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Smart Solution Inspections


Email: inspectdanboyer@yahoo.com
Phone: (217) 254-0431
1219 CR 1200 N, Sullivan Il 61951
Inspector: Orvil Boyer
License # 450.001956

 

Property Inspection Report

Client(s):  Dameon Poe
Property address:  1023 South Main
Sullivan IL 61951
Inspection date:  Saturday, September 14, 2013

This report published on Saturday, March 29, 2014 5:44:34 PM CDT

This report is the exclusive property of this inspection company and the client(s) listed in the report title. Use of this report by any unauthorized persons is prohibited.

Thank you for choosing Smart Solution Inspections. We've made every effort to provide you with a thorough, high quality inspection, and hope that the information in this report proves to be valuable in your consideration of this property. If for any reason you are unsatisfied with this report, or have questions after reviewing it, please don't hesitate to call us. If you are satisfied, please tell your friends about us.

This report is intended to identify major defects within a structure that significantly affect its habitability or that cost in excess of $500 to repair, although minor defects may be noted in the report. Cosmetic items such as damaged molding, trim, doors, cabinets, interior paint or carpet are generally excluded from this report.

Home inspection reports by nature focus on defects and may seem negative in tone. Some features of this property may be in excellent condition and of high quality but have not been mentioned, or been deemed adequate in the report. This is not meant to downplay this property's assets, but to focus on alerting you to potentially expensive problems. Bear in mind that all homes, regardless of their age, have some number of defects.
How to Read this Report
This report is organized by the property's functional areas.  Within each functional area, descriptive information is listed first and is shown in bold type.  Items of concern follow descriptive information. Concerns are shown and sorted according to these types:
Concern typeSafetyPoses a risk of injury or death
Concern typeMajor DefectCorrection likely involves a significant expense
Concern typeRepair/ReplaceRecommend repairing or replacing
Concern typeRepair/MaintainRecommend repair and/or maintenance
Concern typeMinor DefectCorrection likely involves only a minor expense
Concern typeMaintainRecommend ongoing maintenance
Concern typeEvaluateRecommend evaluation by a specialist
Concern typeMonitorRecommend monitoring in the future
Concern typeCommentFor your information

Click here for a glossary of building construction terms.Contact your inspector If there are terms that you do not understand, or visit the glossary of construction terms at http://www.reporthost.com/glossary.asp

Table of Contents
General Information
Roof
Exterior
Grounds
Garage
Central Air Conditioning/Heat Pump
Heating
Water Heater
Plumbing/Fuel Systems
Crawl space/Basement
Electrical Service
Attic
Kitchen
Bathroom
Interior rooms
Interior Basics


General Information
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Time started: 11:00
Time finished: 13:00
Client: Dameon Poe
Realtor: Bill Highland
Client present for discussion at end of inspection: Yes
Weather conditions: Clear
Temperature: Cool
Inspection fee: 0
Type of building: Single family
Approximate age: 1948
Main entrance faces: East
1) Structures built prior to 1980 may contain lead-based paint and/or asbestos in various building materials such as insulation, siding, and/or floor and ceiling tiles. Both lead and asbestos are known health hazards. Evaluating for the presence of lead and/or asbestos is not included in this inspection. The client should consult with specialists as necessary, such as industrial hygienists, professional labs and/or abatement contractors for this type of evaluation. For information on lead, asbestos and other hazardous materials in homes, visit:
http://www.epa.gov
http://www.cpsc.gov
http://www.cdc.gov
Roof
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Estimated age of roof: 5 yrs
Apparent number of layers of roof surface material: One
Visibility: All
Roof Type: Gable
Roofing material: Asphalt
Viewed From: Roof
Shingles Condition: Satisfactory condition
Roof Structure: Satisfactory condition
Roof Flashing: Aluminum, Satisfactory condition
Roof Ventilation: Top, Gable, Satisfactory condition
Roof Valleys: Same roofing material, Satisfactory condition
Plumbing Vents: Yes
Chimney 1 Location: Center
Chimney Viewed From: Roof
Chimney Chase Description: Brick, Mortar skim coat
Chimney Chase Condition: Flaking, Marginal condition (replace/repair in 1-5 years)
Chimney Flue Material: Not visible
2) The chimney chase has a mortar skim coat present. The coating has several cracks present and some flaking. Water stains were noted around the wood framing in the attic below the chimney. The stains were dry on the day of the inspection. Recommend a qualified contractor repair to prevent water intrusion.
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3) Nail heads were exposed at one or more shingles and/or sealant is present.. Recommend applying an approved sealant over exposed nail heads now and maintain as necessary in the future to prevent leaks.
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4) Roof sealant is present around some roof penetrations and will need maintained in the near future to prevent water penetration.
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5) Some debris such as leaves, needles, seeds, etc. have accumulated on the roof surface. Water may not flow easily off the roof, and can enter gaps in the roof surface. Leaks can occur as a result. This is a conducive condition for wood-destroying organisms. Recommend cleaning debris from the roof surface now and as necessary in the future.
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Exterior
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Gutters and Downspouts: Aluminum
Gutters and Downspouts Condition: Needs Cleaning, Satisfactory condition
Siding: Vinyl, Satisfactory condition
Trim/Soffits: Aluminum, Satisfactory condition
Window Frames: Aluminum, Satisfactory condition
Storms/Screens: Vinyl, Satisfactory condition
Exterior Electric: Underground to the house
Foundation material: Poured in place concrete
6) Bare wire ends, or wires with a substandard termination, were found at one or more locations. This is a potential shock hazard. Recommend that a qualified electrician repair as necessary. For example, by cutting wires to length and terminating with wire nuts in a permanently mounted, covered junction box.

South side of the garage. It appears this wire has been discontinued and cut inside the garage.
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7) The exterior wiring for the porch light is substandard. The wiring does not appear to be rated for exterior use.
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8) Some small holes are located around the exterior siding. These areas should be caulked/sealed to prevent water penetration.
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9) The fascia and/or soffit are in need of repairs and/or is missing . Water penetration is likely. Recommend repairs to prevent water intrusion by a qualified person.
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10) One or more minor cracks (1/8 inch or less) were found in the foundation. These don't appear to be a structural concern, but recommend sealing them to prevent water infiltration and monitoring them in the future. Numerous products exist to seal such cracks including hydraulic cement, resilient caulks and epoxy sealants.
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11) Gutters have debris present and will need cleaned.
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Grounds
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Walkways: Concrete, Marginal condition (replace/repair in 1-5 years)
Driveway: Asphalt, Satisfactory condition
Patio: Concrete, Satisfactory condition
Front Stoop/Steps: Concrete, Satisfactory
Back Stoop/Steps: Concrete, Satisfactory condition
Porch: Satisfactory condition
Negative grade: West, North, South
12) Perimeter pavement slopes towards structure in one or more areas. This can result in water accumulating around the structure's foundation, or in basements and crawl spaces if they exist. Accumulated water is a conducive condition to wood destroying insects and organisms. Recommend having a qualified contractor make repairs as necessary so perimeter pavement slopes down and away from the structure and/or put in place proper draining system to control water run off.
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13) The perimeter grading slopes towards the structure in one or more areas. This can result in water accumulating around the structure's foundation, or in basements and crawl spaces if they exist. Accumulated water is a conducive condition to wood destroying insects and organisms. Wet soil may also cause the foundation to settle and possibly fail over time. Recommend grading soil so it slopes down and away from the structure with a slope of at least 5% (10% or better is optimal) for at least 6 feet.
Garage
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Style: Detached
Overhead door 1: Wood, Marginal condition (repair/replace in 1-5 years)
Automatic Opener 1: Yes, Operates
Roofing: Same as house, Satisfactory condition
Siding: Same as house, Satisfactory condition
Trim: Same as house, Satisfactory condition
Floor: Concrete, Marginal condition (repair/replace in 1-5 years)
Electrical outlets: Yes, No GFCI present
14) The auto-reverse mechanism on the vehicle door opener is inoperable or requires too much force to activate. This is a safety hazard, especially for small children. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary. For more information on garage door safety issues, visit: http://www.cpsc.gov/cpscpub/pubs/523.html or http://www.ohdstl.com/safety.html
15) One or more garage electric receptacles appear to have no ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate to determine if GFCI protection exists, and if not, repairs should be made so that all garage receptacles, except for one for use with a refrigerator or freezer, have GFCI protection. For example, install GFCI receptacles or circuit breaker(s) as needed.
16) Bare wire ends, or wires with a substandard termination, were found at one or more locations. This is a potential shock hazard. Recommend that a qualified electrician repair as necessary. For example, by cutting wires to length and terminating with wire nuts in a permanently mounted, covered junction box.
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17) One or more cover plates for switches, receptacles (outlets) or junction boxes were missing or broken. These plates are intended to contain fire and prevent electric shock from occurring due to exposed wires. Recommend that a qualified person install cover plates where necessary.
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18) The garage sub panel used screw-in fuses for the over-current protection devices. Fuses are prone to tampering and over-fusing, which can damage wiring and cause fire hazards. Modern panels use circuit breakers for over-current protection devices, which can be reset easily after tripping rather than needing to replace fuses. Modern panels also offer more flexibility for new, safer protective technologies like ground fault circuit interrupters (GFCls) and arc fault circuit interrupters (AFCls). Consult with a qualified electrician about replacement options for fused panels, and about other system upgrades as necessary.
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19) The garage floor and foundation have significant cracks present and signs of foundation movement. Recommend a foundation contractor evaluate and make repairs as necessary.
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20) The garage door is out of adjustment with gaps present between the door and the opening.
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21) The garage door opener is located on the exterior of the building. This allows anyone to access the garage and limits security.
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22) Much of the garage, including areas around the interior perimeter and in the center are excluded from this inspection due to lack of access from stored items.
Central Air Conditioning/Heat Pump
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Type: Split system
Manufacturer: ICP
Estimated age: 1994
Primary A/C energy source: Electric
Condition of cooling system and/or heat pump: Satisfactory
Air handlers condensation tray: Satisfactory
Exterior electric disconnect: No
23) No exterior disconnect switch was found for the AC condenser. These are normally installed to prevent the unit from responding to the thermostat off-season, or during maintenance. A qualified contractor should evaluate and install one as necessary.
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24) The estimated useful life for most cooling systems and heat pumps is 10 to 15 years. This system appears to be beyond this age and/or its useful lifespan and may need replacing or significant repairs at any time. Recommend budgeting for a replacement in the near future.
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25) Insulation for the outside condensing unit's refrigerant lines was damaged, deteriorated in many areas. This may result in reduced efficiency and increased energy costs. A qualified person should replace insulation as necessary.
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Heating
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Location of heating system: Basement
Heating type: Forced air
Fuel type: Natural gas
Approximate age: 1991
Manufacturer: Heil
Condition of heating system: Satisfactory
Condition of burners: Satisfactory
Condition of venting system: Satisfactory
Condition of combustion air supply: Satisfactory
Condition of air filters: Satisfactory
Location of air filters: At base of air handler
Distribution: Ductwork
Condition of distribution system: Satisfactory
26) The last service date of this system appeared to be more than one year ago, or the inspector was unable to determine the last service date. The client should ask the property owner when it was last serviced. If unable to determine the last service date, or if this system was serviced more than one year ago, a qualified heating and cooling contractor should inspect, clean,perform a heat exchanger Carbon Monoxide test and service this system, and make repairs if necessary. For safety reasons, and because this system is fueled by gas or oil, this servicing should be performed annually in the future. For more information visit: http://www.cpsc.gov/CPSCPUB/PREREL/prhtml05/05017.html
27) Possible asbestos wrap was found on some ducts for the heating system. However, it appeared to be intact and not significantly deteriorated. Asbestos may pose a health hazard when airborne. If this is asbestos, in some cases, no action is needed except to leave this material undisturbed. The client may wish to have this material tested by a qualified specialist to determine if it is asbestos, and if it should be removed or encapsulated. For information on asbestos hazards in the home, visit:
http://www.reporthost.com/?AITH

Note that evaluating for the presence of asbestos is beyond the scope of this inspection. Any mention in this report of these materials is made as a courtesy only, and is meant to refer the client to a specialist.
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28)   Filter location
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Water Heater
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Location of water heater: Basement
Type: Tank
Estimated age: 2012
Energy source: Natural gas
Capacity (in gallons): 40
Manufacturer: Bradford White
Condition of water heater: Satisfactory
Plumbing/Fuel Systems
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Water service: Public
Water service pipe material: Galvanized steel
Condition of service and main line: Satisfactory
Location of main water shut: East wall basement
Water supply pipe material: Copper
Condition of supply lines: Satisfactory
Waste pipe material: Plastic, Galvanized steel
Condition of waste lines: Satisfactory
Drain, waste vent: Plastic, Cast iron
Waste discharge: Satisfactory
Condition of fuel system: Satisfactory
Location of main fuel shut: Meter
Condition of laundry facilities: Satisfactory
Gas supply for laundry equipment present: Yes
240 volt receptacle for laundry equipment present: No
29) Steel hangers are used to support copper water supply pipes. This contact between dissimilar metals causes corrosion. Recommend having a qualified plumber evaluate water supply pipes where these hangers have been used, and repair or replace pipes if necessary. Steel hangers should be replaced with appropriate hangers that won't cause corrosion.

A black material has been placed between the pipe and the hanger in some areas. This may or may not be sufficient enough to separate the different metals. Monitor for changes and repairs as necessary.
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30) The dryer does not have a 220 outlet available. It is direct wired into an old fuse sub panel. Recommend adding an outlet in this location when the sub panel is removed by a qualified person.
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31) Main water shut off
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Crawl space/Basement
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Area: Basement
Access: Inside
Inspection method: Traversed
Floor: Concrete
Foundation walls: Poured concrete
Pier or support post material: Wood, Bearing wall, Steel
Beam material: Solid wood
Floor structure above: Solid wood joists
Stairs: Satisfactory condition
Sump pump installed: Yes
Condition of sump pump: Required repairs, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
32) No ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection device is visible for the sump pump electric supply. A qualified electrician should determine if a GFCI protection device (receptacle or circuit breaker) exists for the sump pump and install one if missing to reduce the danger of electric shock.
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33) The sump pump's power supply appears to be on a circuit shared with other receptacles or fixtures. Sump pumps should be on a dedicated circuit so it doesn't stop working when other equipment malfunctions. A qualified electrician should evaluate and make repairs as necessary.
34) One or more minor cracks (1/8 inch or less) were found in the foundation. These don't appear to be a structural concern, but recommend sealing them to prevent water infiltration and monitoring them in the future for changes. If this concerns the client than I recommend a further evaluation by a foundation contractor to determine if repairs are needed. Numerous products exist to seal such cracks including hydraulic cement, resilient caulks and epoxy sealants.
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35) A sump pump is installed on the premises. This may indicate that water accumulates inside or below the structure. Recommend asking the property owners how often the sump pump operates and for how long at different times of the year. Also, the clients should be aware that the service life of most sump pumps is between five and seven years, and that the pump may need replacing soon depending on its age and how much it operates.
36) No battery backup system was found for the sump pump. If the power goes out during heavy rains, the sump pump won't be able to eliminate accumulated water. Consider installing a battery backup system for the sump pump.
Electrical Service
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Electric service condition: Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Primary service type: Underground
Number of service conductors: 3
Service voltage (volts): 120-240
Location of main service pane: Basement
Service amperage (amps): 100
Service entrance conductor material: Copper
Primary service overload protection type: Circuit breakers
Branch circuit wiring type: Non-metallic sheathed
Location of sub panels: Basement, Garage
System ground: Not visible, Yes
37) One or more open ground, three-pronged electric receptacles were found. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate and make repairs as necessary. For example, replacing receptacles or correcting wiring circuits.

Grounding type receptacles began being required in residential structures during the 1960s. Based on the age of this structure and/or the presence of 2-pronged receptacles in some areas of this structure, an acceptable repair may be to simply replace the ungrounded 3-pronged receptacles with 2-pronged receptacles. However the following appliances require grounding type receptacles:

This list is not exhaustive. Grounded circuits and receptacles should be installed in locations where such appliances will be used.
38) One or more sub panels used screw-in fuses for the over-current protection devices. Fuses are prone to tampering and over-fusing, which can damage wiring and cause fire hazards. Modern panels use circuit breakers for over-current protection devices, which can be reset easily after tripping rather than needing to replace fuses. Modern panels also offer more flexibility for new, safer protective technologies like ground fault circuit interrupters (GFCls) and arc fault circuit interrupters (AFCls). Consult with a qualified electrician about replacement options for fused panels, and about other system upgrades as necessary.
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39) Wire splices were exposed and were not contained in a covered junction box. This is a potential shock or fire hazard. Recommend that a qualified electrician repair per standard building practices. For example, by installing permanently mounted junction boxes with cover plates where needed to contain wiring splices.
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Attic area
 

40) The ground wire going to the main from the exterior meter is not standard and may have a loose connection at the grounding lug. Recommend evaluation and repairs by a licensed electrician.
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41) The legend for overcurrent protection devices (breakers or fuses) in the main panel was missing / incomplete. Recommend installing, updating or correcting the legend as necessary so it's accurate. Evaluation by a qualified electrician may be necessary.
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42) One or more energized conductors in panel(s) # had white, gray or green insulation. Insulation on energized conductors should be black or red in color to identify them as energized wires. Recommend that a qualified electrician re-identify wires per standard building practices. For example, by wrapping in black vinyl tape or marking with a black permanent marker.
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Attic
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Attic access location: Closet
Access: Scuttle
Attic inspection method: Partially traversed
Roof structure type: Rafters
Ceiling structure: Ceiling beams
Sheathing: Planking
Water stains: Around chimney
Ceiling insulation material: Loose fill
Approximate insulation inches: 3-5 Fair
Roof ventilation: Appears serviceable
43) The ceiling insulation's R rating is significantly less than what's recommended for this area. Recommend having a qualified contractor install additional insulation as per standard building practices for better energy efficiency.
44) The screens at the gable vents are ripped and in poor condition. Signs of animal traffic are present. Recommend repairing screens.
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45) Stains were visible on the roof structure in one or more areas. These areas were dry at the time of the inspection. The stains may be caused by a past leak. Recommend asking the property owner about past leaks. The client should monitor these areas in the future, especially after heavy rains, to determine if active leaks exist. If leaks are found, a qualified contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary.

Location: Chimney
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Kitchen
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Condition of counters: Satisfactory
Condition of cabinets: Satisfactory
Condition of sinks and related plumbing: Satisfactory
Water pressure: Adequate
Condition of garbage disposal: Satisfactory
Condition of dishwasher: Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Condition of range, cooktop: Satisfactory
Range, cooktop type: Electric
Condition of refrigerator: Satisfactory
Condition of microwave: Satisfactory
Ceilings condition: Satisfactory
Walls condition: Satisfactory
Floors condition: Satisfactory
Door condition: Satisfactory
Windows condition: Satisfactory
Heat source present: Yes
Electrical outlets: Yes, No GFCI present
Switches: Yes
46) One or more electric receptacles that serve countertop surfaces appear to have no ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate to determine if GFCI protection exists, and if not, repairs should be made so that all receptacles that serve countertop surfaces have GFCI protection. For example, install GFCI receptacles or circuit breaker(s) as needed.
47) A poor wire connection is present under the stove exhaust hood. Recommend repairs by a qualified person.
48) The dishwasher drain line is substandard. The drain line is made of copper tubing and is smaller in diameter than what is recommended. The drain line discharges into the washer stand pipe. The dishwasher drained adequately on the day of the inspection. Recommend evaluation and repairs as needed by a qualified contractor. .
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49) The inspector was unable to determine one light switches operation.
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Bathroom
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Ceilings condition: Satisfactory
Walls condition: Satisfactory
Floors condition: Satisfactory
Heat present: Yes
Door condition: Satisfactory
Windows condition: Satisfactory
Water pressure: Adequate
Sink condition: Satisfactory
Tub/shower: Satisfactory
Toilet bowl: Satisfactory
Exhaust fan: No
Electrical outlets: Yes, No GFCI present
Switches: Yes
50) One or more electric receptacles appear to have no ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate to determine if GFCI protection exists, and if not, repairs should be made so that all receptacles in the Bathroom have GFCI protection. For example, install GFCI receptacles or circuit breaker(s) as needed.
Interior rooms
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Ceilings condition: Satisfactory
Walls condition: Satisfactory
Floors condition: Satisfactory
Heat present: Yes
Door condition: Satisfactory
Windows condition: Satisfactory
Electrical Outlets: Yes
Electrical Switches: Yes
Interior Basics
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Type of windows: Vinyl, Multi, Double hung, Fixed
Evidence of window seal leaks: No
Broken glass: No
Main Entrance Door Condition: Satisfactory
Main Entrance Storm Door Condition: Satisfactory
Exterior Door 1 Condition: Satisfactory
Storm Door 1 Condition: Satisfactory
Stairs: Satisfactory
Smoke detectors present: Yes
Carbon monoxide detectors present: Yes
51) Smoke detectors were missing from bedrooms, on one or more levels. Additional smoke detectors should be installed as necessary so a functioning one exists in each hallway leading to bedrooms, in each bedroom, and one each level of the building. For more information, visit http://www.cpsc.gov/cpscpub/pubs/5077.html
52) Carbon monoxide alarms were missing on one or more levels. This is a potential safety hazard. Some states and/or municipalities require CO alarms to be installed in the vicinity of each sleeping area, on each level and in accordance with the manufacturer's recommendations. Recommend installing additional carbon monoxide alarms per these standards. For more information, visit:
http://www.reporthost.com/?COALRM
Disclaimer
In some cases we may recommend your consulting a specialist such as a structural engineer or licensed electrician. Hiring a specialist can be a prudent means of providing some protection of your financial investment in this property. WE DO NOT MAKE ANY TYPE OF WARRANTY OR GUARANTEE AS TO THE CONDITION OF THE PROPERTY. SOME THINGS MAY REMAIN HIDDEN OR BECOME DEFECTIVE AFTER THE INSPECTION. IT IS NOT POSSIBLE TO DETECT EVERY DEFECT WITHIN A BUILDING DURING THE COURSE OF A GENERAL INSPECTION. THIS REPORT SHOULD BE USED IN CONJUNCTION WITH, AND NOT A REPLACEMENT FOR , A PRE-CLOSING WALK-THROUGH BY THE CLIENT.
THIS INSPECTION IS NOT AN INSURANCE POLICY AGAINST HIDDEN DEFECTS, OR CONDITIONS THAT ARE NOT VISIBLE AND READILY APPARENT AT THE TIME OF INSPECTION.

THE COST OF THIS INSPECTION DOES NOT ENTITLE YOU TO ANY TYPE OF PROTECTION FROM HIDDEN FLAWS AND DEFECTS. THIS INSPECTION DOES NOT TRANSFER YOUR ULTIMATE RESPONSIBILITY TO SMART SOLUTION INSPECTIONS.
Inspector: Signature