Quebecinspect

Website: http://www.quebecinspect.com
Email: info@quebecinspect.com
Phone: (514) 518-8177
76 Hampstead Road 
Hampstead QC H3X 1K4
Inspector: Brian Leibgott

 

Property Inspection Report for John Doe
Client(s): John Doe
Property address: 1234 Main Street, Springfield, Quebec
Inspection date: 8/27/2010
This report published on Friday, August 27, 2010 10:42:29 PM EDT

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Quebecinspect Services Inc.

 
How to Read this Report
This report is organized by the property's functional areas.  Within each functional area, descriptive information is listed first and is shown in bold type.  Items of concern follow descriptive information.
Concerns are shown and sorted according to these types:
SafetyPoses a risk of injury or death 
Major DefectCorrection likely involves a significant expense 
Repair/ReplaceRecommend repairing or replacing 
Repair/MaintainRecommend repair and/or maintenance 
Minor DefectCorrection likely involves only a minor expense 
MaintainRecommend ongoing maintenance 
EvaluateRecommend evaluation by a specialist 
MonitorRecommend monitoring in the future 
CommentFor your information 

Click here for a glossary of building construction terms.  Contact your inspector if there are terms that you do not understand, or visit the glossary of construction terms at http://www.reporthost.com/glossary.asp

Table of Contents
General information
Exterior
Roof
Garage
Attic
Electric service
Water heater
Heating and cooling
Plumbing and laundry
Fireplaces, woodstoves and chimneys
Kitchen
Bathrooms
Interior rooms
 
General information Return to table of contents
Report number: 36
Inspector's name: Brian Leibgott
Structures inspected: Cottage
Property owner's name: Francine Weinstein
Time started: 12:00
Time finished: 3:00
Inspection Fee: 650.00
Payment method: Cash
Present during inspection: Client(s), Property owner(s), Realtor(s)
Occupied: Yes
Weather conditions: Clear
Temperature: Warm 26
Ground condition: Dry
Front of structure faces: East
Main entrance faces: East
Foundation type: Finished basement
The following items are excluded from this inspection: Hot tub, Low voltage outdoor lighting, Central vacuum system, Intercom system
1) Many wall, floor and/or ceiling surfaces were obscured by large amounts of furniture and/or stored items. Many areas couldn't be evaluated.
 
Exterior Return to table of contents
Footing material: Poured in place concrete
Foundation material: Poured in place concrete
Apparent wall structure: Wood frame, Concrete block
Wall covering: Brick veneer
Driveway material: Asphalt
Sidewalk material: Poured in place concrete
Exterior door material: Wood panel
2) One or more large trees on the property may be likely to fall on the structure, and are a potential safety hazard. Recommend consulting with a qualified arborist to determine if tree(s) need to be removed and/or pruned.
3) One or more flights of stairs with more than two risers have no handrail installed. This is a safety hazard.
4) Cover plate(s) are missing from one or more electric boxes, such as for receptacles, switches and/or junction boxes. They are intended to contain fire and prevent electric shock from exposed wires. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of fire and shock. Cover plates should be installed where missing.
5) The driveway drain appears to be inadequate and may not keep water away from the structure or prevent water from ponding. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make necessary repairs such as replacing and/or installing additional drains.
6) Minor cracks were found in one or more sections of brick veneer. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary, such as repointing mortar to prevent water intrusion and further deterioration in the future.
7) Flat or nearly flat areas were found near the foundation. Water might pond in flat or nearly flat areas. Exterior grading drainage cannot be adequately determined during dry weather. Standing water too close to the foundation can undermine the foundation and cause damage, including settling cracks in the walls and ceilings, as well as possible intrusion into the wall framing, possibly causing moisture damage in the walls and basement. Standing water can also provide breeding grounds for unwanted insects. Recommend ensuring that grading slopes away from structure on all sides, monitoring grading during rainfall, and monitor basement for water infiltration during and after heavy rain and thaw season.
8) One or more downspouts are loose or detached. This can result in water accumulating around the structure's foundation, or in basements and crawl spaces if they exist. Accumulated water is a conducive condition to wood destroying insects and organisms, and may also cause the foundation to settle and possibly fail over time. Repairs should be made as necessary so downspouts are securely anchored and functional.
Cost estimate: $ 100

9) One or more gutters are missing. This can result in water accumulating around the structure's foundation, or in basements and crawl spaces if they exist. Accumulated water is a conducive condition to wood destroying insects and organisms, and may also cause the foundation to settle and possibly fail over time. A qualified contractor should install gutters and downspouts where missing. Also, extensions such as splashblocks or tie-ins to underground drain lines should be installed as necessary to carry rain water away from the house.
Cost estimate: $ 300

10) Minor cracks were found in the driveway. However they don't appear to be a structural concern and no trip hazards were found. Recommend repairing cracks to prevent further deterioration from feezing and thawing .
Cost estimate: $ 500

11) Minor cracks were found in the driveway. However they don't appear to be a structural concern and no trip hazards were found. Recommend repairing cracks to prevent further deterioration from feezing and thawing .
12) A few minor cracks (less than 1/4” wide) were found on the exterior the foundation walls. Cracks that are less than ¼" wide and which exhibit no significant vertical or horizontal displacement are not regarded as being structurally threatening. They typically result from common shrinkage, but can also be caused by high humidity, deterioration through time, expansive soil (such as clay), and poor drainage, and if they are not sealed they can allow moisture to enter a residence.
13) Recommend cleaning deck(s) and treating with a preservative claiming to waterproof, block ultraviolet light, and stop mildew. Consumer Reports recommends these products:

  • Cabot Decking Stain and PTW Stain
  • Olympic Water Repellent Deck Stain
  • Thompson's House and Deck Stain
  • Wolman PTW Deck Stain
  • Akzo Sikkens Cetol DEK
  • Benjamin Moore Moorwood Clear Wood Finish
  • DAP Woodlife Premium
  • Olympic Natural Look Protector Plus
    14) One or more sections of foundation and/or exterior walls are excluded from this inspection due to lack of access from vegetation, debris and/or stored items.
    15) One or more sections of retaining walls are excluded from this inspection due to lack of access from vegetation, debris and/or stored items.
     
    Roof Return to table of contents
    Roof inspection method: Traversed
    Roof type: Gable
    Roof covering: Asphalt shingles
    Estimated age of roof: 15 years
    Gutter & downspout material: Steel
    Roof ventilation: Adequate
    16) The roof surface material is beyond or at the end of its service life and needs replacing now. Consult with a qualified roofing contractor to determine replacement options and costs.
    Cost estimate: $ 12000-20000

    17) One or more sections of roof flashing are missing . Leaks may occur as a result. A qualified roofing contractor should evaluate and replace flashing where necessary.
    18) Shingles have raised most likely due to nails that have loosened. Leaks may occur as a result. A qualified roofing contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary, such as reseating nails.
    Cost estimate: $ 400

    19) Debris has accumulated in one or more gutters. Gutters should be cleaned now and as necessary in the future.
     
    Garage Return to table of contents

    20) The auto-reverse mechanism on the vehicle door opener is inoperable or requires too much force to activate. This is a safety hazard, especially for small children. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary. Recommend replacing old garage door opener with new one.
    Cost estimate: $ 450

    21) The garage-house door poses a fire risk because it's not fire-rated (metal or solid-core construction). A qualified contractor should replace this door with a fire-rated door.
    22) The garage-house door isn't equipped with an automatic closing device such as sprung hinges. This door should close and latch automatically to prevent vehicle fumes from entering living spaces and/or to slow the spread of fire from the garage to living spaces. A qualified contractor should install automatic closing device(s) as necessary, and as per standard building practices, so this door closes and latches automatically.
    Cost estimate: $ 75

    23) Weatherstrip around or at the bottom of the garage-house door is deteriorated. It should be replaced as necessary to prevent vehicle fumes from entering living spaces.
    Cost estimate: $ 50

    24) Cover plate(s) are missing from one or more electric boxes, such as for receptacles, switches and/or junction boxes. Cover plates should be installed where missing.
    25) Most areas inside the garage, including the perimeter, areas in the center, and one or more vehicle doors were obscured by stored items and/or debris and couldn't be fully evaluated.
     
    Attic Return to table of contents
    Inspection method: Viewed from hatch
    Roof structure type: Trusses
    Insulation material: Fiberglass loose fill
    Insulation depth: 14"
    Insulation estimated R value: 30
    26) Ceiling insulation is uneven in some areas. This is likely due to someone having walked on or through the insulation. Recommend installing additional insulation where necessary to restore the original R rating.
    27) One or more exhaust fans have no duct and terminate in the attic. This is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects and organisms due to increased moisture levels in the attic from the exhaust air.
    Cost estimate: $ 300
     
    Electric service Return to table of contents
    Primary service type: Overhead
    Primary service overload protection type: Circuit breakers
    Service amperage (amps): 200
    Service voltage (volts): 120/240
    Location of main service switch: Unfinished part of basement
    Location of main disconnect: Breaker at top of main service panel
    Service entrance conductor material: Copper
    System ground: Ground rod(s) in soil
    Branch circuit wiring type: Copper
    Solid strand aluminum branch circuit wiring present: Yes
    Smoke detectors present: Yes
    28) The service drop wires are in contact with trees or vegetation. Recommend having a qualified tree service company or arborist prune or remove trees as necessary to prevent straining or abrading the service drop wires.
     
    Water heater Return to table of contents
    Estimated age: 10 years
    Type: Tank
    Energy source: Electricity
    Capacity (in gallons): 40
    Manufacturer: Giant
    29) A water heater is installed over finished living spaces and has no catch pan and drain installed. Recommend having a qualified contractor install a catch pan and drain to prevent water damage to finished interior spaces below if/when the water heater develops a leak or is drained.
    30) Stored items, furnishings and/or debris blocked access to the water heater. The inspector was unable to fully evaluate the water heater.
     
    Heating and cooling Return to table of contents
    Primary heating system energy source: Electric, Oil
    Primary heat system type: Forced air
    Primary A/C energy source: Electric
    Primary Air conditioning type: Heat pump
    Distribution system: Sheet metal ducts
    Manufacturer: Lennox
    31) Oil was found in one or more areas on the oil supply lines and/or fittings. Leaks may exist. A qualified heating contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary.
    32) The estimated useful life for most forced air furnaces is 15 to 20 years. This furnace appears to be approaching this age and may need replacing at any time. Recommend budgeting for a replacement in the near future.
    Cost estimate: $ 8000

    33) The estimated useful life for most heat pumps is 15 to 20 years. The inspector was unable to determine the age of the heat pump. The clients should be aware that this heat pump may be near, at, or beyond its useful life and may need replacing at any time. Recommend attempting to determine the heat pump's age (ask property owner or service technician), and budgeting for a replacement if necessary.
     
    Plumbing and laundry Return to table of contents
    Location of main water shut-off valve: garage
    Location of main water meter: garage
    Water service: Public
    Service pipe material: Copper
    Supply pipe material: Copper
    Drain pipe material: Plastic
    Waste pipe material: Plastic
    34) The clothes dryer is equipped with a vinyl or foil, accordion-type, flexible exhaust duct. The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission considers these types of ducts to be unsafe, and a fire hazard. These types of ducts can trap lint and are susceptible to kinks or crushing, which can greatly reduce the air flow. This duct should be replaced with a rigid or corrugated semi-rigid metal duct, and by a qualified contractor if necessary. Most clothes dryer manufacturers specify the use of a rigid or corrugated semi-rigid metal duct. For more information, visit:
    http://www.cpsc.gov/CPSCPUB/PUBS/5022.html

    35) The clothes dryer exhaust duct is kinked, crushed and/or damaged. Air flow is restricted as a result. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of fire. The exhaust duct should be replaced or repaired, and by a qualified contractor if necessary.
    36) Neither the clothes washer nor dryer were operated or evaluated. They are excluded from this inspection.
    37) A sump pump is installed on the premises. This may indicate that water accumulates inside or below the structure. Recommend asking the property owners how often the sump pump operates and for how long at different times of the year. Also, the clients should be aware that the service life of most sump pumps is between five and seven years, and that the pump may need replacing soon depending on its age and how much it operates.
     
    Fireplaces, woodstoves and chimneys Return to table of contents
    Fireplace type: Masonry
    Chimney type: Masonry
    38) A significant amount of creosote (1/8 inch or more) is visible in the fireplace flue. A qualified chimney service contractor should inspect, clean, and repair if necessary now and annually in the future.
    39) One or more chimney flues do not have a rainproof cover installed. They prevent the following:

  • Rainwater entering flues and mixing with combustion deposits, creating caustic chemicals which can corrode flues
  • Rainwater entering flues and causing damage to terracotta flue tiles from freeze-thaw cycles

    A qualified chimney service contractor should install rainproof cover(s) where missing.
     
    Kitchen Return to table of contents

    40) Wood flooring in one or more areas is worn, damaged and/or cupping. Recommend having a qualified contractor evaluate and refinish wood flooring as necessary.
    41) Caulking is missing and deteriorated where countertops meet backsplashes in wet areas, such as around sinks. Caulk should be replaced where deteriorated and/or applied where missing to prevent water damage.
     
    Bathrooms Return to table of contents

    42) One or more electric receptacles that serve countertop surfaces within six feet of a sink appear to have no ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate to determine if GFCI protection exists, and if not, repairs should be made so that all receptacles that serve countertop surfaces within six feet of sinks have GFCI protection. For example, install GFCI receptacles or circuit breaker(s) as needed.
    Cost estimate: $ 175

    43) One or more leaks were found at water supply lines. A qualified plumber should evaluate and repair as necessary.
    44) One or more toilets are loose. A qualified contractor should remove the toilet(s) for further evaluation and repairs if necessary. A new wax ring should be installed and toilet(s) should be securely anchored to the floor to prevent movement and leaking.
    45) One or more bathrooms with a shower do not have an exhaust fan installed. Moisture accumulation will occur and may damage the structure. Even if the bathroom has a window that opens, it likely does not provide adequate ventilation, especially during cold weather when the window is closed. A qualified contractor should install exhaust fans as per standard building practices where missing in bathrooms with showers.
    Cost estimate: $ 450

    46) One or more faucet handles are loose or missing and should be repaired or replaced as necessary.
    47) One or more sinks are cracked or broken. A qualified plumber should replace the sink(s) where necessary.
    48) One or more sinks are clogged or drain slowly. Drain(s) should be cleared as necessary, and by a qualified plumber if necessary.
    49) Water damage was found in the shelving or cabinet components below one or more sinks. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary.
     
    Interior rooms Return to table of contents

    50) Seals between double-pane glass in one or more windows appear to have failed based on condensation or stains between the panes of glass. A qualified contractor should evaluate and replace glass where necessary.

    The client(s) should be aware that evidence of broken seals may be more or less visible from one day to the next depending on the temperature, humidity, sunlight, etc. Windows or glass doors other than those that the inspector identified may also have failed seals and need glass replaced too.

    51) One or more doors bind in their jamb and cannot be closed and latched, or are difficult to open and close. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary. For example, adjusting jambs or trimming doors.
    52) Floors in one or more areas are not level. Significant repairs may be needed to make floors level, such as repairs to the foundation. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary.
    53) Squeaking or creaking noises occur when walking on one or more sections of flooring. This is usually caused by substandard construction practices where the subfloor decking is not adequately fastened to the framing below. For example, not enough glue was used and/or nails were used rather than screws. In most cases, this is only an annoyance rather than a structural problem. Various solutions such as Squeeeeek No More and Counter Snap fasteners exist to correct this. Repairs to eliminate the squeaks or creaks may be more or less difficult depending on the floor covering, and the access to the underside of the subfloor. Recommend having a qualified contractor evaluate and repair as necessary. For more information, visit:
    http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q=squeaky+floors

    54) One or more light fixtures appear to be inoperable. Recommend further evaluation by replacing bulb(s) and/or consulting with the property owner(s). Repairs or replacement of the light fixture(s) by a qualified electrician may be necessary.
    55) Minor cracks were found in ceilings in one or more areas. They do not appear to be a structural concern, but the client(s) may wish to repair these for aesthetic reasons.
    56) Minor cracks were found in walls in one or more areas. They do not appear to be a structural concern, but the client(s) may wish to repair these for aesthetic reasons.
     

    Photo 2  

    Photo 3  

    Photo 4  
    Grade slopes towards home

    Photo 5  
    Roof over rear basement extension

    Photo 6  
    Missing flashing

    Photo 7  
    Cracked mortar and caulking above rear patio door

    Photo 8  
    Clothesline is being reinforced by downspout

    Photo 9  
    Chimney flashing is lifted

    Photo 10  
    Exterior outlet is not a GFCI

    Photo 11  
    Bathroom outlet is not GFCI

    Photo 12  
    Redo caulking around counter

    Photo 13  
    Home made wiring is unsafe

    Photo 14  

    Photo 15  

    Photo 16  
    240 Volt wiring for electric ranges is aluminum

    Photo 17  
    Electric hot water heater heating system

    Photo 18  
    Section where existing home meets new extension

    Photo 19  
    Hood does not exhaust to the exterior

     
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