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Right at Home Inspections and Solutions

Website: http://www.righthomeinspect.com
Email: rightathomeinspections@gmail.com
Phone: (708) 473-5116
Inspector: Mark Glowczynski
Illinois License Number: 450.010389

 

Property Inspection Report

Client(s):  MY CLIENT
Property address:  123 Main St.
Chicago, Il 60611
Inspection date:  Monday, August 19, 2013

This report published on Wednesday, February 12, 2014 8:53:42 PM CST

[b]This report is the exclusive property of this inspection company and the client(s) listed in the report title. Use of this report by any unauthorized persons is prohibited.

Thank you for choosing Right at Home Inspections and Solutions. We've made every effort to provide you with a thorough, high quality inspection, and hope that the information in this report proves to be valuable in your consideration of this property. If for any reason you are unsatisfied with this report, or have questions after reviewing it, please don't hesitate to call us. If you are satisfied, please tell your friends about us.
How to Read this Report
This report is organized by the property's functional areas.  Within each functional area, descriptive information is listed first and is shown in bold type.  Items of concern follow descriptive information. Concerns are shown and sorted according to these types:
Concern typeSafetyPoses a risk of injury or death
Concern typeMajor DefectCorrection likely involves a significant expense
Concern typeRepair/ReplaceRecommend repairing or replacing
Concern typeRepair/MaintainRecommend repair and/or maintenance
Concern typeMinor DefectCorrection likely involves only a minor expense
Concern typeMaintainRecommend ongoing maintenance
Concern typeEvaluateRecommend evaluation by a specialist
Concern typeMonitorRecommend monitoring in the future
Concern typeCommentFor your information
Concern typeConducive conditionsConditions conducive for wood destroying insects or organisms (Wood-soil contact, shrubs in contact with siding, roof or plumbing leaks, etc.)

Click here for a glossary of building construction terms.Contact your inspector If there are terms that you do not understand, or visit the glossary of construction terms at http://www.reporthost.com/glossary.asp

Table of Contents
General information
Exterior
Roof
Garage
Attic
Electric service
Water heater
Heating and cooling
Plumbing and laundry
Fireplaces, woodstoves and chimneys
Crawl space
Kitchen
Bathrooms
Master Bed
Bed 2
Bed 3
Living Room
Dining Room
Family Room
Hallways


General information
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Report number: lastname081913
Inspector's name: Mark
Structures inspected: 1
Type of building: Single family
Age of building: 60 per buyer agent
Time started: 1300
Time finished: 1600
Inspection Fee: $$$.cc
Payment method: Check or cash or paypal
Present during inspection: Client(s), Realtor(s)
Occupied: Yes
Weather conditions: Partly cloudy
Temperature: Warm 83 degrees
Ground condition: Dry
Front of structure faces: West
Main entrance faces: West
Foundation type: Crawlspace garage is concrete block
The following items are excluded from this inspection: Swimming pool, Shed, Playground equipment
1) Structures built prior to 1979 may contain lead-based paint and/or asbestos in various building materials such as insulation, siding, and/or floor and ceiling tiles. Both lead and asbestos are known health hazards. Evaluating for the presence of lead and/or asbestos is not included in this inspection. The client(s) should consult with specialists as necessary, such as industrial hygienists, professional labs and/or abatement contractors for this type of evaluation. For information on lead, asbestos and other hazardous materials in homes, visit these websites:
2) Inspector could not find any access to the crawlspace. Typically access could be found inside a closet or outside. No such access was found outside, and there is extensive personal belongings in all closet to hinder any access. I reccomend consulting with the owner on any access point that may be hidden. There are some systems that may be under the house that I cannot evaluate such as but not limited to: sump pumps, plumbing, and HVAC systems.
3) Many wall, floor and/or ceiling surfaces were obscured by large amounts of furniture and/or stored items. Many areas couldn't be evaluated.
Exterior
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Footing material: Not visible
Foundation material: Poured in place concrete visible from limited portions outside only
Apparent wall structure: Wood frame
Wall covering: Metal
Driveway material: Asphalt
Sidewalk material: Poured in place concrete
Exterior door material: Solid core steel
4) One or more outdoor electric receptacles appear to have no ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate to determine if GFCI protection exists, and if not, repairs should be made so that all outdoor receptacles within six feet six inches of ground level have GFCI protection. For example, install GFCI receptacles or circuit breaker(s) as needed.

*** Area of concern is rear of home.***
Photo
Photo 4-1
Non GFCI outside.
 

5) One or more hornet, bee and/or wasp nests were found. These can pose a safety hazard. Nest(s) should be removed as necessary.

*** Area of concern was rear of home near breezway door on corner of fascia. There was no visible nest, however several wasps were entering the gap during walk around.***
6) Fences and/or gates are damaged and/or deteriorated in some areas. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs or replace sections as necessary.
Photo
Photo 6-1
Damaged gate and fence.
 

7) Conducive conditions The perimeter grading slopes towards the structure in one or more areas. This can result in water accumulating around the structure's foundation, or in basements and crawl spaces if they exist. Accumulated water is a conducive condition to wood destroying insects and organisms. Wet soil may also cause the foundation to settle and possibly fail over time. Recommend grading soil so it slopes down and away from the structure with a slope of at least 5% (10% or better is optimal) for at least 6 feet.

*** Area of concern is south end of home.***
Photo
Photo 7-1
Negative slope toward home from neighbors yard.
Photo
Photo 7-2
Slope toward house.

8) Conducive conditions One or more downspouts are loose or detached. This can result in water accumulating around the structure's foundation, or in basements and crawl spaces if they exist. Accumulated water is a conducive condition to wood destroying insects and organisms, and may also cause the foundation to settle and possibly fail over time. Repairs should be made as necessary so downspouts are securely anchored and functional.

*** Area of ocncern is south west and front door downspouts.***
Photo
Photo 8-1
Downspout not attached.
Photo
Photo 8-2
Downspout not attached.

9) Conducive conditions One or more downspouts have no extensions, or have extensions that are ineffective. This can result in water accumulating around the structure's foundation, or in basements and crawl spaces if they exist. Accumulated water is a conducive condition to wood destroying insects and organisms, and may also cause the foundation to settle and possibly fail over time. Repairs should be made as necessary, such as installing or repositioning splash blocks, or installing and/or repairing tie-ins to underground drain lines, so rain water is carried at least six (6) feet away from the structure to soil that slopes down and away from the structure
*** Area of concern is left side of garage. ***
10) Conducive conditions One or more crawl space vent screens are blocked by soil, debris, insulation, stored items or removable panels. This restricts ventilation in the crawl space and may result in increased levels of moisture inside. Materials or items blocking vents should be removed.

*** Most vents appeared to have some vegetation blocking them. One on the south end of house was partially below grade.***
11) One or more fence gates are difficult to open, close and/or latch, or are damaged and/or deteriorated. Repairs should be made as necessary, and by a qualified contractor if necessary, so gates operate easily.
Photo
Photo 11-1
Damaged gate and fence.
 

12) Gaps exist at one or more openings around the exterior, such as those where outside faucets, refrigerant lines, and/or gas supply pipes penetrate the exterior. Gaps should be sealed as necessary to prevent moisture intrusion and entry by vermin.

*** Numerous areas around the home where screws, nail and the like were in or previously in the siding.***

*** Area where there are gaps on the ends are near and above front door, and the rear family room bump-out. ***

*** Several windows have spray foam around portions of them. This is improper methods and materials for sealing windows or gaps. Consult a qualified contractor to correct the issues.***
Photo
Photo 12-1
Gaps in siding.
Photo
Photo 12-2
Penetrations in siding.
Photo
Photo 12-3
Gaps in siding.
Photo
Photo 12-4
Gaps in siding.
Photo
Photo 12-5
Gaps at seam of siding.
 

13) There are "back splash" type flashings at the inside corners of gutters on rear of house. It appears that they may be there to direct excessive rainfall into the gutters from the valleys, rather than over the gutter system itself. Consider removing or keeping these flashings clear of any and all debris as it may cause a back up of water that could damage the sofit and fascia as well as causing ice daming underneath the shingles in the winter months.
Photo
Photo 13-1
Gutter back-splashes on inside corners.
 

14) Conducive conditions Soil is in contact with or less than six inches from siding and/or trim. This is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects and organisms. Soil should be graded and/or removed as necessary so there are at least six inches of space between the siding and trim and the soil below.

*** Area of concern is south end of home. It is evident that the lowest course of aluminum siding is below grade.***
Photo
Photo 14-1
Grade above foundation.
 

15) Conducive conditions Vegetation such as trees, shrubs and/or vines are in contact with or less than one foot from the structure's exterior. Vegetation can serve as a conduit for wood destroying insects and may retain moisture against the exterior after it rains. Vegetation should be pruned and/or removed as necessary to maintain a one foot clearance between it and the structure's exterior.
16) Recommend resealing asphalt driveway.
17) One or more sections of foundation and/or exterior walls are excluded from this inspection due to lack of access from vegetation, debris and/or stored items.
18) Minor cracks were found in the driveway. However they don't appear to be a structural concern and no trip hazards were found. No immediate action is recommended, but the client(s) may wish to have repairs made or have cracked sections replaced for aesthetic reasons.
Roof
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Roof inspection method: Viewed from ground with binoculars
Roof type: Hip and Valley
Roof covering: Asphalt or fiberglass composition shingles
Estimated age of roof: 8 years per realtor
Gutter & downspout material: Aluminum
Roof ventilation: Adequate
19) Conducive conditions One or more sections of flashing at the base of the chimney are deteriorated and/or substandard. Leaks may occur as a result. A qualified roofing contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary.

*** Area of concern is the wood stove chimney. There appears to be a small gap at vertical portion of stack, and the lower part of flashing is not secured.***
Photo
Photo 19-1
Improper gap at base of wood stove stack.
Photo
Photo 19-2
Loose flashing for wood stove stack.

Garage
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20) One or more wall and/or ceiling surfaces between the attached garage and interior living spaces have gaps, holes, or missing or inadequate surface materials. These surfaces are intended to prevent vehicle fumes from entering living spaces, and to slow the spread of fire from the garage to living spaces. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary so the attached garage wall and ceiling surfaces that adjoin living spaces are tightly sealed and fire rated as per standard building practices. Typically these surfaces require a one-hour fire rating.

*** Area of concern is in attic section of garage where gas line enters through the breezway.***
Photo
Photo 20-1
 

21) The garage-house door isn't equipped with an automatic closing device such as sprung hinges. This door should close and latch automatically to prevent vehicle fumes from entering living spaces and/or to slow the spread of fire from the garage to living spaces. A qualified contractor should install automatic closing device(s) as necessary, and as per standard building practices, so this door closes and latches automatically.
Photo
Photo 21-1
 

22) The garage vehicle door is damaged or deteriorated. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair or replace the door as necessary.

*** There is obvious gap on left side of door when looking from the inside. This could let in rain/snow and rodents and insects as well. ***
Photo
Photo 22-1
Garage door not aligned.
 

23) Most areas inside the garage, including the perimeter, areas in the center, and one or more vehicle doors were obscured by stored items and/or debris and couldn't be fully evaluated.
24) Garage foundation is cement block.
Attic
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Inspection method: Partially traversed
Roof structure type: Rafters
Ceiling structure: Not visible
Insulation material: Fiberglass loose fill, Fiberglass roll or batt
Insulation depth: varies
Insulation estimated R value: undetermined due to storage
25) It appears that on the north end of the attic, an access was made for the breezeway by simply knocking sheathing away. This is improper meathod of access. There is also a gas line that runs from the garage into the home via the attic with a large hole by the gas line. This may result in vehicle fumes from entering the living space, and may aid the spread of fire in the event of a vehicle fire in the garage. Consult a qualified contractor to fix the issue.
Photo
Photo 25-1
 

26) Vent for stove/microwave terminates at the roof improperly. The roof 2x6 around said vent is damaged as well.
Photo
Photo 26-1
Damaged roof wood and improper vent termination to roof.
 

27) Most of the area could not be evaluated due to storage of personal belongings. Some systems may have been covered or hidden by the belongings.
Photo
Photo 27-1
Photo
Photo 27-2
Photo
Photo 27-3
Photo
Photo 27-4
Photo
Photo 27-5
 

Electric service
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Primary service type: Underground
Primary service overload protection type: Circuit breakers
Service amperage (amps): 200
Service voltage (volts): 120/240
Location of main service switch: family room behind bar
Location of main disconnect: Breaker at top of main service panel
Service entrance conductor material: Copper
System ground: unk
Main disconnect rating (amps): 200
Branch circuit wiring type: Copper
Solid strand aluminum branch circuit wiring present: Can't verify
Smoke detectors present: No
28) Inadequate working space exists for the main service panel. Standard building practices require the following clearances:

A qualified contractor and/or electrician should evaluate and make modifications as necessary.
29) One or more screws are missing from the main service panel cover and should be replaced. Because energized wiring may exist behind the holes with the missing screws, recommend that a qualified, licensed electrician replace these screws, or that care be taken to ensure that the new screws do not come in contact with wiring inside the panel when they are installed. Stock screws from the panel manufacturer should be used, or their equivalent.

*** Two bottom screws are missing.***
Water heater
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Estimated age: 8 years per label
Type: Tank
Energy source: Natural gas
Capacity (in gallons): 40
Manufacturer: Kenmore
Model: 153339461
Water temperature (degrees Fahrenheit): not determined
30) The vent pipe for water heater that goes into the furnace vent has a negative slope toward the furnace stack. This could leas to a dangerous build up of carbon monoxide gases. Consult a qualified licensed contractor to correct the issue.
Photo
Photo 30-1
Negative slope from water heater to furnace flue.
 

31) The estimated useful life for most water heaters is 8 to 12 years. This water heater appears to be approaching this age and may need replacing at any time. Recommend budgeting for a replacement in the near future.
32) Stored items, furnishings and/or debris blocked access to the water heater. The inspector was unable to fully evaluate the water heater.
Heating and cooling
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Estimated age: unable to determine
Primary heating system energy source: Natural gas
Primary heat system type: Forced air, Baseboard
Primary A/C energy source: Electric
Primary Air conditioning type: Split system
Distribution system: cannot determine
Manufacturer: Tappan
Model: fg6ra096c16b
Serial Number: fga031010906
Filter location: In return air duct below furnace
Last service date: unable to determine
A/C Condenser Model: es5bd03rb
A/C Serial Number: esa090800014
33) The last service date of this system appears to be more than one year ago, or the inspector was unable to determine the last service date. The client(s) should ask the property owner(s) when it was last serviced. If unable to determine the last service date, or if this system was serviced more than one year ago, a qualified heating and cooling contractor should inspect, clean, and service this system, and make repairs if necessary. This servicing should be performed annually in the future.
34) The cooling fins on the outdoor condensing unit's evaporator coils are dirty. This may result in reduced efficiency and higher energy costs. A qualified heating and cooling contractor should clean the evaporator coils as necessary. Also make sure the area around the condensor is clear from vegetaion and stored items.
35) The area where the condensor lines go into the furnace needs to be sealed, as there is a small gap and a small area of moisture was at the line entry as well. Consulte a qualified licensed HVAC technician to repair issues.
Photo
Photo 35-1
Condenser line needs to be sealed. Moisture on furnace from said line.
 

36) Air handler filter(s) are dirty and should be replaced now. They should be checked monthly in the future and replaced as necessary.
37) Inspector could not gain access to crawl to see of any ductwork was underneath the house.
38) The estimated useful life for most forced air furnaces is 15 to 20 years. The inspector was unable to determine the age of the furnace. The clients should be aware that this furnace may be near, at, or beyond its useful life and may need replacing at any time. Recommend attempting to determine the furnace's age (ask property owner or service technician), and budgeting for a replacement if necessary.
Plumbing and laundry
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Location of main water shut-off valve: laundry room, left side of water heater
Location of main water meter: laundry room
Location of main fuel shut-off: north side of garage
Water service: Community well
Service pipe material: Not visible
Supply pipe material: Copper
Vent pipe material: Not visible
Drain pipe material: Not visible
Waste pipe material: Not visible
39) A light shroud is hanging loose in the laundry room.

There is a junction box to the right of the furncae that is missing a cover plate. Missing cover plates pose a significant risk of electrical shick hazard. This should be corrected by a licensed electrician.
Photo
Photo 39-1
Light shroud hanging.
 

40) Copper water supply pipes in homes built prior to 1986 may be joined with solder that contains lead. Lead is a known health hazard, especially for children. Laws were passed in 1985 prohibiting the use of lead in solder, but prior to that solder normally contained about 50 percent lead. The client(s) should be aware of this, especially if children will be living in this structure. Evaluating for the presence of lead in this structure is not included in this inspection. The client(s) should consider having a qualified lab test for lead, and if necessary take steps to reduce or remove lead from the water supply. Various solutions such as these may be advised:

For more information visit:
http://www.cpsc.gov/CPSCPUB/PUBS/5056.html
http://www.epa.gov/safewater/lead/index.html
41) The floor in the laundry room nearest the water heater is sealed with a spray foam material and a few towels near the A/C lines. This is improper materials and methods to repair and damage to flooring systems. Since I could not gain access to the crawlspace, I cannot determine any further extent of damage to the fllooring. The vinyl tiles are also coming loose throughout the laundry room.
Photo
Photo 41-1
Floor issues.
 

42) It appears that there may be a sump pump in the crawlspace as there is some sort of drain line on the north end of the house where the rear family room is. SInce there is no crawl access I could not evaluate this.
43) Neither the clothes washer nor dryer were operated or evaluated. They are excluded from this inspection.
Fireplaces, woodstoves and chimneys
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Fireplace type: Masonry with metal liner
Woodstove type: Metal
Chimney type: Metal
44) The masonry on the wall around the wood stove is missing mortar in several areas. This will pose a significant risk of fire if left as is. Consult a qualified licensed contractor to correct this.

There is bare 2x4 on the base of the wood stove floor area. This may pose a fire risk. Consult a qualified licensed contractor to fix.
Photo
Photo 44-1
Missing mortar.
Photo
Photo 44-2
Missing tile/brickwork.

45) The power cord for the fan on the wood stove has exposed inner wiring. The ouside sheathing is pulled away from the switch itself. Consult a licensed qualified eletrician to correct the issue.
Photo
Photo 45-1
Wires pulled from wood stove fan.
 

46) The flue for the wood stove has possible water streaks running down the outside. Upon outside evaluation it appears the flashing has a small gap around the stack on the roof. This may be the cause of the possible water streaks. I did not have access above the ceiling to evaluate the extent of and water damage if any.
Photo
Photo 46-1
Water drip marks.
 

47) All solid fuel burning appliances (woodstoves and fireplaces, etc.) should be inspected annually by a qualified chimney service contractor, cleaned and repaired as necessary.
Photo
Photo 47-1
Dirty wood stove.
 

Crawl space
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Inspection method: Not inspected
48) There are several crawlspace vents that have spray foam around them. This is improper method and materials for sealing such vents. Consult a qualified contractor to correct the issues.
49)   Inspector could not find any access to the crawlspace. Typically access could be found inside a closet or outside. No such access was found outside, and there is extensive personal belongings in all closets to hinder any access. I reccomend consulting with the owner on any access point that may be hidden. There are some systems that may be under the house that I cannot evaluate such as but not limited to: sump pumps, plumbing, and HVAC systems. There may or may not be water issues due to the grade being above the foundation on the south end of the house.
Kitchen
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50) One or more cabinets are not securely fastened to the wall. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of the cabinet(s) falling. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary.

*** Area of concern is the vertical pantry on left side of fridge. The upper portion is pulling away from the wall.***
Photo
Photo 50-1
Pantry pulling away.
 

51) One or more sink drains have substandard repairs, such as tape, sealant and/or non-standard components. A qualified plumber should evaluate and repair as necessary. ***Plumbers putty built up around both drains. No active leaks during inspection though.***
Photo
Photo 51-1
Plumbers putty built up.
 

52) The bracket that attaches the dishwasher to the underside of the countertop is loose, missing or installed in a substandard way. Repairs should be made as necessary, such as installing or reinstalling the bracket, and by a qualified contractor if necessary.
Photo
Photo 52-1
Dishwasher not secured.
 

53) Hardware such as hinges, latches or pulls are loose and/or missing on one or more cabinets. Repairs should be made and/or hardware should be replaced as necessary, and by a qualified contractor if necessary.
54) One sliding shelf on left side of stove inside the cabinet was hard to pull out. It appeared to be overloaded with contents.
Photo
Photo 54-1
Lower shelf difficult to move.
 

Bathrooms
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55) *** The flooring into the shared bath has a noticeable slope when walking in from smaller bedroom. This may or may not be simply a construcion issue when the addition was added (which this bath is part of), or it may or may not be a structural issue/problem that could not be evaluated during the inspection due to lack of crawlspace access. Consider further evaluation on this issue by proper licensed qualified contractors. ***
Photo
Photo 55-1
Floor slopes from older section to newer.
 

56) One or more open ground, three-pronged grounding type receptacles were found. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate and make repairs as necessary.

*** Area of concern is main hall bath. Outlet tester showed an open ground. Also, when top of medicine cabinet was moved the light fixture went out, then went back on. Consult a qualified licensed electrician to correct the issue.***

Grounding type receptacles were first required in residential structures during the 1960s. Based on the age of this structure and/or the absence of 2-pronged receptacles, repairs should be made by correcting wiring circuits as necessary so all receptacles are grounded as per standard building practices. Replacement of three-pronged receptacles with 2-pronged receptacles is not an acceptable solution.
57) One or more light fixtures are loose or installed in a substandard way. A qualified contractor or electrician should evaluate and make repairs as necessary so light fixtures are securely mounted and installed in accordance with the manufacturer's installation instructions.

*** Area of concern is main hall bath. The medicine cabinet light fixture went out, then went back on while testing the outlet.***
58) Conducive conditions Floor tiles installed in "wet" areas have gaps between them. The wooden subfloor beneath may be damaged by water intrusion. A qualified contractor should evaluate, make repairs if necessary, and replace flooring with a waterproof floor such as sheet vinyl in wet areas.

*** Area of concern is shared bath.***
Photo
Photo 58-1
Cracked tile in shared bath.
 

59) Drawers are difficult to open and close in one or more cabinets. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary.

*** Area of concern is main hall bath, lower drawer.***
Photo
Photo 59-1
Loose drawer in main hall bath.
 

60) One or more sink stopper mechanisms are missing, or need adjustment or repair. Stopper mechanisms should be installed where missing and/or repairs should be made so sink stoppers open and close easily.

*** Area of concern is main hall bath.***
61) Conducive conditions Caulk is missing or deteriorated around the base of one or more bathtub spouts. It should be replaced where deteriorated and/or applied where missing to prevent water intrusion and damage to wall structures.

*** Area of concern is main hall bath.***
Photo
Photo 61-1
Caulk behind spout.
 

62) Conducive conditions Caulk is missing or deteriorated around one or more shower surrounds. It should be replaced where deteriorated and/or applied where missing to prevent water intrusion and damage to the wall structure.

*** Both tubs should be recaulked properly. There appeared to be a build of of caulikng material on the tub in the shared bath.***
Photo
Photo 62-1
Re caulk shared tub.
Photo
Photo 62-2
Re caulk shared tub.

Master Bed
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63) This structure was built prior to 1979 and may contain lead paint. Laws were enacted in 1978 in the US preventing the use of lead paint in residential structures. Lead is a known safety hazard, especially to children but also to adults. The paint found in and around this structure appeared to be intact and may be encapsulated by more recent layers of paint that are not lead-based. Regardless, recommend following precautions as described in the following links to Consumer Products Safety Commission website articles regarding possible lead paint.

What You Should Know About Lead Based Paint in Your Home: Safety Alert - CPSC Document #5054

CPSC Warns About Hazards of "Do lt Yourself" Removal of Lead Based Paint: Safety Alert - CPSC Document #5055
64) One or more electric baseboard heaters are damaged or deteriorated. For example, missing, bent or loose metal panels. A qualified electrician should evaluate and repair or replace heaters as necessary.

*** Some covers for baseboard heaters are missing. ****
Photo
Photo 64-1
Master bed baseboard heater missing screen.
 

65) Lock mechanisms on one or more windows are missing and/or damaged so that they are inoperable. Repairs should be made by a qualified contractor or service technician so that windows lock and unlock easily.
Photo
Photo 65-1
Master bed window lock broken, not secure.
 

66) Noticeable caulking was built up around the glazing of one or more windows in master bedroom. Monitor and consider repair from a qualified licensed contractor.
Photo
Photo 66-1
Caulk on master bed window.
 

Bed 2
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67) This structure was built prior to 1979 and may contain lead paint. Laws were enacted in 1978 in the US preventing the use of lead paint in residential structures. Lead is a known safety hazard, especially to children but also to adults. The paint found in and around this structure appeared to be intact and may be encapsulated by more recent layers of paint that are not lead-based. Regardless, recommend following precautions as described in the following links to Consumer Products Safety Commission website articles regarding possible lead paint.

What You Should Know About Lead Based Paint in Your Home: Safety Alert - CPSC Document #5054

CPSC Warns About Hazards of "Do lt Yourself" Removal of Lead Based Paint: Safety Alert - CPSC Document #5055
68) The fan is noisy. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair or replace it as necessary.

*** Area of concern is the light green bedroom. ***
Bed 3
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69) This structure was built prior to 1979 and may contain lead paint. Laws were enacted in 1978 in the US preventing the use of lead paint in residential structures. Lead is a known safety hazard, especially to children but also to adults. The paint found in and around this structure appeared to be intact and may be encapsulated by more recent layers of paint that are not lead-based. Regardless, recommend following precautions as described in the following links to Consumer Products Safety Commission website articles regarding possible lead paint.

What You Should Know About Lead Based Paint in Your Home: Safety Alert - CPSC Document #5054

CPSC Warns About Hazards of "Do lt Yourself" Removal of Lead Based Paint: Safety Alert - CPSC Document #5055
70) The fan is noisy. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair or replace it as necessary.

*** Area of concern is the blue bedroom.***
Living Room
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71) Some ceiling/wall areas in this structure have "popcorn" textured surfaces possibly installed prior to 1979. This material may contain asbestos, which is a known carcinogen and poses a health hazard. Laws were passed in the United States in 1978 prohibiting use of asbestos in residential structures, but stocks of existing materials have been known to be used for some time thereafter. The client(s) may wish to have this ceiling material tested by a qualified lab to determine if it does contain asbestos.

In most cases, when the material is intact and in good condition, keeping it encapsulated with paint and not disturbing it may reduce or effectively eliminate the health hazard. If the client wishes to remove the material, or plans to disturb it through remodeling, they should have it tested by a qualified lab and/or consult with a qualified industrial hygienist or asbestos abatement specialist. For more information, visit:
http://www.cpsc.gov/CPSCPUB/PUBS/453.html
72) One or more air supply registers are loose or installed in a substandard way. Repairs should be made as necessary so registers are securely attached, flush with the surface they are installed on, and otherwise correctly installed.

*** Area of concern is front wall, right side.***
Photo
Photo 72-1
Register in front living room.
 

Dining Room
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73) Cover plate(s) are broken at one or more electric boxes, such as for receptacles, switches and/or junction boxes. They are intended to contain fire and prevent electric shock from exposed wires. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of fire and shock. Cover plates should be replaced where necessary.

*** Area of concern is the breezeway.***
Photo
Photo 73-1
Breezeway outlet.
 

74) This structure was built prior to 1979 and may contain lead paint. Laws were enacted in 1978 in the US preventing the use of lead paint in residential structures. Lead is a known safety hazard, especially to children but also to adults. The paint found in and around this structure appeared to be intact and may be encapsulated by more recent layers of paint that are not lead-based. Regardless, recommend following precautions as described in the following links to Consumer Products Safety Commission website articles regarding possible lead paint.

What You Should Know About Lead Based Paint in Your Home: Safety Alert - CPSC Document #5054

CPSC Warns About Hazards of "Do lt Yourself" Removal of Lead Based Paint: Safety Alert - CPSC Document #5055
75) One or more sliding glass doors are difficult to open or close. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair or replace door(s) as necessary.


*** Area of concern is the breezeway.***
76) The lock mechanisms on one or more sliding glass doors are inoperable and/or difficult to operate. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary.

*** Area of concern is the breezeway, and the lock handle is missing.***
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Photo 76-1
Breezeway sliding door lock
 

77) Seals between double-pane glass in one or more sliding glass doors appear to have failed based on condensation or stains between the panes of glass. A qualified contractor should evaluate and replace glass where necessary.

The client(s) should be aware that evidence of broken seals may be more or less visible from one day to the next depending on the temperature, humidity, sunlight, etc. Glass doors or windows other than those that the inspector identified may also have failed seals and need glass replaced too.

*** Area of concern is the breezeway.***
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Photo 77-1
Breezeway sliding door seal.
 

78) One or more locksets are loose and should be tightened, repaired and or replaced as necessary.

*** Area of concern is main entry screen door into the breezeway.***
79) The control switch for the center ceiling light in the breezeway is missing the knob to turn it on and off. Consult a qualified licensed electrician to repair the issue.
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Photo 79-1
Breezeway light switch.
 

Family Room
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80) Wood work for the casement windows in rear family room appear older and the finish is wearing away. Bare wood is susceptible to rot and further damage. Consider having a qualified contractor correct the issue. These windows were also difficult to close as the lower control mechanism kept falling off the glide.
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Photo 80-1
Bare wood on rear family room windows.
 

Hallways
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81) This structure was built prior to 1979 and may contain lead paint. Laws were enacted in 1978 in the US preventing the use of lead paint in residential structures. Lead is a known safety hazard, especially to children but also to adults. The paint found in and around this structure appeared to be intact and may be encapsulated by more recent layers of paint that are not lead-based. Regardless, recommend following precautions as described in the following links to Consumer Products Safety Commission website articles regarding possible lead paint.

What You Should Know About Lead Based Paint in Your Home: Safety Alert - CPSC Document #5054

CPSC Warns About Hazards of "Do lt Yourself" Removal of Lead Based Paint: Safety Alert - CPSC Document #5055

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Photo X-1
Spray foam around window.
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Photo X-2
Spray foam around window.
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Photo X-3
Spray foam around window.
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Photo X-4
Open junction box.
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Photo X-5
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Photo X-6
Main entry door hardware.

All report findings are the conditions found at the time of the inspection and are non-destructive in nature. All findings within this report are based on obvious and outward conditions. Right at Home cannot make any assumptions on any conditions behind any permanently mounted fixture, drywall, object, system, cabinet etc. These conditions may or may not change at any time after the inspection. Right at Home shall not guarantee or be made liable for any accuracy of conditions if they have changed after the inspection. Some repairs may or may not have been made after the inspection. Right at Home shall not guarantee or be liable for any repairs made after the inspection. The inspector shall not move any personal item to gain access to any door, hatch, scuttle, etc. The inspector shall not move/disturb any blown in insulation. The inspector shall not turn on any water, electrical, gas service that is off at the time of the inspection.

Right at Home Inspections and Solutions shall not negotiate any issues with the builder/owner/contractor or their attorneys or agents. The company shall not make any recommendations to any one other than the client.

**By relying on this inspection report you have agreed to be bound by the terms, conditions and limitations as set forth in the CONTRACT AGREEMENT, which was presented to you at the time of the inspection or in an electronic attachment included with your completed report. If you do not have a copy of the CONTRACT AGREEMENT please contact Right at Home Inspections and Solutions and a copy will be provided to you either electronically or by fax. If you do not agree to be bound by this CONTRACT AGREEMENT in its entirety, you must contact
Right at Home Inspections and Solutions immediately upon receipt of this completed report. In addition, all electronic and paper copies of the inspection report must be deleted and destroyed, and may not be used in whole or in part for consideration in a real estate transaction, and hereby releases Right at Home Inspections and Solutions from any and all liabilities that may arise in the future. **

By acceptance of this report, the client or report holder agrees to said conditions.