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RAINIER INSPECTIONS, INC.

Website: http://www.RainierInspections.com
Inspector's email: InspectorBrad@frontier.com
Phone: (206) 948-6415
FAX: (425) 488-3565
11410 NE 124th St #186 
Kirkland WA 98034-4305
Inspector: Brad Albin, ACI
ASHI Certified Inspector #10233
Washington State Licensed Home Inspector #239

  

ASHI HOME INSPECTION REPORT

Client(s):  Todd Nibs
Property address:  11380 216th St NE
Bellevue WA 98095
"Glesea"
Inspection date:  Thursday, January 15, 2015

This report published on Wednesday, January 06, 2016 8:57:43 PM PST

Rainier Inspections, Inc. (RII) provides visual inspections which comply with WAC 308-408C, licensing law which regulates Washington home inspectors. The Washington Home Inspector's Standards of Practice can be viewed at http://ashiww.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/04/SOP.pdf Our inspections also meet the current Standards of Practice of the American Society of Home Inspectors (ASHI). http://ashiww.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/04/standards.pdf

This report has been prepared for the sole and exclusive use of the client indicated above and is limited to an impartial opinion which is not a warranty that items inspected are defect-free, or that latent or concealed defects may exist as of the date of this inspection, or which may have existed in the past, or may exist in the future. The report is limited to the components of the property which were visible to the inspector on the date of the inspection and the opinion of the inspector as to their condition at the time of the inspection. This report is the exclusive property of (RII) and the client(s) listed in the report title. Use of this report by any unauthorized persons is prohibited. All concerns noted in this report should be repaired by licensed and bonded WA state contractors per standard building practices.



How to Read this Report
This report is organized by the property's functional areas.  Within each functional area, descriptive information is listed first and is shown in bold type.  Items of concern follow descriptive information. Concerns are shown and sorted according to these types:
Safety HazardAny item that is identified as a safety hazard is to be considered harmful or dangerous to its occupants due to its presence or absence in the structure.
Minor ConcernA minor concern does not significantly affect habitability and can be considered an inexpensive repair. The baseline repair cost used in this report is $500.00 or less.
Repair/ReplaceRecommend repairing or replacing the noted concern as soon as possible.
Repair/MaintainRecommend repairing or replacing the noted concern in the near future.
Maintenance ItemAny item identified as a maintenance item is considered routine repairs for a house. These items can become larger concerns if not corrected.
Further InvestigateAn item which requires further investigation by a specialist. This includes, but is not limited to, destructive testing, engineering evaluations or cost estimates by licensed and bonded contractors.
MonitorThe inspected item is nearing the end of it's service life, but is not significantly impeding habitability or unsafe. The item could have hidden defects. Future replacement may be needed.
Appeared ServiceableThe inspected item is operating correctly in response to normal operating controls. No significant deficiencies were noted at the date and time of the inspection.
CommentAdditional information, upgrade items or excluded items.
DamageDamage caused by wood destroying organisms (Rot, Insects, etc.)
Conducive conditionsConditions conducive for wood destroying organisms (Wood destroying ants, termites or wood rot)

Click here for a glossary of building construction terms.Contact your inspector If there are terms that you do not understand, or visit the glossary of construction terms at http://www.reporthost.com/glossary.asp

Table of Contents
General Information
Grounds
Deck
Exterior, Doors, Windows
Roof
Carport
Heating and Cooling Systems
Plumbing and Fuel Systems
Water Heater
Electric System
Kitchen
Bathrooms and Laundry
Interior, Doors and Windows
Fireplaces and Chimneys
Attic and Roof Structure
Basement
Foundation


General Information
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Report number: 111005
Time started: 10:00 am
Time finished: 12:30 pm
Client(s) present during the inspection: Yes, Todd
Others present during the inspection: Listing agent, Phillip
Inspector: Brad Albin
Weather conditions during inspection: Overcast, Wet
Temperature during inspection: Cold, (Degrees Fahrenheit), 50
Ground condition: Wet
Recent weather: Rain
Inspection fee: $450
Type of structure inspected: Two story, Daylight basement
Age of structure (in years): 57
Source for structure age: Property listing
Entry of structure faces (for reference in the report): West
Occupied: No
Additions and modifications: East addition, 2001

1) Comment - This inspection does not include any review or research into applicable building permits for additions and/or remodels to this property. The client should research the existence of permits and/or approved plans for additions and/or remodels to this property. This information may be available from the homeowner or from the local building department.

2) Comment - Structures built prior to the mid 1980s may contain lead and/or asbestos. Lead is commonly found in paint and some plumbing components. Asbestos is found in various building materials such as insulation, siding, floor tiles and ceiling texturing. Laws were passed in 1978 to prohibit usage of lead and asbestos, but stocks of materials containing these substances remained in use for a number of years thereafter. Both lead and asbestos are known health hazards. Evaluating for the presence of lead and/or asbestos is beyond the scope of this inspection. Any mention of these materials in this report is made as a courtesy only, and meant to refer the client to a specialist. Consult with specialists as necessary, such as industrial hygienists, professional labs and/or abatement specialists for this type of evaluation. For information on lead, asbestos and other hazardous materials in homes, visit:
http://www.pscleanair.org

3) Comment - The property was vacant prior to the inspection. The systems have not been under normal use prior to the inspection. This condition can limit the observations the inspector makes about the property. Conditions in need of repair may surface after the house is occupied and the systems are under normal use.

Grounds
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Limitations: Inspection of the exterior grounds and drainage is visual and intended to determine if the grading is properly carrying surface water away from the structure. It is based on normal weather conditions at the time of the inspection. An inspection of sub-surface site drainage characteristics is not performed. A risk evaluation for flooding and mudslides is also not performed during the home inspection. Unless specifically included in the inspection, the following items are excluded from this inspection and report: docks, bulkheads, underground drainage systems, concealed sump pumps, soil stability. Inspectors observe trees and shrubs to see if they affect the structure being inspected. The physical condition of the trees and shrubs themselves is not evaluated.
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Condition of fences and gates: Appeared serviceable
Fence and gate material: Wood
Condition of retaining walls: Appeared serviceable
Retaining wall material: Masonry block
Site profile: Moderate slope, Down from west to east
Drainage: Appeared serviceable
Condition of trees and shrubs: (see comments below)
Condition of driveway: Appeared serviceable
Driveway material: Asphalt
Condition of walks and patios: Appeared serviceable
Walk and patio material: Poured in place concrete
Condition of porch(s): Appeared serviceable
Porch material: Poured in place concrete

4) Comment - The over-all site is moderately sloped. No surface erosion concerns where observed. The condition of the geology below the surface can not be determined during a visual inspection. The soil stability of the slope is excluded from this inspection. For a detailed analysis of the site geology, a soils engineer could be contacted.

5) Comment - Site drains exist on the building site. The operation and discharge location of the site/yard drains is not included in a visual ASHI® inspection. All site drains should be regularly checked for operation and cleaned as needed.

6) Comment - The health of the large trees on the property was not evaluated. An Arborist could be retained to provide detailed information about the condition and health of the trees. An Arborist can also provide pruning suggestions for the trees.

Deck
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Limitations: The visible footings, posts, beams, joists, decking, stairs, and railings are inspected. Treated wood, cedar and composite materials are always recommended for decks because they resists rot very well. Non-treated wood decks will experience ongoing rot and will need repairs during their lifespan. Some decks are enclosed preventing an inspection of the support structure.
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Condition of deck: Appeared serviceable (see comments below)
Deck material: Treated wood
Condition of stairs, handrails and guardrails: Appeared serviceable
Exterior stair material: Treated wood
Rail material: Treated wood, Tempered glass

7) Repair/Maintain, Damage - Fungal rot was found in the decking boards at one or more locations. All rotten wood should be replaced. This type of repair will probably need to be done annually to maintain the deck.
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Photo 7-1
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Photo 7-2

Exterior, Doors, Windows
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Limitations: The exterior is inspected visually at grade level. Some items are often high off the ground and may be viewed using binoculars from the ground or from a ladder. This may limit a full evaluation. The inspector's evaluation is based on generally accepted building practices and the age of the components. Retractable window awnings and window security bars are not inspected. Comments about these systems are a courtesy only.
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Apparent wall structure: Wood frame, 2" x 4"
Condition of siding: Appeared serviceable (see comments below)
Condition of caulking and paint: Appeared serviceable
Siding material: Cedar, Brick veneer
Condition of exterior entry doors: Appeared serviceable
Exterior door material: Solid core wood
Condition of windows: Appeared serviceable, (see comments below)
Type(s) of windows: Vinyl, Aluminum, Insulated glass, Single-pane
Wall insulation: Wall insulation is not visible, (see comments below)

8) Maintenance Item, Conducive conditions - Soil is in contact with or is less than 6 inches from the wood siding on the south side. This is a conducive condition for wood-destroying organisms. Recommend grading or removing soil as necessary to maintain a 6-inch clearance. Note that damage from fungal rot and/or insects may be found when soil is removed, and repairs may be necessary. Also recommend maintaining slope away from the structure for proper drainage.
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Photo 8-1
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Photo 8-2

9) Maintenance Item - One cracked window pane was observed at the south side of the basement. The damaged window glass should be replaced.

10) Comment - The brick veneer had no visible weep holes and/or base flashing. Masonry veneers should be constructed as follows to prevent water penetration and accumulation in the wall structure:
  • Weep holes should be installed (typically every 24 inches max) at the bottom of the masonry to allow any accumulated water to drain out of the wall cavity.
  • Base flashing should be installed below the masonry veneer to prevent water from accumulating at the base of the wall cavity.
It is common that either or both of these components are not installed in masonry veneers, more so in older homes. However, without them water is more likely to accumulate in wall cavities and cause fungal rot and/or structural damage. The likelihood of this occurring depends on the installation configuration, such as how deep the roof overhangs are, how tall the exterior walls are, what the exposure is to prevailing weather, what the proximity to sprinkler systems is, etc. In most cases it's not practical to install these components retroactively, since all or significant sections of the masonry veneer would need to be dismantled. Note that the inspector is unable to determine if any damage has already occurred since these areas are inaccessible. The client should at least be aware of this potential for water intrusion, and monitor these walls inside and out for any signs of accumulated moisture in the future. If damage occurs, recommend that a qualified contractor repair as necessary. For more information, visit:
http://www.reporthost.com/?MVCD

11) Comment - Insulated glass windows are installed in the addition and kitchen. Occasionally, the seals between insulated glass windows fail and the window panel becomes fogged. Broken window seals are often detectable however; varying weather conditions, humidity, temperature and light can make detection impossible during the home inspection. Hidden window seal damage may exist. This inspection and report does not guarantee or warranty the condition of the window panels or seals.

12) Comment - All of the original house windows consist of single-pane glass. Single-pane windows are prone to sweating and are one of the largest sources of heat loss in winter and heat gain in the summer due to their low insulating ability and high air leakage rates. Consider replacing single-pane windows with multi-pane windows as an energy saving upgrade to the house.

13) Comment - Exterior wall insulation may not exist in this age of house. Generally, wall insulation was installed in houses built in the 1960's and later. Insulation is recommended to prevent heat loss. Further investigation is advised. If necessary, blown-in insulation can be installed to improve energy efficiency of the house.

Roof
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Limitations: Roofs are inspected visually from an area that does not put either the inspector or the roof at risk. The best inspection location is on the surface. Steep, wet, snow, or ice covered roofs are not inspected from the surface. The inspector does not provide an estimate of remaining life on the roof surface material, nor guarantee that leaks have not occurred in the roof surface, skylights or roof penetrations in the past. Regarding roof leaks, only active leaks, visible evidence of possible sources of leaks, and evidence of past leaks observed during the inspection are reported on as part of this inspection. The inspector does not guarantee or warrant that leaks will not occur in the future.
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Approximate age of roof surface (years): Less then a year, per the home owner
Roof inspection method: Traversed
Condition of roof surface material: Appeared serviceable
Roof surface material: Torch down (modified bitumen)
Roof structure type: Gable
Condition of exposed flashings: Appeared serviceable
Condition of skylights: Appeared serviceable
Condition of gutters, downspouts and extensions: Appeared serviceable, (see comments below)
Gutter and downspout material: Built-in gutters (Torch-down asphalt), Aluminum downspouts

14) Maintenance Item, Conducive conditions - Significant amounts of debris have accumulated in one or more gutters or downspouts. Gutters can overflow and cause water to come in contact with the building exterior, or water can accumulate around the foundation. Recommend cleaning gutters and downspouts now and as necessary in the future.
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Photo 14-1
 

15) Maintenance Item, Conducive conditions - Vegetation such as trees and shrubs overhang the roof surface or are in contact with the roof edge at the southwest corner. Organic debris such as leaves or needles are likely to accumulate in gutters and on the roof surface. Gutters can overflow and cause water to come in contact with the building exterior or water can accumulate around the foundation. Vegetation in contact with the roof can damage the roof surface and/or the roof drainage system. This condition is also conducive to rodent infestations in the attic. Recommend pruning vegetation so as to not be in contact with the roof and to not overhang the roof surface. If vegetation is too tall then it should be pruned at least 10 feet above the roof surface.
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Photo 15-1
 

16) Monitor - This home had integrated gutters that are built into the eaves or roof overhangs and drain through an enclosed soffit. Such gutters are prone to leaking water into the roof structure when drain holes become clogged. Drain holes are often small (only 2 inches) in diameter, and require more frequent cleaning than modern metal gutters and downspouts. When drain holes or gutters do clog, subsequent water leaks may cause stained soffits, rot at soffits or roof structure lumber, and/or peeling paint. Monitor these gutters and clean them as necessary in the future.

17) Comment - The downspout drains have been updated to modern 4" plastic drain pipes. The operation and discharge location of the underground downspout drains is not included in a visual ASHI® inspection. Plugged drains are a common cause of water leakage into basements. The downspout connections should be observed for overflowing and the drains cleaned as needed.

Carport
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Limitations: Garages and carports are inspected based on accessibility and are reported as being attached or unattached from the house structure. The exterior components (i.e. roof, walls, eaves, fascias, gutters, etc.), will be reported in the appropriate section if the garage is attached. Interior components (i.e. walls, etc.) should be reported when defects exist and when they differ from those components previously listed as part of the house structure.
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Type: Attached Carport
Condition of carport structure: Appeared serviceable, Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Condition of roof surface material: Appeared serviceable
Approximate age of roof surface (years): Unknown
Roof inspection method: Traversed
Condition of roof structure: Appeared serviceable, (see comments below)
Roof structure type: Flat
Roof surface material: Torch down (modified bitumen)

18) Minor Concern, Repair/Replace - Fungal rot was found at the trim and fascia boards in the southwest corner. Conducive conditions for rot should be corrected (e.g. plugged downspouts and roof drainage) to prevent further rot damage. All rotten wood should be replaced as necessary.
Photo
Photo 18-1
Photo
Photo 18-2

19) Repair/Maintain - The aluminum "silver" coating on the flat roof surface was deteriorated. Such coatings are designed to protect against ultraviolet light and moisture, help prevent leaks and cracks, lower-roof surface temperatures, and maintain waterproofing properties. Recommend that a qualified person apply a new roof coating now and as necessary in the future. Typically this is done every four to five years.
Photo
Photo 19-1
 

20) Maintenance Item - Significant amounts of debris have accumulated in one or more downspouts. The roof can overflow and cause water to come in contact with the wood structure. Recommend cleaning downspouts now and as necessary in the future.
Photo
Photo 20-1
 

Heating and Cooling Systems
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Limitations: Heating and cooling inspections are visual. Weather permitting, we will operate both the heating and A/C units in their respective modes. We will use normal controls and access panels to evaluate how well the system is performing its intended function. The inspector does not provide an estimate of remaining life on heating or cooling system components, does not determine if heating or cooling systems are appropriately sized, or perform any evaluations that require a pilot light to be lit, a shut-off valve to be operated, a circuit breaker to be turned "on" or a serviceman's or oil emergency switch to be operated. Testing for the presents of Carbon Monoxide is also not performed during this visual inspection. This inspection and report do not guarantee or warranty the condition of the heat exchanger (gas/oil - furnace/boiler).
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General heating system type(s): Forced air furnace
General heating distribution type(s): Ducts and registers
Last service date of primary heat source (year): 8/2015
Source for last service date of primary heat source: Label
Condition of forced air heating system: Appeared serviceable, Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Forced air heating system fuel type: Heating Oil
Estimated age: Old, 40-50 years
Forced air heating system manufacturer: Yukon Husky
Location of forced air furnace: Basement
Condition of burners: Appeared serviceable
Condition of exhaust venting system: Appeared serviceable
Location for forced air filter(s): At top of air handler
Condition of furnace filters: Appeared serviceable
Condition of forced air ducts and registers: Appeared serviceable, (see comments below)
Condition of combustion air supply: Appeared serviceable
Condition of cooling system: Not inspected, (see comments below)
Cooling system type: Air conditioner
Cooling system fuel type: Electric
Location of compressor: South side
Estimated age, (years, based on manufacture date): 16
Cooling system manufacturer: Lennox
Condition of controls: Appeared serviceable, (see comments below)

21) Safety Hazard, Repair/Replace, Further Investigate - A) The furnace was recently serviced, however, the furnace burner chamber had significant deterioration, (broken and missing firebrick, loose seals, and possibly damaged heat exchanger parts above the burner). Recommend that a qualified heating contractor evaluate further. Repairs or replacement may be necessary.
B) Because of the age and condition of the forced air furnace, recommend that a qualified HVAC contractor inspect the heat exchanger and perform a carbon monoxide test when it's serviced. Note that these tests are beyond the scope of a standard home inspection.
Photo
Photo 21-1
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Photo 21-2

22) Minor Concern, Repair/Replace - The pad for the heat pump or air conditioning condensing unit was not level. This unit requires adequate support. The compressor may be damaged if this unit is tilted 10 degrees or more. Also, the pad should elevate the unit above the soil to prevent corrosion. Recommend that a qualified heating contractor repair as necessary.
Photo
Photo 22-1
 

23) Maintenance Item - The gas or oil-fired forced air furnace appeared to have been serviced within the last year based on information provided to the inspector or labeling on the equipment. If this is true, then routine servicing is not needed at this point. However, a qualified HVAC contractor should inspect, clean, and service this system, every one to two years in the future. For more information visit:
http://www.reporthost.com/?ANFURINSP

24) Maintenance Item - The last service date of the forced air cooling system appeared to be within the last year based on information provided to the inspector or labeling on the equipment. If this is true, then routine servicing is not needed at this point. However a qualified HVAC contractor should inspect, clean, and service this system every three to five years, and make repairs if necessary in the future.

25) Maintenance Item - An electronic air filter was installed. Recommend checking filters upon taking occupancy and quarterly in the future. Guidelines vary depending on the manufacturer, but when the filters are dirty, the following steps should normally be performed:
  • Turn off filter and wait 30 seconds before pulling off cover
  • Note direction arrow on cells is oriented and positions of pre-filters and cells
  • Remove cells and pre-filters
  • Clean pre-filters with a vacuum cleaner and brush attachment
  • Wash cells in a dishwasher, in a tub or with a garden hose
  • Be careful not to break ionizing wires or bend collector plates
  • Use only soaps that are safe for aluminum (e.g. dishwasher soap)
  • When using a dishwasher, support cells with 4 glasses, and don't use the drying cycle
  • When using a bathtub, soak cells for 15-20 minutes and then agitate them
  • Let cells air-dry
  • Reinstall cells and filters in the correct position and orientation and turn filter back on
Note that how often filters need cleaning depends on how the system is configured (e.g. always on versus "auto"), and on environmental factors (e.g. pets, smoking, frequency of house cleaning, number of occupants, the season). For more information, visit:
http://www.reporthost.com/?EAFM

26) Maintenance Item - Dirt and/or dust were visible in one or more sections of supply and/or return air ducts for the heating or cooling system. This can be a health hazard, especially for those with allergies or respiratory problems. The Environmental Protection Association (EPA) recommends considering having ducts professionally cleaned when dust and debris and/or particles are released into the home from your supply registers. At a minimum, the visible debris should be thoroughly cleaned. Recommend that a qualified contractor clean the ducts. For more information on duct cleaning in relation to indoor air quality, visit:
http://www.reporthost.com/?DUCTCLEAN

27) Further Investigate - A) The outdoor air temperature was below 60 degrees Fahrenheit during the inspection. Air conditioning systems can be damaged if operated during such low temperatures. Because of this, the inspector was unable to operate and fully evaluate the cooling system.
B) The estimated useful life for most air conditioning condensing units is 10-15 years. This unit appeared to be towards the end of it's useful lifespan. It may need replacing or significant repairs at any time. Recommend budgeting for repair or replacement in the near future.

28) Comment - The furnace thermostat and the air conditioning thermostat are separate units. This is a non-standard configuration. More comfortable heating/cooling and better energy conservation can be obtained by installing a single programmable thermostat to operate the furnace and the air conditioner.
Photo
Photo 28-1
 

Plumbing and Fuel Systems
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Limitations: Inspectors operate normal controls and put the system through a normal cycle. During the plumbing inspection, no operational inspection of any water shut-off valves will be performed. Often these valves have not been operated for some time, and could be frozen in the open position. We recommend operating the valves at least once a year to keep the seals from drying out and replacing any frozen shut-off valves. The following items are not included in this inspection: buried main, side and lateral sewer lines; exterior gray water systems; plumbing components concealed within the foundation or building structure, or in inaccessible areas such as below tubs; underground utilities and systems; overflow drains for tubs and sinks. For information regarding water quality, the local water department should be contacted.
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Water service: Public water system
Location of main water shut-off: Basement
Visible service pipe material: Galvanized iron
Condition of supply lines: Appeared serviceable, (see comments below)
Supply pipe material: Galvanized iron most of the house, Copper at kitchen remodel only
Sewer Type: Public sewer system
Condition of drain pipes: Appeared serviceable
Drain pipe material: Galvanized iron
Condition of waste pipes: Appeared serviceable
Waste pipe material: Galvanized iron
Location(s) of plumbing clean-outs: Basement
Vent pipe condition: Appeared serviceable
Vent pipe material: Galvanized iron
Sump pump and drain system installed: Yes
Condition of sump pump and drain system: Appeared serviceable
Visible fuel storage systems: Below ground oil tank, By carport

29) Monitor - Low water flow was observed at one or more sinks, bathtubs and showers when multiple fixtures were operated at the same time. The water supply pipes are probably corroded and clogged on the inside. The system was functional at the time of the inspection, however, future replacement of the old piping may be needed.

30) Monitor - Some or all of the water supply and/or drain or vent pipes were made of galvanized steel. Based on the age of this structure and the 40-60 year useful life of this piping, it will likely need replacing in the future. Leaks can develop, flooding and/or water damage may occur, flow can be restricted due to scale accumulating inside the piping, and water may be rusty. Note that it is beyond the scope of this inspection to determine what percentage of the piping is older, galvanized steel, as much of it is concealed in wall, floor and/or ceiling cavities. Recommend the following:
  • Consulting with a qualified plumber about replacement options and costs
  • Budget for replacement in the future
  • Monitor these pipes for leaks and decreased flow in the future
  • Consider replacing old, galvanized steel piping proactively
For more information, visit:
http://www.reporthost.com/?GALVPIPE

31) Comment - The inspection of all buried and concealed drain lines is excluded from this inspection and report. This exclusion also applies to the operation and condition of the side sewer from the house to the main sewer system. Side sewer problems are common in old houses. We recommend having the side sewer camera inspected prior to closing or have the seller provide documentation regarding side sewer updates and condition.

32) Comment - The inspector did not determine the location of the water meter. Recommend consulting with the property owner to determine the meter location, that you locate it yourself, or consult with the local water municipality if necessary. It is especially important to find the meter if no main shut-off valve is found because the meter may be the only way to turn off the water supply in the event of an emergency, such as when a supply pipe bursts.

33) Comment - A) The inspector was unable to fully evaluate the sump pump because it was inaccessible. Its condition was not determined. No problems where observed with any of the visible portions of the drain system.
B) The inspector was unable to determine the output location for the sump pump's discharge pipe. Consult with the property owner or evaluate further to determine the location of the sump pump discharge pipe. Discharge pipes should terminate well away from foundations so water doesn't accumulate around the foundation.
C) All receipt and warranty information for the basement drainage system should be obtained from the seller for the buyers records.

34) Comment - An active oil tank exists on the property. Recommend buying oil storage tank replacement insurance available from many full-service oil providers. This insurance should cover up to 100% of the replacement costs of a tank and usually costs less than a few dollars per month. For more information, visit:
http://www.reporthost.com/?OILTANKINS
http://www.reporthost.com/?OILSPILL

35) Comment - In 1995, the Heating Oil Pollution Liability Protection Act was created. Under this law $60,000, of pollution liability insurance will be provided for active oil tanks. The cost of the insurance program is paid for by heating oil dealers. Repair and replacement of damaged heating oil equipment is not covered under this program. Heating oil suppliers offer tank equipment warranties with their annual service and fill agreements. To qualify for this liability insurance, the oil tank must be registered with the Pollution Liability Insurance Agency (PLIA) and been active for eighteen months prior to the registration date. To obtain a registration form call the PLIA at (360) 586-5997 or 1-800-822-3905. For more information, visit:
http://www.reporthost.com/?OILSPILL
http://www.reporthost.com/?OILTANKINS

Water Heater
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Limitations: Water heaters are inspected visually for proper installation and operation. Activating any shut-off valves or gas pilot lights is beyond the scope of this inspection. Note that the inspector does not provide an estimate of remaining life on water heaters, does not determine if water heaters are appropriately sized, or perform any evaluations that require a pilot light to be lit or a shut-off valve to be operated. For maintenance the drain valve should be opened for a couple minutes once a year to control rust and corrosion of the tank. This will help extend the the water heater's life. All water heaters must have a temperature/pressure relief valve with a properly installed discharge pipe. This valve prevents the tank from overheating or over-pressurizing. Once a year the valve should be opened and closed to make sure it is working and clear debris from the valve seat.
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Condition of water heater: Appeared serviceable
Type: Tank
Energy source: Electricity
Estimated Age: Old, 15 years
Capacity (in gallons): 82
Temperature-pressure relief valve installed: Yes
Manufacturer: Kenmore
Location of water heater: Basement
Hot water temperature tested: No

36) Monitor - The estimated useful life for most water heaters is 10-15 years. This water heater appeared to be at this age and/or its useful lifespan and may need replacement in the near future. Recommend budgeting for replacement or considering replacement now before any leaks occur. The client should be aware that significant flooding can occur if the water heater fails.

Electric System
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Limitations: Electrical inspections are visual and operational. Inspectors operate a representative number of switches, test a representative number of outlets and observe visible wires. A representative number is defined as: at least one fixture, but not every fixture. The following systems are not included in this inspection: TV cable, phone lines and high speed internet wiring. Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. The inspector does not operate circuit breakers as part of the inspection, and does not install or change light bulbs.
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Electric service condition: Appeared serviceable, Updated
Primary service type: Overhead
Number of service conductors: 3
Service voltage (volts): 120-240
Estimated service amperage (amps): 200
Primary service overload protection type: Circuit breakers
Service entrance conductor material: Stranded copper
Main disconnect rating (amps): 200
System ground: Ground rod(s) in soil, Cold and hot water supply pipes
Condition of main service panel: Appeared serviceable, Updated 1997
Location of main service panel #A: Basement
Location of main disconnect: Breaker at top of main service panel
Condition of branch circuit wiring: Appeared serviceable, Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Branch circuit wiring type: (Romex) Non-metallic sheathed cable, Cloth sheathed cable
Wire ground type: The electrical receptacles are grounded (three-prong) and non-grounded (two prong) types.
Smoke alarms installed: No, recommend install
Carbon monoxide alarms installed: No, recommend install

37) Safety Hazard, Repair/Replace - Extension cords were being used as permanent wiring to the sump pump. Theses cords should only be used for portable equipment on a temporary basis. Using extension cords as permanent wiring is a potential fire and shock hazard, and indicates that wiring is inadequate and needs updating. Recommend eliminating all extension cords for permanently installed equipment.
Photo
Photo 37-1
Photo
Photo 37-2

38) Safety Hazard, Repair/Replace - Three prong receptacles are installed on non-grounded circuits in various areas of the house. This is often done by home owners in older homes, but prevents proper identification of original wiring and updated wiring. Repairing this condition does not require adding grounded circuits. Two prong receptacles should be installed at all non-grounded circuit receptacles.

39) Safety Hazard, Repair/Replace - One or more electric receptacles (outlets) where reverse-polarity wired, where the hot and neutral wires are reversed, at various areas in the house. This condition is a shock hazard. Recommend retaining an electrician to check all outlets and repair and needed. For more information, visit:
http://www.reporthost.com/?RPR

40) Safety Hazard, Repair/Replace - One or more electric receptacles (outlets) in the bathroom(s) had no visible ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection, or the inspector was unable to determine if GFCI protection was present. If not GFCI-protected, receptacles in wet areas pose a shock hazard. Recommend installing GFCI protection per standard building practices. General guidelines for GFCI-protected receptacles include the following locations:
  • Outdoors (since 1973)
  • Bathrooms (since 1975)
  • Garages (since 1978)
  • Kitchens (since 1987)
  • Crawl spaces and unfinished basements (since 1990)
  • Wet bar sinks (since 1993)
  • Laundry and utility sinks (since 2005)
For more information, visit: http://www.reporthost.com/?GFCI

41) Safety Hazard, Repair/Replace - No smoke alarms were visible. This is a potential safety hazard. Smoke alarms should be installed per standard building practices (e.g. in hallways leading to bedrooms, in each bedroom, on each floor and in attached garages). For more information, visit:
http://www.reporthost.com/?SMKALRM

42) Safety Hazard, Repair/Replace - No carbon monoxide alarms were visible. This is a potential safety hazard. This state requires CO alarms to be installed for new construction and/or for homes being sold. Recommend installing approved CO alarms outside of each separate sleeping area in the immediate vicinity of the bedrooms and on each level and in accordance with the manufacturer's recommendations. For more information, visit:
http://www.reporthost.com/?COALRM

43) Comment - Ground fault circuit interrupters are installed. GFCI's provide electrical shock protection in water use areas of the house. These safety devices are required in; kitchens, bathrooms, at laundry sinks, exterior areas in contact with the ground, crawl space and garages. Older homes should consider updating the electrical system with these devices. GFCI outlets should be periodically "tripped" to verify they are operating.

Kitchen
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Limitations: Kitchen appliances are tested for on/off function only during the inspection. The following items are not included in the inspection: household appliances such as ice makers, water filters, appliance timers, clocks, cook functions, cleaning operations, thermostats for temperature control accuracy, and lights. Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not provide an estimate of the remaining life of appliances, and does not determine the adequacy of operation of appliances.
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Permanently installed kitchen appliances present during inspection: Separate oven, Cooktop, Dishwasher, Refrigerator, Under-sink food disposal, Microwave oven, Trash compactor, Range hood
Condition of counters: Appeared serviceable, (see comments below)
Condition of cabinets: Appeared serviceable
Condition of sinks and related plumbing: Appeared serviceable
Condition of under-sink food disposal: Appeared serviceable
Condition of dishwasher: Appeared serviceable
Condition of range, cooktop and/or oven: Appeared serviceable
Range, cooktop or oven type: Electric
Condition of refrigerator: Appeared serviceable
Condition of built-in microwave oven: Appeared serviceable
Condition of trash compactor: Appeared serviceable

44) Maintenance Item - Recommend cleaning and sealing the countertops now and in the future as necessary to prevent staining and to improve waterproofing.

Bathrooms and Laundry
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Limitations: Bathroom inspections are visual and operational. Inspectors operate plumbing fixtures to determine the presence of leaks and look for water damage. The inspector does not operate water supply or shut-off valves for sinks, toilets, bidets, or clothes washers due to the possibility of valves leaking or breaking when operated. The inspector does not determine if shower pans or tub and shower enclosures are water tight, or determine the completeness or operability of any gas piping to laundry appliances.
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Location #A: Half bath, Basement
Location #B: Full bath, First floor
Condition of counters: Appeared serviceable
Condition of cabinets: Appeared serviceable
Condition of flooring: Appeared serviceable
Condition of walls and ceilings: Appeared serviceable
Condition of sinks and related plumbing: Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Condition of toilets: Appeared serviceable
Condition of bathtubs and related plumbing: Appeared serviceable
Condition of shower(s) and related plumbing: Appeared serviceable
Condition of ventilation systems: Appeared serviceable
Bathroom ventilation type: Spot fans
Laundry equipment: Not inspected, further investigation is advised
240 volt receptacle for laundry equipment present: Yes
Laundry drains: Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)

45) Minor Concern, Repair/Replace - The the sink drains in the bathrooms are very corroded. Both drains should be replaced. The sink drain in the half bathroom was also leaking. A qualified person should repair as necessary.
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Photo 45-1
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Photo 45-2

46) Minor Concern, Repair/Replace - The clothes washer drain is tapped into the back of the sewer clean-out. The standpipe is non-standard and could leak into the basement. Standard building practices require that the stand pipe be:
  • A minimum of 2 inches in diameter
  • At least 33 inches tall for a top-loading clothes washer
  • At least 24 inches tall for a front-loading clothes washer
  • Have a trap to prevent sewer gases from entering the house
Recommend that a qualified person repair as necessary per standard building practices.
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Photo 46-1
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Photo 46-2

47) Repair/Replace - The clothes dryer was equipped with a vinyl or mylar, accordion-type, flexible exhaust duct. The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission considers these types of ducts to be unsafe, and a fire hazard. They can trap lint and are susceptible to kinks or crushing, which can greatly reduce the air flow and cause overheating. Recommend that such ducts be replaced with a rigid or corrugated semi-rigid metal duct, and by a qualified contractor if necessary. For more information, visit:
http://www.reporthost.com/?DRYER
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Photo 47-1
 

48) Comment - The estimated useful life for most appliances is 10-15 years. One or more appliances (clothes washer and/or clothes dryer) appeared to be near, at or beyond their service life. Even if operable, recommend budgeting for replacements in the near future.

Interior, Doors and Windows
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Limitations: Interior room inspections are conducted visually. Inspectors examine and base findings on homes of similar construction and age. Water stains or evidence of leakage/moisture will be noted in the report. Cosmetic items such as: paint, wallpaper, carpet, and window treatments, will not be inspected. A representative number of doors and windows are operated during the inspection, but not every door and window. Note that the inspector does not evaluate any areas or items which require moving stored items, furnishings, debris, equipment, floor coverings, insulation or similar materials. The client should be aware that paint may obscure wall and ceiling defects, floor coverings may obscure floor defects, and furnishings may obscure wall, floor and floor covering defects. Determining the cause and/or source of indoor odors is not within the scope of this inspection.
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Condition of interior doors: Appeared serviceable
Condition of windows: Appeared serviceable
Condition of walls and ceilings: Appeared serviceable
Wall type or covering: Drywall
Ceiling type or covering: Drywall
Condition of flooring: Appeared serviceable
Condition of concrete slab floor(s): Appeared serviceable
Flooring type or covering: Tile, Hardwood
Condition of stairs, handrails and guardrails: Appeared serviceable

49) Comment - The ceilings in part of this house are vaulted, therefore, no attic area exists at these areas. No comment can be made on the structural components, ventilation or insulation in these areas. Hidden rot and moisture damage can occur in poorly vented vaulted ceilings.

50) Comment - Hairline cracks were found in the basement, concrete slab floor. These are common and are caused by drying of the concrete.

Fireplaces and Chimneys
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Limitations: The following items are not included in this inspection: chimney flues (except where visible). Note that the inspector does not determine the adequacy of drafting or sizing of fireplace and wood stove flues, and also does not determine if prefabricated or zero-clearance fireplaces are installed in accordance with the manufacturer's specifications. The inspector does not perform any evaluations that require a pilot light to be lit, and does not light fires. The inspector provides a basic visual examination of a chimney and any associated wood burning device. The National Fire Protection Association has stated that an in-depth Level 2 chimney inspection should be part of every sale or transfer of property with a wood-burning device. Such an inspection may reveal defects that are not apparent to the home inspector who is a generalist.
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Condition of wood-burning fireplaces, stoves: Appeared serviceable, Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Wood-burning fireplace type: Masonry
Condition of chimneys and flues: Appeared serviceable, Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Wood-burning chimney type: Masonry with clay tile liner for the furnace flue, Masonry with no liner for the fireplace
Gas-fired flue type: liner furnace

51) Minor Concern, Repair/Replace - The fireplace damper was inoperable and corroded. Recommend that a qualified contractor repair or replace damper as necessary.
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Photo 51-1
 

52) Minor Concern, Repair/Maintain - No spark screen or rain cap was installed at the fireplace chimney flue or the oil furnace flue terminations. Spark screens reduce the chance of embers exiting the flue and causing fires. They also prevent wildlife (e.g. birds, rodents, raccoons) from entering flues. Rain caps prevent water from entering flues, mixing with combustion deposits and creating caustic chemicals which can corrode flues. They also prevent damage to masonry from freeze-thaw cycles and prevent metal components (e.g. dampers, metal firebox liners) from rusting. Recommend that a qualified person install rain caps with spark screens per standard building practices where missing.
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Photo 52-1
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Photo 52-2

Attic and Roof Structure
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Limitations: Attic inspections are visual. Inspectors will access the attic if possible. The following items or areas are not included in this inspection: areas that could not be traversed or viewed clearly due to lack of access; areas and components obscured by insulation.
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Attic inspection method: Viewed from hatch(es)
Location of attic access point #A: Hallway, First floor
Condition of roof structure: Appeared serviceable
Roof structure type: Rafters, Wood decking
Ceiling structure: Ceiling joists
Condition of insulation in attic (ceiling, skylight chase, etc.): None installed
Condition of roof ventilation: Appeared serviceable
Roof ventilation type: Box vents (roof jacks), Enclosed soffit vents

53) Repair/Replace - No ceiling insulation was installed in the attic. Recommend that a qualified contractor install insulation for better energy efficiency and per standard building practices (typically with an R rating of R-38).
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Photo 53-1
 

Basement
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Limitations: Structural components such as joists and beams, and other components such as piping, wiring and/or ducting that are obscured by finished walls are excluded from this inspection. The inspector does not guarantee or warrant that water will not accumulate in the basement in the future. The inspector does not determine the adequacy of basement floor or stairwell drains, or determine if such drains are clear or clogged. Note that all basement areas should be checked periodically for water intrusion, plumbing leaks and pest activity.
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Condition of exterior entry doors: Appeared serviceable
Exterior door material: Vinyl
Condition of floor substructure: Appeared serviceable
Support post material: Wood, Bearing wall
Floor structure: Solid wood joists, Wood decking, Beams

54) Monitor - A water-proofing system was found in the basement . This may be an indication that water has accumulated in the basement in the past. Consult with the property owner and/or reviewing disclosure statements. Also monitor the basement for accumulated water in the future. The inspector did not determine if drainage issues have or haven't been resolved and does not guarantee or warrant that water will not accumulate in the basement in the future.

Foundation
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Limitations: Foundation inspections are visual and limited to accessible components. Accessibility will vary due to type of foundation and other obstacles. We look for cracks and bulges during the inspection. The most common problem concerning foundations is water leakage. Regarding foundations, some amount of cracking is normal in concrete slabs and foundation walls due to shrinkage and drying. Note that the inspector does not determine the adequacy of seismic reinforcement
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Condition of foundation and footings: Appeared serviceable
Apparent foundation type: Unfinished basement, Daylight basement
Foundation/stem wall material: Poured in place concrete
Anchor bolts or hold downs for seismic reinforcement: None
Shear panels for seismic reinforcement: None

55) Appeared Serviceable, Comment - The structure appears to be square and level. No cracks where observed in the foundation.

56) Comment - A) No anchor bolts or hold downs were observed, connecting the structure to the foundation. Such devices can be obscured by sill plates, insulation, or other components. Foundation ties in the form of anchor bolts became common in the 1970s, and hold downs have become common in more recent years.
B) No shear panels were observed at the exterior wood framed walls (pony walls), in the basement. Vertical or horizontal wood decking is not a sufficient shear panel. The lack of proper bracing makes these walls weak in an earthquake. Plywood shear panels should be installed at each foundation corner to strengthen the wall framing.
C) The steel pole support for the addition do not have any cross-bracing. This structure could suffer damage in an earthquake. The client may wish to have a qualified contractor evaluate further and install such seismic reinforcement.

All concerns noted in this report should be reviewed and repaired by licensed and bonded WA state contractors per standard building practices.

Signature
Brad Albin, ACI, LWHI #239, Rainier Inspections, Inc. InspectorBrad@frontier.com (Cell) 206-948-6415

Company Web Site: www.RainierInspections.com