Red, White & Blue Home Inspections LLC

Website: http://www.fayettevillehomeinspections.com
Email: tylerblue83@gmail.com
Phone: (910) 988-8337
1521 Berkshire Rd 
Fayetteville NC 28304
Inspector: Glenn Tyler Blue
NCHIL # 3156

 

Property Inspection Report
Client(s):  Dennis Morgan
Property address:  231 Murray Fork Dr.
Fayetteville, NC 28314
Inspection date:  Friday, March 15, 2013

This report published on Saturday, March 16, 2013 4:24:20 PM EDT

View report Summary

This report is the exclusive property of this inspection company and the client(s) listed in the report title. Use of this report by any unauthorized persons is prohibited.

 
How to Read this Report
This report is organized by the property's functional areas.  Within each functional area, descriptive information is listed first and is shown in bold type.  Items of concern follow descriptive information.
Concerns are shown and sorted according to these types:
SafetyPoses a safety hazard 
Major defectCorrection likely involves a significant expense 
Repair/ReplaceRecommend repairing or replacing 
Repair/MaintainRecommend repair and/or maintenance 
MaintainRecommend ongoing maintenance 
EvaluateRecommend evaluation by a specialist 
MonitorRecommend monitoring in the future 
CommentFor your information 

Click here for a glossary of building construction terms.Contact your inspector If there are terms that you do not understand, or visit the glossary of construction terms at http://www.reporthost.com/glossary.asp

Table of Contents
General information
Exterior
Roof
Attic
Electric service
Water heater
Heating and cooling
Plumbing and laundry
Fireplaces, woodstoves and chimneys
Crawl space
Kitchen
Bathrooms
Interior rooms
 
 
General information Return to table of contents
Type of building: Single family
Age of building: 1972
Time started: 8:30
Time finished: 11:00
Inspection Fee: $300.00
Payment method: Check
Present during inspection: Property owner(s)
Occupied: No
Weather conditions: Clear
Temperature: Cold40's
Ground condition: Dry
Foundation type: Crawlspace
The following items are excluded from this inspection: Shed
1) Structures built prior to 1979 may contain lead-based paint and/or asbestos in various building materials such as insulation, siding, and/or floor and ceiling tiles. Both lead and asbestos are known health hazards. Evaluating for the presence of lead and/or asbestos is not included in this inspection. The client(s) should consult with specialists as necessary, such as industrial hygienists, professional labs and/or abatement contractors for this type of evaluation. For information on lead, asbestos and other hazardous materials in homes, visit these websites:
  • The Environmental Protection Association (http://www.epa.gov)
  • The Consumer Products Safety Commission (http://www.cpsc.gov)
  • The Center for Disease Control (http://www.cdc.gov)
    2) The water service was turned off during the inspection because a major leak was discovered . As a result, plumbing supply, drain and waste lines, fixtures, and some appliances such as water heaters weren't fully evaluated.
     
     
    Exterior Return to table of contents
    Footing material: Poured in place concrete
    Foundation material: Concrete block, Brick
    Apparent wall structure: Wood frame
    Wall covering: Composition wood clapboard
    Driveway material: Poured in place concrete
    Sidewalk material: Poured in place concrete
    Exterior door material: Solid core wood
    3) Rot was found in one or more areas on soffit boards. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary, replacing all rotten wood.

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    4) One or more light fixtures appear to be inoperable. Recommend further evaluation by replacing bulb(s) and/or consulting with the property owner(s). Repairs or replacement of the light fixture(s) by a qualified electrician may be necessary.
    5) The roof for the screened deck is failing. As a result the ceiling is falling down due to water penetration. Recommend having a qualifed contractor evaluate and repair.

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    6) One or more gutters are damaged. This can result in water accumulating around the structure's foundation, or in basements and crawl spaces if they exist. Accumulated water is a conducive condition to wood destroying insects and organisms, and may also cause the foundation to settle and possibly fail over time. A qualified contractor should replace or repair gutters where necessary.

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    7) One or more crawl space vent screens are missing. Animals such as vermin or pets may enter the crawl space and nest, die and/or leave feces and urine. A qualified contractor should install screens where missing using screen material such as "hardware cloth" with 1/4 inch minimum gaps.
    8) One or more outside faucets aren't anchored securely to the structure's exterior. Fasteners should be installed or replaced as necessary so faucets are securely anchored to prevent stress on plumbing supply lines and possible leaks. It appears that this faucet copper line has been cut because the faucet can spin around. Have a licensed plumbing contractor evaluate and repair.

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    9) One or more minor cracks (1/8 inch or less) were found in the foundation. These don't appear to be a structural concern, but recommend sealing them to prevent water infiltration and monitoring them in the future. Numerous products exist to seal such cracks including:
  • Hydraulic cement. Requires chiseling a channel in the crack to apply.
  • Resilient caulks (easy to apply).
  • Epoxy sealants (both a waterproof and structural repair).

    Photo 2  
     

    10) Vegetation such as trees, shrubs and/or vines are in contact with or less than one foot from the structure's exterior. Vegetation can serve as a conduit for wood destroying insects and may retain moisture against the exterior after it rains. Vegetation should be pruned and/or removed as necessary to maintain a one foot clearance between it and the structure's exterior.
    11) The exterior finish in some areas is failing. A qualified contractor should prep (pressure wash, scrape, sand, prime caulk, etc.) and repaint or restain areas as needed and as per standard building practices.

    Photo 1  
     

    12) Minor cracks were found in the driveway. However they don't appear to be a structural concern and no trip hazards were found. No immediate action is recommended, but the client(s) may wish to have repairs made or have cracked sections replaced for aesthetic reasons.
     
     
    Roof Return to table of contents
    Roof inspection method: Traversed
    Roof type: Cross gable
    Roof covering: Asphalt or fiberglass composition shingles
    Gutter & downspout material: Aluminum
    Roof ventilation: Adequate
    13) One or more sections of flashing at the base of the chimney are deteriorated and/or substandard. Leaks may occur as a result. A qualified roofing contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary.

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    14) One or more composition shingles are damaged, deteriorated and/or missing, and should be replaced. Leaks may occur as a result. A qualified roofing contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary.

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    15) One or more "rubber boot" flashings are damaged or deteriorated and may result in leaks or vermin intrusion. A qualified contractor should replace flashings where necessary.

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    16) One or more vents are lifting at the base or are improperly installed so that water or vermin intrusion may occur. A qualified contractor should make repairs as necessary, such as permanently fastening down the lifted edge(s), or reinstalling flashings.

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    17) Composition tabbed shingles are installed on one or more roof sections with a slope less than 3/12 (three inches rise for every 12 inches run). Most shingle manufacturers won't warranty composition shingles if used on a roof with a slope less than 3/12. At a minimum, the client(s) should consult with a qualified roofing contractor regarding this and monitor these roof section(s) and interior spaces below for leaks in the future. Ideally, or if leaks occur, a qualified roofing contractor should replace the roof surface with materials intended for low slopes such as a "torch down" roof.

    One or more flashings at parapet walls are deteriorated and/or substandard. These may result in leaks. A qualified roofing contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary.

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    Attic Return to table of contents
    Inspection method: Partially traversed
    Roof structure type: Trusses
    Ceiling structure: Trusses
    Insulation material: Fiberglass loose fill
    18) Wire splices are exposed due to not being contained in a covered junction box. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock and fire. A qualified electrician should evaluate and make repairs as necessary. For example, install securely mounted junction boxes with cover plates where needed to contain wiring splices.

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    19) Stains were visible on the roof structure in one or more areas. These areas were dry at the time of the inspection. The stains may be caused by a past leak. Recommend asking the property owner(s) about past leaks. The client(s) should monitor these areas in the future, especially after heavy rains, to determine if active leaks exist. If leaks are found, a qualified roofing contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary.

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    20) Some attic areas were inaccessible due to lack of permanently installed walkways, the possibility of damage to insulation, low height and/or stored items. These areas are excluded from this inspection.
     
     
    Electric service Return to table of contents
    Primary service type: Underground
    Primary service overload protection type: Circuit breakers
    Service amperage (amps): 200
    Service voltage (volts): 120/240
    Location of main service switch: Hallway
    Location of main disconnect: No single main disconnect, use all breakers in main service panel
    Service entrance conductor material: Aluminum
    System ground: Ground rod(s) in soil
    Main disconnect rating (amps): Not applicable, no single main disconnect
    Branch circuit wiring type: Copper
    Solid strand aluminum branch circuit wiring present: No
    Smoke detectors present: Yes
     
     
    Water heater Return to table of contents
    Type: Tank
    Energy source: Electricity
    Capacity (in gallons): 50
    Manufacturer: Richmond
    21) The estimated useful life for most water heaters is 8 to 12 years. This water heater appears to be at this age or older and may need replacing at any time. Recommend budgeting for a replacement in the near future.
    22) Corrosion was found on fittings and/or water supply lines for the water heater. Leaks may exist. A qualified plumbing contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary.

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    Heating and cooling Return to table of contents
    Primary heating system energy source: Electric
    Primary heat system type: Heat pump
    Primary A/C energy source: Electric
    Primary Air conditioning type: Heat pump
    Distribution system: Sheet metal ducts, Flexible ducts
    Manufacturer: Unknown
    Filter location: Behind return air grill
    23) The estimated useful life for most heat pumps is 15 to 20 years. This heat pump appears to be approaching this age and may need replacing at any time. Recommend budgeting for a replacement in the near future.
    24) The heat pump did not respond when its controls were operated. This system was not fully evaluated. The client(s) should consult with the property owner(s) as to how it operates and have a qualified heating and cooling contractor evaluate and make repairs if necessary.
    25) One or more heating/cooling ducts are lying on the ground. Ducts should be supported (typically with straps or hangers) so that they are not in contact with the ground and subject to damage from moisture. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary so ducts are suspended as per standard building practices, and not in contact with the ground.
    26) One or more sections of flex duct are sagging excessively. Most manufacturers, and the Sheet Metal and Air Conditioning Contractors National Association (SMACNA) recommend that this type of duct sag no more than 1/2" per foot between supports. A qualified heating/cooling contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary.
    27) One or more sections of flex duct are improperly supported and installed in a substandard way. Most manufacturers and the Sheet Metal and Air Conditioning Contractors National Association (SMACNA) recommend that flex duct be supported with the following guidelines:
  • Ducts should not sag more than 1/2 inch every foot between supports
  • Support straps should be spaced no farther apart than 5 feet
  • Support straps should be 1-1/2 inches wide or more

    A qualified heating/cooling contractor should evaluate and repair ducts and/or supports as necessary.
    28) Insulation for the outside condensing unit's refrigerant lines is damaged, deteriorated and/or missing in one or more areas. This may result in reduced efficiency and increased energy costs. A qualified heating and cooling contractor should replace insulation as necessary.
    29) The last service date of this system appears to be more than one year ago, or the inspector was unable to determine the last service date. The client(s) should ask the property owner(s) when it was last serviced. If unable to determine the last service date, or if this system was serviced more than one year ago, a qualified heating and cooling contractor should inspect, clean, and service this system, and make repairs if necessary. This servicing should be performed annually in the future.
     
     
    Plumbing and laundry Return to table of contents
    Location of main water shut-off valve: Small closet left side of home
    Location of main water meter: Left side of yard
    Location of main fuel shut-off: None
    Water service: Public
    Service pipe material: Copper
    Supply pipe material: Copper
    Vent pipe material: Plastic
    Drain pipe material: Plastic
    Waste pipe material: Plastic
    30) The floor where the washer and dryer go has been damaged by water. The subfloor needs to be replaced. Have a qualifed contractor evaluate and make necessary repairs.

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    31) Many copper supply lines appear to be cut and damaged in the crawlspace. The Inspector cut the water off when he noticed large amounts of water being dumped into crawlspace. Have a licensed plumbing contractor repair all damaged copper lines under the home.

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    32) The main shut-off has a small leak around the handle when the water is on. When the shut-off is off it allows water to pass by which empties into crawlspace due to cut supply lines. Have the shut-off repaired by a licensed plumbing contractor.

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    33) Stains were found in one or more sections of drain and/or waste pipes. Recommend monitoring these areas in the future, and if leaks are found, have a qualified plumber evaluate and repair as necessary. Alternatively, the client(s) may wish to have a qualified plumber evaluate now and repair if necessary.

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    Fireplaces, woodstoves and chimneys Return to table of contents
    Fireplace type: Masonry
    Chimney type: Masonry
    34) A significant amount of creosote (1/8 inch or more) is visible in the fireplace flue. A qualified chimney service contractor should inspect, clean, and repair if necessary now and annually in the future.
    35) No damper is visible in one or more fireplaces. This can result in increased energy costs due to unconditioned air entering living spaces, or due to conditioned air exiting living spaces through the chimney. A qualified chimney service contractor should evaluate and make modifications as necessary, such as installing a closeable damper.
    36) The masonry chimney crown is deteriorated (cracked or broken) and needs repairs or replacement. The crown is meant to keep water off of the chimney structure. The chimney can be damaged by wet masonry going through freeze-thaw cycles. A properly constructed chimney crown should:
  • Be constructed using either pre-cast concrete slabs, cast-in-place steel reinforced concrete, solid stone, or metal
  • Be sloped down from the flue a minimum of 3 inches of fall per foot of run
  • Extend a minimum of 2-1/2 inches beyond the face of the chimney on all sides
  • Not directly contact the flue liner (if installed), and this gap should be filled with flexible caulk
  • Have flashing installed between the bottom of the crown and the top of the brick chimney

    A qualified chimney service contractor or mason should evaluate and repair or replace the crown as necessary.

    Photo 12  
     

    37) All solid fuel burning appliances (woodstoves and fireplaces, etc.) should be inspected annually by a qualified chimney service contractor, cleaned and repaired as necessary.
     
     
    Crawl space Return to table of contents
    Inspection method: Partially traversed
    Insulation material underneath floor above: Fiberglass roll or batt
    Pier or support post material: Concrete, Masonry
    Beam material: Solid wood
    Floor structure above: Solid wood joists
    Vapor barrier present: Yes
    38) One or more notches are cut into the middle third of joist(s). This is substandard construction and has damaged the joist(s). A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary.

    Photo 18  
     

    39) Standing water was found in one or more sections of the crawl space. Accumulated water is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects and organisms and should not be present in the crawl space. A qualified contractor who specializes in drainage issues should evaluate and repair as necessary. Typical repairs for preventing water from accumulating in crawl spaces include:
  • Repairing, installing or improving rain run-off systems (gutters, downspouts and extensions or drain lines)
  • Improving perimeter grading
  • Repairing, installing or improving underground footing and/or curtain drains

    Ideally, water should not enter crawl spaces, but if water must be controlled after it enters the crawl space, then typical repairs include installing trenches, drains and/or sump pump(s) in the crawl space.

    Photo 16  
     

    40) The vapor barrier is in poor condition. For example, installed in a substandard way, large areas of exposed soil, cuts or tears in the plastic, significant amounts of sediment on top, etc. This is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects and organisms due to the likelihood of water evaporating into the structure from the soil. A qualified contractor should replace the vapor barrier. Standard building practices require the following:
  • The soil below the vapor barrier should be smooth and free from sharp objects.
  • Seams should overlap a minimum of 12 inches.
  • The vapor barrier should lap up onto the foundation side walls.

    Better building practices require that:
  • Seams and protrusions should be sealed with a pressure sensitive tape.
  • The vapor barrier should be caulked and attached tightly to the foundation side walls. For example, with furring strips and masonry nails.
    41) Insulation under the floor in the crawlspace is damaged, deteriorated, or has fallen down. A qualified contractor should make repairs as necessary to restore the insulation to its original rating.
    42) No insulation under floor in crawl space in some areas. Recommend that a qualified contractor install R19 or better (6" thick fiberglass batt) insulation below floor where missing for energy efficiency.
    43) Some crawl space areas were inaccessible due to low height (less than 18 inches), ductwork or pipes blocking, standing water, and/or stored items. These areas are excluded from this inspection.
     
     
    Kitchen Return to table of contents

    44) One or more electric receptacles that serve countertop surfaces within six feet of a sink appear to have no ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate to determine if GFCI protection exists, and if not, repairs should be made so that all receptacles that serve countertop surfaces within six feet of sinks have GFCI protection. For example, install GFCI receptacles or circuit breaker(s) as needed.
    45) The refrigerator appears to be inoperable. The client(s) should ask the property owner(s) about this, and if necessary, the refrigerator should be replaced, or a qualified appliance technician should evaluate and repair.
    46) The oven bake function appears to be inoperable. The client(s) should ask the property owner(s) about this, and if necessary, a qualified appliance technician should evaluate and repair as necessary.
    47) One or more stove top burners are inoperable. A qualified appliance technician should evaluate and repair as necessary.
    48) One or more cabinets and/or drawers are damaged and/or deteriorated. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair or replace cabinets and/or components as necessary.
    49) Vinyl flooring is damaged and/or deteriorated in one or more areas. A qualified contractor should replace or repair the damaged flooring.
    50) Water stains and/or minor water damage was found in the shelving or cabinet components below the sink. The client(s) should evaluate and consider having repairs made.
     
     
    Bathrooms Return to table of contents

    51) One or more electric receptacles that serve countertop surfaces within six feet of a sink appear to have no ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate to determine if GFCI protection exists, and if not, repairs should be made so that all receptacles that serve countertop surfaces within six feet of sinks have GFCI protection. For example, install GFCI receptacles or circuit breaker(s) as needed.
    52) Tile and/or grout around one or more bathtubs is damaged or deteriorated. For example, deteriorated or missing grout, cracked, missing or loose tiles, etc. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair tile and/or grout as necessary.

    Photo 24  
     

    53) One or more bathrooms with a shower do not have an exhaust fan installed. Moisture accumulation will occur and may damage the structure. Even if the bathroom has a window that opens, it likely does not provide adequate ventilation, especially during cold weather when the window is closed. A qualified contractor should install exhaust fans as per standard building practices where missing in bathrooms with showers.
    54) One or more light fixtures appear to be inoperable. Recommend further evaluation by replacing bulb(s) and/or consulting with the property owner(s). Repairs or replacement of the light fixture(s) by a qualified electrician may be necessary.
    55) Water stains and/or minor water damage was found in the shelving or cabinet components below the sink. The client(s) should evaluate and consider having repairs made.
     
     
    Interior rooms Return to table of contents

    56) One or more electric receptacles have reverse-polarity wiring, where the hot and neutral wires are reversed. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate and make repairs as necessary.

    Photo 25  
     

    57) One or more electric receptacles and/or the boxes they are installed in are loose and/or not securely anchored. Wire conductors may be damaged due to repeated movement and/or tension on wires, or insulation may be damaged. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock and fire. A qualified electrician should evaluate and repair as necessary.
    58) Based on the age of this structure and the appearance of existing smoke alarms, the alarms may be older than 10 years old. According to National Fire Protection Association, aging smoke alarms don't operate as efficiently and often are the source for nuisance alarms. Older smoke alarms are estimated to have a 30% probability of failure within the first 10 years. Newer smoke alarms do better, but should be replaced after 10 years. Unless you know that the smoke alarms are new, replacing them when moving into a new residence is also recommended by NFPA. For more information, visit:
    http://www.google.com/search?q=old+smoke+alarms

    59) One or more air supply registers has a weak air flow, or no apparent flow, and may result in an inadequate air supply for heating/cooling. Recommend asking the property owner(s) about this. Adjustable damper(s) in ducts may exist and be reducing the flow. If dampers exist, then they should be opened to attempt to improve the air flow. If the property owner(s) are unaware of such dampers, or if adjusting dampers does not improve the air flow, then a qualified heating/cooling contractor should evaluate and repair or make modifications as necessary.
    60) One or more electric receptacles appear to have no power. Recommend asking the property owner(s) about this. Switches may need to be operated to make some receptacles energized. If necessary, a qualified electrician should evaluate and make repairs as necessary.
    61) Glass in one or more windows is broken. A qualified contractor should replace glass where necessary.
    62) Vinyl flooring is damaged and/or deteriorated in one or more areas. A qualified contractor should replace or repair the damaged flooring.
    63) One or more light fixtures appear to be inoperable. Recommend further evaluation by replacing bulb(s) and/or consulting with the property owner(s). Repairs or replacement of the light fixture(s) by a qualified electrician may be necessary.

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    64) Stains were found in one or more ceiling areas. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary.

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    65) Minor cracks were found in walls in one or more areas. They do not appear to be a structural concern, but the client(s) may wish to repair these for aesthetic reasons.

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    The Inspection was in accordance with the "standards and practice and the code of ethics" of the NC Home Inspector Licensure Board. The inspection was visual in nature and not technically exhaustive. The Inspector did not dismantle and/or move equipment, systems, furniture, appliances, floor covers, finished surfaces or components, personal property or other items to conduct this this inspection. The Inspection and report are not a guarantee or warranty that the items inspected are defect free, or that concealed defects do not or will not exist. Problems may exist even though signs of such may not be present during the inspection, or are hidden from a general visual inspection.