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SQUARE HOME SERVICES


Email: SquareHomeService@gmail.com
Phone: (716) 307-2922
407 E Highland Ave 
Olean NY 14760-2813
Inspector: Mark Raecher
NY State Licensed Home Inspector:
UID: 16000052159

Property Inspection Report
Client(s): Mark Raecher/Ashley O'Brien
Property address: 407 East Highland Ave
Olean, NY 14760
Inspection date: 1/5/2012
This report published on Thursday, January 12, 2012 4:37:37 PM EST

View summary page

This is a visual Home Inspection for the purpose of informing the client of apparent structural, and mechanical conditions in readily and easily accessible areas that existed at the date and time of the inspection only.

 
How to Read this Report
This report is organized by the property's functional areas.  Within each functional area, descriptive information is listed first and is shown in bold type.  Items of concern follow descriptive information.
Concerns are shown and sorted according to these types:
SafetyPoses a risk of injury or death 
Major DefectHighly recommend immediate repair/replacement 
Repair/ReplaceRecommend repairing or replacing 
Repair/MaintainRecommend repair and/or maintenance 
Minor DefectCorrection likely involves only a minor expense 
EvaluateRecommend evaluation by a specialist 
MonitorRecommend monitoring in the future 
CommentFor your information 

Click here for a glossary of building construction terms.  Contact your inspector if there are terms that you do not understand, or visit the glossary of construction terms at http://www.reporthost.com/glossary.asp

Table of Contents
General Information
Grounds
Exterior / Foundation
Crawl space
Basement
Roof / Attic
Garage / Carport
Electric
Heating and cooling
Plumbing and laundry
Fireplaces, woodstoves and chimneys
Kitchen
Bathrooms
Attic
 
General Information Return to table of contents
Report number: 009
Time started: 5pm
Time finished: 7pm
Inspector: Mark A. Raecher
Present during inspection: Property owner
Client present for discussion at end of inspection: Yes
Weather conditions: Cloudy
Temperature: Cold30 degrees F
Ground condition: Wet, Frozen, Snow covered
Inches of accumulated snow: 2-3
Inspection fee: free
Type of building: Single family, Detached garage
Age of building(s): 1945 - 67 years
Source for building age: Municipal records, Property listing
Front of building faces: South
Main entrance faces: South
Occupied: Yes
Property owner's name: Mark Raecher/Ashley O'Brien
1) Structures built prior to 1980 may contain lead-based paint and/or asbestos in various building materials such as insulation, siding, and/or floor and ceiling tiles. Both lead and asbestos are known health hazards. Evaluating for the presence of lead and/or asbestos is not included in this inspection. The client should consult with specialists as necessary, such as industrial hygienists, professional labs and/or abatement contractors for this type of evaluation. For information on lead, asbestos and other hazardous materials in homes, visit:
http://www.epa.gov
http://www.cpsc.gov
http://www.cdc.gov

2) Some wall and floor surfaces were obscured by furniture and couldn't be fully evaluated.
3) The client should be aware that prior to 1976, factory built homes in America were built only according to voluntary standards. Because this building was built prior to 1976, it may be significantly substandard in safety, efficiency, quality, durability, etc. Factory built homes since 1976 have been required to comply with federal construction and safety standards (the HUD Code). This code is administered by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), and standardizes design, construction, energy efficiency, fire resistance, transportability, strength, and durability. It also mandates performance standards for the electrical, plumbing, air conditioning, thermal, and heating systems.
 
Grounds Return to table of contents
Limitations: The following items are not included in this inspection: swimming pools, spas, hot tubs, water features and related equipment; playground, recreation or leisure equipment; landscape lighting; areas below exterior structures with less than three feet of vertical clearance; irrigation systems; invisible fencing; sea walls, docks and boathouses. Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not test or determine the adequacy of drainage systems for grounds, walkways, below-grade stairs and roof downspouts. The inspector does not provide an evaluation of geological conditions and/or site stability, compliance of pool or spa fencing with municipal requirements, or determination that deck, balcony and/or stair membranes are watertight.
The following items are excluded from this inspection: Shed
Condition of fences and gates: Appeared serviceable
Fence and gate material: Metal
Site profile: Level
Condition of driveway: Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Driveway material: Asphalt
Condition of sidewalks and/or patios: Appeared serviceable
Sidewalk material: Poured in place concrete
Condition of deck, patio and/or porch covers: Appeared serviceable, Required repairs, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Deck, patio, porch cover material and type: Open, Covered (Refer to Roof section)Back Patio Open/ Front porch covered.
Limitations: The following items are not included in this inspection: swimming pools, spas, hot tubs, water features and related equipment; playground, recreation or leisure equipment; landscape lighting; areas below exterior structures with less than three feet of vertical clearance; irrigation systems; invisible fencing; sea walls, docks and boathouses. Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not test or determine the adequacy of drainage systems for grounds, walkways, below-grade stairs and roof downspouts. The inspector does not provide an evaluation of geological conditions and/or site stability, compliance of pool or spa fencing with municipal requirements, or determination that deck, balcony and/or stair membranes are watertight.
Condition of decks, porches and/or balconies: Appeared serviceable
Condition of guardrails: Required repairs, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Deck, porch and/or balcony material: Wood, ConcreteMetal railings
Condition of exterior stairs: Required repairs, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)Front Stairs.
Condition of handrails: Appeared serviceable
Exterior stair material: Concrete
4) Exterior stairs were deteriorated. A qualified person should evaluate and repair or replace as necessary. Front.
5) Handrails at one or more flights of stairs were . This is a safety hazard. Standard building practices require that handrails be:

  • Installed at stairs with four or more risers
  • Sized and shaped so your hand can encircle them
  • Permanently and securely attached, and able to withstand a 200 pound force in any direction at any point
  • Continuous and extend for the entire flight of the stairs
  • Located between 30 and 38 inches above the leading edge of the stair treads

    A qualified person should repair, replace or install as necessary and as per standard building practices. Recommend additional railing on rear entry steps.
    6) Perimeter pavement sloped towards building in one or more areas. This can result in water accumulating around the building foundation. Recommend having a qualified contractor evaluate and make repairs as necessary so perimeter pavement slopes down and away from the structure.
    7) Evidence of poor drainage was found in one or more sections of the driveway in the form of standing water. No drains were visible in these areas. A qualified person should evaluate and make repairs as necessary to prevent water from accumulating in the future. For example, installing drains and drain lines.
    8) The driveway had significant cracks, settlement, heaving and/or deterioration in one or more areas. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair or replace sections as necessary.
    9) One or more deck, patio and/or porch covers were deteriorated. A qualified person should evaluate and repair or replace as necessary, and as per standard building practices.
    10) One or more deck, patio and/or porch covers were . A qualified person should evaluate and repair or replace as necessary, and as per standard building practices. Recommend front porch roof replacement. Evidence of leaks broken, worn shingles.
    11) The roof surface material to one or more sections of front porch covers was near, at or beyond the material's service life. A qualified person should evaluate and repair or replace roof surfaces as necessary.
    12) Minor cracks, settlement, heaving and/or deterioration were found in the driveway. However they don't appear to be a structural concern and no trip hazards were found. No immediate action is recommended, but the client may wish to have repairs made or have cracked sections replaced for aesthetic reasons.
    13) Some sections were obscured by vegetation and couldn't be fully evaluated.
    14) fence sections were obscured by and couldn't be fully evaluated. No gate. Property fence
    15) Some sections were obscured by snow and couldn't be fully evaluated.
    16) Minor cracks, settlement, heaving and/or deterioration were found in one or more sidewalk or patio sections. However they don't appear to be a structural concern and no trip hazards were found. No immediate action is recommended, but the client may wish to have repairs made or have cracked sections replaced for aesthetic reasons.
    17) Some patios, porches were obscured by snow, carpeting and couldn't be fully evaluated. Front porch, and rear steps carpeted.
    Patio snow covered.

    18) All areas of the substructure were inaccessible due to lack of access from permanently installed skirting. These areas couldn't be evaluated and are excluded from the inspection.
    19) Some exterior stairs were obscured by snow, carpeting and couldn't be fully evaluated. Front stairs obscured by snow.
    Rear stairs obscured by carpet.
     
    Exterior / Foundation Return to table of contents
    Limitations: The following items are not included in this inspection: below-grade foundation walls and footings, or those obscured by vegetation or building components; exterior building surfaces or components obscured by vegetation, stored items or debris. Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Some amount of cracking is normal in concrete slabs and foundation walls due to shrinkage and drying. Note that the inspector does not determination the adequacy of sump pumps, seismic reinforcement, nor determine if support posts, columns, beams, joists, studs, trusses, etc. are of adequate size, spanning or spacing.
    Condition of wall covering: Required repairs, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
    Apparent wall structure: Wood frame
    Wall covering: Metal
    Condition of foundation and footings: Required repairs, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
    Foundation type: Finished basement, Crawlspace
    Foundation material: Concrete block
    Footing material: Not determined
    Condition of floor substructure: Appeared serviceable
    Pier or support post material: Wood, Steel
    Beam material: Solid wood, Built up wood
    Floor structure: Solid wood joists
    20) sections of siding and/or trim were missing, substandard. A qualified person should evaluate and repair, replace or install siding or trim as necessary. Missing corner pieces on SE side of house.
    N Side above flat roof, siding is missing and replaced with painted wood. Not properly sealed.

    21) Substandard construction was found in areas of the floor substructure. For example, over spanned joists, substandard support post footings. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary, and as per standard building practices.
    22) Caulk was deteriorated in areas. For example, . A qualified person should repair or replace as necessary. For more information, visit:
    http://www.reporthost.com/_docs/FPL_Caulking_Ins_Outs.pdf

    23) One or more minor cracks (1/8 inch or less) were found in the foundation. These don't appear to be a structural concern, but recommend sealing them to prevent water infiltration and monitoring them in the future. Numerous products exist to seal such cracks including hydraulic cement, resilient caulks and epoxy sealants.
    24) Some sections of the floor substructure were not fully evaluated due lack of access from ducts or pipes.
     
    Crawl space Return to table of contents
    Inspection method: Partially traversed
    Insulation material underneath floor above: Fiberglass roll or batt, None visibleNo insulation except under bathroom.
    Pier or support post material: Wood
    Beam material: Solid wood
    Floor structure above: Solid wood joists
    Vapor barrier present: No
    25) No vapor barrier is installed. This is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects and organisms due to the likelihood of water evaporating into the structure from the soil. A qualified contractor should install a vapor barrier. Standard building practices require the following:

  • The soil below the vapor barrier should be smooth and free from sharp objects.
  • Seams should overlap a minimum of 12 inches.
  • The vapor barrier should lap up onto the foundation side walls.

    Better building practices require that:

  • Seams and protrusions should be sealed with a pressure sensitive tape.
  • The vapor barrier should be caulked and attached tightly to the foundation side walls. For example, with furring strips and masonry nails.
    26) Insulation under the floor in the crawlspace is damaged, deteriorated, or has fallen down. A qualified contractor should make repairs as necessary to restore the insulation to its original rating.
    27) Water supply pipes are uninsulated. Recommend insulating pipes as necessary for better energy efficiency and to prevent water pipes from freezing.
    28) Some crawl space areas were inaccessible due to low height (less than 18 inches), ductwork or pipes blocking, standing water, and/or stored items. These areas are excluded from this inspection.
     
    Basement Return to table of contents
    Insulation material underneath floor above: None visible
    Pier or support post material: Wood, Steel
    Beam material: Solid wood, Steel
    Floor structure above: Solid wood joists
    29) One or more open ground, three-pronged electric receptacles were found. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate and make repairs as necessary. For example, replacing receptacles or correcting wiring circuits.

    Grounding type receptacles began being required in residential structures during the 1960s. Based on the age of this structure and the presence of 2-pronged receptacles in some areas of this structure, an acceptable repair may be to simply replace the ungrounded 3-pronged receptacles with 2-pronged receptacles. However the following appliances require grounding type receptacles:

  • Computer hardware
  • Refrigerators
  • Freezers
  • Air conditioners
  • Clothes washers
  • Clothes dryers
  • Dishwashers
  • Kitchen food waste disposers
  • Information technology equipment
  • Sump pumps
  • Electrical aquarium equipment
  • Hand-held motor-operated tools
  • Stationary and fixed motor-operated tools
  • Light industrial motor-operated tools
  • Hedge clippers
  • Lawn mowers

    This list is not exhaustive. Grounded circuits and receptacles should be installed in locations where such appliances will be used.
    30) Cover plate(s) are missing from one or more electric boxes, such as for receptacles, switches and/or junction boxes. They are intended to contain fire and prevent electric shock from exposed wires. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of fire and shock. Cover plates should be installed where missing.
    31) One or more floor joists are undersized for their span. Sagging and/or bouncing floors may result. In extreme circumstances, floors may collapse. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary.
    32) Standing water and/or wet areas were found in one or more sections of the basement. Accumulated water is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects and organisms and should not be present in the basement. A qualified contractor who specializes in drainage issues should evaluate and repair as necessary. Typical repairs for preventing water from accumulating in the basement include:

  • Repairing, installing or improving rain run-off systems (gutters, downspouts and extensions or drain lines)
  • Improving perimeter grading
  • Repairing, installing or improving underground footing and/or curtain drains

    Ideally, water should not enter the basement, but if water must be controlled after it enters the basement, then typical repairs include installing sump pump(s) or interior perimeter drains.
     
    Roof / Attic Return to table of contents
    Limitations: The following items or areas are not included in this inspection: areas that could not be traversed or viewed clearly due to lack of access; areas and components obscured by insulation; solar roofing components; any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not determination if rafters, trusses, joists, beams, etc. are of adequate size, spanning or spacing. The inspector does not provide an estimate of remaining roof surface life, does not determine that the roof has absolutely no leaks at the time of the inspection, and does not determine that the roof won't leak in the future. Only active leaks and evidence of past leaks observed during the inspection are reported on as part of this inspection. To absolutely determine than no leaks exist, complete access to all roof structure areas must be available during a wide variety of weather conditions, including prolonged heavy rain, high wind from varying directions, heavy accumulations of snow and/or ice, and melting snow and ice.
    Condition of roof structure: Appeared serviceable
    Roof type: Hipped, Flat or low slope
    Age of roof surface(s): Less than 5 years.
    Roof inspection method: Traversed
    Condition of shingle and/or shake roof surface materials: Appeared serviceable
    Roof surface material: Asphalt or fiberglass composition shingles
    Apparent number of layers of roof surface material: One
    Condition of gutters, downspouts and extensions: Appeared serviceable
    Gutter and downspout material: Plastic
    Gutter and downspout installation: Partial
    Condition of attic: Appeared serviceable
    Attic inspection method: Viewed from hatch(es)
    Roof structure type: Rafters
    Ceiling structure: Ceiling beams
    Ceiling insulation material: Fiberglass roll or batt
    Ceiling insulation depth: 9-12 inches
    Vapor retarder: Installed
    Roof ventilation: SubstandardNo soffits. Additional vents recommended.
    33) Ventilation was substandard in the attic. This may result in high attic and roof surface temperatures, reduce the life of the roof covering materials and increase cooling costs. High levels of moisture are also likely, and can be a conducive condition for wood destroying organisms. Standard building practices require one square foot of vent area for 150 to 200 square feet of attic space. Vents should be evenly distributed between soffits, ridges and at corners to promote air circulation. A qualified contractor should evaluate and install vents as per standard building practices.
    34) Paper facing on batt insulation in the attic was exposed. The paper facing is flammable, and poses a safety hazard due to the risk of fire. Also, the paper facing typically acts as a vapor barrier, and if located away from the interior surfaces, can trap moisture from condensation in the cavity between the paper facing and the interior spaces. This is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects. The inspector was unable to evaluate the structure obscured by the insulation. A qualified person should reinstall or replace the insulation as per standard building practices and as per the manufacturer's instructions.
    35) Some roof surfaces were obscured by snow and couldn't be fully evaluated.
     
    Garage / Carport Return to table of contents
    Limitations: The inspector does not determine the adequacy of firewall ratings. Requirements for ventilation in garages varies between municipalities.
    Type: Detached
    Condition of detached garage or carport structure: Appeared serviceable
    Condition of garage: Appeared serviceable
    Condition of garage vehicle door(s): Appeared serviceable
    Garage vehicle door type: Sectional
    Number of vehicle doors: 1
    Condition of garage interior: Appeared serviceable
    36) Some wall, ceiling areas were obscured by stored items and couldn't be evaluated. These areas are excluded from the inspection.
     
    Electric Return to table of contents
    Limitations: The following items are not included in this inspection: generator systems, surge suppressors, inaccessible or concealed wiring; underground utilities and systems; low voltage lighting or lighting on timers or sensors. Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not determine the adequacy of grounding or bonding, does not determine if this system has an adequate capacity for the client's specific needs, nor determine if this system has any reserve capacity for additions or expansion. The inspector does not operate circuit breakers as part of the inspection, install or change light bulbs, nor determine the operability of every wall switch.
    Electric service condition: Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below), Near, at or beyond service life
    Primary service type: Overhead
    Number of service conductors: 2
    Service voltage (volts): 120
    Service amperage (amps): 60
    Primary service overload protection type: Fuses
    Service entrance conductor material: Aluminum
    Main disconnect rating (amps): Not applicable, no single main disconnect
    System ground: Cold water supply pipes
    Condition of main service panel: Appeared serviceable
    Condition of sub: Appeared serviceable
    Location of main service panel #A: Basement
    Location of sub-panel #B: Basement
    Location of main disconnect: No single main disconnect, use all breakers in main service panel
    Branch circuit wiring type: (BX) Armor clad flexible, Copper
    Condition of branch circuit wiring: Serviceable
    Smoke detectors present: Yes
    Carbon monoxide detectors present: Yes
    37) The service entrance wire insulation was frayed and/or deteriorated in one or more areas. A qualified electrician should evaluate and make repairs or replace wires as necessary.
    38) One or more ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) type receptacles were found to have an open ground. GFCI protection will still work with an open ground, but ideally repairs should be made as necessary so grounding is correct with these receptacles. A qualified electrician should evaluate and make repairs as necessary.
    39) One or more electric receptacles at the had no visible ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate to determine if GFCI protection exists, and if not, repair as necessary. For more information, visit:
    http://www.mikeholt.com/documents/nec/pdf/GFCI_requirement_page2.pdf

    40) One or more electric receptacles at the kitchen, bathroom(s) had no visible ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. Recommend having a qualified electrician evaluate to determine if GFCI protection exists, and if not, repair as necessary. For more information, visit:
    http://www.mikeholt.com/documents/nec/pdf/GFCI_requirement_page2.pdf

    41) The only receptacles available for use in one or more bathrooms appeared to be those integrated in light fixtures, with no visible ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate and install GFCI protected receptacles as per standard building practices if none as necessary and as per standard building practices.
    42) Panel # used older style, screw-in fuses. This type of fuse allows anyone to install incorrectly rated fuses, possibly resulting in damage to wiring. Based on the age and/or appearance of the panel(s) using fuses, and/or deterioration of the panels or components inside, recommend having a qualified electrician replace this panel with a modern panel and circuit breakers. If the panel isn't replaced, then a qualified electrician should evaluate and make repairs as necessary.
    43) Few electric receptacles and two-pronged receptacles rather than three-pronged, grounded receptacles were installed in one or more areas. This can result in "octopus" wiring with extension cords. Two-prong receptacles are considered unsafe by today's standards, and limit the ability to use appliances that require a ground in these rooms. This is a safety hazard for both fire and shock. Examples of appliances that require grounded receptacles include:

  • Computer hardware
  • Refrigerators
  • Freezers
  • Air conditioners
  • Clothes washers
  • Clothes dryers
  • Dishwashers
  • Kitchen food waste disposers
  • Information technology equipment
  • Sump pumps
  • Electrical aquarium equipment
  • Hand-held motor-operated tools
  • Stationary and fixed motor-operated tools
  • Light industrial motor-operated tools
  • Hedge clippers
  • Lawn mowers

    This list is not exhaustive. A qualified electrician should evaluate and install additional receptacles and grounded receptacles as per the client's needs and standard building practices.
    44) One or more electric receptacles were incorrectly wired with "false grounds" where the receptacle's ground screw is connected to the neutral or white wire in the circuit. In such cases the receptacle may appear to be grounded, but actually isn't. This poses a safety hazard for shock, and may damage equipment plugged into the receptacle. A qualified electrician should evaluate and repair as necessary. For more information, visit:

    http://www.inspect-ny.com/electric/False_Grounding.htm

    45) One or more open ground, three-pronged electric receptacles were found. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate and make repairs as necessary. For example, replacing receptacles or correcting wiring circuits.

    Grounding type receptacles began being required in residential structures during the 1960s. Based on the age of this structure and the presence of 2-pronged receptacles in some areas of this structure, an acceptable repair may be to simply replace the ungrounded 3-pronged receptacles with 2-pronged receptacles. However the following appliances require grounding type receptacles:

  • Computer hardware
  • Refrigerators
  • Freezers
  • Air conditioners
  • Clothes washers
  • Clothes dryers
  • Dishwashers
  • Kitchen food waste disposers
  • Information technology equipment
  • Sump pumps
  • Electrical aquarium equipment
  • Hand-held motor-operated tools
  • Stationary and fixed motor-operated tools
  • Light industrial motor-operated tools
  • Hedge clippers
  • Lawn mowers

    This list is not exhaustive. Grounded circuits and receptacles should be installed in locations where such appliances will be used.
    46) The legend for overcurrent protection devices (breakers or fuses) in panel # was . Recommend installing, updating or correcting the legend as necessary so it's accurate. Evaluation by a qualified electrician may be necessary.
    47) Branch circuit wiring installed in buildings built prior to the mid 1980s is typically rated for a maximum temperature of only 60 degrees Centigrade. This includes non-metallic sheathed (Romex) wiring, and both BX and AC metal clad flexible wiring. Knob and tube wiring, typically installed in homes built prior to 1950 may be rated for even lower maximum temperatures. Newer electric fixtures including lighting and fans typically require wiring rated for 90 degrees Centigrade. Connecting older, 60 degree-rated wiring to such newer fixtures is a potential safety hazard due to the risk of fire. Repairs for such conditions often involve replacing the last few feet of wiring to newer fixtures with new 90 degree-rated wire. This often requires installing a junction box to join the old and new wiring.

    It is beyond the scope of this inspection to determine if such incompatible components are installed, or to determine the extent to which they're installed. Based on the age of this building, the client should be aware that this safety hazard may be present in this building. Recommend consulting with the property owner to determine if and when newer fixtures were installed, and/or to have a qualified electrician evaluate and repair as per standard building practices.

    48) Recommend additional Smoke/CO2 detectors.
     
    Heating and cooling Return to table of contents
    Estimated age: 1992
    Primary heating system energy source: Natural gas
    Primary heat system type: Forced air
    Distribution system: Sheet metal ducts, Metal pipe, Plastic pipe
    Manufacturer: Heil
    Filter location: In return air duct below furnace
    49) The last service date of this system appears to be more than one year ago, or the inspector was unable to determine the last service date. The client(s) should ask the property owner(s) when it was last serviced. If unable to determine the last service date, or if this system was serviced more than one year ago, a qualified heating and cooling contractor should inspect, clean, and service this system, and make repairs if necessary. For safety reasons, and because this system is fueled by gas or oil, this servicing should be performed annually in the future. For more information visit:
    http://www.cpsc.gov/CPSCPUB/PREREL/prhtml05/05017.html

    50) What appears to be environmentally hazardous material is visible on some ductwork. However, it appears to be intact and not significantly deteriorated. The client may wish to have this material tested at a qualified lab. For information on asbestos hazards in the home, visit:
    http://www.cpsc.gov/CPSCPUB/PUBS/453.html

    51) No shut-off valve was visible for the oil supply lines. Recommend having a qualified heating contractor evaluate and install one if none is found.
     
    Plumbing and laundry Return to table of contents
    Location of main water shut-off valve: Basement
    Location of main water meter: Basement
    Location of main fuel shut-off: At meter outside
    Water service: Public
    Service pipe material: Copper
    Supply pipe material: Copper, Galvanized steel
    Vent pipe material: Plastic, Cast iron
    Drain pipe material: Plastic, Galvanized steel, Cast iron
    Waste pipe material: Plastic, Galvanized steel
    52) No ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection device is visible for the sump pump electric supply. A qualified electrician should determine if a GFCI protection device (receptacle or circuit breaker) exists for the sump pump and install one if missing to reduce the danger of electric shock.
    53) Some, most, or all of the water supply pipes in this structure are made of galvanized steel. Based on the age of this structure, corrosion, leaks, and/or the results of a "functional flow test" performed during the inspection, some or all of these pipes appear to have exceeded their estimated useful life of 40 to 60 years. During a functional flow test, multiple fixtures are run simultaneously to determine if the flow is adequate. For example, if the shower flow decreases substantially when the toilet is flushed. Internal corrosion and rust can reduce the inside diameter of these pipes over time, resulting in reduced flow and leaks. A qualified plumber should evaluate and replace supply pipes and fittings as necessary.
    54) The clothes dryer is equipped with a vinyl or foil, accordion-type, flexible exhaust duct. The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission considers these types of ducts to be unsafe, and a fire hazard. These types of ducts can trap lint and are susceptible to kinks or crushing, which can greatly reduce the air flow. This duct should be replaced with a rigid or corrugated semi-rigid metal duct, and by a qualified contractor if necessary. Most clothes dryer manufacturers specify the use of a rigid or corrugated semi-rigid metal duct. For more information, visit:
    http://www.cpsc.gov/CPSCPUB/PUBS/5022.html

    55) Stains were found in one or more sections of drain and/or waste pipes. Recommend monitoring these areas in the future, and if leaks are found, have a qualified plumber evaluate and repair as necessary. Alternatively, the client(s) may wish to have a qualified plumber evaluate now and repair if necessary.
    56) A sump pump is installed on the premises. Recommend asking the property owners how often the sump pump operates and for how long at different times of the year. Also, the clients should be aware that the service life of most sump pumps is between five and seven years, and that the pump may need replacing soon depending on its age and how much it operates.
     
    Fireplaces, woodstoves and chimneys Return to table of contents
    Chimney type: Masonry
    57) The masonry chimney's mortar is deteriorated and should be repaired to prevent further, significant deterioration. Recommend having a qualified chimney service contractor or mason evaluate chimney and repair as necessary. This will likely require repointing the mortar.
     
    Kitchen Return to table of contents

    58) One or more open ground, three-pronged electric receptacles were found. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate and make repairs as necessary. For example, replacing receptacles or correcting wiring circuits.

    Grounding type receptacles began being required in residential structures during the 1960s. Based on the age of this structure and the presence of 2-pronged receptacles in some areas of this structure, an acceptable repair may be to simply replace the ungrounded 3-pronged receptacles with 2-pronged receptacles. However the following appliances require grounding type receptacles:

  • Computer hardware
  • Refrigerators
  • Freezers
  • Air conditioners
  • Clothes washers
  • Clothes dryers
  • Dishwashers
  • Kitchen food waste disposers
  • Information technology equipment
  • Sump pumps
  • Electrical aquarium equipment
  • Hand-held motor-operated tools
  • Stationary and fixed motor-operated tools
  • Light industrial motor-operated tools
  • Hedge clippers
  • Lawn mowers

    This list is not exhaustive. Grounded circuits and receptacles should be installed in locations where such appliances will be used.
    59) One or more electric receptacles that serve countertop surfaces within six feet of a sink appear to have no ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate to determine if GFCI protection exists, and if not, repairs should be made so that all receptacles that serve countertop surfaces within six feet of sinks have GFCI protection. For example, install GFCI receptacles or circuit breaker(s) as needed.
    60) No range hood is installed over the range or cook top. Ventilation and/or lighting may be inadequate and moisture may accumulate indoors. Recommend having a qualified contractor install a vented and lighted range hood, with the exhaust fan configured so as to vent outdoors.
    61) The kickplate at the base of the dishwasher is missing, loose and/or damaged. Repairs should be made as necessary, or the kickplate should be replaced, and by a qualified contractor if necessary.
     
    Bathrooms Return to table of contents

    62) One or more open ground, three-pronged electric receptacles were found. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate and make repairs as necessary. For example, replacing receptacles or correcting wiring circuits.

    Grounding type receptacles began being required in residential structures during the 1960s. Based on the age of this structure and the presence of 2-pronged receptacles in some areas of this structure, an acceptable repair may be to simply replace the ungrounded 3-pronged receptacles with 2-pronged receptacles. However the following appliances require grounding type receptacles:

  • Computer hardware
  • Refrigerators
  • Freezers
  • Air conditioners
  • Clothes washers
  • Clothes dryers
  • Dishwashers
  • Kitchen food waste disposers
  • Information technology equipment
  • Sump pumps
  • Electrical aquarium equipment
  • Hand-held motor-operated tools
  • Stationary and fixed motor-operated tools
  • Light industrial motor-operated tools
  • Hedge clippers
  • Lawn mowers

    This list is not exhaustive. Grounded circuits and receptacles should be installed in locations where such appliances will be used.
    63) One or more faucets leak or drip when turned off. A qualified plumber should evaluate and repair as necessary.
    64) One or more sinks is loose, or not securely attached to the wall behind it. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary.
    65) Caulk is missing and/or deteriorated at one or more bathtubs. For example, where the tub base meets the floor below, where the tub surround meets the tub, and/or around the base of the tub spout. Caulk should be replaced where deteriorated and/or applied where missing to prevent water intrusion and damage to wall and floor structures.
     
    Attic Return to table of contents
    Inspection method: Viewed from hatch
    Roof structure type: Rafters
    Ceiling structure: Ceiling beams
    Insulation material: Fiberglass roll or batt
    Insulation depth: 12 inches
    66) Paper facing on batt insulation is oriented towards open spaces, rather than against interior space surfaces. This occurs when newer, fiberglass batt insulation with paper facing on one side is installed backwards or upside down, or when older batt insulation wrapped on both sides with paper is installed. The paper facing is flammable. Newer insulation usually has a warning label indicating this on the facing.

    For newer batt insulation with paper facing on one side only, the paper facing should be oriented towards interior spaces rather than exposed, open spaces. The existing insulation should be reinstalled or replaced.

    For older batt insulation with paper facing on both sides, recommend that repairs be made as necessary to eliminate the exposed paper facing.

    A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary, and as per standard building practices and the insulation manufacturer's recommendations to eliminate the fire hazard.

    Also, the paper facing also acts as a vapor barrier, and if located away from the interior surfaces, can trap moisture from condensation in the cavity between the paper facing and the interior spaces. This is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects. The inspector was unable to evaluate the structure obscured by the insulation. When repairs are made, the exposed structure should be evaluated for damage by wood destroying insects and/or organisms, and repairs should be made if necessary.

    67) Some attic areas were inaccessible due to lack of permanently installed walkways, the possibility of damage to insulation, low height and/or stored items. These areas are excluded from this inspection.
     
    This Inspector makes no warranty, express or implied as to the fitness for use, condition, performance or adequacy of any inspected structure, item, component or system.