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Property Inspection Services


400 Greenlaurel Drive 
Atlanta GA 30342-2071
Inspector: Eugene White

Property Inspection Report

Client(s):  Bill Smith
Property address:  123 Peachtree
Atlanta, GA
Inspection date:  Tuesday, October 13, 2015

This report published on Friday, February 10, 2017 11:41:03 AM EST

This report is the exclusive property of this inspection company and the client(s) listed in the report title. Use of this report by any unauthorized persons is prohibited.
How to Read this Report
This report is organized by the property's functional areas.  Within each functional area, descriptive information is listed first and is shown in bold type.  Items of concern follow descriptive information. Concerns are shown and sorted according to these types:
Concern typeSafetyPoses a risk of injury or death
Concern typeMajor DefectCorrection likely involves a significant expense
Concern typeRepair/ReplaceRecommend repairing or replacing
Concern typeRepair/MaintainRecommend repair and/or maintenance
Concern typeMinor DefectCorrection likely involves only a minor expense
Concern typeMaintainRecommend ongoing maintenance
Concern typeEvaluateRecommend evaluation by a specialist
Concern typeMonitorRecommend monitoring in the future
Concern typeCommentFor your information

Click here for a glossary of building construction terms.Contact your inspector If there are terms that you do not understand, or visit the glossary of construction terms at http://www.reporthost.com/glossary.asp

Table of Contents
General information
Exterior
Roof
Garage
Attic
Electric service
Water heater
Heating and cooling
Plumbing and laundry
Fireplaces, woodstoves and chimneys
Basement
Kitchen
Bathrooms
Interior rooms

View summary


General information
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Type of building: Single family
Time started: 10:00
Time finished: 3:30
Inspection Fee: 425.00
Payment method: Check
Present during inspection: Client(s)
Occupied: No
Weather conditions: Clear
Temperature: Cool
Ground condition: Dry
Front of structure faces: West
Main entrance faces: West
Foundation type: Unfinished basement, Finished basement
The following items are excluded from this inspection: Private sewage disposal system, Security system, Built-in sound system

1) This property has one or more fuel burning appliances, and no carbon monoxide alarms are visible. This is a safety hazard. Recommend installing one or more carbon monoxide alarms as necessary and as per the manufacturer's instructions. For more information, visit http://www.cpsc.gov/CPSCPUB/PREREL/prhtml05/05017.html

Exterior
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Footing material: Poured in place concrete
Foundation material: Poured in place concrete
Apparent wall structure: Wood frame
Wall covering: Cement-based clapboard, Brick veneer
Driveway material: Poured in place concrete
Sidewalk material: Poured in place concrete
Exterior door material: Solid core steel, Glass panel

2) Enclosed deck, which is now sunroom, appears to have additional supports added to support weight of enclosed room and no cracks appear on interior wall or floor so it appears the support is doing the job, but the supports should have been designed by a structural engineer to support the additional wall, roof, ceiling and tile flooring loads. Mid span beam is supported on thin patio slab, not a footing, and rear 4x6 posts are supported by footings below grade. Monitor posts for settlement and sunroom wall for any cracks.
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3) The driveway has significant cracks and/or deterioration in rear right section that has settled as much as 1". A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair or replace driveway sections as necessary. A catch basin should be considered in this section to capture water and route underground to the toe of the slope to prevent erosion around drive.
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4) Rear left and rear right gutters have nails that have backed out which can cause them to sag so that significant amounts of water accumulate in them rather than draining through the downspouts. This can cause gutters to overflow, especially when organic debris such as leaves or needles have accumulated in them. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary, such as replacing nails with screw type gutter attachments.
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5) Siding is damaged and/or deteriorated left side of chimney and corner boards are peeling. Siding is damaged at left front side at foundation and rear right near foundation/patio. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs and/or replace siding and paint/caulk chimney corner boards as necessary to prevent water and vermin intrusion.
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6) Soffit board has minor damage on right side near center. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs if necessary.
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7) Downspouts at front right corner, rear left corner, front left of garage and other areas have extensions that are ineffective. This can result in water accumulating around the structure's foundation, or in basements and crawl spaces if they exist. Accumulated water is a conducive condition to wood destroying insects and organisms, and erosion may also cause the foundation to settle and possibly fail over time. Repairs should be made as necessary, such as installing or repositioning splash blocks, or installing and/or repairing tie-ins to underground drain lines, so rain water is carried at least several feet away from the structure to soil that slopes down and away from the structure.
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8) One downspouts is crushed. This can restrict the water flow and result in clogging and overflowing gutters. Water may accumulate around the structure's foundation, or in basements and crawl spaces if they exist. Accumulated water is a conducive condition to wood destroying insects and organisms, and may also cause the foundation to settle and possibly fail over time. Damaged downspouts should be repaired or replaced as necessary, and by a qualified contractor if necessary.
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9) Gaps exist at cable openings and other openings around the exterior, such as those where outside faucets, refrigerant lines, and/or gas supply pipes penetrate the exterior. Gaps should be sealed as necessary to prevent moisture intrusion and entry by vermin.
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10) One or more wooden deck support posts are in contact with soil. This is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects and organisms. However no damage from wood destroying insects or organisms was found. Standard building practices require that there be at least 6" of space between any wood and the soil below, even if the wood is treated. If possible, soil should be removed or graded so a 6" clearance is maintained. Otherwise recommend installing borate based Impel rods to prevent rot. For more information, visit:
http://www.google.com/search?q=impel+rods
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11) One shutter is bowed out at top and loose from wall at front right garage window. Have contractor reattach shutter.
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12) Two front left window screens are damaged with holes in screen. Have contractor replace damaged screens.
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13) One or more minor cracks (1/8 inch or less) were found in the foundation. These don't appear to be a structural concern, but recommend sealing them to prevent water infiltration and monitoring them in the future. Numerous products exist to seal such cracks including:
  • Hydraulic cement. Requires chiseling a channel in the crack to apply.
  • Resilient caulks (easy to apply).
  • Epoxy sealants (both a waterproof and structural repair).
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14) The finish on the deck(s) is worn and/or deteriorated. Recommend cleaning and refinishing as necessary.
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15) Caulk is missing or deteriorated at front window sills and front right porch fascia board and should be replaced and/or applied where necessary. For more information on caulking, visit:
The Ins and Outs of Caulking.
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Roof
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Roof inspection method: Viewed from ground with binoculars
Roof type: Gable, Hipped
Roof covering: Asphalt or fiberglass composition shingles
Estimated age of roof: 17 Yrs
Gutter & downspout material: Aluminum
Roof ventilation: Adequate

16) Prior repair has been made in front left valley and rear right valley above deck door. One mismatched color shingle was replaced near front valley and an area was tarred near front left valley and rear right valley. A qualified roofing contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary.
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17) The siding on chimney walls above lower roof sections is in contact with or has less than a one inch gap between it and the roof surface below. A gap of at least one inch is recommended so water isn't wicked up into the siding from the shingles below, and also to provide room for additional layers of roofing materials when the current roof surface fails. Siding on left side has water damage and should be replaced. Recommend having a qualified contractor make repairs as necessary, such as trimming siding, so at least a one inch gap exists between the siding and the roofing below where necessary.
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18) Debris has accumulated in rear gutters. This is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects since gutters may overflow and cause water to come in contact with the structure's exterior or make water accumulate around the foundation. Gutters should be cleaned now and as necessary in the future.

19) Monitor for roofing nails that have loosened or backed out. Leaks may occur as a result. If shingles are lifted by nails backing out, a qualified roofing contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary, such as reseating nails and applying sealant.
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20) Because of the configuration of the roof, the inspector was unable to traverse the roof and wasn't able to fully evaluate the entire roof.

Garage
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21) Although no significant brick cracks are evident, brick lintel appears to sag in center of garage opening. Monitor the brick for cracks indicating the sag is worsening. Repair would require removing the brick, stabilizing the metal lintel and replacing the brick.

Attic
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Inspection method: Traversed
Roof structure type: Rafters
Ceiling structure: Ceiling beams
Insulation material: Fiberglass loose fill, Fiberglass roll or batt
Insulation depth: 10-12"

22) Ceiling insulation is missing in area of prior leak on right side by plumbing vent. Recommend installing insulation where missing for better energy efficiency and monitoring area for future leak.
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23) Pull-down stairs are installed for the attic access. No insulation is installed above the stairs and no weatherstripping is installed around the hatch perimeter. To reduce air leakage, recommend installing weatherstripping and an insulated hatch cover. An example of one can be seen at http://www.batticdoor.com/

Interior air leaking into the attic results in heating and cooling losses, increased energy costs, and a possible increase in moisture levels in the attic due condensation forming on the underside of the roof sheathing during cold weather.

24) There is no firestop at the chimney between the attic and the ceiling below. Have qualified contract install firestop at opening between the ceiling and the attic above.
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Electric service
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Primary service type: Underground
Primary service overload protection type: Circuit breakers
Service amperage (amps): 200
Service voltage (volts): 120/240
Location of sub panels: Basement front left
Location of main disconnect: Breaker at top of main service panel
Service entrance conductor material: Aluminum
System ground: Ground rod(s) in soil
Main disconnect rating (amps): 200
Branch circuit wiring type: Non-metallic sheathed
Solid strand aluminum branch circuit wiring present: No
Smoke detectors present: Yes

25) Third up from bottom right overcurrent protection devices (circuit breakers or fuses) is "double tapped", where 2 or more wires are clamped in a terminal designed for only one wire. This is a safety hazard since the bolt or screw may tighten securely against one wire, but leave others loose. Arcing, sparks and fires may result. A qualified electrician should evaluate and repair as necessary.
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26) Grounding clamp that secures the electric service's grounding electrode conductor to the grounding rod is rusted or corroded. Grounding may be inadequate as a result and may be a safety hazard for shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate and repair as necessary.
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27) The main service panel cover couldn't be removed due to screw would not back out. This panel wasn't fully evaluated. Repairs should be made so the cover can come off easily.

Water heater
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Type: Tank
Energy source: Natural gas
Capacity (in gallons): 50
Manufacturer: Rheem
Model: 41V50

28) The temperature-pressure relief valve is leaking from exterior overflow pipe and overflow pipe contains water that is against TPR valve which can corrode valve and prevent proper operation. A qualified plumbing contractor should replace this valve.
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29) The estimated useful life for most water heaters is 8 to 12 years. This water heater appears to be at this age or older and may need replacing at any time. Recommend budgeting for a replacement in the near future.

Heating and cooling
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Estimated age: 16 Yrs
Primary heating system energy source: Natural gas
Primary heat system type: Forced air, Medium efficiency
Primary A/C energy source: Electric
Primary Air conditioning type: Split system
Distribution system: Flexible ducts
Manufacturer: Comfortmaker
Model: FBF125J20A5
Filter location: In return air duct below furnace

30) The last service date of this system appears to be more than one year ago, or the inspector was unable to determine the last service date. The client(s) should ask the property owner(s) when it was last serviced. If unable to determine the last service date, or if this system was serviced more than one year ago, a qualified heating and cooling contractor should inspect, clean, and service this system, and make repairs if necessary. For safety reasons, and because this system is fueled by gas or oil, this servicing should be performed annually in the future. For more information visit:
http://www.cpsc.gov/CPSCPUB/PREREL/prhtml05/05017.html

31) Two unvented gas space heaters are located in basement. During use, products of combustion such as carbon monoxide will enter the living space and oxygen is consumed during combustion. Unvented space heaters that are not properly monitored are unsafe to use. However, there is no other heating source for the basement.
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32) The estimated useful life for most forced air furnaces is 15 to 20 years. This furnace appears to be approaching this age and may need replacing at any time. Recommend budgeting for a replacement in the near future.

33) The estimated useful life for air conditioning compressors is 8 to 15 years. This unit appears to have exceeded this age and may need replacing at any time. Recommend budgeting for a replacement in the near future.

34) The gas has been off for a period of time. The attempt to light pilot with automatic ignition timed out and the furnace did not light up when operating normal controls. This system was not fully evaluated. The client(s) should consult with the property owner(s) as to how it operates and have a qualified heating and cooling contractor evaluate and make repairs if necessary.

35) The upstairs bonus room may have no insulation between garage ceiling and floor, attic doors are not weather-stripped and supply air register may be too small for space. The heat gain may exceed the air conditioning capacity of the ductwork; therefore, a supplemental space a/c unit has been added for additional cooling capacity.

36) The air handler's filter has no cover. As a result, unfiltered air from attic can flow through the system. The heating/cooling equipment service life and the indoor air quality may be reduced. A qualified contractor should make repairs as necessary, such as installing filter compartment door so filter is securely installed with minimal gaps at edges.
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37) Air handler filter was very dirty and a replacement filter beside unit was installed. Filters should be checked monthly in the future and replaced as necessary.

Plumbing and laundry
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Water pressure (psi): 140
Location of main fuel shut-off: Right wall
Water service: Public
Service pipe material: Polyethelene
Supply pipe material: CPVC
Vent pipe material: Plastic
Drain pipe material: Plastic
Waste pipe material: Plastic

38) Recommend having the septic tank inspected. Recommend having the tank pumped if it was last pumped more than 3 years ago. This was completed during the inspection.

39) The water supply pressure is 140 psi which is significantly greater than the maximum 80 psi recommended. Pressures above 80 psi may void warranties for some appliances such as water heaters or washing machines. Flexible supply lines to washing machines are more likely to burst with higher pressures. Typically the pressure cannot be regulated at the water meter. Recommend having a qualified plumber evaluate and make modifications to reduce the pressure below 80 psi. Pressure reducing valve on the main service pipe should be adjusted for lower pressures or replaced if necessary.
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40) An ejector pump with sump is installed to pump basement bathroom drain into main sewer drain. It performed and appeared to be in good operating condition.

Fireplaces, woodstoves and chimneys
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Fireplace type: Metal prefabricated
Chimney type: Metal

41) One or more fireplaces equipped with a gas burner has a damper that can be closed. This is a safety hazard due to the possibility of burner or pilot light exhaust gases entering living spaces. A qualified chimney service contractor should make repairs as necessary so the damper is made permanently open. Typically a bracket or bolt is installed for this purpose.

Basement
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Insulation material underneath floor above: Fiberglass roll or batt
Pier or support post material: Wood
Beam material: Laminated wood, Wood I joists
Floor structure above: Engineered wood joists

42) One electric receptacle on right wall/front receptacle of the left basement room has reverse-polarity wiring, where the hot and neutral wires are reversed. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate and make repairs as necessary.

43) Cover plate(s) are missing from electric boxes in basement mechanical room and left and right rear basement rooms. They are intended to contain fire and prevent electric shock from exposed wires. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of fire and shock. Cover plates should be installed where missing.
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44) Evidence of prior water intrusion was found along crack in left basement wall at sewer line. Accumulated water is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects and organisms and should not be present in the basement. The client(s) should review any disclosure statements available and ask the property owner(s) about past accumulation of water in the basement. The basement should be monitored in the future for accumulated water, especially after heavy and/or prolonged periods of rain. If water is found to accumulate, a qualified contractor who specializes in drainage issues should evaluate and repair as necessary. Typical repairs for preventing water from accumulating in the basement include:
  • Repairing, installing or improving rain run-off systems (gutters, downspouts and extensions or drain lines)
  • Improving perimeter grading
  • Repairing, installing or improving underground footing and/or curtain drains

Ideally, water should not enter the basement, but if water must be controlled after it enters the basement, then typical repairs include installing sump pump(s) or interior perimeter drains.
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45) Rear right exterior entrance door jambs are damaged and/or deteriorated and should be repaired or replaced by a qualified contractor. Metal doors are beginning to rust and should be sanded, primed and painted. Top of door does not seal at weather stripping. Have qualified contractor repair jambs and doors as necessary.
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46) Prior water intrusion into basement at front wall appears to come from washer area above. Since no washer was installed, it was not possible to determine if leak is active. Monitor area after washer use to determine if leak is active and have plumber evaluate and repair as necessary,
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Kitchen
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47) Electric receptacle behind kitchen sink and/or the box it is installed in is loose and/or not securely anchored. Wire conductors may be damaged due to repeated movement and/or tension on wires, or insulation may be damaged. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock and fire. A qualified electrician should evaluate and repair as necessary.

48) Laminate countertop left of kitchen sink has a seam where water could enter. Although it appears in good shape, water entry could cause the countertop to delaminate. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair countertop as necessary.
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49) The bracket that attaches the dishwasher to the underside of the countertop is missing. Repairs should be made as necessary, such as installing or reinstalling the bracket, and by a qualified contractor if necessary.

Bathrooms
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50) Access to master bathroom jetted tub pump is inadequate to replace pump. Have qualified contractor provide larger access opening to pump.
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51) The inspector was unable to determine if ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection is installed for the basement jetted tub's electric supply due to lack of access to the equipment below the basement tub. If no GFCI protection is installed, then this is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified contractor and/or electrician should evaluate and install GFCI protection if none exists. If necessary, modifications should be made to allow access to the GFCI device for periodic evaluation and to reset it when it trips.

52) Left master bathroom and right bathroom toilets are loose. A qualified contractor should remove the toilet(s) for further evaluation and repairs if necessary. A new wax ring should be installed and toilet(s) should be securely anchored to the floor to prevent movement and leaking.

53) Basement bathroom with a shower has an exhaust fan installed, but does not appear to exhaust to exterior. Moisture accumulation will occur and may damage the structure. A qualified contractor should duct exhaust fan to exterior as per standard building practices where missing in bathrooms with showers.

54) Basement toilet seat is missing. Seat should be replaced as necessary.

55) Master bathroom jetted tub has a leak in circulation line visible from side access panel. Have plumber evaluate and repair leak in line.
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56) Right bathroom drain plug is detached from stem and does not open/close properly. Reattach drain to stem or replace as necessary.
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57) Master shower has been heavily caulked possibly from prior leaking. All caulk joints should be maintained to prevent water intrusion and damage to the floor structure.
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Interior rooms
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58) Guardrail at top of stairs to bonus room is very loose and/or wobbly. This is a safety hazard. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary, such as installing new fasteners or hardware, installing additional fasteners and/or installing additional railing components as necessary so they are securely attached.
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59) Evidence of "light to moderate" insect infestation was found at right front floor/wall of sunroom. Debris was noted on patio below this area. Recommend a pest control company evaluate and treat as necessary.
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60) Based on the age of this structure and the appearance of existing smoke alarms, the alarms may be older than 10 years old. According to National Fire Protection Association, aging smoke alarms don't operate as efficiently and often are the source for nuisance alarms. Older smoke alarms are estimated to have a 30% probability of failure within the first 10 years. Newer smoke alarms do better, but should be replaced after 10 years. Unless you know that the smoke alarms are new, replacing them when moving into a new residence is also recommended by NFPA. For more information, visit:
http://www.google.com/search?q=old+smoke+alarms

61) An insufficient number of smoke alarms are installed in basement. Additional smoke alarms should be installed as necessary so a functioning one exists in each hallway leading to bedrooms, and in each bedroom. For more information, visit http://www.cpsc.gov/cpscpub/pubs/5077.html

62) Batteries in all the smoke alarms should be replaced after taking occupancy, and annually in the future. "Chirping" noises emitted from smoke alarms typically indicate that batteries need replacing. For more information, visit:
http://www.cpsc.gov/cpscpub/pubs/5077.html

63) Squeaking or creaking noises occur when walking on one or more sections of carpeted flooring. This is usually caused by substandard construction practices where the subfloor decking is not adequately fastened to the framing below. For example, not enough glue was used and/or nails were used rather than screws. In most cases, this is only an annoyance rather than a structural problem. Various solutions such as Squeeeeek No More and Counter Snap fasteners exist to correct this. Repairs to eliminate the squeaks or creaks may be more or less difficult depending on the floor covering, and the access to the underside of the subfloor. Recommend having a qualified contractor evaluate and repair as necessary. For more information, visit:
http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q=squeaky+floors

64) Air supply register in family room is loose or installed in a substandard way. Repairs should be made as necessary so register is securely attached, flush with the surface on which they are installed.

65) Several windows that were built to open, will not open, or open only minimally due to their being painted shut, damaged and/or deteriorated in some way. Repairs should be made as necessary, and by a qualified contractor if necessary so windows open fully, and open and close easily.

66) Right rear bedroom door will not latch when closed. Repairs should be made as necessary, and by a qualified contractor if necessary. For example, aligning strike plates with latch bolts and/or replacing locksets.

67) Exterior entrance door to deck is damaged and/or deteriorated at bottom of jamb and dead bolt does not engage. Door should be repaired by a qualified contractor.
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68) Carpeting in right rear bedroom is soiled and/or stained. Recommend having carpeting professionally cleaned as necessary.

69) Basement rooms that are considered living spaces appear to have no visible source of heat other than gas space heaters. The client(s) should consult with the property owner(s) regarding this, and if necessary, a qualified contractor should evaluate and install safe heat source(s) as necessary.

70) Front light fixture in hall to garage appears to be inoperable. Recommend further evaluation by replacing bulb(s) and/or consulting with the property owner(s). Repairs or replacement of the light fixture(s) by a qualified electrician may be necessary.
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71) Stains were found on tiles in basement ceiling areas under kitchen sink and dishwasher. However, no elevated levels of moisture were found. The stain(s) may be due to past plumbing leaks. Recommend asking the property owner(s) about this, and monitoring the stained area(s) in the future, especially. If elevated moisture is found in the future, a qualified contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary.
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72) Minor stain was found in right front sunroom wall. The stain may come from a prior leak in roof that was repaired above. Monitor area after heavy rains to determine if leak is active and have roofing contractor repair if active.
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73) Several light fixtures and ceiling fans have inoperative bulbs and could not be fully evaluated. Bulbs may simply need to be installed, or repairs or replacement may be necessary.