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Professional Home Inspections

Website: http://www.prohomeinsp.com/
Email: tim@prohomeinsp.com
Inspector's email: tim@prohomeinsp.com
Phone: (309) 678-5719
131 E Frances Ave 
Peoria IL 61614-5008
Inspector: Timothy Patrick

Summary

Client(s):  Mr. & Mrs Customer
Property address:  1234 USA
Inspection date:  Tuesday, October 03, 2017

This report published on Monday, October 23, 2017 3:58:52 PM CDT

This report is the result of a property inspection performed by Timothy W. Patrick License #450.011786

Concerns are shown and sorted according to these types:
Concern typeSafetyPoses a safety hazard
Concern typeMajor DefectCorrection likely involves a significant expense
Concern typeRepair/ReplaceRecommend repairing or replacing
Concern typeRepair/MaintainRecommend repair and/or maintenance
Concern typeMaintainRecommend ongoing maintenance
Concern typeEvaluateRecommend evaluation by a specialist
Concern typeMonitorRecommend monitoring in the future
Concern typeCommentFor your information


General Information
1 - Structures built prior to the mid 1980s may contain lead and/or asbestos. Lead is commonly found in paint and in some plumbing components. The EPA does not recognize newer coats of paint as encapsulating older coats of lead-based paint. Asbestos is commonly found in various building materials such as insulation, siding, and/or floor and ceiling tiles. Laws were passed in 1978 to prohibit usage of lead and asbestos, but stocks of materials containing these substances remained in use for a number of years thereafter. Both lead and asbestos are known health hazards. Evaluating for the presence of lead and/or asbestos is beyond the scope of this inspection. Any mention of these materials in this report is made as a courtesy only, and meant to refer the client to a specialist. Consult with specialists as necessary, such as industrial hygienists, professional labs and/or abatement specialists for this type of evaluation. For information on lead, asbestos and other hazardous materials in homes, visit:
http://www.reporthost.com/?EPA
http://www.reporthost.com/?CPSC
http://www.reporthost.com/?CDC

2 - This is a safety concern an as such needs to be address as soon as possible.

Grounds
3 - Cracks, holes, settlement, heaving and/or deterioration resulting in trip hazards were found in the driveway, For safety reasons, recommend that a qualified contractor repair as necessary.

Exterior and Foundation
4 - Caulk was deteriorated in some areas. For example, around windows. Recommend that a qualified person renew or install caulk as necessary. Where gaps are wider than 1/4 inch, an appropriate material other than caulk should be used. For more information, visit:
http://www.reporthost.com/?CAULK

5 - One or more minor cracks (1/8 inch or less) were found in the foundation. These didn't appear to be a structural concern, but recommend sealing them to prevent water infiltration and monitor them in the future. Numerous products exist to seal such cracks including hydraulic cement, non-shrinking grout, resilient caulks and epoxy sealants.

6 - Vegetation such as trees, shrubs and/or vines was in contact with or close to the building exterior. Vegetation can serve as a pathway for wood-destroying insects and can retain moisture against the exterior after it rains. This is a conducive condition for wood-destroying organisms. Recommend pruning, moving or removing vegetation as necessary to maintain at least 6 inches of space between it and the building exterior. A 1-foot clearance is better.

Roof
8 - Recommend redirecting downspout from top dormer gutter.

Garage or Carport
9 - The auto-reverse mechanism on one or more automatic openers for garage vehicle doors was inoperable. This is a potential safety hazard. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary. For more information on garage door safety issues, visit:
http://www.reporthost.com/?NRGD

10 - Ceiling drywall missing or loose.

11 - Northeast wall shows signs of water exposure. Recommend addressing the down spout above the garage on the roof.

Interior, Doors and Windows
13 - One or more bedrooms had windows that wouldn't open or were stuck shut. Unless a bedroom has an exterior entry door, at least one window requires adequate egress in the event of a fire or emergency to allow escape or to allow access by emergency personnel. Recommend that a qualified contractor repair or make modifications per standard building practices. For more information, visit:
http://www.reporthost.com/?EGRESS

14 - One or more bedroom windows had substandard egress by today's standard building practices. Adequate egress is important in the event of a fire or emergency to allow escape or to allow access by emergency personnel. Bedroom windows wouldn't open. This is a potential safety hazard. Standard building practices require that every bedroom have at least one egress window or an exterior entry door. Egress windows must comply with these requirements:And for window wells below grade:Where windows are too high, at a minimum, keep something that serves as a ladder below the window at all times. Recommend that a qualified contractor repair or make modifications per standard building practices. For more information, visit:
http://www.reporthost.com/?EGRESS

15 - One or more windows that were designed to open and close were stuck shut. Recommend that a qualified person repair windows as necessary so they open and close easily.

16 - Crank handles at many windows were stripped, loose and/or broken. Recommend that a qualified person replace handles or make repairs as necessary.

Bathrooms, Laundry and Sinks
17 - The exhaust fan at location(s) #A and B was . Moisture may accumulate and result in mold, bacteria or fungal growth. Recommend that a qualified person clean, repair or replace fans as necessary.

Exhaust ducts ran in attic are not properly installed. Current installation does not allow for proper moisture ventilation

18 - One or more leaks were found at water shut-off valves for the toilet at location(s) #. A qualified plumber should repair as necessary.

19 - Landry room floor damaged.

Kitchen
20 - Countertops and/or backsplashes were damaged or deteriorated. Recommend repairing or replacing as necessary.

21 - Water damage was found in shelving or cabinets below the sink. Recommend that a qualified contractor repair as necessary after any plumbing leaks have been repaired. If moisture is present then concealed areas should be dried thoroughly.

22 - Cabinet hardware such as hinges, latches, closers, magnets or pulls were loose, missing or damaged at one or more cabinet drawers, doors or turntables. Recommend that a qualified person repair as necessary.

Electric
25 - One or more electric receptacles at the kitchen, bathroom(s), 1/2 bath, master bath, wet bar and/or laundry area had no visible ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection, or the inspector was unable to determine if GFCI protection was present. If not GFCI-protected, receptacles in wet areas pose a shock hazard. Recommend that a qualified electrician evaluate and install GFCI protection if necessary and per standard building practices. General guidelines for GFCI-protected receptacles include the following locations:For more information, visit:
http://www.reporthost.com/?GFCI

26 - One or more exterior receptacle covers were broken. This is a potential shock hazard. Recommend that a qualified person replace covers where necessary.

27 - One or more wall switches were broken or damaged. Recommend that a qualified electrician replace wall switches as necessary.

Heating, Ventilation and Air Condition (HVAC)
31 - The last service date of the gas or oil-fired forced air furnace appeared to be more than 1 year ago, or the inspector was unable to determine the last service date. Ask the property owner when it was last serviced. If unable to determine the last service date, or if this system was serviced more than 1 year ago, recommend that a qualified HVAC contractor inspect, clean, and service this system, and make repairs if necessary. For safety reasons, and because this system is fueled by gas or oil, this servicing should be performed annually in the future. Any needed repairs noted in this report should be brought to the attention of the HVAC contractor when it's serviced. For more information visit:
http://www.reporthost.com/?ANFURINSP

32 - The estimated useful life for most forced air furnaces is 15-20 years. This furnace appeared to be near this age and/or its useful lifespan and may need replacing or significant repairs at any time. Recommend budgeting for a replacement in the near future.

33 - The estimated useful life for most heat pumps and air conditioning condensing units is 10-15 years. This unit appeared to be beyond and/or 5/95 this age and/or its useful lifespan and may need replacing or significant repairs at any time. Recommend budgeting for a replacement in the near future.

Manufactured in 1995, Recommend complete heating and cooling systems be serviced by certified service tech..

34 - The last service date of the forced air heating/cooling system appeared to be more than 1 year ago, or the inspector was unable to determine the last service date. Ask the property owner when it was last serviced. If unable to determine the last service date, or if this system was serviced more than 1 year ago, recommend that a qualified HVAC contractor service this system and make repairs if necessary. Because this system has a compressor and refrigerant system, this servicing should be performed annually in the future. Any needed repairs noted in this report should be brought to the attention of the contractor when it's serviced.

35 - Vegetation such as trees, shrubs and/or vines were too close to the heat pump or air conditioning condensing unit. There should be at least 12 inches of clearance on all sides and at least 4-6 feet above. Inadequate clearance around and above can result in reduced efficiency, increased energy costs and/or damage to equipment. Recommend pruning and/or removing vegetation as necessary.

36 - The cooling fins at the air handler evaporator coils were dirty. Recommend that a qualified person clean fins as necessary.

Fireplaces, Stoves, Chimneys and Flues
37 - One or more solid fuel-burning fireplaces or stoves were found at the property. When such devices are used, they should be professionally inspected and cleaned annually to prevent creosote build-up and to determine if repairs are needed. The National Fire Protection Association states that a "Level 2" chimney inspection should be performed with every sale or transfer of property with a wood-burning device. Recommend consulting with the property owner about recent and past servicing and repairs to all wood-burning devices and chimneys or flues at this property. Recommend that a qualified specialist evaluate all solid fuel-burning devices and chimneys, and clean and repair as necessary. Note that if a wood stove insert is installed, it may need to be removed for such an evaluation. For more information, search for "chimney inspection" at:
http://www.reporthost.com/?CSIA

Wood Destroying Organism Findings
38 - Because of apparent cosmetic damage at location(s) #, recommend that a qualified contractor evaluate and repair as necessary. All wood significantly damaged by wood-destroying insects or fungal rot should be replaced or removed.

39 - Evidence of past infestation of termites was found at location(s) # in the form of mud tubes with visible wood damage. Recommend the following: