk, or substandard caulking were found between countertops and backsplashes and/or around the sink at location(s) #A. Water can penetrate these areas and cause damage. Recommend that a qualified person repair as necessary. For example, by installing or replacing caulk.

169) Cabinet hardware such as hinges, latches, closers, magnets or pulls at location(s) #A were loose, missing or damaged at one or more cabinet drawers, doors or turntables. Recommend that a qualified person repair as necessary.

170) The sink at location(s) #A drained slowly. Recommend clearing drain and/or having a qualified plumber repair if necessary.

171) The bathtub drain stopper mechanism at location(s) #A was missing. Recommend that a qualified person repair or replace as necessary.
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Photo 171-1
 

172) Gaps, no caulk, or substandard caulking were found between the shower enclosure and the walls at location(s) #A and B. Water can penetrate these areas and cause damage. Recommend that a qualified person re-caulk or install caulking as necessary.
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Photo 172-1
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Photo 172-2

173) The jetted tub at location(s) #A was not evaluated due to the bathtub drain stopper mechanism missing. Recommend that a qualified person repair or replace as necessary and evaluate the tubs operation.

174) The shower head mechanism at location(s) #A was missing. Recommend that a qualified person repair or replace as necessary.
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Photo 174-1
 

175) Recommend cleaning and sealing the grout in flooring at location(s) #A and B now and in the future as necessary to prevent staining and to improve waterproofing.

176) Stains were found in the shelving or cabinets below the sink at location(s) #A. Plumbing leaks may have occurred in the past. Consult with the property owner about this, and if necessary that a qualified person evaluate and repair.

177) The bathtub at location(s) #A was worn, blemished or deteriorated.

Interior, Doors and Windows
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Limitations: The following items are not included in this inspection: security, intercom and sound systems; communications wiring; central vacuum systems; elevators and stair lifts; cosmetic deficiencies such as nail-pops, scuff marks, dents, dings, blemishes or issues due to normal wear and tear in wall, floor and ceiling surfaces and coverings, or in equipment; deficiencies relating to interior decorating; low voltage and gas lighting systems. Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not evaluate any areas or items which require moving stored items, furnishings, debris, equipment, floor coverings, insulation or similar materials. The inspector does not test for asbestos, lead, radon, mold, hazardous waste, urea formaldehyde urethane, or any other toxic substance. Some items such as window, drawer, cabinet door or closet door operability are tested on a sampled basis. The client should be aware that paint may obscure wall and ceiling defects, floor coverings may obscure floor defects, and furnishings may obscure wall, floor and floor covering defects. If furnishings were present during the inspection, recommend a full evaluation of walls, floors and ceilings that were previously obscured when possible. Carpeting and flooring, when installed over concrete slabs, may conceal moisture. If dampness wicks through a slab and is hidden by floor coverings that moisture can result in unhygienic conditions, odors or problems that will only be discovered when/if the flooring is removed. Determining the cause and/or source of odors is not within the scope of this inspection.
Condition of exterior entry doors: Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Exterior door material: Wood, Metal
Condition of interior doors: Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Condition of windows and skylights: Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Type(s) of windows: Vinyl, Wood, Double-hung, Crank out
Condition of walls and ceilings: Required repairs, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Wall type or covering: Drywall
Ceiling type or covering: Drywall, Tiles
Condition of flooring: Required repairs, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Flooring type or covering: Wood or wood products, Tile. Laminate

178) One or more windows that were designed to open and close smoothly, had the top window fall open from the top when the windows were unlocked. Recommend that a qualified person repair windows as necessary so they open and close easily.

179) Stains and elevated levels of moisture were found in one or more ceiling areas. The stains appear to be due to an active roof leak, no apparent leaks were observed in the attic area above these stains. Recommend that a qualified contractor evaluate and repair as necessary.
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Photo 179-1
Several stains were observed and tested as high moisture in the hallway
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Photo 179-2
Several stains were observed and tested as high moisture in the hallway
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Photo 179-3
This is the attic area above the hallway were the stains were observed. There is a plywood walkway installed. (viewed from the attic access hatch looking south towards the kitchen area)
 

180) Floors in one or more areas were not level. This can be caused by foundation settlement or movement of the foundation, posts and/or beams. Significant repairs may be needed to make floors level. Recommend that a qualified contractor and/or engineer evaluate further. Repairs should be performed by a qualified contractor.

181) Fungal rot was found at one or more exterior door jambs. Recommend that a qualified person repair as necessary. All rotten wood should be replaced.
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Photo 181-1
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Photo 181-2
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Photo 181-3
 

182) Some exterior door hardware, including deadbolts were missing. Recommend that a qualified person repair or replace as necessary.
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Photo 182-1
 

183) One or more interior doors were damaged and/or missing. Recommend that a qualified person replace or repair doors as necessary.

184) One or more windows that were designed to open and close were difficult to open and close. Recommend that a qualified person repair windows as necessary so they open and close easily.

185) One or more walls and/or ceilings were damaged, were cracked and/or had substandard repairs. Recommend that a qualified person repair as necessary.

186) Fixtures such as closet shelving, clothes hanger poles and/or towel hangers were Missing. Recommend that a qualified person repair or replace as necessary.

187) One or more interior doors wouldn't latch or were difficult to latch. Recommend that a qualified person repair as necessary. For example, by adjusting latch plates or locksets.

188) One or more interior doors were sticking in the door jamb and were difficult to operate. Recommend that a qualified person repair as necessary. For example, by trimming doors.

189) Wood flooring in one or more areas was significantly worn, deteriorated or damaged. Recommend that a qualified contractor refinish wood flooring as necessary.

190) Minor cracks, nail pops and/or blemishes were found in walls and/or ceilings in one or more areas. Cracks and nail pops are common, are often caused by lumber shrinkage or minor settlement, and can be more or less noticeable depending on changes in humidity. They did not appear to be a structural concern, but the client may wish to repair these for aesthetic reasons. For recurring cracks, consider using an elastic crack covering product:
http://www.reporthost.com/?ECC

191) Recommend cleaning and sealing grout in tile or stone flooring now and in the future as necessary to prevent staining and to improve waterproofing.

192) One or more exterior doors had minor damage and/or deterioration. Although serviceable, the client may wish to repair or replace such doors for appearances' sake.

193) One or more hinged exterior doors had no deadbolt lock installed and relied solely on the entry lockset for security. Recommend installing locksets on exterior doors where missing for added security.

194) Screens were missing from some windows. These windows may not provide ventilation during months when insects are active.

Wood Destroying Organism Findings
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Limitations: This report only includes findings from accessible and visible areas on the day of the inspection. In addition to the inaccessible areas documented in this report, examples of other inaccessible areas include: sub areas less than 18 inches in height; attic areas less than 5 feet in height, areas blocked by ducts, pipes or insulation; areas where locks or permanently attached covers prevent access; areas where insulation would be damaged if traversed; areas obscured by vegetation. All inaccessible areas are subject to infestation or damage from wood-destroying organisms. The inspector does not move furnishings, stored items, debris, floor or wall coverings, insulation, or other materials as part of the inspection, nor perform destructive testing. Wood-destroying organisms may infest, re-infest or become active at any time. No warranty is provided as part of this inspection.

Thank You for choosing Sugar Maple Home Inspection Service LLC.

The items listed in this report are, in the inspector’s opinion, those that pose a safety hazard or affect the habitability or integrity of the house. The client is strongly advised to read the entire report.

All comments by the inspector should be considered before purchasing this home. Any recommendations by the inspector to repair or replace suggests a second opinion or further inspection by a qualified contractor. All costs associated with further inspection fees and repair or replacement of item, component or unit should be considered before you purchase the property.

This is a report of a visual inspection of the readily accessible areas of the building listed on the initial page. At the time of inspection, any area which is not exposed to view, is concealed, or is inaccessible because of soil, snow, water, walls, floors, carpets, ceilings, furnishings, or any other things is not included in this inspection.

All heating and cooling equipment should be serviced every year by a qualified HVAC technician

Water leaks may not appear during the inspection if the home is vacant due to lack of normal usage, but may appear only after repeated usage, and we cannot be held responsible for these

Home inspectors are not required to report on the following: Life expectancy of any component or system; The causes of the need for a repair; The methods, materials, and costs of corrections; The suitability of the property for any specialized use; Compliance or non-compliance with codes, ordinances, statutes, regulatory requirements or restrictions; The market value of the property or its marketability; The advisability or inadvisability of purchase of the property; Any component or system that was not observed; The presence or absence of pests such as wood damaging organisms, rodents, or insects; or Cosmetic items, underground items, or items not permanently installed. Home inspectors are not required to: Offer warranties or guarantees of any kind; Calculate the strength, adequacy, or efficiency of any system or component; Enter any area or perform any procedure that may damage the property or its components or be dangerous to the home inspector or other persons; Operate any system or component that is shut down or otherwise inoperable; Operate any system or component that does not respond to normal operating controls; Disturb insulation, move personal items, panels, furniture, equipment, plant life, soil, snow, ice, or debris that obstructs access or visibility; Determine the presence or absence of any suspected adverse environmental condition or hazardous substance, including but not limited to mold, toxins, carcinogens, noise, contaminants in the building or in soil, water, and air; Determine the effectiveness of any system installed to control or remove suspected hazardous substances; Predict future condition, including but not limited to failure of components; Since this report is provided for the specific benefit of the customer(s), secondary readers of this information should hire a licensed inspector to perform an inspection to meet their specific needs and to obtain current information concerning this property.