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Preferred Real Estate Inspection, LLC

Website: http://www.preferredrealestateinspections.com
Email: preferredinspections@cox.net
Phone: (405) 514-8583
FAX: (405) 470-1680
23321 Lauren Lane 
Edmond, OK 73025
Inspector: Timothy Kerce, CPI
Oklahoma License #649

 

Property Inspection Report
Client(s): **************************************************************
Property address: A 4500 sq. ft. home on the golf course
Quail Creek
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma
Inspection date: 3/22/2010
This report published on Monday, April 19, 2010 8:36:26 PM CDT

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This report is the exclusive property of this inspection company and the client(s) listed in the report title. Use of this report by any unauthorized persons is prohibited.

 
How to Read this Report
This report is organized by the property's functional areas.  Within each functional area, descriptive information is listed first and is shown in bold type.  Items of concern follow descriptive information.
Concerns are shown and sorted according to these types:
SafetyPoses a risk of injury or death 
Major DefectCorrection likely involves a significant expense 
Repair/ReplaceRecommend repairing or replacing 
Repair/MaintainRecommend repair and/or maintenance 
Minor DefectCorrection likely involves only a minor expense 
MaintainRecommend ongoing maintenance 
EvaluateRecommend evaluation by a specialist 
MonitorRecommend monitoring in the future 
CommentFor your information 

Click here for a glossary of building construction terms.  Contact your inspector if there are terms that you do not understand, or visit the glossary of construction terms at http://www.reporthost.com/glossary.asp

Table of Contents
General information
Exterior
Roof
Garage
Attic
Electric service
Water heater
Heating and cooling
Plumbing and laundry
Fireplaces, woodstoves and chimneys
Kitchen
Bathrooms
Interior rooms
Sprinkler System

 
General information Return to table of contents
Type of building: Single family
Age of building: Built in 1965
Present during inspection: Client(s), Realtor(s)
Occupied: Yes
Weather conditions: Clear
Temperature: Cool
Ground condition: Wet Snow on ground and roof
Front of structure faces: North
Main entrance faces: North
Foundation type: Slab on grade
The following items are excluded from this inspection: Security system, Swimming pool, Hot tub, Low voltage outdoor lighting, Built-in sound system, Intercom system
1) Safety, Repair/Replace - This property has one or more fuel burning appliances, and no carbon monoxide alarms are visible. This is a safety hazard. Recommend installing one or more carbon monoxide alarms as necessary and as per the manufacturer's instructions. For more information, visit http://www.cpsc.gov/CPSCPUB/PREREL/prhtml05/05017.html
2) Safety, Comment - Structures built prior to 1979 may contain lead-based paint and/or asbestos in various building materials such as insulation, siding, and/or floor and ceiling tiles. Both lead and asbestos are known health hazards. Evaluating for the presence of lead and/or asbestos is not included in this inspection. The client(s) should consult with specialists as necessary, such as industrial hygienists, professional labs and/or abatement contractors for this type of evaluation. For information on lead, asbestos and other hazardous materials in homes, visit these websites:
  • The Environmental Protection Association (http://www.epa.gov)
  • The Consumer Products Safety Commission (http://www.cpsc.gov)
  • The Center for Disease Control (http://www.cdc.gov)
    3) Comment - Some wall, floor and/or ceiling surfaces were obscured by furniture and/or stored items. Some areas couldn't be evaluated.
    4) Comment - Several systems are located in the property that are outside the scope of a normal inspection. These include the intercom system, the speaker system, the powered skylights, the clean-outs for the fireplaces, the security system, and the data/phone system, video surveillance system, the automatic gate, the hide-a-beds in the Cabana, and the small fridge in the Cabana

    There is also a swimming pool and spa system installed.

    These systems were not evaluated. Suggest asking the owner about the operation of these systems and having the pool and spa system evaluated by a qualified contractor.

    Photo 72  
    Control for powered skylight windows.

    Photo 143  

    Photo 145  
    Powered skylights.

    Photo 156  
    Floor heating system in master bath was not evaluated.

    Photo 83  
    Security control box in attic.

    Photo 84  

    Photo 280  
    Data/Phone junction box in garage.

    Photo 144  
    Security system control.

    Photo 198  

    Photo 246  

    Photo 43  
    Exterior intercom.

    Photo 218  

    Photo 196  
    Cleanout for fireplaces.

    Photo 264  
    Keypad Gate was not evaulated, but appeared to be working.

    Photo 129  
    Speaker system

    Photo 161  
    Lighting system controls and audio controls.

    Photo 232  
    Hide-a-bed hydraulic system.

    Photo 233  

    Photo 234  
    Fridge in Cabana, not evaluated.

    Photo 256  
    Video surveillance system.

     
    Exterior Return to table of contents
    Limitations: The following items are not included in this inspection: below-grade foundation walls and footings, or those obscured by vegetation or building components; exterior building surfaces or components obscured by vegetation, stored items or debris. Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Some amount of cracking is normal in concrete slabs and foundation walls due to shrinkage and drying. Note that the inspector does not determination the adequacy of sump pumps, seismic reinforcement, nor determine if support posts, columns, beams, joists, studs, trusses, etc. are of adequate size, spanning or spacing.
    Site profile: Level
    Footing material: Not visible
    Foundation material: Poured in place concrete
    Apparent wall structure: Wood frame
    Wall covering: Wood clapboard, Brick veneer
    Driveway material: Poured in place concrete
    Sidewalk material: Poured in place concrete
    Exterior door material: Solid core wood, Solid core steel, Sliding glass
    5) Safety, Repair/Replace, Evaluate - One or more electric receptacles and/or the boxes they are installed in are loose and/or not securely anchored. Wire conductors may be damaged due to repeated movement and/or tension on wires, or insulation may be damaged. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock and fire. A qualified electrician should evaluate and repair as necessary.

    Photo 276  
    Outlet in back yard is loose and has hole in back.

    Photo 219  
    Several junction boxes have loose covers.

    6) Safety, Repair/Replace, Evaluate - One or more outdoor electric receptacles appear to have no ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate to determine if GFCI protection exists, and if not, repairs should be made so that all outdoor receptacles within six feet six inches of ground level have GFCI protection. For example, install GFCI receptacles or circuit breaker(s) as needed.

    Photo 217  
    Back porch.

    Photo 182  
    This one also doesn't appear to operate. Back porch.

    7) Safety, Repair/Replace, Evaluate - Wires are exposed due to not being contained in a covered junction box. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock and fire. A qualified electrician should evaluate and make repairs as necessary. For example, install securely mounted junction boxes with cover plates where needed to contain wiring.

    Photo 248  
    Old light fixture? Back southeast side. Is it hot?
     

    8) Safety, Repair/Replace - Cover plate(s) are missing from one or more electric boxes, such as for receptacles, switches and/or junction boxes. They are intended to contain fire and prevent electric shock from exposed wires. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of fire and shock. Cover plates should be installed where missing.

    Photo 187  

    Photo 199  
    Back southeast corner.

    9) Safety, Repair/Replace - An exterior electric receptacle is being used for appliances or systems that are constantly in use, and is equipped with "in-use" receptacle covers for wet locations, however the cover is damage and won't close completely. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock and fire. "In use" covers should be installed where necessary.

    Photo 275  
    Southeast corner next to fence.
     

    10) Safety, Repair/Replace - There is exposed electrical wiring on the front porch, left side. This is a safety hazard as the wiring could be cut or nicked and cause electrical shock. Wiring should be behind the wall or placed in plastic or metal conduit by a qualified electrician if necessary.

    Photo 61  
     

    11) Repair/Replace, Evaluate - One or more areas of the grounds around the structure have significantly soggy soil, standing water or indications of accumulated water at times (sediment, dead grass, etc.). Recommend consulting with a qualified contractor who specializes in drainage, to determine if or what repairs are needed to provide adequate drainage. Possible repairs may involve grading soil, or installing, repairing and/or replacing underground drains.

    Photo 185  

    Photo 192  

    Photo 250  
     

    12) Repair/Replace, Evaluate - Rot was found in one or more areas on soffit boards. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary, replacing all rotten wood.

    Photo 247  

    Photo 239  

    Photo 240  
    Many of the door frames and thresholds are showing signs of rot at the bottom.

    Photo 189  
    Some of the posts are showing signs of rot at the base.

    13) Repair/Replace, Evaluate - One or more outside faucets appeared to be inoperable. No water came out of the faucet(s) when turned on. This may be due to a (winterizing) shut-off valve being turned off. As per the NACHI and ASHI Standards of Practice, the inspector did not attempt to turn on or off any water supply shut-off valves. Recommend that the client(s) ask the seller about outside faucets with no water, and/or have a qualified plumber evaluate and repair faucet(s) as necessary.

    Photo 255  
    Left of front door. No water.
     

    14) Repair/Replace - One or more large trees are very close the foundation. Tree roots can cause significant structural damage to foundations. Recommend having a qualified tree service contractor or arborist remove trees as necessary to prevent damage to the structure's foundation.
    15) Repair/Replace - Gaps exist at one or more openings around the exterior, such as those where outside faucets, refrigerant lines, and/or gas supply pipes penetrate the exterior and areas were the roof meets the walls. Gaps should be sealed as necessary to prevent moisture intrusion and entry by vermin. There was a large number of mud dobber nests in the attic.

    Photo 95  
    The wasps love the attic.

    Photo 60  

    16) Repair/Replace - Minor cracks were found in one or more sections of brick veneer. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary, such as repointing mortar to prevent water intrusion and further deterioration in the future.

    Photo 59  

    Photo 183  

    17) Repair/Replace - One or more outside faucets leak. For example, from the valve stem when turned on or from the spigot when turned off. A qualified plumber should evaluate and repair as necessary.

    Photo 258  
    Front faucet is leaking from valve stem.
     

    18) Maintain - Trees and/or shrubs are in contact with or are close to the roof edge(s) in one or more areas. Damage to the roof may result, especially during high winds. Vegetation can also act as a conduit for wood destroying insects. Vegetation should be pruned back and/or removed as necessary to prevent damage and infestation by wood destroying insects.

    Photo 193  

    Photo 194  

    19) Maintain - Caulk is missing or deteriorated in some areas and should be replaced and/or applied where necessary. For more information on caulking, visit The Ins and Outs of Caulking.

    Photo 47  
     

    20) Comment - One or more sections of foundation and/or exterior walls are excluded from this inspection due to lack of access from vegetation, debris and/or stored items.
    21) Comment - The driveway has been coated with paint or epoxy. Client should note that when the finish fails, it will more than likely have to be re-coated with the same substance.
    22) Comment - There are drains located in the front and back yards, drives, pool decks and sidewalks. These are outside the scope of a normal inspection and were not evaluated, however, most of the drains appeared to be working correctly.

    Photo 243  

    Photo 49  

    23) Comment - Minor cracks were found in one or more driveway, sidewalk or patio sections. However they don't appear to be a structural concern and no trip hazards were found. No immediate action is recommended, but the client(s) may wish to have repairs made or have cracked sections replaced for aesthetic reasons.

    Photo 62  

    Photo 207  

    Photo 208  

    Photo 265  

    24) Comment - Vegetation such as trees, shrubs and/or vines are in contact with or less than one foot from the structure's exterior. Vegetation can serve as a conduit for wood destroying insects and may retain moisture against the exterior after it rains. Vegetation should be pruned and/or removed as necessary to maintain a one foot clearance between it and the structure's exterior.

    Photo 209  
     

    25) Comment - There is no guttering installed. This can result in water accumulating around the structure's foundation. Accumulated water is a conducive condition to wood destroying insects and organisms, and may also cause the foundation to settle and possibly fail over time. A qualified contractor should install gutters and downspouts where missing. Also, extensions such as splashblocks or tie-ins to underground drain lines should be installed as necessary to carry rain water away from the house.

    Water has constantly run off the roof and into the northeast window causing damage and algae/moss growth.

    Photo 186  

    Photo 251  

    26) Comment - Many of the exterior lights are on a timer and could not be evaluated. Recommend further evaluation and/or consulting with the property owner(s). Repairs or replacement of the light fixture(s) by a qualified electrician may be necessary.

    Photo 213  

    Photo 244  

    Photo 272  

    Photo 293  
    Exterior light switches in hall.

    27) Comment - The exterior garden walls are out of the scope of a normal inspection and were not fully evaluated, however, major deterioration was noted, including cracks, spalling, and heaving. Further evaluation is needed to determine the costs involved to repair these walls.

    Furthermore, the brick patio and walks are showing signs of deterioration, cracks, spalling, and growth of vegetation which can further damage bricks. A complete evaluation by a qualified contractor may be needed to determine the costs involved for repairs and maintenance.

    Photo 241  

    Photo 242  

    Photo 245  

    Photo 254  

    Photo 266  

    Photo 184  

    28) Comment - There is a fountain located in the back. It was not running at the time of the inspection and could not be fully evaluated. Suggest asking owner if the fountain is operational, and how it operates.

    Photo 188  
     

     
    Roof Return to table of contents
    Roof inspection method: Viewed from ground due to wet conditions
    Roof type: Gable, Hipped
    Roof covering: Wood shakes
    Estimated age of roof: Realtor said less than 20 years. Inspector believes the roof is older.
    The roof has how many layers of shingles.: 1
    Gutter & downspout material: None
    Roof ventilation: Adequate for wood shakes
    29) Safety, Repair/Replace - One or more plumbing vent pipes terminate less than six inches above the roof surface below. Debris or snow may block openings, and may result in sewer gases entering living spaces. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary so vent pipes terminate at least six inches above roof surfaces.

    Photo 260  
     

    30) Major Defect, Evaluate - The roof surface material appears to be near the end of its service life and will likely need replacing in the near future, even with repairs. The client(s) should budget for a replacement roof surface, and may want to have a qualified roofing contractor evaluate and attempt to issue a "5 year roof certificate".

    Photo 201  

    Photo 203  

    Photo 216  
    Moss/algae growth is heavy at the ends of some shingles.
     

    31) Major Defect, Comment - The roof structure below the surface is "skip sheathed" where batten boards rather than sheets of plywood support the roof surface. Installing a composition fiberglass or asphalt roof in the future will require the additional expense of installing sheathing, such as plywood or oriented strand board (OSB) over the batten boards.
    32) Repair/Replace, Evaluate - Roofing nails in one or more areas have loosened or backed out. Leaks may occur as a result. A qualified roofing contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary, such as reseating nails. There were loose shingles laying on the roof.

    Photo 204  

    Photo 210  

    Photo 279  
     

    33) Repair/Replace, Comment - The siding on one or more exterior walls above lower roof sections is in contact with or has less than a one inch gap between it and the roof surface below. A gap of at least one inch is recommended so water isn't wicked up into the siding from the shingles below, and also to provide room for additional layers of roofing materials when the current roof surface fails. Recommend having a qualified contractor make repairs as necessary when a new roof is installed, such as trimming siding, so at least a one inch gap exists between the siding and the roofing below where necessary.

    Photo 205  
    The siding may be rotting where it touches the shingles, on all gable ends of the roof. Also note, that the skylights are the biggest source of leaks on a roof and should be maintained and monitored year around.

    Photo 262  

    34) Repair/Replace - New siding/baton boards have been added at the front of the house. They have not been painted. These should be painted to keep wood from deteriorating.

    Photo 263  
     

    35) Maintain, Monitor - Two sections of roof surfaces are sloped towards each other. Debris such as leaves or needles are more likely to accumulate in this area than rest of the roof. Leaks may occur as a result. Recommend monitoring such areas for accumulated debris in the future and cleaning as necessary.
    36) Maintain - Moss is growing on the roof. As a result, shingles may lift or be damaged. Leaks may result and/or the roof surface may fail prematurely. This is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects and organisms. Efforts should be taken to kill the moss during its growing season (wet months). Typically zinc-based chemicals are used for this, and must be applied periodically. For information on various moss treatment products and their pros and cons, visit http://bryophytes.science.oregonstate.edu/page24.htm

    Photo 200  

    Photo 252  

    Photo 253  

    Photo 257  

    37) Maintain - Trees are overhanging roof and are within 10 feet of roof vertically. This is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects and organisms since organic debris such as leaves or needles are more likely to accumulate on the roof surface. Accumulated debris may cause water to enter gaps in the roof surface and leak into attic and/or interior spaces. Trees should be pruned so they are at least 10 feet above roof, or don't overhang the roof.

    Photo 261  
     

    38) Evaluate, Comment - Some deterioration was noted on the chimneys. Inspector was unable to closely evaluate the chimneys due to wet conditions on a cedar shake roof. Further evaluation may be needed by a qualified contractor to check the condition of the chimney's, their caps, and rain covers.

    Photo 202  
     

    39) Comment - Because of the roof covering type and/or the configuration of the roof, the inspector was unable to traverse the roof and wasn't able to fully evaluate the entire roof.
    40) Comment - The roof was partially obscured by snow and couldn't be fully evaluated.
     
    Garage Return to table of contents

    41) Safety, Repair/Replace, Evaluate - The auto-reverse mechanism on the single vehicle door opener is inoperable or requires too much force to activate. This is a safety hazard, especially for small children. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary. The two doors connected to the same opener were not tested due to the configuration of this opener and the risk of harm to the system. For more information on garage door safety issues, visit: http://www.cpsc.gov/cpscpub/pubs/523.html or http://www.ohdstl.com/safety.html

    Photo 2  
    Not tested.

    Photo 45  
    Tested, but did not reverse as it should.

    42) Safety, Repair/Replace, Evaluate - One or more garage electric receptacles appear to have no ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate to determine if GFCI protection exists, and if not, repairs should be made so that all garage receptacles, except for one for use with a refrigerator or freezer, have GFCI protection. For example, install GFCI receptacles or circuit breaker(s) as needed.

    Photo 40  
     

    43) Safety, Repair/Replace, Comment - No infrared "photo eye" devices are installed for the vehicle door's electric door opener. They've been required on all vehicle door openers since 1993 and improve safety by triggering the vehicle door's auto-reverse feature without need for the door to come in contact with the object, person or animal that's preventing it from closing. Recommend considering having a qualified contractor install these devices for improved safety. For more information on garage door safety issues, visit: http://www.cpsc.gov/cpscpub/pubs/523.html or http://www.ohdstl.com/safety.html

    The door openers and springs are very old, but seem to be operating OK. They could fail at any time. Suggest budgeting for an update systems for energy and safety reasons.

    Photo 3  

    Photo 46  
    One opener is connected to two doors.

    Photo 65  
     

    44) Repair/Replace, Evaluate - The lock mechanism on the garage vehicle door is inoperable or difficult to operate. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary so vehicle doors can be easily secured. Sometimes these locks are bolted open so that they cannot be locked and won't damage the openers.

    Photo 64  
     

    45) Repair/Replace, Comment - There appears to be repaired damage above the doors to the room in the back of the garage.

    The light fixture in this room was missing a cover.

    The cabinets in this room were missing drawer handles.

    Photo 30  

    Photo 31  

    Photo 33  
    Repaired areas above both corners of doors. Water damage?

    Photo 34  
    There is flaking paint just above these doors.

    46) Repair/Replace - There were several doors in the garage that were warped, did not close properly, did not latch properly, were damaged or had a broken handle. These should be repaired/replaced as necessary.

    The trim around the door into the house was damaged and should be repaired or replaced.

    Photo 22  
    Water heater closet door handle is loose.

    Photo 32  

    Photo 36  

    Photo 37  

    Photo 44  
    Door to house.
     

    47) Repair/Replace - There was a hole in the bottom of the wall on the west side. There appears to be damage to the sill.

    Photo 39  
     

    48) Maintain, Comment - Some parts of the garage could not be fully evaluated due to personal belongings, a vehicle, and appliances or cabinets against the walls.

    There were 3 refrigerator/freezer units in the garage. These are outside the scope of a normal inspection and were not fully evaluated, however, they appeared to be operating at the time of the inspection. The coils should be cleaned and maintained on a regular basis.

    Photo 23  

    Photo 41  

    Photo 283  

    Photo 24  
    If keeping the fridge, clean the coils.

    49) Evaluate, Comment - There appears to be mold or a mold-like substance on the wall of the furnace closet under the stairs in the garage. This inspection does not include a mold evaluation and cannot determine the extent of the mold or any damage behind the walls. The client may wish to consultant a mold specialist and may want to evaluate the situation behind this wall. There was no visible wet conditions.

    There was also water stains on the the wall above the freezer. There did not appear to be a leak at the time of the inspection.

    Photo 5  

    Photo 35  

    50) Comment - The light switch that operates the lights in the garage also turn the lights on for the attic. Suggest that they be wired separately.

    Photo 63  
     

     
    Attic Return to table of contents
    Inspection method: Traversed
    Roof structure type: Rafters
    Ceiling structure: Ceiling beams
    Insulation material: Fiberglass loose fill, Fiberglass roll or batt
    Insulation depth: 8" - 12"
    51) Safety, Repair/Replace, Evaluate - Paper facing on batt insulation is oriented towards open spaces, rather than against interior space surfaces. This occurs when newer, fiberglass batt insulation with paper facing on one side is installed backwards or upside down, or when older batt insulation wrapped on both sides with paper is installed. The paper facing is flammable. Newer insulation usually has a warning label indicating this on the facing.

    For newer batt insulation with paper facing on one side only, the paper facing should be oriented towards interior spaces rather than exposed, open spaces. The existing insulation should be reinstalled or replaced.

    For older batt insulation with paper facing on both sides, recommend that repairs be made as necessary to eliminate the exposed paper facing.

    A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary, and as per standard building practices and the insulation manufacturer's recommendations to eliminate the fire hazard.

    Also, the paper facing also acts as a vapor barrier, and if located away from the interior surfaces, can trap moisture from condensation in the cavity between the paper facing and the interior spaces. This is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects. The inspector was unable to evaluate the structure obscured by the insulation. When repairs are made, the exposed structure should be evaluated for damage by wood destroying insects and/or organisms, and repairs should be made if necessary.

    Photo 90  

    Photo 91  

    Photo 98  

    Photo 99  

    Photo 100  
    Over master bath.

    Photo 101  
    Notice no insulation on the back part of the chase over the master bedroom.

    Photo 78  
    Bonus Room.

    Photo 103  
    Over master bedroom, pulled back and not replaced.

    Photo 104  
    Not placed correctly, some upside down.

    Photo 153  
    This is where there is no insulation in the master bedroom.

    52) Safety, Repair/Replace, Evaluate - One or more sections of wiring that weren't terminated were found. This is a potential safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate and repair as necessary. For example, cutting the wire to length and terminating the wire with wire nuts in a securely anchored, covered, properly sized junction box.

    Photo 52  
    Over garage, is it live?
     

    53) Safety, Repair/Replace, Evaluate - Wire splices are exposed due to not being contained in a covered junction box. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock and fire. A qualified electrician should evaluate and make repairs as necessary. For example, install securely mounted junction boxes with cover plates where needed to contain wiring splices.

    Photo 77  
    Over garage.
     

    54) Safety, Repair/Replace, Evaluate - Extension cords are being used as permanent wiring in one or more areas. They should only be used for portable equipment on a temporary basis. Using extension cords as permanent wiring poses a fire and shock hazard, and is an indication that wiring is inadequate and should be updated. Extension cords may be undersized. Connections may not be secure, resulting in power fluctuations, damage to equipment, and sparks that could start a fire. Extension cords should be removed as necessary, or a qualified electrician should evaluate and make repairs as necessary. For example, install additional circuits and/or electric receptacles.

    Photo 86  
    Data/Security system board in attic.
     

    55) Safety, Repair/Replace - There are several lights in the attic that did not work. They may just need new bulbs, however; two of them are wired incorrectly and unsafely. These should be repaired by ensuring they are mounted correctly and the correct wiring procedures are used, by a qualified electrician if necessary.

    Photo 56  
    Above the garage, loose and exposed wiring.

    Photo 89  
    Above the living room.

    Photo 106  
    Above the master bedroom. Loose and exposed wiring.
     

    56) Repair/Replace, Minor Defect, Evaluate - One or more areas of the roof structure were wet or had elevated levels of moisture at the time of the inspection. There appears to be an active leak in the roof or structure exterior. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary.

    Photo 53  
    Active water leak above garage, just north of electrical panel.

    Photo 54  

    57) Repair/Replace, Minor Defect - The ridge supports in the attic above the garage have failed. They are splitting and bowing due to not being constructed properly. These should be replaced using standard building procedures, by a qualified contractor if necessary.

    Photo 287  
    This one has split down the middle.

    Photo 288  
    This one is bowing.

    58) Repair/Replace - Ceiling insulation is missing in some areas. Recommend installing insulation where missing for better energy efficiency.

    Photo 80  
    Above the utility room.

    Photo 81  
    Same area, Lots of "stuff"

    59) Repair/Replace - The door to the attic sticks at the bottom. This should be repaired/replaced as necessary so that the door opens and closes easily.

    Photo 75  
     

    60) Evaluate, Monitor - Stains were visible on the roof structure in one or more areas. These areas were dry at the time of the inspection. The stains may be caused by a past leak. Recommend asking the property owner(s) about past leaks. The client(s) should monitor these areas in the future, especially after heavy rains, to determine if active leaks exist. If leaks are found, a qualified roofing contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary.

    Stains were also visible above the fireplace, which is a typical location for leaks.

    Photo 96  

    Photo 105  

    Photo 94  
     

    61) Evaluate, Comment - Ventilation appears to be adequate in the attic. However, when a new roofing system is installed the ventilation may be substandard in the attic. Inadequate attic ventilation may result in high attic and roof surface temperatures, reduce the life of the roof covering materials and increase cooling costs. High levels of moisture are also likely, and can be a conducive condition for wood destroying insects and organisms. Standard building practices require one square foot of vent area for 150 to 200 square feet of attic space. Vents should be evenly distributed between soffits, ridges and at corners to promote air circulation. A qualified contractor should evaluate and install vents as per standard building practices.

    Ensure that existing vents are kept clean in the gable ends.

    Photo 195  

    Photo 206  

    62) Evaluate, Comment - Cross-ties were cut for the new chase in the master bedroom area. While this is not a major concern, cross-ties are installed to keep the roof from spanning outward. Over time the roof could move in this area. The chase may have eliminated the need for cross-ties, but this inspector believed that the cross-ties should have been rejoined at the chase. Suggest having a qualified contractor evaluate and see if repairs are needed.

    Photo 102  
     

    63) Monitor, Comment - Water supply pipes are located in the attic that are routed to the new addition in the master bedroom They appear to be insulated. Ensure that the insulation remains to prevent water pipes from freezing.

    Photo 88  
     

    64) Comment - Some attic areas were inaccessible due to lack of permanently installed walkways, the possibility of damage to insulation, low height and/or stored items. These areas are excluded from this inspection.

    Photo 79  
     

    65) Comment - There was a lot of construction debris located in the attic. Loose bags of insulation, unused bat insulation, unused electrical fixtures, and unused HVAC ducts.

    Photo 76  

    Photo 87  

    Photo 92  
     

     
    Electric service Return to table of contents
    Primary service type: Underground
    Primary service overload protection type:
    Service amperage (amps): 200
    Service voltage (volts): 120/240
    Location of main service switch: In the garage.
    Location of sub panels: Outside next to meter.
    Location of main disconnect: Breaker at top of main service panel
    Service entrance conductor material: Copper
    Main disconnect rating (amps): 200
    Branch circuit wiring type: Non-metallic sheathed
    Smoke detectors present: Yes
    66) Safety, Repair/Replace - Exposed wiring and/or bus bars exist in the main service panel due to closure covers missing (slots where circuit breakers fit through the panel cover). This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. Closure covers should be installed where missing to eliminate exposed wiring, and by a qualified electrician if necessary.

    Photo 223  
    Main panel in Cabana.
     

    67) Safety, Evaluate, Comment - It appears that most of the older cloth-covered wiring in the attic has been replaced. It is unknown what wiring behind the walls was replaced. The older wiring was not removed and is still in place. It is beyond the scope of this inspection to determine if the wiring is updated or correct. The older wiring that is present is showing signs of deterioration and wear.

    If the client is worried about the safety of the new wiring and weather or not all of it was replaced, then a full evaluation from a licensed electrician may be needed.

    Photo 58  
     

    68) Repair/Replace, Evaluate - The legend for overcurrent protection devices (breakers or fuses) in all of the service panels are missing, unreadable or incomplete. Recommend installing, updating or correcting the legend as necessary so it's accurate. Evaluation by a qualified electrician may be necessary.

    Photo 51  

    Photo 197  

    Photo 285  
     

    69) Evaluate, Comment - The electric service to this property appears to be rated at 200 amps, and may be inadequate for the client(s) needs with a house of this size. Recommend consulting with a qualified electrician about the need to upgrade to a larger amp service. There are no breakers currently available in the main panel for added service.

    Photo 286  
     

    70) Comment - Low voltage interior lighting was found during the inspection. This is considered to be a specialty system. Only a cursory evaluation of this lighting was performed during the inspection. For a full evaluation, the client(s) should hire a qualified electrician.

    Photo 82  
    Low voltage lighting wiring in the attic.

    Photo 110  
    Low voltage lighting controls. These were not evaluated.

    Photo 85  

    Photo 290  

    71) Comment - The GFI for the master bath electrical outlets is located inside the main panel.

    Photo 50  
     

     
    Water heater Return to table of contents
    Estimated age: Main - 9 years, East - Less than 2 years, Cabana - Less than 5 years
    Type: Tank, Instantaneous
    Energy source: Electricity, Natural gas Cabana is electric
    Capacity (in gallons): 50
    Manufacturer: General Electric, Rheem
    Model: GE Model #GG50T6A , Ser# GENG 0101160470
    Water temperature (degrees Fahrenheit): Main - Over 140 degrees East - 135 degrees
    72) Safety, Repair/Replace, Evaluate - The water heater in the garage is installed so flames and/or sources of spark are less than 18 inches above the floor. Standard building practices require that the open flame or source of spark for appliances in a garage be located at least 18 inches above the floor. Fuel vapors from vehicles, storage containers or other sources are heavier than air and may ignite when exposed to pilot lights, sparks or open flames. This is a safety hazard. A qualified heating and cooling contractor should evaluate and make repairs and/or modifications as necessary.

    Photo 282  
     

    73) Safety, Repair/Replace, Evaluate - Scorch marks are visible on the water heater cabinet above the combustion chamber opening. This may be a sign of improper venting, an improperly positioned burner, or other problems. A qualified plumber should evaluate and repair if necessary.

    Photo 15  
     

    74) Safety, Repair/Replace, Comment - There is evidence of water leaks in the main hot water and furnace closet, however there were no wet areas. These stains may be old.

    There is also not enough clearance from the flue pipe to combustibles such as insulation and sheetrock. There should be at least 1" of clearance to combustibles to avoid the risk of fire.

    Photo 17  
    Needs 1" of clearance. Fire Danger!

    Photo 10  

    Photo 18  

    Photo 20  

    75) Safety, Repair/Replace - No drain line is installed for the temperature-pressure relief valve. This is a potential safety hazard due to the risk of scalding if someone is standing next to the water heater when the valve opens. A qualified plumber should install a drain line as per standard building practices. For example, extending to 6 inches from the floor, or routed so as to drain outside.

    Photo 16  
    Drain line goes here. Extremely dangerous!
     

    76) Safety, Repair/Replace - No drip leg is installed on the water heater gas supply line. Drip legs are intended to trap oil, scale, water condensation and/or debris from the gas supply lines before they reach and damage the water heater components. A qualified contractor should install a drip leg as per standard building practices when the hot water heater is replaced. This water heater is also connected using two gas lines joined together. This is not standard installation procedure and may be unsafe.

    Photo 21  
     

    77) Safety, Repair/Replace - The vent stack for the main water heater is loose and not positioned correctly, which can cause gases and carbon monoxide to not be vented properly. This should be repaired immediately.

    Photo 11  
     

    78) Safety, Repair/Replace - The Tankless water heater in the Cabana has loose and exposed wiring. This should be repaired, by a qualified electrician if necessary.

    Photo 225  
     

    79) Safety, Comment - The hot water temperature for the main heater is greater than 140 degrees Fahrenheit. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of scalding. The thermostat should be adjusted so the water temperature doesn't exceed 120 degrees. For more information on scalding dangers, visit http://www.tap-water-burn.com/

    The water temperature for the Tankless system on the east side was set to 135 degrees. It should be set at less than 120 degrees.

    80) Major Defect, Comment - The estimated useful life for most water heaters is 8 to 12 years. This water heater appears to be at this age or older and may need replacing at any time. Recommend budgeting for a replacement in the near future.
    81) Repair/Replace, Evaluate - Corrosion was found in one or more areas on the water heater, and water stains were found below. The water heater may be failing. A qualified plumbing contractor should evaluate and replace water heater if necessary.

    Photo 14  
    Water appears to be coming from the drain line.
     

    82) Comment - Above the main hot water heater.

    Photo 12  
    May shut off all the water to the house. No other main shut off was located. Ask the owner if this is the location for the main shut-off "for the whole house".
     

    83) Comment - The Tankless water heater for the east side of the house is located inside the ceder closet in the master bedroom.

    Photo 160  
     

     
    Heating and cooling Return to table of contents
    Estimated age: Main and East are new. Upstairs and Cabana appear to be installed in 1981
    Primary heating system energy source: Natural gas, Electric
    Primary heat system type: Forced air
    Primary A/C energy source: Electric
    Primary Air conditioning type: Split system
    Distribution system: Sheet metal ducts, Flexible ducts, Not visible
    Manufacturer: Bryant, GoodmanFridgeking/Tappan
    Filter location: In return air duct above furnace, Behind return air grill
    84) Safety, Repair/Replace, Evaluate, Monitor - One or more gaps were found in the air handler's return air duct, blower compartment cover, filter cover and/or junctions between these. Air from the attached garage is likely to be drawn into the heating/cooling system's supply ducts. Because these components are located in the attached garage, vehicle fumes such as exhaust gases or fuel vapors may enter living spaces. This may be a safety hazard. A qualified heating and cooling contractor should evaluate and make repairs and/or modifications as necessary to eliminate or reduce gaps in this system's air handling components.

    Photo 97  
    The original insulated ductwork in the attic is seeing some wear and deterioration. Eventually, it will need replacement. This gap is at the return above the east unit.
     

    85) Safety, Repair/Replace, Evaluate - The furnace on the east side may not have an adequate supply of combustion and/or dilution air. There is a vent in the ceiling above the furnace, but the inspector could not find the outlet in the attic. This may cause Carbon Monoxide to accumulate and is a safety hazard. Standard building practices now require two combustion air ducts, one high, one low, for furnace located inside.A qualified heating and cooling contractor should evaluate and determine if combustion and dilution air supply sources are adequate, and make repairs and/or modifications if necessary.

    Photo 25  

    Photo 26  

    86) Safety, Repair/Replace - Combustible materials were found less than two inches from the double wall flue pipe for gas-fueled furnace. This is a fire hazard. Combustible materials should be moved, or repairs made by a qualified contractor, as necessary to maintain this clearance.

    There should also not be any gaps in the flue. This should be taped to prevent carbon monoxide from escaping into the house.

    Photo 27  
    Code also requires three screws at these types of junctions. This is new material joined to old. If the roof is replaced, this entire flue should be brought up to code for safety.
     

    87) Safety, Repair/Replace - Combustible materials were found less than one inch from the flue pipe for gas-fueled furnace in the garage. This is a fire hazard. Combustible materials should be moved, or repairs made by a qualified contractor, as necessary to maintain this clearance.

    No electrical wiring or gas lines should be in contact with this flue. It reaches very hot temperatures.

    Photo 281  
    Electrical wires should not be anywhere near a hot flue. I wouldn't have a gas line(red) this close either!
     

    88) Major Defect, Comment - The estimated useful life for most forced air furnaces is 15 to 20 years. The furnaces located in the attic for the bonus room and in the Cabana appear to be at this age or older and may need replacing at any time. Recommend budgeting for a replacement in the near future.
    89) Major Defect, Comment - The estimated useful life for air conditioning compressors is 8 to 15 years. This units for the bonus room and Cabana appear to have exceeded this age and may need replacing at any time. Recommend budgeting for a replacement in the near future.

    Photo 214  
     

    90) Repair/Replace - No drip leg is installed on the new furnace gas supply lines. Drip legs are intended to trap oil, scale, water condensation and/or debris from the gas supply lines before they reach and damage the furnace or boiler components. These should have been installed, as per standard building practices, when the new systems were installed.

    Photo 6  

    Photo 28  

    91) Repair/Replace - Insulation for the outside condensing unit's refrigerant lines is damaged, deteriorated and/or missing in one or more areas. This may result in reduced efficiency and increased energy costs. A qualified heating and cooling contractor should replace insulation as necessary.

    Photo 48  
    Bonus room unit.
     

    92) Repair/Maintain, Evaluate - The last service date of this system appears to be more than two years ago, or the inspector was unable to determine the last service date. The client(s) should ask the property owner(s) when it was last serviced. If unable to determine the last service date, or if this system was serviced more than two years ago, a qualified heating and cooling contractor should inspect, clean, and service this system, and make repairs if necessary. This servicing should be performed every few years in the future, or as per the contractor's recommendations.
    93) Maintain - Air handler filter(s) are dirty and should be replaced now. They should be checked monthly in the future and replaced as necessary.

    Photo 66  
    Filters for bonus room and Cabana are located behind the return air grill.

    Photo 29  

    Photo 7  
    Filters for the new units are located above the furnace. There are 3 in each.

    Photo 8  
    Dirty filters should be changed immediately.

    94) Comment - The outdoor air temperature was below 60 degrees Fahrenheit during the inspection. Because of this, the inspector was unable to operate and fully evaluate the cooling system.
    95) Comment - There does not appear to be any heat/cooling vents in some of the bathrooms. Supplemental heat may be needed.
     
    Plumbing and laundry Return to table of contents
    Location of main water shut-off valve: Above water heater in garage
    Location of main water meter: Next to street on north side
    Location of main fuel shut-off: At meter on south side in back
    Water service: Public
    Service pipe material: Not visible
    Supply pipe material: Copper, CPVC, Polyethylene, PEX
    Vent pipe material: Plastic, Cast iron, Not visible
    Drain pipe material: Plastic
    Waste pipe material: Plastic, Not visible
    96) Safety, Comment - Copper water supply pipes in homes built prior to 1986 may be joined with solder that contains lead. Lead is a known health hazard, especially for children. Laws were passed in 1985 prohibiting the use of lead in solder, but prior to that solder normally contained about 50 percent lead. The client(s) should be aware of this, especially if children will be living in this structure. Evaluating for the presence of lead in this structure is not included in this inspection. The client(s) should consider having a qualified lab test for lead, and if necessary take steps to reduce or remove lead from the water supply. Various solutions such as these may be advised:

  • Flush water taps or faucets. Do not drink water that has been sitting in the plumbing lines for more than six hours.
  • Install appropriate filters at points of use.
  • Use only cold water for cooking and drinking. Hot water dissolves lead more quickly than cold water.
  • Use bottled or distilled water.
  • Treat well water to make it less corrosive.
  • Have a qualified plumbing contractor replace supply pipes and/or plumbing components as necessary.

    For more information visit:
    http://www.cpsc.gov/CPSCPUB/PUBS/5056.html
    http://www.epa.gov/safewater/lead/index.html
    97) Safety, Comment - Three waste pipe clean-outs were located.

    Photo 211  
    Near the back fence.

    Photo 215  
    For the Cabana?

    Photo 249  
    For the house? or maybe just for the new addition.
     

    98) Safety, Comment - The water meter is located at the front of the house. The gas meter is located at the back of the house. Both can be used to shut off water and gas in an emergency.

    Photo 212  
     

    99) Evaluate, Monitor - It appears as though most of the plumbing in the house has been replaced. There was a mixture of copper, PEX, plastic and what appears to be Polybutylene plumbing supply lines. There appears to be a mixture of plastic and cast iron waste pipes and vents installed. It is beyond the scope of this inspection to do a complete evaluation of the plumbing system and the plumbing under the slab, in the ground, and in the walls cannot be seen.

    It should be understood that if Polybutylene piping is used, then it has proven to be more prone to leakage than other types of supply piping systems like copper; and PEX is still not long term tested. Recommend reviewing any disclosure statements if available for comments on leaks in the water supply system.

    Some of the old waste pipes were cut but not capped. All old pipes should be capped.

    Photo 13  
    Polybutylene pipes? Only your plumber will know for sure.

    Photo 19  
    Old cast iron wast vent pipe.

    Photo 115  
    Old waste line not capped.

    Photo 135  
    Old waste line and supply lines properly capped.

    100) Comment - Neither the clothes washer nor dryer were operated or evaluated. They are excluded from this inspection.
     
    Fireplaces, woodstoves and chimneys Return to table of contents
    Fireplace type: Masonry
    Chimney type: Masonry
    101) Safety, Repair/Replace, Evaluate - A significant amount of creosote (1/8 inch or more) is visible in the fireplace flue for the kitchen fireplace. A qualified chimney service contractor should inspect, clean, and repair if necessary now and annually in the future.

    The others did not appear to have a lot of creosote build-up, but probably should be evaluated and cleaned also.

    Photo 180  
     

    102) Safety, Repair/Replace - The chimney flue for the kitchen does not appear to have a screened cover installed. Screened covers prevent the following:

  • Fire hazard from wood fire sparks and embers exiting flues
  • Wildlife (birds, rodents, raccoons, etc.) entering flues
  • Rainwater entering flues and mixing with combustion deposits, creating caustic chemicals which can corrode flues
  • Rainwater entering flues and causing damage to terracotta flue tiles from freeze-thaw cycles

    A qualified chimney service contractor should install screened cover(s) where missing. Screens should have holes 1/4 inch or larger. The other covers should be checked for damage and proper installation.

    Photo 259  
     

    103) Monitor - Minor cracks, pitting and/or deterioration were found in some fireplace firebrick. However the bricks were not loose and appear to be serviceable. The clients should monitor the condition of the firebricks in the fireplace's firebox in the future. If significant deterioration occurs or if bricks become loose, then a qualified chimney service contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary.

    Photo 155  
    Kitchen fireplace.

    Photo 181  
    Main fireplace.

    104) Comment - All solid fuel burning appliances (woodstoves and fireplaces, etc.) should be inspected annually by a qualified chimney service contractor, cleaned and repaired as necessary.
     
    Kitchen Return to table of contents

    105) Safety, Repair/Replace, Evaluate - One or more electric receptacles that serve countertop surfaces within six feet of a sink appear to have no ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate to determine if GFCI protection exists, and if not, repairs should be made so that all receptacles that serve countertop surfaces within six feet of sinks have GFCI protection. For example, install GFCI receptacles or circuit breaker(s) as needed.

    Photo 173  
     

    106) Safety, Repair/Replace, Evaluate - There was an small electric oven located in the cabinet below the gas grill. It was not evaluated. It was connected in the back to what appears to be an extension cord. It could not be determined where the extension cord terminated. This is an unsafe electrical connection and can cause overheating and fire. The appliance should be connected directly into its own outlet. Suggest evaluation by a qualified contractor and installing a proper outlet for connecting the oven.

    Photo 179  
     

    107) Repair/Replace, Minor Defect - The gas grill located in the kitchen did not light when using it's controls. Recommend asking the seller about this grill, and if necessary repairing grill. The flue for this grill was dirty and needed cleaning.

    Photo 177  

    Photo 178  

    108) Repair/Replace - The light in range hood is inoperable. Recommend replacing light bulb(s) or having repairs made by a qualified contractor as necessary.

    Photo 176  
     

    109) Comment - The cabinets do not have any handles or pulls. Client should be aware that drawers and doors may be more difficult to open.

    Photo 116  

    Photo 174  

    110) Comment - The kitchen is equipped with a separate ice maker. This appliance is not apart of a standard inspection and was not fully evaluated, however, it did appear to be functioning.

    Photo 175  
     

     
    Bathrooms Return to table of contents

    111) Safety, Repair/Replace, Evaluate - One outlet in the master bathroom appeared to have an open ground, three-pronged grounding type receptacle. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate and make repairs as necessary.

    The client should be aware that all of the outlets for the master bath sinks are located under the sinks. This would seem to be very inconvenient, and the client may consider moving the outlets to a better location.

    Photo 157  
    Plug in the center drawer of the master bathroom.
     

    112) Safety, Repair/Replace, Evaluate - One or more electric receptacles that serve countertop surfaces within six feet of a sink appear to have no ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate to determine if GFCI protection exists, and if not, repairs should be made so that all receptacles that serve countertop surfaces within six feet of sinks have GFCI protection. For example, install GFCI receptacles or circuit breaker(s) as needed.

    Photo 231  
    Cabana bath, no GFI.

    Photo 138  
    Middle room bath, no GFI.

    Photo 235  
    Middle room bath, no GFI
     

    113) Repair/Replace, Evaluate - The drain valve in the shower in a middle bathroom appears to not operate and would not close. Repair or replace as necessary.

    Photo 151  
     

    114) Repair/Replace - The light fixture in the Cabana shower is missing a cover. This should be repaired or replaced as necessary.

    Photo 230  
     

    115) Repair/Replace - One of the middle bathroom sinks is draining slowly. Drain(s) should be cleared as necessary, and by a qualified plumber if necessary.

    Photo 134  
     

    116) Repair/Replace - Tile and/or grout in one or more showers is damaged and/or deteriorated. For example, deteriorated or missing grout, cracked, missing or loose tiles, etc. Tile and grout should be repaired as necessary.

    Photo 226  
    Corners are cracking and new caulk in Cabana shower. Also note that the light is not working.

    Photo 228  
    Watch out for scorpions!

    Photo 111  
    Corners need caulk.

    Photo 291  

    Photo 158  
    Master shower tile is cracking.

    Photo 152  

    117) Repair/Replace - Tile flooring is damaged and/or deteriorated in the bath off of the utility room. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary. For example, replacing broken tiles and deteriorated grout, and resealing grout.

    Photo 113  
     

    118) Repair/Replace - The handles in the master shower are loose and should be tightened and sealed to prevent moisture from getting behind the walls.

    Photo 159  
     

    119) Repair/Replace - The shower head in the Cabana shower and one of the middle bathrooms is leaking at the shower head.

    Photo 136  

    Photo 227  
    Cabana shower.

    120) Repair/Replace - The door that leads out of the master bath is poorly constructed and unfinished. There is no threshold. The tile ends outside. There is a gap between the door and the exterior wall. There is no door handle. All these items should be addressed and repaired and this entrance brought up to normal building standards.

    Photo 190  
    Unfinished gap.

    Photo 191  

    121) Monitor, Comment - One or more sink drains use flexible drain pipe. This type of drain pipe is more likely to clog than smooth wall pipe.

    Photo 133  
    Most of the baths have this type of drain line.
     

     
    Interior rooms Return to table of contents
    Description of the walls: Walls are covered in painted sheetrock, paneling, brick
    Description of the ceilings: Painted sheetrock
    The following floor materials are installed: Tile, Carpet, Wood, Laminate Brick
    122) Safety, Repair/Replace, Evaluate - One or more open ground, three-pronged grounding type receptacles were found. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate and make repairs as necessary.

    There is a wall located in the living room behind the piano, here all of the outlets are not grounded. An evaluation may want to be made on weather or not the wiring for these outlets was replaced.

    Grounding type receptacles were first required in residential structures during the 1960s. Based on the age of this structure and/or the absence of 2-pronged receptacles, repairs should be made by correcting wiring circuits as necessary so all receptacles are grounded as per standard building practices. Replacement of three-pronged receptacles with 2-pronged receptacles is not an acceptable solution.

    Photo 123  
    Outlet in middle bedroom.

    Photo 149  

    Photo 162  
    Outlets in living room.

    Photo 163  

    Photo 169  
     

    123) Safety, Repair/Replace, Evaluate - Extension cords are being used as permanent wiring in the bonus room. They should only be used for portable equipment on a temporary basis. Using extension cords as permanent wiring poses a fire and shock hazard, and is an indication that wiring is inadequate and should be updated. Extension cords may be undersized. Connections may not be secure, resulting in power fluctuations, damage to equipment, and sparks that could start a fire. Extension cords should be removed as necessary, or a qualified electrician should evaluate and make repairs as necessary. For example, install additional circuits and/or electric receptacles.

    Client should note that outlets are very scarce or non-existent in this room. There do not appear to be any outlets on the south wall, the east wall, or the middle of the room. Wiring this room may be costly.

    Photo 108  

    Photo 109  

    Photo 69  
    No outlets and no cabinet door handles.

    Photo 74  
    No outlets for the desk.

    Photo 120  
    Outlet under cabinet is missing cover. Safety issue!
     

    124) Safety, Repair/Replace - Based on the age of this structure and the appearance of existing smoke alarms, the alarms may be older than 10 years old. According to National Fire Protection Association, aging smoke alarms don't operate as efficiently and often are the source for nuisance alarms. Older smoke alarms are estimated to have a 30% probability of failure within the first 10 years. Newer smoke alarms do better, but should be replaced after 10 years. Unless you know that the smoke alarms are new, replacing them when moving into a new residence is also recommended by NFPA. For more information, visit this article: NFPA urges replacing home smoke alarms after 10 years.

    Batteries in all the smoke alarms should be replaced after taking occupancy, and annually in the future. "Chirping" noises emitted from smoke alarms typically indicate that batteries need replacing. For more information, visit http://www.cpsc.gov/cpscpub/pubs/5077.html

    An insufficient number of smoke alarms are installed. Additional smoke alarms should be installed as necessary so a functioning one exists in each hallway leading to bedrooms, and in each bedroom. For more information, visit http://www.cpsc.gov/cpscpub/pubs/5077.html

    Photo 42  
    Unusual for smoke detector in garage.

    Photo 93  
    Very unusual for smoke detectors in attic.

    Photo 121  
    In middle hall.

    Photo 142  
    No smoke detectors in middle bedrooms!

    125) Safety, Repair/Replace - Several outlets are loose, or outlet covers are missing screws. They are intended to contain fire and prevent electric shock from exposed wires. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of fire and shock. Outlets should be repaired, cover plates should have all screws.

    Photo 141  
    Some covers are missing screws.

    Photo 229  

    Photo 172  
    Some loose cover plates or outlet.

    Photo 284  
    Garage.

    Photo 118  
    Dryer outlet is loose.
     

    126) Safety, Repair/Replace - There were some outlets added to the cabinets in the middle room. The wiring to those outlets is installed incorrectly and unsafe. The wire runs from the attic, through a closet, across the floor an into the cabinets. The outlets are not installed correctly and the connections are exposed. All of these are a safety hazard and should be corrected or replaced, by a qualified electrician if necessary.

    Photo 292  

    Photo 125  

    Photo 126  

    Photo 127  

    127) Safety, Minor Defect - Cover plate(s) are missing from one or more electric boxes, such as for receptacles, switches and/or junction boxes. They are intended to contain fire and prevent electric shock from exposed wires. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of fire and shock. Cover plates should be installed where missing.

    Photo 107  
    Bonus room.

    Photo 117  
    Washing machine outlet.

    Photo 140  
    Behind large TV.

    Photo 171  
    Same room.

    128) Safety, Comment - This structure was built prior to 1979 and may contain lead paint. Laws were enacted in 1978 in the US preventing the use of lead paint in residential structures. Lead is a known safety hazard, especially to children but also to adults. The paint found in and around this structure appeared to be intact and may be encapsulated by more recent layers of paint that are not lead-based. Regardless, recommend following precautions as described in the following links to Consumer Products Safety Commission website articles regarding possible lead paint.

    What You Should Know About Lead Based Paint in Your Home: Safety Alert - CPSC Document #5054

    CPSC Warns About Hazards of "Do lt Yourself" Removal of Lead Based Paint: Safety Alert - CPSC Document #5055

    129) Repair/Replace, Evaluate - One or more electric receptacles appear to have no power. Recommend asking the property owner(s) about this. Switches may need to be operated to make some receptacles energized. If necessary, a qualified electrician should evaluate and make repairs as necessary.

    Photo 238  
    Outlet in Cabana
     

    130) Repair/Replace, Evaluate - One or more light fixtures appear to be inoperable. Recommend further evaluation by replacing bulb(s) and/or consulting with the property owner(s). Repairs or replacement of the light fixture(s) by a qualified electrician may be necessary.

    Photo 71  
    Some lights in the bonus room were not working.

    Photo 68  
    Light in the stairwell.

    Photo 236  
    Light in the Cabana.
     

    131) Repair/Replace, Evaluate - Squeaking or creaking noises occur when walking on one or more sections of flooring. In most cases, this is only an annoyance rather than a structural problem. Various solutions such as Squeeeeek No More and Counter Snap fasteners exist to correct this. Repairs to eliminate the squeaks or creaks may be more or less difficult depending on the floor covering, and the access to the underside of the subfloor. Recommend having a qualified contractor evaluate and repair as necessary.
    132) Repair/Replace - The doorbell appears to be inoperable. Recommend having a qualified electrician evaluate and repair as necessary.

    The doorbell button in the back is loose or damaged. It should be repaired or replaced as necessary, and by a qualified contractor if necessary.

    Photo 147  

    Photo 9  
    Back door.

    133) Repair/Replace - One or more windows that were built to open, will not open, or open only minimally due to their being painted shut, damaged and/or deteriorated in some way. Repairs should be made as necessary, and by a qualified contractor if necessary so windows open fully, and open and close easily.

    Photo 237  
    The windows in the Cabana would not open and may be painted shut.
     

    134) Repair/Replace - Lock mechanisms on some of the windows are missing and/or damaged so that they are inoperable. Repairs should be made so that windows lock and unlock easily.

    Photo 73  
    The lock on one of the windows in the bonus room does not line up properly.

    Photo 139  
    Middle bedroom windows won't latch.

    135) Repair/Replace - One or more interior doors are damaged and/or deteriorated and should be repaired or replaced by a qualified contractor.

    One or more doors bind in their jamb and cannot be closed and latched, or are difficult to open and close. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary. For example, adjusting jambs or trimming doors.

    Photo 112  
    Door to bath off of utility room drags at the bottom.

    Photo 114  
    Door is warped and does not close completely.

    Photo 122  
    Door is damaged at the top.

    Photo 130  
    Door is damage at the corner.

    Photo 170  
    Door trim throughout the house is starting to crack at the joints.

    Photo 4  
    This is the double door to the hall. The strike plates are missing as well as the latches on top of the doors.

    Photo 70  
    Cabinet doors don't close completely in the bonus room.

    Photo 124  
    These cabinet doors do not close completely in a closet.

    Photo 221  
     

    136) Repair/Replace - The weatherstrip around one or more exterior entry doors is missing and/or deteriorated. Weatherstrip should be installed where missing and/or replaced where deteriorated, and by a qualified contractor if necessary.

    Photo 57  
    Doors to Cabana

    Photo 55  

    Photo 119  
    Door to exterior from utility room.
     

    137) Repair/Replace - The deadbolt mechanism for the front door appeared inoperable or difficult to operate. Repair or replace as necessary.

    Photo 146  
     

    138) Repair/Replace - Most sliding glass doors are difficult to open or close, especially the one in the living room next to the kitchen. It was also difficult to lock or unlock this door. Doors probably need to be adjusted and lubricated, but should be repaired as necessary.

    The screens were even harder to open and close and should also be adjusted, lubricated, or repaired.

    Photo 165  

    Photo 220  

    Photo 164  

    Photo 222  
    Doors to the Cabana are not sliding doors. They were not operated due to their age and the appearance that they may have been painted shut.

    139) Repair/Replace - The lock mechanisms on one or more sliding glass doors are inoperable and/or difficult to operate. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary.
    140) Repair/Replace - One or more sliding screen doors are damaged and/or deteriorated. Screen doors should be replaced where necessary.

    Photo 167  
    The screen off the living room is off it's track.
     

    141) Repair/Replace - Wood flooring in one or more areas is worn, damaged and/or cupping. Recommend having a qualified contractor evaluate and refinish wood flooring as necessary.

    Photo 168  
     

    142) Repair/Replace - Trim is damaged and/or deteriorated in one or more areas. Recommend having a qualified contractor replace or repair trim as necessary.

    Photo 131  
    Shoe racks in one closet in the middle bedroom closet are damaged.
     

    143) Repair/Replace - The cabinet hardware in one of the middle bedrooms is loose and should be repaired.

    Photo 128  
     

    144) Repair/Replace - There is a small hole in the window frame to the left of the main fireplace that should be filled to keep air and insects out.

    Photo 154  
     

    145) Maintain - Carpeting in one or more rooms is soiled and/or stained. Recommend having carpeting professionally cleaned as necessary.

    Photo 67  
    The carpet on the stairs and in the bonus room is dirty.
     

    146) Evaluate, Comment - There is a unknown piece of equipment located in most of the closets and some of the rooms. Suggest asking the owner there purpose and method of operation or maintenance.

    Photo 132  
     

    147) Evaluate - One or more rooms that are considered living spaces appear to have no visible source of heat. The client(s) should consult with the property owner(s) regarding this, and if necessary, a qualified contractor should evaluate and install heat source(s) as necessary.

    Photo 38  
    There appears to be no heat source in the hall bath.

    Photo 137  
    The only heat source in one of the middle baths is this in-wall electrical unit. This should be considered unsafe and replaced with a newer unit or ceiling mounted unit.

    148) Monitor, Comment - Waters stains were found in the ceiling in the closet of the Cabana. This area is located directly below the HVAC unit and water could come from condensation or from a over flowing condensation drip pan.

    It could also come from a leak in the roof. The area was not wet and there did not appear to be any leaks at the time of the inspection. Suggest asking owner about this stain.

    Photo 224  
     

    149) Comment - Most of the supply registers were checked and appear to be serviceable. Most were dirty, however.

    Photo 148  
     

    150) Comment - Minor cracks were found in ceilings in the garage, the hallway, and several other areas. They do not appear to be a structural concern, but the client(s) may wish to repair these for aesthetic reasons.

    Photo 150  
    Hallway towards master bedroom.

    Photo 166  
    Crack in the trim above the main fireplace.

    Photo 289  
    Some skylight corners were cracking.
     

     
    Sprinkler System Return to table of contents

    151) Comment - Sprinkler control box is located on the west side of the house with the pool equipment. There are instructions inside the cover, however, the client may wish to ask the owner if they have the manual.

    Unit is Rain Bird, Model #ESP 12-LX. Find more information here:
    http://www.rainbird.com/pdf/turf/man_ESP-LXModular.pdf

    The system can be set on automatic or manual or sensor. There is a rain sensor installed but it was not tested.

    There are 12 zones. They are defined on the inside cover of the control box.

    Zones and heads were tested. System appeared to be operational with noted repairs needed.

    Water pressure appeared adequate.

    Photo 267  
    This head next to the east drive is leaking at below the ground.

    Photo 268  

    Photo 269  
    This head next to the street is leaking below the ground.

    Photo 270  

    Photo 271  
    This head in the west side flower bed is leaking below the ground.

    Photo 273  
    Both of these heads add debris on them and they would not completely rise.

    Photo 274  
    This area off the back drive did not appear to get full water coverage.

    Photo 277  
    This area on the east side did not appear to get full water coverage.

    Photo 278  
    The timer date and time were set wrong.
     

     
    For questions about this report or to schedule an inspection, contact Preferred Real Estate Inspections, LLC