Colorado Mountain Home Inspection LLC

Website: http://parkcountyhomeinspections.com
Email: comtbldrs@gmail.com
Phone: (719) 836-4835 · (719) 459-3969
318 lakeview rd. PO Box 453 Fairplay Co. 80440
Inspector: robert wilson

 

Property Inspection Report
Client(s): Jane Doe
Property address: 1000 Pleasant Valley Road
Anytown, Colorado 80000.
Inspection date: Tuesday, December 29, 2007
This report published on 1/3/2010 5:24:30 PM CST

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This report is the exclusive property of this inspection company and the client(s) listed in the report title. Use of this report by any unauthorized persons is prohibited.

 
How to Read this Report
This report is organized by the property's functional areas.  Within each functional area, descriptive information is listed first and is shown in bold type.  Items of concern follow descriptive information.
Concerns are shown and sorted according to these types:
SafetyPoses a risk of injury or death 
Major DefectCorrection likely involves a significant expense 
Repair/ReplaceRecommend repairing or replacing 
Repair/MaintainRecommend repair and/or maintenance 
Minor DefectCorrection likely involves only a minor expense 
EvaluateRecommend evaluation by a specialist 
MonitorRecommend monitoring in the future 
CommentFor your information 

Click here for a glossary of building construction terms.  Contact your inspector if there are terms that you do not understand, or visit the glossary of construction terms at http://www.reporthost.com/glossary.asp

Table of Contents
General information
Exterior
Roof
Attic
Electric service
Water heater
Heating and cooling
Plumbing and laundry
Basement
Kitchen
Bathrooms
Interior rooms
 
General information Return to table of contents
Report number: 12/29/2009 #1
Inspector: Robert Wilson
Structures inspected: 1
Type of building: Single family
Age of building: Approx 80 years old
Time started: 9:30 Am
Time finished: 2:00 PM
Inspection Fee: $250.00
Payment method: Check
Occupied: Yes
Weather conditions: Clear
Temperature: Cool
Ground condition: Frozen
Front of structure faces: East
Main entrance faces: East
Foundation type: Crawlspace
The following items are excluded from this inspection: washer and dryer
1) Structures built prior to 1979 may contain lead-based paint and/or asbestos in various building materials such as insulation, siding, and/or floor and ceiling tiles. Both lead and asbestos are known health hazards. Evaluating for the presence of lead and/or asbestos is not included in this inspection. The client(s) should consult with specialists as necessary, such as industrial hygienists, professional labs and/or abatement contractors for this type of evaluation. For information on lead, asbestos and other hazardous materials in homes, visit these websites:
  • The Environmental Protection Association (http://www.epa.gov)
  • The Consumer Products Safety Commission (http://www.cpsc.gov)
  • The Center for Disease Control (http://www.cdc.gov)
    2) One or more leaks were found in gas supply lines, fittings and/or valves. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of explosion. A qualified contractor and/or the gas utility company should evaluate and make repairs as soon as possible.

    (Listing realtor arranged for a repair while I was present)

    3) Some wall, floor and/or ceiling surfaces were obscured by furniture and/or stored items. Some areas couldn't be evaluated.
    4)   House is very old but appears to be in good condition for it's age. Many items selected in this report are due to the age of the house
     
    Exterior Return to table of contents
    Footing material: Poured in place concrete, Not visible
    Foundation material: Concrete block, StoneOnly small portions of the foundation were visable
    Apparent wall structure: BrickAppears to be brick covered with stucco, unable to determine
    Wall covering: Stucco
    Driveway material: None
    Sidewalk material: Poured in place concrete
    Exterior door material: Hollow core wood
    5) One or more sets of stairs are wobbly. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary, such as installing additional supports and/or diagonal bracing.

    Basement stairs to cellar/crawl space

    Photo 16  
     

    6) One or more light fixtures located in "wet" or "damp" locations have no visible rating for use in wet locations. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate and replace light fixtures as necessary and as per standard building practices.

    Photo 7  
     

    7) Stairs are unsafe due to a non-standard configuration, such as too-high riser heights and/or too-narrow tread depths. Standard building practices call for riser heights not to exceed eight inches and tread depths to be at least nine inches but preferably 11 inches. Riser heights should not vary more than 3/8 inch on a flight of stairs. At a minimum, the client(s) should be aware of this hazard, especially when guests who are not familiar with the stairs are present. Ideally a qualified contractor should repair or replace stairs so they conform to standard building practices.

    Photo 16  
     

    8) Fences and/or gates are damaged and/or deteriorated in some areas. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs or replace sections as necessary.
    9) One or more gutters are poorly sloped so that significant amounts of water accumulate in them rather than draining through the downspouts. This can cause gutters to overflow, especially when organic debris such as leaves or needles have accumulated in them. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary, such as correcting the slope in gutters or installing additional downspouts and extensions if necessary.

    Photo 2  
     

    10) Soffit boards are damaged or deteriorated in one or more areas. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary.

    Photo 26  
     

    11) One or more light fixtures are damaged and/or deteriorated. A qualified electrician should evaluate and repair or replace light fixtures where necessary.

    Photo 11  
     

    12) One or more sections of foundation footings are significantly above grade. Footings should be below grade so adequate lateral support is provided by the soil. Soil should be installed as necessary so footings are below grade.
    13) The perimeter grading slopes towards the structure in one or more areas. This can result in water accumulating around the structure's foundation, or in basements and crawl spaces if they exist. Accumulated water is a conducive condition to wood destroying insects and organisms. Wet soil may also cause the foundation to settle and possibly fail over time. Recommend grading soil so it slopes down and away from the structure with a slope of at least 5% (10% or better is optimal) for at least 6 feet.
    14) One or more downspouts have no extensions, or have extensions that are ineffective. This can result in water accumulating around the structure's foundation, or in basements and crawl spaces if they exist. Accumulated water is a conducive condition to wood destroying insects and organisms, and may also cause the foundation to settle and possibly fail over time. Repairs should be made as necessary, such as installing or repositioning splash blocks, or installing and/or repairing tie-ins to underground drain lines, so rain water is carried at least several feet away from the structure to soil that slopes down and away from the structure.

    Photo 14  
     

    15) Screens are damaged on south side windows
    Glass is missing on one south side storm window

    Photo 12  

    Photo 13  

    16) One or more sections of foundation and/or exterior walls are excluded from this inspection due to lack of access from vegetation, debris and/or stored items.
     
    Roof Return to table of contents
    Roof inspection method: Traversed
    Roof type: Gable, Shed
    Roof covering: Asphalt or fiberglass composition shinglesrubberized roofing on shed portion
    Estimated age of roof: 10 to twenty years
    Gutter & downspout material: Aluminum
    Roof ventilation: Unable to determine (no access to attic spaces)
    17) This asphalt or fiberglass composition roof surface has two or more layers of roofing materials. When this roof is replaced, recommend a complete "tear off", where all existing layers of roofing are removed before installing new roofing materials. For 20-year rated composition shingles, additional layers of material reduce the new roof material's lifespan as follows:

  • 16-20 years - First roof
  • 12-16 years - Second layer on existing roof

    Removing existing roofing materials will significantly increase the cost of the next roof.
    18) The roof was partially obscured by snow and couldn't be fully evaluated.

    Photo 3  

    Photo 5  

    Photo 10  
     

    19)   Gas pipe runs up and across the shed roof entering the house in several places. Monitor for leaks

    Photo 5  

    Photo 6  

    20)   Galvanized chimney cap has started to rust. also needs small amount of calk where metal and brick join

    Photo 8  
     
     
    Attic Return to table of contents
    Inspection method: Not inspected
    Roof structure type: Not visible
    Ceiling structure: Not visible
    Insulation material: None visible
    21) No access hatch was found for the attic. The inspector was unable to evaluate the attic, and it's excluded from this inspection. Recommend having a qualified contractor install access hatches as necessary and as per standard building practices to allow periodic evaluation of attic spaces.
     
    Electric service Return to table of contents
    Primary service type: Overhead
    Primary service overload protection type: Circuit breakers
    Service amperage (amps): 100Appears to be 100 amp
    Location of main service switch: Two breakers in bedroom closet
    Location of main disconnect: No single main disconnect, use all breakers in main service panel
    Main disconnect rating (amps): Not applicable, no single main disconnect
    Smoke detectors present: Yes
    22) The service drop wire insulation is frayed and/or deteriorated in one or more areas. The utility company should evaluate and make repairs or replace wires as necessary.

    Photo 7  
     

    23) The service drop wires are less than eight feet above one or more sections of flat roof that can be walked on. This is a safety hazard for shock since people on the roof may come into contact with the service drop wires. The utility company and/or a qualified electrician should evaluate and repair as necessary.

    Photo 7  
     

    24) The electric service to this property appears to be rated at substantially less than 200 amps, and may be inadequate for the client(s) needs. Recommend consulting with a qualified electrician about upgrading to a 200 amp service.
    25) The main service panel cover couldn't be removed due to lack of access from shelving, cabinets, walls and/or ceilings. This panel wasn't fully evaluated. Repairs should be made so the panel cover can be easily removed.
     
    Water heater Return to table of contents
    Estimated age: 25 years
    Type: Tank
    Energy source: Natural gas
    Capacity (in gallons): Not visible
    Manufacturer: State
    26) No drain line is installed for the temperature-pressure relief valve. This is a potential safety hazard due to the risk of scalding if someone is standing next to the water heater when the valve opens. A qualified plumber should install a drain line as per standard building practices. For example, extending to 6 inches from the floor, or routed so as to drain outside.

    Photo 31  
     

    27) The estimated useful life for most water heaters is 8 to 12 years. This water heater appears to be at this age or older and may need replacing at any time. Recommend budgeting for a replacement in the near future.

    Photo 33  
     

    28) Corrosion was found in one or more areas on the water heater, and water stains were found below. The water heater may be failing. A qualified plumbing contractor should evaluate and replace water heater if necessary.

    Photo 32  
     

    29) Stored items, furnishings and/or debris blocked access to the water heater. The inspector was unable to fully evaluate the water heater.
     
    Heating and cooling Return to table of contents
    Estimated age: Two very old units heat the house, both were on and not fyrthur evaluated
    Primary heating system energy source: Natural gas
    Primary heat system type: Radiant
    Distribution system: N/A
    30) The furnace or boiler flame(s) are yellow or orange rather than blue. This may be caused by inadequate combustion air and/or dirty or clogged burners. A qualified heating and cooling contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary.
    31) Combustible materials were found less than 18 inches from the single wall flue pipe for the oil or gas-fueled furnace or boiler. This is a fire hazard. Combustible materials should be moved, or repairs made by a qualified contractor, as necessary to maintain this clearance.

    Photo 35  
     

    32) The last service date of this system appears to be more than one year ago, or the inspector was unable to determine the last service date. The client(s) should ask the property owner(s) when it was last serviced. If unable to determine the last service date, or if this system was serviced more than one year ago, a qualified heating and cooling contractor should inspect, clean, and service this system, and make repairs if necessary. For safety reasons, and because this system is fueled by gas or oil, this servicing should be performed annually in the future. For more information visit: http://www.cpsc.gov/CPSCPUB/PREREL/prhtml05/05017.html
     
    Plumbing and laundry Return to table of contents
    Water service: Public
    Supply pipe material: Copper, Galvanized steel
    Vent pipe material: Plastic, Cast iron
    Drain pipe material: Plastic, Cast iron
    Waste pipe material: Plastic, Galvanized steel
    33) Copper water supply pipes in homes built prior to 1986 may be joined with solder that contains lead. Lead is a known health hazard, especially for children. Laws were passed in 1985 prohibiting the use of lead in solder, but prior to that solder normally contained about 50 percent lead. The client(s) should be aware of this, especially if children will be living in this structure. Evaluating for the presence of lead in this structure is not included in this inspection. The client(s) should consider having a qualified lab test for lead, and if necessary take steps to reduce or remove lead from the water supply. Various solutions such as these may be advised:

  • Flush water taps or faucets. Do not drink water that has been sitting in the plumbing lines for more than six hours.
  • Install appropriate filters at points of use.
  • Use only cold water for cooking and drinking. Hot water dissolves lead more quickly than cold water.
  • Use bottled or distilled water.
  • Treat well water to make it less corrosive.
  • Have a qualified plumbing contractor replace supply pipes and/or plumbing components as necessary.

    For more information visit:
    http://www.cpsc.gov/CPSCPUB/PUBS/5056.html
    http://www.epa.gov/safewater/lead/index.html
    34) Some, most, or all of the water supply pipes in this structure are made of galvanized steel. Based on the age of this structure, these pipes may be nearing or may have exceeded their estimated useful life of 40 to 60 years. Internal corrosion and rust can reduce the inside diameter of these pipes over time, resulting in reduced flow and eventually, leaks. The inspector performed a "functional flow test" during the inspection where multiple fixtures were run simultaneously, and found the flow to be adequate. For example, the shower flow didn't decrease substantially when the toilet was flushed. Despite this, and because of their apparent age, these pipes may need replacing at any time.
    35) The inspector was not able to find the main water shut-off valve. The client(s) should consult with the property owner(s) to determine if a shut-off valve exists, find it themselves, or hire a qualified plumber if necessary to find it. If no shut-off valve is found for the structure, then recommend having a qualified plumber install one to more easily allow the water supply to be turned off in the event of an emergency, such as when a supply pipe burst

    Plumbing has been updated and modified over the years. Unable to tell which pipes are in use and which are not. Waste pipes are a combination of cast iron lead and plastic

    Photo 23  

    Photo 24  

    36) Stains were found in one or more sections of drain and/or waste pipes. Recommend monitoring these areas in the future, and if leaks are found, have a qualified plumber evaluate and repair as necessary. Alternatively, the client(s) may wish to have a qualified plumber evaluate now and repair if necessary.

    Photo 24  
     

    37) Neither the clothes washer nor dryer were operated or evaluated. They are excluded from this inspection.
     
    Basement Return to table of contents
    Insulation material underneath floor above: None visible
    Pier or support post material: Wood
    Beam material: Solid wood
    Floor structure above: Solid wood joists
    38) One or more sets of stairs are wobbly. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary, such as installing additional supports and/or diagonal bracing.

    Photo 16  
     

    39) Wooden support posts are not securely fastened to beams above. This is a safety hazard since they can separate during a seismic event. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary, such as installing metal ties, bracing with lumber and/or plywood gussets as per standard building practices.

    Photo 18  

    Photo 19  

    40) One or more floor joists are undersized for their span. Sagging and/or bouncing floors may result. In extreme circumstances, floors may collapse. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary.
    41) One or more exterior entrance doors are damaged and/or deteriorated and should be repaired or replaced by a qualified contractor.

    Photo 15  
     

    42)   Basement has been dug out and undermined supporting foundation.
    Floor above has questionable support. Some supporting timbers rest directly on dirt
    Reccommend that entire basement be evaluated by licensed engineer

    Photo 19  

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    Photo 21  

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    Photo 25  
     
     
    Kitchen Return to table of contents

    43) The range can tip forward, and no anti-tip bracket appears to be installed. This is a safety hazard since the range may tip forward when weight is applied to the open door, such as when a small child climbs on it, or if heavy objects are dropped on it. Anti-tip brackets have been sold with all free standing ranges since 1985. An anti-tip bracket should be installed to eliminate this safety hazard. For more information, visit http://www.hgtv.com/hgtv/remodeling/article/0,1797,HGTV_3659_2017492,00.html
    44) Cover plate(s) are missing from one or more electric boxes, such as for receptacles, switches and/or junction boxes. They are intended to contain fire and prevent electric shock from exposed wires. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of fire and shock. Cover plates should be installed where missing.

    Photo 28  
     

    45) No GFCI outlets were present. All outlets are two prong due to the age of the house( ungrounded)
    46) No range hood is installed over the range or cook top. Ventilation and/or lighting may be inadequate and moisture may accumulate indoors. Recommend having a qualified contractor install a vented and lighted range hood, with the exhaust fan configured so as to vent outdoors.
    47) One or more kitchen appliances appear to be near, at, or beyond their intended service life of 10 to 15 years. Recommend budgeting for replacements as necessary.
    48)   When the oven was operated the smoke alarm went off in the kitchen
     
    Bathrooms Return to table of contents

    49) One or more wall-mounted electric switches are within reach of shower stalls. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. At a minimum, the client(s) should be aware of the shock hazard this represents and never operate such switches while showering. Ideally, a qualified electrician should evaluate and move switches as necessary, or a qualified contractor should make modifications as necessary so wall switches are unreachable from shower stalls.
    50) Caulk is missing or deteriorated above one or more bathtubs, where the tub surround meets the tub. It should be replaced where deteriorated and/or applied where missing to prevent water intrusion and damage to the wall structure.

    Photo 30  
     

    51) The enamel coating on one or more bathtubs is damaged and/or deteriorated. For example, chipped or worn, and/or rust on some exposed steel. However, no leaks were found due to the deterioration. The client(s) should evaluate to determine if the bathtub(s) should be refinished or replaced.
     
    Interior rooms Return to table of contents

    52) Two-pronged electric receptacles rather than three-pronged, grounded receptacles are installed in one or more interior rooms. They are considered to be unsafe by today's standards and limit the ability to use appliances that require a ground in these rooms. Examples of appliances that require grounded receptacles include:

  • Computer hardware
  • Refrigerators
  • Freezers
  • Air conditioners
  • Clothes washers
  • Clothes dryers
  • Dishwashers
  • Kitchen food waste disposers
  • Information technology equipment
  • Sump pumps
  • Electrical aquarium equipment
  • Hand-held motor-operated tools
  • Stationary and fixed motor-operated tools
  • Light industrial motor-operated tools
  • Hedge clippers
  • Lawn mowers

    This list is not exhaustive. A qualified electrician should evaluate and install grounded receptacles as per the client(s)' needs and standard building practices.
    53) One or more electric receptacles that serve countertop surfaces within six feet of a sink appear to have no ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate to determine if GFCI protection exists, and if not, repairs should be made so that all receptacles that serve countertop surfaces within six feet of sinks have GFCI protection. For example, install GFCI receptacles or circuit breaker(s) as needed.
    54) One or more bedroom windows have inadequate egress in the event of a fire due to their being too high from the floor, having too small of an opening, and/or being unable to open. Bedroom windows should be easy to open, stay open by themselves, and have:

  • A maximum sill height of 44 inches from the floor
  • A minimum width of opening of 20 inches
  • A minimum height of opening of 24 inches
  • A minimum net clear opening of 5.7 square feet (5 square feet for ground floor).

    For windows that are too high, keeping furniture such as a chair immediately below the window can improve egress, but is not a permanent solution. Recommend having a qualified contractor make modifications as necessary, such as moving or replacing window(s) to comply with these recommendations. For more information, visit http://www.taunton.com/finehomebuilding/pages/h00100.asp
    55) This structure was built prior to 1979 and may contain lead paint. Laws were enacted in 1978 in the US preventing the use of lead paint in residential structures. Lead is a known safety hazard, especially to children but also to adults. The paint found in and around this structure appeared to be intact and may be encapsulated by more recent layers of paint that are not lead-based. Regardless, recommend following precautions as described in the following links to Consumer Products Safety Commission website articles regarding possible lead paint.

    What You Should Know About Lead Based Paint in Your Home: Safety Alert - CPSC Document #5054

    CPSC Warns About Hazards of "Do lt Yourself" Removal of Lead Based Paint: Safety Alert - CPSC Document #5055

    56) Squeaking or creaking noises occur when walking on one or more sections of flooring. This is usually caused by substandard construction practices where the subfloor decking is not adequately fastened to the framing below. For example, not enough glue was used and/or nails were used rather than screws. In most cases, this is only an annoyance rather than a structural problem. Various solutions such as Squeeeeek No More and Counter Snap fasteners exist to correct this. Repairs to eliminate the squeaks or creaks may be more or less difficult depending on the floor covering, and the access to the underside of the subfloor. Recommend having a qualified contractor evaluate and repair as necessary.
    57) Lock mechanisms on one or more windows are missing and/or damaged so that they are inoperable. Repairs should be made by a qualified contractor or service technician so that windows lock and unlock easily.

    Photo 27  
     

    58) One or more rooms that are considered living spaces appear to have no visible source of heat. The client(s) should consult with the property owner(s) regarding this, and if necessary, a qualified contractor should evaluate and install heat source(s) as necessary.
    59) One or more light fixtures appear to be inoperable. Recommend further evaluation by replacing bulb(s) and/or consulting with the property owner(s). Repairs or replacement of the light fixture(s) by a qualified electrician may be necessary.

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