34 Woodruff Drive 
Scotia, NY 12302
Inspector: David Huhtala
NY Lic # 16000012794

  

Property Inspection Report
Client(s): Mike and Cheryl Client
Property address: 123 Yourstreet
Anywhere, NY
Inspection date: 3/3/2010
This report published on Monday, March 12, 2012 12:19:21 PM EDT

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The following demo report contains examples of possible defects and concerns that might be found in homes of various types and conditions. Its purpose is to give the reader information as to how reports are structured, how defects are identified and explained, and other features.

This report is the exclusive property of Residential Inspection Services and the client(s) listed in the report title. Use of this report by any unauthorized persons is prohibited.

Different types of concerns are provided in this report.
Virtually all homes contain defects and/or issues of varying seriousness. This report identifies many issues that we believe a client should be aware of in addition to those with an estimated remediation cost that exceeds the presently accepted real estate contract threshold of 1,500.00.
We identify these lesser issues with the goal of providing our client with a more complete picture of the home overall. The identification of these lesser issues is intended to provide the client with information that he or she can use in formulating future repairs, modifications, or updates.

We report concerns as follows:

Serious or otherwise potentially costly defects with a potential remediation expense in excess of 1,500.00 are noted with a dollar sign.[/b]

These are defects that may affect contract due to cost of repairs.

Safety concerns are noted with a red cross.

Defects with an estimated remediation cost of less than 1,500.00 are noted with a hammer.

Maintenance issues are noted with a screwdriver or paintbrush.

In some cases, monitoring an area or further evaluation by a specialist is recommended because the evidence on the day of inspection is inconclusive.
It is recommended that this further evaluation take place prior to closing because in some cases a specialist may find a previously unknown or concealed serious defect.

Other comments are as noted.

 
How to Read this Report
This report is organized by the property's functional areas.  Within each functional area, descriptive information is listed first and is shown in bold type.  Items of concern follow descriptive information.
Concerns are shown and sorted according to these types:
SafetyPoses a risk of injury or death 
Major DefectCorrection likely involves a significant expense in excess of 1,500.00. 
Repair/ReplaceRecommend repairing or replacing 
Repair/MaintainRecommend repair and/or maintenance 
Minor DefectCorrection likely involves only a minor expense 
Maintain/UpgradeRecommended future improvements or maintenance 
EvaluateRecommend evaluation by a qualified person 
ServiceableItem or component is in servicable condition 
CommentFor your information 

Wood Destroying Organism Concerns
Concerns relating to wood destroying organisms are shown as follows:
InfestationEvidence of infestation of wood destroying insects or organisms (Live or dead insect bodies, fungal growth, etc.) 
DamageDamage caused by wood destroying insects or organisms (Rot, carpenter ant galleries, etc.) 
Conducive conditionsConditions conducive for wood destroying insects or organisms (Wood-soil contact, shrubs in contact with siding, roof or plumbing leaks, etc.) 

Click here for a glossary of building construction terms. Contact your inspector if there are terms that you do not understand, or visit the glossary of construction terms at http://www.reporthost.com/glossary.asp

Table of Contents
General information
Exterior
Roof
Garage
Attic
Electric service
Water heater
Heating and cooling
Plumbing and laundry
Fireplaces, woodstoves and chimneys
Basement
Kitchen
Bathrooms
Interior rooms
 
General information Return to table of contents
Report number: 05111
Structures inspected: Main House, Garage
Type of building: Single family
Age of building: 80
Time started: 10:00 AM
Time finished: 12:00 PM
Present during inspection: Client(s), Property owner(s), Realtor(s)
Occupied: Yes
Weather conditions: Partly cloudy
Temperature: Cold
Ground condition: Frozen
Front of structure faces: South
Main entrance faces: South
Foundation type: Unfinished basement
1) One or more leaks were found in gas supply lines, fittings and/or valves. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of explosion. A qualified contractor and/or the gas utility company should evaluate and make repairs as soon as possible.

Photo 1  

Photo 17  

2) This property has one or more fuel burning appliances, and no carbon monoxide alarms are visible. This is a safety hazard. Recommend installing one or more carbon monoxide alarms as necessary and as per the manufacturer's instructions. For more information, visit http://www.cpsc.gov/CPSCPUB/PREREL/prhtml05/05017.html
3) Evidence of one or more possible abandoned underground oil tanks was found (vent pipe, metal supply lines, etc.). The client(s) should determine if underground oil tank(s) exist on this property, and if tank(s) have been removed or legally decommissioned.

If the tank(s) haven't been decommissioned or removed, then the client(s) may be liable for decommission and/or cleanup of contaminated soil in the future. Recommend the following:
  • Have any non-decommissioned, abandoned underground oil tanks legally decommissioned or removed as necessary.
  • Have the soil tested for oil contamination.
  • Have contaminated soil removed as necessary

    Photo 4  
     
     
    Exterior Return to table of contents
    Footing material: Poured in place concrete
    Foundation material: Concrete block
    Apparent wall structure: Wood frame
    Wall covering: Metal
    Driveway material: Asphalt
    Sidewalk material: Poured in place concrete
    Exterior door material: Solid core wood
    4) One or more downspouts are missing. This can result in water accumulating around the structure's foundation, or in basements and crawl spaces if they exist. Accumulated water is a conducive condition to wood destroying insects and organisms, and may also cause the foundation to settle over time. A qualified contractor should install downspout(s) where missing. Also recommend installing extensions such as splashblocks or tie-ins to underground drain lines as necessary to carry rainwater away from the house.

    Photo 6  
     

    5) One or more downspouts are loose or detached. This can result in water accumulating around the structure's foundation, or in basements and crawl spaces if they exist. Accumulated water is a conducive condition to wood destroying insects and organisms, and may also cause the foundation to settle over time. Repairs should be made as necessary so downspouts are securely anchored and functional.

    Photo 8  
     

    6) Recommend resealing asphalt driveway.
    7) Soffit, fascia appear serviceable
    8) General condition of siding, trim appears serviceable
    9) Minor cracks were found in the driveway. However they don't appear to be a structural concern and no trip hazards were found. No immediate action is recommended, but the client(s) may wish to have repairs made for aesthetic reasons.
     
    Roof Return to table of contents
    Roof inspection method: Viewed from eaves on ladder, Viewed from ground with binoculars
    Roof type: Gable
    Roof covering: Asphalt or fiberglass composition shingles
    Estimated age of roof: 20
    Gutter & downspout material: Aluminum
    Roof ventilation: Adequate
    10) The roof surface material appears to be near the end of its service life and will likely need replacing in the near future, even with repairs. The client(s) should budget for a replacement roof surface.

    Photo 22  

    Photo 23  

    11) Flashings at the base of the chimney are substandard. Excessive sealant was observed in areas where flashing should exist. Active leaking is evident in the attic area in this area (refer to attic section). A qualified roofing contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary.

    Photo 21  
     
     
    Garage Return to table of contents

    12) Vehicle door, automatic opener, exterior entry door appear serviceable.
    13) General condition of walls, ceiling, floor appear serviceable.
    14) Garage - house door appears serviceable.
     
    Attic Return to table of contents
    Inspection method: Traversed
    Roof structure type: Rafters
    Ceiling structure: Ceiling beams
    Insulation material: Fiberglass roll or batt
    Insulation depth: 6
    Insulation estimated R value: 19
    15) One or more areas of the roof structure were wet or had elevated levels of moisture at the time of the inspection. There appears to be an active leak in the roof or structure exterior. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary.

    Photo 14  

    Photo 15  

    16) One or more exhaust fan ducts terminate in attic because no vent cap is installed at the roof or exterior wall surfaces. This is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects and organisms (mold) due to increased moisture levels in the attic from the exhaust air. A qualified contractor should evaluate and install vent caps where missing and as per standard building practices, so all exhaust air is vented outside.

    Photo 16  
    Bathroom exhaust fan duct
     

    17) No insulation is installed over the attic access hatch. Recommend installing insulation above hatch for better energy efficiency.
     
    Electric service Return to table of contents
    Primary service type: Overhead
    Primary service overload protection type: Circuit breakers
    Service amperage (amps): 150
    Service voltage (volts): 120/240
    Location of main service switch: Basement
    Location of main disconnect: Breaker at top of main service panel
    Service entrance conductor material: Aluminum
    System ground: Ground rod(s) in soil, Cold water supply pipes
    Main disconnect rating (amps): 150
    Branch circuit wiring type: Non-metallic sheathed, (BX) Armor clad
    Solid strand aluminum branch circuit wiring present: No
    18) Electric service appears serviceable.
     
    Water heater Return to table of contents
    Estimated age: 7
    Type: Tank
    Energy source: Natural gas
    Capacity (in gallons): 40
    Manufacturer: A.O. Smith
    Water temperature (degrees Fahrenheit): 118
    19) A small gas leak exists at a union in the gas supply pipe. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary

    Photo 1  
     

    20) Water heater appears serviceable.
     
    Heating and cooling Return to table of contents
    Estimated age: 25
    Primary heating system energy source: Natural gas
    Distribution system: Metal pipe
    Last service date: Unknown
    Primary A/C energy source: N/A
    Manufacturer: Utica
    Primary heat system type: Gravity, Steam, Standard efficiency
    21) What appears to be asbestos is visible on some pipes. It is significantly deteriorated in some areas, and if it is asbestos, it may pose a health hazard and require abatement. Recommend having this material tested at a qualified lab. If the material is found to contain asbestos, recommend consulting with a qualified asbestos abatement contractor or industrial hygienist. For information on asbestos hazards in the home, visit http://www.cpsc.gov/CPSCPUB/PUBS/453.html

    Photo 12  

    Photo 13  

    22) A small gas leak was detected at a valve in the supply pipe for the boiler. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary.

    Photo 17  
     

    23) The last service date of this system appears to be more than two years ago, or the inspector was unable to determine the last service date. The client(s) should ask the property owner(s) when it was last serviced. If unable to determine the last service date, or if this system was serviced more than two years ago, a qualified heating and cooling contractor should inspect, clean, and service this system, and make repairs if necessary. This servicing should be performed every few years in the future, or as per the contractor's recommendations.
    24) Burner flame appears typical.
    25) Boiler and controls appear serviceable.
     
    Plumbing and laundry Return to table of contents
    Location of main water shut-off valve: Basement
    Location of main water meter: Basement
    Location of main fuel shut-off: Gas meter
    Water service: Public
    Service pipe material: Copper
    Supply pipe material: Copper
    Vent pipe material: Plastic, Cast iron
    Drain pipe material: Plastic, Cast iron
    Waste pipe material: Cast iron
    26) The concrete laundry sink is cracked and leaking. A qualified plumber should replace the sink.
    27) Plumbing supply equipment appears serviceable.
    28) Washer, dryer connections appear serviceable.
     
    Fireplaces, woodstoves and chimneys Return to table of contents
    Fireplace type: Masonry
    Chimney type: Masonry
    29) The damper in the fireplace is damaged and/or not functional. It appears to be out of position and will not fully close. A qualified chimney service contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary to prevent interior conditioned air from escaping up the chimney.

    Photo 2  
     

    30) The ash cleanout door in the basement is severely deteriorated. A qualified contractor should repair / replace prior to further use of the fireplace to eliminate the risk of fire due to hot ashes spilling into the basement area.

    Photo 3  
     

    31) All solid fuel burning appliances (woodstoves and fireplaces, etc.) should be inspected annually by a qualified chimney service contractor, cleaned and repaired as necessary.
     
    Basement Return to table of contents
    Insulation material underneath floor above: None visible
    Pier or support post material: Steel
    Beam material: Built up wood
    Floor structure above: Solid wood joists
    32) One or more joists are damaged due to non-standard or substandard notching and/or hole boring. Standard building practices specify the following limitations for notching and boring joists:

  • Notches should not be cut in the middle third of any joist
  • Notches should not be deeper than 1/6 of the joist depth
  • Notches should not be deeper than 1/4 of the joist depth at joist ends
  • Bored holes should not be closer than 2 inches to the edges of the joist
  • Bored holes should not be wider than 1/3 of the joist depth

    A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary.
    33) Wire splices are exposed due to not being contained in a covered junction box. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock and fire. A qualified electrician should evaluate and make repairs as necessary. For example, install securely mounted junction boxes with cover plates where needed to contain wiring splices.

    Photo 25  
     

    34) One or more flights of stairs with more than two risers have no handrail installed. This is a safety hazard. A qualified contractor should install graspable handrails that your hand can completely encircle at stairs where missing, and as per standard building practices.

    Photo 18  
     

    35) Cover plate(s) are missing from one or more electric boxes, such as for receptacles, switches and/or junction boxes. They are intended to contain fire and prevent electric shock from exposed wires. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of fire and shock. Cover plates should be installed where missing.

    Photo 26  

    Photo 27  

    36) Standing water and/or wet areas were found in one or more sections of the basement. Accumulated water is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects and organisms and should not be present in the basement. A qualified contractor who specializes in drainage issues should evaluate and repair as necessary. Typical repairs for preventing water from accumulating in the basement include:

  • Repairing, installing or improving rain run-off systems (gutters, downspouts and extensions or drain lines)
  • Improving perimeter grading
  • Repairing, installing or improving underground footing and/or curtain drains

    Ideally, water should not enter the basement, but if water must be controlled after it enters the basement, then typical repairs include installing sump pump(s) or interior perimeter drains.

    Photo 19  

    Photo 28  

    37) The weatherstrip around the exterior entry door is deteriorated. Weatherstrip should be replaced where deteriorated, and by a qualified contractor if necessary.
    38) General condition of visible foundation walls, floor, and floor structure above appear serviceable.
     
    Kitchen Return to table of contents

    39) The range hood fan is inoperable. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair or replace the fan or the range hood as necessary.
    40) General condition of the floor, cabinets, countertop appear serviceable.
    41) Sink, faucet, plumbing appear serviceable.
    42) General condition of stovetop, oven, refrigerator appear serviceable.
     
    Bathrooms Return to table of contents

    43) One or more electric receptacles that serve countertop surfaces within six feet of a sink appear to have no ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate to determine if GFCI protection exists, and if not, repairs should be made so that all receptacles that serve countertop surfaces within six feet of sinks have GFCI protection. For example, install GFCI receptacles or circuit breaker(s) as needed.
    44) One toilet tank lid is cracked. Lid should be repaired or replaced as necessary.

    Photo 20  
     

    45) Caulk is missing or deteriorated above one or more bathtubs, where the tub surround meets the tub. It should be replaced where deteriorated and/or applied where missing to prevent water intrusion and damage to the wall structure.

    Photo 10  
     

    46) General condition of floor, cabinets, shelving appear serviceable.
    47) Sink, plumbing appear serviceable.
    48) Ventilation appears serviceable.
     
    Interior rooms Return to table of contents

    49) One or more open ground, three-pronged grounding type receptacles were found. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate and make repairs as necessary.

    Detected receptacles were marked with yellow tape.

    50) One or more smoke alarms are damaged or missing from their mounting brackets, and an insufficient number of smoke alarms are installed. Damaged and/or missing smoke alarms should be replaced as necessary so a functioning one exists in each hallway leading to bedrooms, and in each bedroom. For more information, visit http://www.cpsc.gov/cpscpub/pubs/5077.html

    Photo 9  

    Photo 24  

    51) Cover plate(s) are missing from one or more electric boxes, such as for receptacles, switches and/or junction boxes. They are intended to contain fire and prevent electric shock from exposed wires. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of fire and shock. Cover plates should be installed where missing.

    Photo 11  
     

    52) The weatherstrip around one or more exterior entry doors is deteriorated. Weatherstrip should be replaced where deteriorated, and by a qualified contractor if necessary.
    53) General condition of walls, ceilings, floors appear serviceable.
    54) Sample of tested windows appear serviceable.
    55) Minor cracks were found in ceilings in one or more areas. They do not appear to be a structural concern, but the client(s) may wish to repair these for aesthetic reasons.
     
    Thank you for allowing me to inspect your new property. Please call with any questions or concerns.