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REPInspections


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Inspector: Alexander Martin
InterNachi

  

Property Inspection Report
Client(s): Ron & Deborah
Property address: 10251 Virginia Ave
South Gate CA 90280-6567
Inspection date: 4/12/2012
This report published on Friday, April 13, 2012 2:20:46 AM PDT

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This report is the exclusive property of this inspection company and the client(s) listed in the report title. Use of this report by any unauthorized persons is prohibited.

Dear customer:

Thank you for choosing REPInspections to perform the following inspection on the property you wish to purchase.
This report is the exclusive property of REPInspection and the individual/s paying for the inspection fee and report. Use of this report by any unauthorized persons is prohibited.

All findings should be made to REPInspections.

This report represents our professional opinion of the condition of the inspected elements of the subject property, determine during a limited time inspection. This inspection was performed, where applicable, in a manner consistent with the standards of the home inspection industry, terms and conditions of the inspection agreement and limitations noted in the inspection agreement. Information contained herein was prepared exclusively for the named client and their authorized representatives.

We have inspected the subject property and must report to you exactly what we found. Because of the age, design and location of the home, we might find some hairline cracks on driveways or walls, see paint peeling off Walls, cracks on tiles, chipped bathtubs or some cracks over windows and doors. These are normal and cosmetic conditions.

While due care was exercised in the performance of this inspection, the company makes no representations or guarantees with respect to latent deficiencies or future conditions as part of the inspection or this report. This report is valid only for a period of thirty (30) days from the date of the inspection. This report, including any attachments, should be reviewed in its entirety. Any questions about the inspection or report should be resolved prior to title transfer.

This inspection report was prepared in a format specifically for the individual/s paying for the inspections fee and report and such transfer does not cover all potential areas of concern a third party may have. This report is transferable only with the consent of the individual/s paying for inspections fee and report and such transfer does not imply any warranty or guarantee regarding the report by inspection firm.

If you have any questions regarding this report, please feel free to call us.

 
How to Read this Report
This report is organized by the property's functional areas.  Within each functional area, descriptive information is listed first and is shown in bold type.  Items of concern follow descriptive information.
Concerns are shown and sorted according to these types:
SafetyPoses a risk of injury or death 
Major DefectCorrection likely involves a significant expense 
Repair/ReplaceRecommend repairing or replacing 
Repair/MaintainRecommend repair and/or maintenance 
Minor DefectCorrection likely involves only a minor expense 
MaintainRecommend ongoing maintenance 
EvaluateRecommend evaluation by a specialist 
MonitorRecommend monitoring in the future 
CommentFor your information 

Wood Destroying Organism Concerns
Concerns relating to wood destroying organisms are shown as follows:
InfestationEvidence of infestation of wood destroying insects or organisms (Live or dead insect bodies, fungal growth, etc.) 
DamageDamage caused by wood destroying insects or organisms (Rot, carpenter ant galleries, etc.) 
Conducive conditionsConditions conducive for wood destroying insects or organisms (Wood-soil contact, shrubs in contact with siding, roof or plumbing leaks, etc.) 

Click here for a glossary of building construction terms. Contact your inspector if there are terms that you do not understand, or visit the glossary of construction terms at http://www.reporthost.com/glossary.asp

Table of Contents
General information
Exterior
Roof
Garage
Attic
Electric service
Water heater
Heating and cooling
Plumbing and laundry
Crawl space
Kitchen
Bathrooms
Interior rooms
 
General information Return to table of contents
Type of building: Single family
Age of building: 1923
Time started: 4:00pm
Time finished: 7:30pm
Inspection Fee: $200
Payment method: Credit Card
Present during inspection: None
Occupied: No
Weather conditions: Cloudy
Temperature: Cool
Ground condition: Dry
Front of structure faces: East
Main entrance faces: East
Foundation type: Crawlspace
1) This property has one or more fuel burning appliances, and no carbon monoxide alarms are visible. This is a safety hazard. Recommend installing one or more carbon monoxide alarms as necessary and as per the manufacturer's instructions. For more information, visit http://www.cpsc.gov/CPSCPUB/PREREL/prhtml05/05017.html
2) Structures built prior to 1979 may contain lead-based paint and/or asbestos in various building materials such as insulation, siding, and/or floor and ceiling tiles. Both lead and asbestos are known health hazards. Evaluating for the presence of lead and/or asbestos is not included in this inspection. The client(s) should consult with specialists as necessary, such as industrial hygienists, professional labs and/or abatement contractors for this type of evaluation. For information on lead, asbestos and other hazardous materials in homes, visit these websites:
  • The Environmental Protection Association (http://www.epa.gov)
  • The Consumer Products Safety Commission (http://www.cpsc.gov)
  • The Center for Disease Control (http://www.cdc.gov)
    3) The home has evidence of modifications or remodeling after the original construction date. This work may or may not have been permitted by the proper authorities and may or may not have been constructed to the applicable building codes that were in effect at the time. I recommend the client inquire with the seller and research permits applicable for the address with the City of South Gate Building Permit Dept or the Authority Having Jurisdiction (AHJ) if the home is outside the city limits and ETJ. Un-permitted remodeling may conceal hidden defects due to poor workmanship and may be subject to certain penalties and fines in addition to repairing any violations. This could result in a significant financial liability.

    Photo 176  
    The front area of the property appears to be an addition after the original Construction date. (Living room, bedroom)

    Photo 81  
    The front half of the property appears to have a newer roof and ceiling structure.

    Photo 67  
    Modifications to many areas of the foundation.

    Photo 7  
    Fuel lines routed on the exterior.
     
    Exterior Return to table of contents
    Footing material: Poured in place concrete
    Foundation material: Concrete block
    Apparent wall structure: Wood frame
    Wall covering: Stucco
    Driveway material: Poured in place concrete
    Sidewalk material: Poured in place concrete
    Exterior door material: Glass panel
    4) One or more light fixtures are loose or installed in a substandard way. A qualified contractor or electrician should evaluate and make repairs as necessary so light fixtures are securely mounted and installed in accordance with the manufacturer's installation instructions.

    Photo 16  
     

    5) One or more outside faucets are missing backflow prevention devices. These devices reduce the likelihood of polluted or contaminated water entering the potable water supply. This condition can occur when an outside faucet is left in the "on" position with a hose connected and the sprayer head turned off. When pressure in the system fluctuates, water can be drawn back into the water supply pipes from the house. If a chemical sprayer is being used with the hose, those chemicals can enter the water supply pipes.

    Recommend installing backflow prevention devices on all exterior hose bibs where missing. They are available at most home improvement stores and are easily installed. For more information, visit:
    http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/AE113

    Photo 17  

    Photo 101  

    6) One or more hornet, bee and/or wasp nests were found. These can pose a safety hazard. Nest(s) should be removed as necessary.

    Photo 26  
     

    7) Cracks, deterioration and/or damage were found in one or more areas of the stucco siding. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs and/or replace stucco siding as necessary.

    Photo 8  

    Photo 12  

    Photo 50  

    Photo 30  

    8) The driveway has significant cracks and/or deterioration in one or more areas. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair or replace driveway sections as necessary.

    Photo 21  

    Photo 22  

    Photo 23  

    Photo 24  

    9) Sidewalks and/or patios have significant cracks and/or deterioration in one or more areas. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair or replace sidewalk and/or patio sections as necessary.

    Photo 4  

    Photo 5  

    Photo 47  

    Photo 48  

    10) One or more outside faucets leak. For example, from the valve stem when turned on or from the spigot when turned off. A qualified plumber should evaluate and repair as necessary.

    Photo 18  

    Photo 100  

    11) Siding is incomplete or missing in one or more areas. A qualified contractor should install siding where missing to prevent water and vermin intrusion.

    Photo 15  
     

    12) Sidewalk(s) and/or patios are undermined in one or more areas, where soil has eroded out from beneath. Repairs should be made to prevent further erosion and undermining.

    Photo 14  
     

    13) One or more fence gates are difficult to open, close and/or latch, or are damaged and/or deteriorated. Repairs should be made as necessary, and by a qualified contractor if necessary, so gates operate easily.

    Photo 46  
     

    14) One or more exhaust duct end caps are missing. Their purpose is to prevent unconditioned air from entering the house, and keep out birds, rodents and insects. Blocked ducts can cause fan motors and/or clothes dryers to overheat and may pose a fire hazard. Vent cap(s) should be installed where necessary.

    Photo 9  
     

    15) The Gable vent screen is missing. Birds and vermin may enter the attic because of this. Screens should be replaced or repaired where necessary, or installed where missing.

    Photo 11  
     

    16) Vegetation such as trees, shrubs and/or vines are in contact with or less than one foot from the structure's exterior. Vegetation can serve as a conduit for wood destroying insects and may retain moisture against the exterior after it rains. Vegetation should be pruned and/or removed as necessary to maintain a one foot clearance between it and the structure's exterior.

    Photo 19  
     

    17) The exterior finish in some areas is failing. A qualified contractor should prep (pressure wash, scrape, sand, prime caulk, etc.) and repaint or restain areas as needed and as per standard building practices.

    Photo 10  

    Photo 13  

    Photo 31  

    Photo 34  

    18) Termite damage was found in some areas of the property. Recommend hiring a Pest control technician to evaluate.

    Photo 25  

    Photo 27  

    Photo 102  

    Photo 49  

    19) One or more light fixtures appear to be inoperable. Recommend further evaluation by replacing bulb(s) and/or consulting with the property owner(s). Repairs or replacement of the light fixture(s) by a qualified electrician may be necessary.

    Photo 187  
     

    20) No key was available to operate the sliding gate's lock mechanism. The gate could not be fully evaluated.

    Photo 2  

    Photo 3  
     
    Roof Return to table of contents
    Roof inspection method: Traversed
    Roof type: Cross gable
    Roof covering: Asphalt or fiberglass composition shingles
    Estimated age of roof: Unkown
    Gutter & downspout material: None
    Roof ventilation: Adequate
    21) One or more plumbing vent pipes terminate less than six inches above the roof surface below. Debris or snow may block openings, and may result in sewer gases entering living spaces. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary so vent pipes terminate at least six inches above roof surfaces.

    Photo 96  
     

    22) Kickout flashing is missing in one or more areas.The kickout flashing is installed above the rain gutter and/or drip edge flashing where the roof meets a vertical wall. This specialty flashing “kicks out” rain water and diverts it away from the lower wall. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary.

    Photo 20  
     

    23) One or more vent flashings are no longer being used and should be caped off or replaced to prevent water damage to the roof structure below.

    Photo 98  

    Photo 99  

    24) Debris such as leaves, needles, seeds, etc. have accumulated on the roof. This is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects and organisms since water may not flow easily off the roof, and may enter gaps in the roof surface. Leaks may occur as a result. Debris should be cleaned from the roof now and as necessary in the future.

    Photo 97  
     

    25) Trees and/or shrubs are in contact with or are close to the roof edge(s) in one or more areas. Damage to the roof may result, especially during high winds. Vegetation can also act as a conduit for wood destroying insects. Vegetation should be pruned back and/or removed as necessary to prevent damage and infestation by wood destroying insects.

    Photo 95  
     

    26)  

    Photo 94  
     
     
    Garage Return to table of contents

    27) One or more sections of wiring that weren't terminated were found. This is a potential safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate and repair as necessary. For example, cutting the wire to length and terminating the wire with wire nuts in a securely anchored, covered, properly sized junction box.

    Photo 58  
     

    28) Wire splices are exposed due to not being contained in a covered junction box. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock and fire. A qualified electrician should evaluate and make repairs as necessary. For example, install securely mounted junction boxes with cover plates where needed to contain wiring splices.

    Photo 61  
     

    29) The door jamb is damaged. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary.

    Photo 55  

    Photo 56  

    30) Vinyl flooring is damaged and/or deteriorated in one or more areas. A qualified contractor should replace or repair the damaged flooring.

    Photo 57  

    Photo 59  

    Photo 60  
     

    31) The weatherstrip around one or more exterior entry doors is missing and/or deteriorated. Weatherstrip should be installed where missing and/or replaced where deteriorated, and by a qualified contractor if necessary.

    Photo 53  

    Photo 54  

    32) The Vehicle door was locked with a padlock. The key provided does not open this lock. The vehicle door could not be fully evaluated.

    Photo 51  

    Photo 52  
     
    Attic Return to table of contents
    Inspection method: Traversed
    Roof structure type: Rafters
    Insulation material: Fiberglass roll or batt, Mineral wool loose fill
    Insulation depth: 8"
    Insulation estimated R value: R-28
    33) Paper facing on batt insulation is oriented towards open spaces, rather than against interior space surfaces. This occurs when newer, fiberglass batt insulation with paper facing on one side is installed backwards or upside down, or when older batt insulation wrapped on both sides with paper is installed. The paper facing is flammable. Newer insulation usually has a warning label indicating this on the facing.

    For newer batt insulation with paper facing on one side only, the paper facing should be oriented towards interior spaces rather than exposed, open spaces. The existing insulation should be reinstalled or replaced.

    For older batt insulation with paper facing on both sides, recommend that repairs be made as necessary to eliminate the exposed paper facing.

    A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary, and as per standard building practices and the insulation manufacturer's recommendations to eliminate the fire hazard.

    Also, the paper facing also acts as a vapor barrier, and if located away from the interior surfaces, can trap moisture from condensation in the cavity between the paper facing and the interior spaces. This is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects. The inspector was unable to evaluate the structure obscured by the insulation. When repairs are made, the exposed structure should be evaluated for damage by wood destroying insects and/or organisms, and repairs should be made if necessary.

    Photo 84  
     

    34) Cover plate(s) are missing from one or more electric boxes, such as for receptacles, switches and/or junction boxes. They are intended to contain fire and prevent electric shock from exposed wires. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of fire and shock. Cover plates should be installed where missing.

    Photo 91  
     

    35) One or more exhaust fan ducts are broken and/or have fallen down, or somehow terminate in the attic. This is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects and organisms due to increased moisture levels in the attic from the exhaust air. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make permanent repairs as necessary and as per standard building practices, so all exhaust air is vented outside.

    Photo 89  
     

    36) Ceiling insulation is uneven in some areas. This is likely due to someone having walked on or through the insulation. Recommend installing additional insulation where necessary to restore the original R rating.

    Photo 82  

    Photo 90  

    37) Ceiling insulation is missing in some areas. Recommend installing insulation where missing for better energy efficiency.

    Photo 83  

    Photo 85  

    38) No insulation is installed over the attic access hatch. Recommend installing insulation above hatch for better energy efficiency.

    Photo 86  
     

    39) Stains were visible on the roof structure in one or more areas. These areas were dry at the time of the inspection. The stains may be caused by a past leak. Recommend asking the property owner(s) about past leaks. The client(s) should monitor these areas in the future, especially after heavy rains, to determine if active leaks exist. If leaks are found, a qualified roofing contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary.

    Photo 79  

    Photo 80  

    40) Some attic areas were inaccessible due to lack of permanently installed walkways, the possibility of damage to insulation, low height and/or stored items. These areas are excluded from this inspection.
     
    Electric service Return to table of contents
    Primary service type: Overhead
    Primary service overload protection type: Circuit breakers
    Service amperage (amps): 100
    Service voltage (volts): 120/240
    Location of main service switch: Rear of property
    Location of main disconnect: Breaker at top of main service panel
    Service entrance conductor material: Aluminum
    System ground: Ground rod(s) in soil
    Main disconnect rating (amps): 100
    Branch circuit wiring type: Copper
    Solid strand aluminum branch circuit wiring present: No
    Smoke detectors present: Yes
    41) One or more wires are burned or heat-damaged, or have melted insulation. A qualified electrician should evaluate and repair or replace wiring as necessary.

    Photo 138  

    Photo 139  

    42) This property has "knob and tube" wiring, which was commonly installed prior to 1950. It is ungrounded, and considered unsafe by today's standards. Over time, the wire's insulation may become brittle and fall apart or wear thin, resulting in exposed conductors and a risk of shock and/or fire. This wiring is also easily damaged by covering it with insulation (a common practice), and incorrectly tapping new wiring into it.

    The inspector did not find any energized knob and tube wiring during the inspection. However this is no indication that all the knob and tube wiring has been abandoned. It is not within the scope of this inspection to determine what percentage of this property's wiring is of the knob and tube type, or to determine what percentage of the knob and tube wiring is energized vs. abandoned. A qualified electrician should evaluate this wiring and make repairs or replace wiring as necessary.

    Note that some insurance companies may be unwilling to offer homeowner's insurance for properties with knob and tube wiring. Recommend that the client(s) consult with their insurance carrier regarding this.

    Photo 88  

    Photo 92  

    Photo 93  
     

    43) Exposed wiring and/or bus bars exist in the main service panel due to closure covers missing (slots where circuit breakers fit through the panel cover). This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. Closure covers should be installed where missing to eliminate exposed wiring, and by a qualified electrician if necessary.

    Photo 37  
     

    44) One or more screws are missing from the main service panel cover and should be replaced. Because energized wiring may exist behind the holes with the missing screws, recommend that a qualified, licensed electrician replace these screws, or that care be taken to ensure that the new screws do not come in contact with wiring inside the panel when they are installed. Stock screws from the panel manufacturer should be used, or their equivalent.

    Photo 137  
     

    45) An opening exists at the top of the main service panel. Water may enter the service entrance conduit and equipment as a result. A qualified electrician should evaluate and repair as necessary.

    Photo 38  

    Photo 39  

    46) Main Service panel.

    Photo 35  

    Photo 36  

    47) Sub panel located at the interior of property.

    Photo 140  
     
     
    Water heater Return to table of contents
    Estimated age: Could not be determined, looks old
    Type: Tank
    Energy source: Natural gas
    Capacity (in gallons): Not visible
    Manufacturer: Not visible
    Model: Not visible
    48) Excessive scale was found on the water heater's burner and/or pilot assemblies and/or around the draft hood. This may be caused by condensation in the exhaust flue due to improper drafting and/or continuous use due to the water heater being undersized. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair or replace the water heater as necessary.

    Photo 44  
     

    49) No drain line is installed for the temperature-pressure relief valve. This is a potential safety hazard due to the risk of scalding if someone is standing next to the water heater when the valve opens. A qualified plumber should install a drain line as per standard building practices. For example, extending to 6 inches from the floor, or routed so as to drain outside.

    Photo 41  
     

    50) The outer cover for the water heater combustion chamber is missing, loose, or improperly fitted. This is a potential fire hazard. Repairs should be made as necessary, and by a qualified contractor if necessary, to replace, reinstall or repair the flame shield as necessary.

    Photo 45  
     

    51) Corrosion was found on fittings and/or water supply lines for the water heater. Leaks may exist. A qualified plumbing contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary.

    Photo 42  
     

    52) No drip leg is installed on the water heater gas supply line. Drip legs are intended to trap oil, scale, water condensation and/or debris from the gas supply lines before they reach and damage the water heater components. A qualified contractor should install a drip leg as per standard building practices.

    Photo 43  
     

    53) The estimated useful life for most water heaters is 8 to 12 years. The inspector was unable to determine the age of the water heater due to the manufacturer's label being obscured, no serial number being visible, or the serial number not clearly indicating the age. The clients should be aware that this water heater may be near, at, or beyond its useful life and may need replacing at any time. Recommend attempting to determine the water heater's age, and budgeting for a replacement if necessary.
    54) A permanently installed insulated jacket is installed on the water heater. It obscures the manufacturer's information label and most of the water heater. The inspector was unable to fully evaluate the water heater.

    Photo 40  
     
     
    Heating and cooling Return to table of contents
    Estimated age: Could not be determined
    Primary heating system energy source: Natural gas
    Primary heat system type: Gravity
    Primary A/C energy source: N/A
    Primary Air conditioning type: N/A
    Distribution system: N/A
    Manufacturer: Williams
    Model: Not visible
    55) The inspector was unable to determine the age of the Wall furnace. The clients should be aware that this furnace may be near, at, or beyond its useful life and may need replacing at any time. Recommend attempting to determine the furnace's age (ask property owner or service technician), and budgeting for a replacement if necessary.

    Photo 132  

    Photo 182  

    56) The furnace was shut off at the time of the inspection. For example, the gas supply was shut off, the pilot light was out, and/or the electric supply was turned off. As a result, the inspector was unable to fully evaluate this unit.

    Photo 133  

    Photo 183  
     
    Plumbing and laundry Return to table of contents
    Water pressure (psi): 55-60
    Location of main water shut-off valve: Not found
    Location of main water meter: Street
    Location of main fuel shut-off: Left side of property, rear
    Water service: Public
    Service pipe material: Galvanized steel
    Supply pipe material: Copper, Galvanized steel
    Vent pipe material: Plastic, Cast iron
    Drain pipe material: Plastic, Galvanized steel
    Waste pipe material: Plastic, Cast iron
    57) One or more plumbing vents terminate in the attic. This may result in sewer gases entering living spaces. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary so vent pipes terminate above roof surfaces.

    Photo 87  
     

    58) Cover plate(s) are missing from one or more electric boxes, such as for receptacles, switches and/or junction boxes. They are intended to contain fire and prevent electric shock from exposed wires. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of fire and shock. Cover plates should be installed where missing.

    Photo 131  
     

    59) The gas supply for the laundry area should be capped off when not in use to prevent an accidental gas leak.

    Photo 130  
     

    60) Some, most, or all of the water supply pipes in this structure are made of galvanized steel. Based on the age of this structure, corrosion, leaks, and/or the results of a "functional flow test" performed during the inspection, some or all of these pipes appear to have exceeded their estimated useful life of 40 to 60 years. During a functional flow test, multiple fixtures are run simultaneously to determine if the flow is adequate. For example, if the shower flow decreases substantially when the toilet is flushed. Internal corrosion and rust can reduce the inside diameter of these pipes over time, resulting in reduced flow and leaks. A qualified plumber should evaluate and replace supply pipes and fittings as necessary.

    Photo 76  
    An active leak exist on the corroded supply pipe.

    Photo 77  

    61) Corrosion was visible on one or more areas of copper water supply pipes. This most often occurs with acid water with a pH of less than 6.5. Leaks may result because of this. A qualified plumber should evaluate and replace water supply components as necessary. The client(s) should consult with a qualified plumber regarding the possibility of acidic water, and what solutions may be available to neutralize the pH.

    Photo 65  
     

    62) The clothes dryer exhaust duct is broken or disconnected in one or more places. Clothes dryers produce large amounts of moisture which should not enter structure interiors. Damage to building components may result. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make permanent repairs as necessary. For more information, visit:
    http://www.cpsc.gov/CPSCPUB/PUBS/5022.html

    Photo 127  

    Photo 129  

    63) One or more drain and/or waste pipes are disconnected. A qualified plumber should evaluate and repair as necessary.

    Photo 68  
     

    64) The inspector was not able to find the main water shut-off valve. The client(s) should consult with the property owner(s) to determine if a shut-off valve exists, find it themselves, or hire a qualified plumber if necessary to find it. If no shut-off valve is found for the structure, then recommend having a qualified plumber install one to more easily allow the water supply to be turned off in the event of an emergency, such as when a supply pipe bursts.
    65) Water Meter.

    Photo 6  
     

    66) Main Fuel shut-off Location.

    Photo 32  

    Photo 33  
     
    Crawl space Return to table of contents
    Inspection method: Partially traversed
    Insulation material underneath floor above: None visible
    Pier or support post material: Concrete
    Beam material: Solid wood
    Floor structure above: Solid wood joists
    Vapor barrier present: No
    67) One or more pier or foundation footings are undermined, where soil has either eroded out from underneath, or has been excavated too close to the footing. Structural engineers typically require undisturbed soil to extend at least a foot horizontally out from the edge of footings, and then slope down no more steeply than 45 degrees. Otherwise soil may collapse from beneath the footing(s). A qualified structural engineer should evaluate and determine what repairs if any should be made. If repairs are prescribed, then a qualified contractor should perform them in accordance with the engineer's recommendations.

    Photo 66  

    Photo 78  

    68) One or more sections of the foundation appear to be substandard. These appear to be a structural concern. The client(s) are strongly advised to hire qualified contractors and/or engineers as necessary for further evaluation. Such contractors may include:

  • Foundation repair contractors who may prescribe repairs, and will give cost estimates for prescribed repairs
  • Masonry contractors who repair and/or replace brick veneer
  • Structural engineers who determine if repairs are necessary, and prescribe those repairs

    Photo 63  

    Photo 64  

    Photo 73  
     

    69) No insulation is installed under the floor in the crawl space. Recommend that a qualified contractor install R19 or better (6" thick fiberglass batt) insulation under the floor for better energy efficiency.
    70) Evidence of prior water intrusion was found in one or more sections of the crawl space. For example, sediment stains on the vapor barrier or foundation, and/or efflorescence on the foundation. Accumulated water is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects and organisms and should not be present in the crawl space. The client(s) should review any disclosure statements available and ask the property owner(s) about past accumulation of water in the crawl space. The crawl space should be monitored in the future for accumulated water, especially after heavy and/or prolonged periods of rain. If water is found to accumulate, a qualified contractor who specializes in drainage issues should evaluate and repair as necessary. Typical repairs for preventing water from accumulating in crawl spaces include:

  • Repairing, installing or improving rain run-off systems (gutters, downspouts and extensions or drain lines)
  • Improving perimeter grading
  • Repairing, installing or improving underground footing and/or curtain drains

    Ideally, water should not enter crawl spaces, but if water must be controlled after it enters the crawl space, then typical repairs include installing trenches, gravity drains and/or sump pump(s) in the crawl space.

    Photo 62  
     

    71) Wooden support posts are not securely fastened to beams above. This is a safety hazard since they can separate during a seismic event. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary, such as installing metal ties, bracing with lumber and/or plywood gussets as per standard building practices.

    Photo 72  
     

    72) Rot was found in some areas of the subfloor. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary, replacing all rotten wood.

    Photo 69  

    Photo 70  

    Photo 74  

    Photo 75  

    73) No vapor barrier is installed. This is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects and organisms due to the likelihood of water evaporating into the structure from the soil. A qualified contractor should install a vapor barrier. Standard building practices require the following:

  • The soil below the vapor barrier should be smooth and free from sharp objects.
  • Seams should overlap a minimum of 12 inches.
  • The vapor barrier should lap up onto the foundation side walls.

    Better building practices require that:

  • Seams and protrusions should be sealed with a pressure sensitive tape.
  • The vapor barrier should be caulked and attached tightly to the foundation side walls. For example, with furring strips and masonry nails.
    74) Some crawl space areas were inaccessible due to low height (less than 18 inches), ductwork or pipes blocking, standing water, and/or stored items. These areas are excluded from this inspection.

    Photo 71  
     
     
    Kitchen Return to table of contents

    75) One or more electric receptacles and/or the boxes they are installed in are loose and/or not securely anchored. Wire conductors may be damaged due to repeated movement and/or tension on wires, or insulation may be damaged. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock and fire. A qualified electrician should evaluate and repair as necessary.

    Photo 124  
     

    76) One or more electric receptacles that serve countertop surfaces within six feet of a sink appear to have no ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate to determine if GFCI protection exists, and if not, repairs should be made so that all receptacles that serve countertop surfaces within six feet of sinks have GFCI protection. For example, install GFCI receptacles or circuit breaker(s) as needed.

    Photo 121  

    Photo 122  

    77) Cover plate(s) are missing from one or more electric boxes, such as for receptacles, switches and/or junction boxes. They are intended to contain fire and prevent electric shock from exposed wires. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of fire and shock. Cover plates should be installed where missing.

    Photo 120  
     

    78) The gas supply line for the kitchen area should be capped off when not in used to prevent accidental gas leak.

    Photo 106  
     

    79) One or more sink drains have an active leak. For example, at pipe fittings and/or junctions between pipe and sink. A qualified plumber should evaluate and repair as necessary.

    Photo 117  
     

    80) The range hood fan is noisy or vibrates excessively. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair or replace the fan or range hood as necessary.

    Photo 123  
     

    81) The under-sink food disposal is inoperable. A qualified plumber or contractor should evaluate and repair or replace the food disposal as necessary.

    Photo 119  
     

    82) One or more faucets leak by handle(s) or at their base when turned on. A qualified plumber should evaluate and repair as necessary.

    Photo 115  
     

    83) One or more cabinets and/or drawers are damaged and/or deteriorated. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair or replace cabinets and/or components as necessary.

    Photo 125  
     

    84) Tile, stone and/or grout countertops are damaged and/or deteriorated in one or more areas. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary. For example, replacing broken tiles and deteriorated grout, and resealing grout.

    Photo 114  
     

    85) Water damage was found in the shelving or cabinet components below one or more sinks. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary.

    Photo 116  

    Photo 118  
    Mold is visible on the wall behind. Recommend hiring a contractor (or other professional service provider) to do the cleanup, make sure the contractor has experience cleaning up mold.

    86) Vinyl flooring is damaged and/or deteriorated in one or more areas. A qualified contractor should replace or repair the damaged flooring.

    Photo 107  
     

    87) Caulk is missing and/or deteriorated where countertops meet backsplashes in wet areas, such as around sinks. Caulk should be replaced where deteriorated and/or applied where missing to prevent water damage.

    Photo 113  
     

    88) One or more light fixtures appear to be inoperable. Recommend further evaluation by replacing bulb(s) and/or consulting with the property owner(s). Repairs or replacement of the light fixture(s) by a qualified electrician may be necessary.

    Photo 126  
     

    89) The enamel coating on one or more sinks is damaged and/or deteriorated. For example, chipped or worn, and/or rust on some exposed steel. However, no leaks were found due to the deterioration. The client(s) should evaluate to determine if the sinks should be replaced.

    Photo 110  

    Photo 111  

    Photo 112  
     
     
    Bathrooms Return to table of contents

    90) One or more ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) electric receptacles did not trip when tested with the inspector's test instrument. These devices should trip when tested with a test instrument in addition to tripping via the test buttons on the receptacles. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate and repair as necessary.

    Photo 156  

    Photo 157  

    91) One or more electric receptacles that serve countertop surfaces within six feet of a sink appear to have no ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate to determine if GFCI protection exists, and if not, repairs should be made so that all receptacles that serve countertop surfaces within six feet of sinks have GFCI protection. For example, install GFCI receptacles or circuit breaker(s) as needed.

    Photo 172  
     

    92) One or more electric receptacles and/or the boxes they are installed in are loose and/or not securely anchored. Wire conductors may be damaged due to repeated movement and/or tension on wires, or insulation may be damaged. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock and fire. A qualified electrician should evaluate and repair as necessary.

    Photo 173  
     

    93) Floor tiles installed in "wet" areas have gaps between them. The wooden subfloor beneath may be damaged by water intrusion. A qualified contractor should evaluate, make repairs if necessary, and replace flooring with a waterproof floor such as sheet vinyl in wet areas.

    Photo 165  
     

    94) One or more toilets are loose. A qualified contractor should remove the toilet(s) for further evaluation and repairs if necessary. A new wax ring should be installed and toilet(s) should be securely anchored to the floor to prevent movement and leaking.

    Photo 164  
     

    95) Tile and/or grout in one or more showers is damaged and/or deteriorated. For example, deteriorated or missing grout, cracked, missing or loose tiles, etc. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair tile and/or grout as necessary.

    Photo 160  

    Photo 161  

    Photo 167  

    Photo 168  

    96) One or more exhaust fans are noisy or vibrate excessively. A qualified contractor should evaluate and replace the fan(s) or make repairs as necessary.

    Photo 166  
     

    97) One or more bathrooms with a shower do not have an exhaust fan installed. Moisture accumulation will occur and may damage the structure. Even if the bathroom has a window that opens, it likely does not provide adequate ventilation, especially during cold weather when the window is closed. A qualified contractor should install exhaust fans as per standard building practices where missing in bathrooms with showers.

    Photo 162  
     

    98) One or more sink stopper mechanisms are missing, or need adjustment or repair. Stopper mechanisms should be installed where missing and/or repairs should be made so sink stoppers open and close easily.

    Photo 163  

    Photo 175  

    99) Recommend installing a shower drain screen where missing.

    Photo 169  
     

    100) Caulk is missing or deteriorated along the base of one or more bathtubs, where flooring meets the tub. It should be replaced where deteriorated and/or applied where missing to prevent water intrusion and damage to the floor structure.

    Photo 158  
     

    101) Caulk is missing or deteriorated around the base of one or more bathtub spouts. It should be replaced where deteriorated and/or applied where missing to prevent water intrusion and damage to wall structures.

    Photo 159  
     

    102) Caulk is missing and/or deteriorated where countertops meet backsplashes in wet areas, such as around sinks. Caulk should be replaced where deteriorated and/or applied where missing to prevent water damage.

    Photo 170  

    Photo 171  

    103) One or more light fixtures appear to be inoperable. Recommend further evaluation by replacing bulb(s) and/or consulting with the property owner(s). Repairs or replacement of the light fixture(s) by a qualified electrician may be necessary.

    Photo 174  
     
     
    Interior rooms Return to table of contents

    104) One or more open ground, three-pronged grounding type receptacles were found. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate and make repairs as necessary.

    Grounding type receptacles were first required in residential structures during the 1960s. Based on the age of this structure and/or the absence of 2-pronged receptacles, repairs should be made by correcting wiring circuits as necessary so all receptacles are grounded as per standard building practices. Replacement of three-pronged receptacles with 2-pronged receptacles is not an acceptable solution.

    Photo 155  

    Photo 180  

    105) One or more electric receptacles and/or the boxes they are installed in are loose and/or not securely anchored. Wire conductors may be damaged due to repeated movement and/or tension on wires, or insulation may be damaged. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock and fire. A qualified electrician should evaluate and repair as necessary.

    Photo 143  
     

    106) The light fixture in one or more long hallways is controlled by a single switch at one end. This is a safety hazard due to inadequate lighting. The light should be controlled by three-way switches near each end of the hallway so it can be easily operated at both ends. A qualified electrician should evaluate and make repairs as necessary.

    Photo 149  
    The inspector was unable to determine the function of the multiple switches located in the hallway.

    Photo 181  

    107) One or more sections of wiring that weren't terminated were found. This is a potential safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate and repair as necessary. For example, cutting the wire to length and terminating the wire with wire nuts in a securely anchored, covered, properly sized junction box.

    Photo 184  

    Photo 185  

    108) One or more smoke alarms are damaged, deteriorated and/or missing from their mounting brackets. Damaged and/or missing smoke alarms should be replaced as necessary so a functioning one exists in each hallway leading to bedrooms, and in each bedroom. For more information, visit:
    http://www.cpsc.gov/cpscpub/pubs/5077.html

    Photo 186  
     

    109) One or more interior doors have a keyed lockset or deadbolt installed. This is a safety hazard for small children in the event that they lock themselves in the room, do not know how to unlock the door, and the key is not available. Keyed locksets and/or deadbolts should be replaced as necessary with "privacy" locksets that don't require a key.

    Photo 150  
     

    110) Cover plate(s) are missing from one or more electric boxes, such as for receptacles, switches and/or junction boxes. They are intended to contain fire and prevent electric shock from exposed wires. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of fire and shock. Cover plates should be installed where missing.

    Photo 134  

    Photo 154  

    111) Batteries in all the smoke alarms should be replaced after taking occupancy, and annually in the future. "Chirping" noises emitted from smoke alarms typically indicate that batteries need replacing. For more information, visit:
    http://www.cpsc.gov/cpscpub/pubs/5077.html

    Photo 136  

    Photo 151  

    112) Some ceiling areas in this structure have "popcorn" textured surfaces possibly installed prior to 1979. This material may contain asbestos, which is a known carcinogen and poses a health hazard. Laws were passed in the United States in 1978 prohibiting use of asbestos in residential structures, but stocks of existing materials have been known to be used for some time thereafter. The client(s) may wish to have this ceiling material tested by a qualified lab to determine if it does contain asbestos.

    In most cases, when the material is intact and in good condition, keeping it encapsulated with paint and not disturbing it may reduce or effectively eliminate the health hazard. If the client wishes to remove the material, or plans to disturb it through remodeling, they should have it tested by a qualified lab and/or consult with a qualified industrial hygienist or asbestos abatement specialist. For more information, visit:
    http://www.cpsc.gov/CPSCPUB/PUBS/453.html

    113) Floors in one or more areas are not level. Significant repairs may be needed to make floors level, such as repairs to the foundation. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary.

    Photo 108  

    Photo 109  

    Photo 141  

    Photo 142  

    114) One or more sliding closet doors are difficult to open or close. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair or replace door(s) as necessary.

    Photo 179  
     

    115) Squeaking or creaking noises occur when walking on one or more sections of flooring. This is usually caused by substandard construction practices where the subfloor decking is not adequately fastened to the framing below. For example, not enough glue was used and/or nails were used rather than screws. In most cases, this is only an annoyance rather than a structural problem. Various solutions such as Squeeeeek No More and Counter Snap fasteners exist to correct this. Repairs to eliminate the squeaks or creaks may be more or less difficult depending on the floor covering, and the access to the underside of the subfloor. Recommend having a qualified contractor evaluate and repair as necessary. For more information, visit:
    http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q=squeaky+floors

    Photo 148  
     

    116) One or more interior doors are damaged and/or deteriorated and should be repaired or replaced by a qualified contractor.

    Photo 146  

    Photo 147  

    117) The weatherstrip around one or more exterior entry doors is missing and/or deteriorated. Weatherstrip should be installed where missing and/or replaced where deteriorated, and by a qualified contractor if necessary.

    Photo 104  

    Photo 105  

    Photo 152  

    Photo 153  

    118) Vinyl flooring is damaged and/or deteriorated in one or more areas. A qualified contractor should replace or repair the damaged flooring.

    Photo 103  

    Photo 128  

    119) Fixtures such as door stops, towel bars and/or toilet paper holders are missing in one or more areas. Recommend having a qualified contractor install fixtures where missing.
    120) One or more exterior entrance doors are damaged and/or deteriorated and should be repaired or replaced by a qualified contractor.

    Photo 28  

    Photo 29  

    121) One or more light fixtures appear to be inoperable. Recommend further evaluation by replacing bulb(s) and/or consulting with the property owner(s). Repairs or replacement of the light fixture(s) by a qualified electrician may be necessary.

    Photo 135  

    Photo 145  

    122) One or more interior door are sealed closed and could not be fully evaluated.

    Photo 144  

    Photo 178  

     
    1.1. A Home Inspection is a non-invasive, visual examination of a residential dwelling, performed for a fee, which is designed to identify observed material defects within specific components of said dwelling. Components may include any combination of mechanical, structural, electrical, plumbing, or other essential systems or portions of the home, as identified and agreed to by the Client and Inspector, prior to the inspection process.

    I. A home inspection is intended to assist in evaluation of the overall condition of the dwelling. The inspection is based on observation of the visible and apparent condition of the structure and its components on the date of the inspection, and not the prediction of future conditions.

    II. A home inspection will not reveal every concern that exists or ever could exist, but only those material defects observed on the day of the inspection.

    III. A home inspection can include a survey and/or analysis of energy flows and usage in a residential property if the client requests it.

    1.2. A Material Defect is a condition of a residential real property, or any portion of it, that would have a significant, adverse impact on the value of the real property, or that involves an unreasonable risk to people on the property. The fact that a structural element, system or subsystem is near, at or beyond the end of the normal useful life of such a structural element, system or subsystem is not by itself a material defect.

    1.3. An Inspection Report shall describe and identify, in written format, the inspected systems, structures, and components of the dwelling, and shall identify material defects observed. Inspection reports may contain recommendations regarding conditions reported or recommendations for correction, monitoring or further evaluation by professionals, but this is not required.
    A complete copy of the STANDARDS OF PRACTICE we adhere to can be found at the following link: http://www.nachi.org/sop.htm