Photo Inspect


23 Four Mile River Rd 
Old Lyme CT 06371-1506
Inspector: Bob or Dan Reemsnyder
BOB: CT - HOI.84; NH - 00195
DAN: CT -

 

Home Inspection Report
Client(s):  Sample Report
Property address:  123 USA Rd.
Anytown, CT
Inspection date:  Saturday, May 18, 2013

This report published on Tuesday, October 22, 2013 7:44:28 AM EDT

View summary

This report is the exclusive property of Photo Inspect and the client(s) listed in the report title. Use of this report by any unauthorized persons is prohibited.

 
How to Read this Report
This report is organized by the property's functional areas.  Within each functional area, descriptive information is listed first and is shown in bold type.  Items of concern follow descriptive information.
Concerns are shown and sorted according to these types:
SafetyPoses a risk of injury or death 
Major DefectCorrection likely involves a significant expense 
Repair/ReplaceRecommend repairing or replacing 
Repair/MaintainRecommend repair and/or maintenance 
Minor DefectCorrection likely involves only a minor expense 
MaintainRecommend ongoing maintenance 
EvaluateRecommend evaluation by a specialist 
MonitorRecommend monitoring in the future 
ServiceableItem or component is in serviceable condition 
CommentFor your information 

Click here for a glossary of building construction terms.Contact your inspector If there are terms that you do not understand, or visit the glossary of construction terms at http://www.reporthost.com/glossary.asp

Table of Contents
General Information
Exterior
Roof
Attached garage
Basement
Electric service
Heating and air conditioning
Plumbing
Water heater
Attic
Laundry
Kitchen
Bathrooms
Interior rooms
Interior stairs
Fireplaces and Wood Stoves


 
General Information Return to table of contents
Time started: 1:00 PM
Present during inspection: Buyer, Listing Agent, Buyers Realtor
Occupied: Yes
Age of building: 1989
Type of building: Single family
Weather conditions: Clear
Temperature: Warm
Ground condition: Dry
Foundation type: Unfinished basement
1) CT State Regulations pertaining to Home Inspections does not require hydrological assessment of homes (water intrusion into basements or crawl spaces). There are many factors that contribute to these conditions, and many homes may experience water intrusion at one time or another, particularly during highly unusual weather or seasonal changes, which can affect the water table. Future water intrusion cannot be predicted, and the inspection does not include historical research. As a visual inspection, the inspector will note any current conditions and visual evidence, and give recommendations to help eliminate or minimize water intrusion in the future.
The home owner should maintain property through maintaining grade slopes away from home, cleaning gutters, and extending downspouts.
Consult with seller on any problems experienced in the past, or knowledge of any problems experienced in the past.

2) When the inspectors arrived at the home home the power was off to the home, during the course of inspection the power was turned on by the electric company, sometimes this can cause power surges etc and negatively effect appliances, electronic devices, alarms etc.
3) This inspection report provides you with a good assessment of the condition of your prospective purchase on the day of the inspection. Helping to protect your investment will be very important, and you can find further information about maintenance of your home at our website:
www.photoinspect.com
We offer an instructional DVD, as well as the book, The Inspector's Guide, Prepare Your Home for Sale
This is an excellent reference for maintaining of your home. You will find our email address there, and we encourage you to email questions. I will try to answer all requests.

4) It is the goal of the inspection to put a home-buyer in a better position to make a buying decision. Not all improvements will be identified during this inspection. Unexpected repairs should still be anticipated. The inspection is not to be considered a guarantee or warranty of any kind.
This inspection is visual only. A representative sampling of building components are viewed in areas that are accessible at the time of the inspection. Furniture and storage, when present, limit accessibility to inspect some areas. As per State of Connecticut Home Inspection Regulations, no destructive testing or dismantling of building components is performed. Furniture is not moved, and main valves are not turned on.
 
Exterior Return to table of contents
Footing material: Not visible
Foundation material: Poured in place concrete
Apparent wall structure: Wood frame
Wall covering: Wood shinglesBrick
Soffit, Fascia, Eaves: Wood
Grading, surface drainage: Graded away from house
Landscaping: Bushes
Driveway material: Asphalt
Exterior door material: Wood panel, Glass panel
Steps or Stoops: Stone, Brick
Railings: Metal
Basement/crawl access: Metal, Hatch
Basement/Crawl windows: Metal
5) One or more ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) receptacles are defective, either they did not trip with the inspectors test equipment or they are tripped and won't reset. This is a safety hazard and may pose a risk of fire and/or shock. Recommend having a qualified, licensed electrician evaluate and make repairs as necessary.

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6) Bricks or stones on exterior stairs are in need of localized repointing. Loose stones can become a trip hazard. Consult with a mason for repairs.

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7) Wood columns at the front are in poor condition. Replacement will probably be the best solution. Consult with a qualified builder.

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8) Wood siding shingles are loose or damaged in localized areas and should be replaced on an as-needed basis. As a general rule, if more than 10% of shingles are damaged, re-siding the entire exterior may be warranted. Consult with a siding contractor.

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9) Rot was noted at windows at one or more of the following areas:
  • jambs
  • sills
  • casings
  • sash(es)
  • drip edge

    Wood rot can sometimes be repaired, but more often it is necessary to replace damaged wood. Hidden damage can be present. Consult with a builder or carpenter.

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    10) The wood exterior patio door(s) exhibit small cracks or need surface maintenance some areas are delaminating. Recommend maintenance, repairs be done. Consult with a builder/painter.

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    11) One or more downspouts are loose or detached. This can result in water accumulating around the structure's foundation, or in basements and crawl spaces if they exist. Accumulated water is a conducive condition to wood destroying insects and organisms, and may also cause the foundation to settle and possibly fail over time. Recommend making repairs as necessary so downspouts are securely anchored and functional.

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    12) The end cap on the clothes dryer exhaust duct is damaged. Their purpose is to prevent air from entering the house through the clothes dryer, save energy, and keep out birds, rodents and bugs. Birds' nests can block the opening and are flammable. Recommend installing a new vent cap.

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    13) Typical wear is noted on driveway surface, including small cracks, worn areas. Cracks should be sealed and surface coated to protect the surface. This can be done by a driveway contractor, although products are available for homeowner applications.

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    14) Vegetation (trees, shrubs and/or vines) are in contact with the structure's exterior. This is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects and organisms. Vegetation can serve as a conduit for insects and may retain moisture against the exterior after it rains. Recommend pruning or removing vegetation as necessary so there's at least a one foot gap between all vegetation and the structure's exterior.

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    15) Metal basement window(s) need typical repairs such as painting of metal on sash to prevent further rusting or repairing cracked or broken glass. Recommend maintenance be made as necessary.

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    16) The metal hatchway to the basement or crawl is in need of repainting or maintenance. Recommend sanding rusted areas, and applying a rust inhibitor paint. Consult with paint store or hardware store for products available.

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    17) Stone work needs localized repointing and/or patching. Consult with a mason.

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    18) Light fixture at back is damaged and should be repaired by an electrician.

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    19) The exterior finish in some areas is failing. Recommend having a qualified painting contractor prep (pressure wash, scrape, sand, prime caulk, etc.) and repaint or restain areas as needed and as per standard building practices.

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    Roof Return to table of contents
    Roof inspection method: Viewed from eaves on ladder
    Roof type: Gable
    Roof covering: Asphalt or fiberglass composition shingles
    Estimated age of roof: Around 23
    Chimney flashing material: Lead
    Gutter & downspout material: Aluminum
    Roof ventilation: Adequate
    20) This roof covering is beginning to show signs of aging, including torn, missing or damaged shingles. It may be possible to patch in shingles for the short term, however older roof coverings are more prone to wind and weather damage. Patched shingles may also present noticeable visual difference in surface, unless owner has bundles of the original shingles.
    We recommend consulting with a roof contractor on options available. It may be more cost effective to re-roof, however that would be a substantial investment. Patching with a similar color shingle will extend the life-cycle a few more years.

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    stains noted on attic framing
     

    21) Significant amounts of organic debris (leaves, needles, etc.) are on the flat roof drains. This is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects, leaks and organisms since accumulated debris may cause water to enter gaps in the roof surface and leak into attic and/or interior spaces. Recommend cleaning roof now and in the future where and when necessary.

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    22) Moss and/or lichen is growing on the roof. This is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects and organisms which can lead to the premature failure of the roof and subsequent leaks. Recommend treating moss during its growing season (wet months) with a moss killer. For information on various moss treatment products and their pros and cons, visit http://bryophytes.science.oregonstate.edu/page24.htm

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    23)   Loose mortar in chimney should be repointed at the brick or block joints. Consult with a mason.

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    Attached garage Return to table of contents
    Divider wall to Living Space: Drywall
    Service Door to House: Metal
    Automatic Door Opener: All Doors
    Overhead Door: Wood
    Floor: Poured concrete
    24) All the outlets in the garage appear to be on a circuit that needs repair. Reversed polarity outlets were evident, along with faulty GFCI outlet. An electrician should be consulted.

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    Basement Return to table of contents

    25) A support plate on one lally column in the crawl space is just catching the support beam. Recommend a builder support this better.

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    26) Typical cracks (1/8" to 1/2") present in foundation. We recommend sealing cracks to prevent water infiltration. Numerous products exist to seal such cracks including:
  • Hydraulic cement. Requires chiseling a channel in the crack to apply. See http://www.quickrete.com/catalog/HydraulicWater-StopCement.html for an example.
  • Resilient caulks (easy to apply). See http://www.quickrete.com/catalog/GrayConcreteRepair.html for an example.
  • Epoxy sealants (both a waterproof and structural repair). See http://www.mountaingrout.com/ for examples of these products.
    There are companies that specialize is crack repair.

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    27) The metal support columns show evidence of moderate rust or deterioration. These should be monitored and may eventually need maintenance or replacement. Consult with a builder.

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    28) Typical flaws were noted in the support beam, which include:
  • Cracks
  • Splices not aligned with support columns
  • Poor quality shims below beam
  • Slight twisting
  • Top column plates not fastened well

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    29) Typical cracks were noted in the slab. There was no evidence of water intrusion at the time of the inspection, however, some people choose to seal these cracks.

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    Electric service Return to table of contents
    Primary service type: Underground
    Primary service overload protection type: Circuit breakers
    Service amperage (amps): 400
    Service voltage (volts): 120-240
    Location of main service panel: Basement
    Sub panels: Present
    Location of sub panels: Side of main
    Location of main disconnect: Crawl space
    Location of sub panel disconnect: Breaker within main load center
    Service conductor material: Aluminum
    Service ground: A driven rod and water pipe connection
    Main disconnect rating (amps): 400
    Branch circuit wiring type: Non-metallic sheathed
    Solid strand aluminum branch circuit wiring present: No
    Smoke detectors present: Yes
    30) One or more circuit breakers are "double tapped"in main panel, where 2 or more wires are clamped in a circuit breaker terminal, and the circuit breaker is only designed for 1 wire. This is a safety hazard since wires may loosen and cause arcing, sparking and fires. Recommend having a qualified, licensed electrician evaluate and repair.

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    31) Exposed wiring exists in one or more sub panels due to covers missing from open circuit breaker slots. Recommend installing covers in open slots.

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    32) Voids were noted in load center. These can allow mice to enter the panel and damage wires. These voids should be plugged. Consult with an electrician.

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    33) Service load centers were generally in good condition, with typical defects evident.

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    Main breaker is in crawl space (400 amp)
     
    Heating and air conditioning Return to table of contents
    Type of Heat: Boiler (water), Hydro-Air (boiler and air handler)
    Fuel or energy source: Oil
    Distribution system: Sheet metal ducts, Metal & Flexible ducts
    Age of Heating Unit - Boiler or Furnace: Core boiler is new
    Vent systems, flues and chimneys: Masonry lined and metal
    Fuel storage: (2) 275 gallon tanks in basement
    Fuel feed supply: In conduit
    Filter location: Within air handlers
    Fossil fuel safety: Smoke detector present, Safety cut-off noted, Emergency switch present
    Air conditioning type: 3 Exterior Compressors, 3 Interior Air Handlers
    A/C energy source: Electric
    Make up air: Open to basement or crawl
    34) Two of the air handlers are in marginal condition with one or more of the following defects:
  • rusted or clogged condensate trays
  • leaking condensate lines
  • condensate pump defects
  • dirty air filters
    Recommend consulting with a heating and ventilation contractor for repairs or replacement. .

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    35) The insulation on the AC coolant line is old or damaged and should be replaced.

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    36) Vegetation is growing too close to the exterior units, which could affect the operation of the unit. Trimming back of all vegetation is recommended.

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    37) Two of the exterior compressors are nearing the end of their life cycle, which is usually 15-20 years. The units operated as designed at the inspection, however you should budget for replacement. Newer units are often more economical to run.

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    38) The boiler is newer and operated as designed at inspection. Annual cleaning and servicing is recommended to maintain unit.
     
    Plumbing Return to table of contents
    Location of Main Shut Off: Basement
    Water service: Private
    Service pipe material: Plastic
    Supply pipe material: Copper
    Vent pipe material: Plastic
    Drain pipe material: Plastic
    Waste pipe material: Plastic
    39) The home has some active supply leaks evident including:
  • sediment filter
  • by the pressure switch
  • a valve in the crawl space is leaking

    A plumber should be consulted for immediate repair.

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    40) Waste line leak(s) or corrosion evident at a few of joints. Sometimes the glue at the fittings may be defective, or there was human error when assembling. A plumber should be consulted for possible repair.

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    41) The water softener discharge appears to go into septic system. New requirements now specify that the backwash water be discharged to a separate drywell (this helps prevent salts, chemicals from damaging the septic tank or inhibiting bacterial breakdown of septic waste).

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    42) The home has an additional large expansion tank and a 250 gallon, plastic, water storage tank located in basement. This is sometimes done to store more water if a well is producing below 3 gallons per minute, in an effort to compensate. The selling agent indicated many homes in this area have this arrangement and it was the well driller that sold additional components for added "protection" to new buyers.

    It is recommended that you obtain the original well report from town records for review. You may email a copy to our office for our review, as well. It is also recommended that you consult with the current owners on any issues with water supply they may have had over the years.

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    large plastic storage container
     
    Water heater Return to table of contents
    Estimated age: Exceeds typical life span of water heater
    Type: Side Arm, storage tank at side of boiler, Tankless coil, within a boiler
    Energy source: Oil
    Capacity (in gallons): 40
    Water Temperature: 115 to 120 degrees F
    43) The main boiler has recently been replaced. The new boiler has a tankless coil that is currently supplying the hot water needs of the occupants. This current configuration in not ideal for a home of this size. The side arm, indirect water heater that is currently leaking should be replaced. A plumber should be consulted.

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    Attic Return to table of contents
    Inspection method: Traversed
    Roof structure type: Rafters
    Ceiling structure: Ceiling beams
    Insulation material: Fiberglass roll or batt
    Insulation Depth: 9" to 12" of insulation depth
    44) Evidence of "light to moderate" rodent infestation was found in one or more areas. The Center for Disease Control (CDC) defines this as less than 20 feces per square foot. Rodent infestation may be a safety hazard due to the risk of contracting Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome (HPS). HPS is a rare (only 20-50 cases per year in the United states) but deadly (40% mortality rate) disease transmitted by infected rodents through urine, droppings, or saliva. Humans can contract the disease when they breathe in aerosolized virus. For example, from sweeping up rodent droppings.

    Recommend following guidelines in the CDC's Clean Up, Trap Up, Seal Up article for eradicating rodents, cleaning up their waste and nesting materials, and preventing future infestations. While Hanta virus is believed to survive less than one week in droppings and urine, specific precautions should be taken during clean up. The clients may wish to consult with a qualified, licensed pest control operator for eliminating the infestation. A qualified licensed abatement contractor or industrial hygenist could be contacted for clean up. If the infestation was minimal, clean up of rodent waste and nesting materials in non-living spaces (crawl spaces and attics) may not be necessary, or may be performed for aesthetic reasons only (odor and appearance).

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    45) Cover plate(s) are missing from one or more electric receptacle, switch and/or junction boxes. They are intended to contain fire and prevent electric shock from exposed wires. This is a safety hazard and poses a risk of both fire and shock. Recommend installing cover plates over boxes where missing.
    46) Ceiling insulation is uneven in some areas. This is likely due to someone having walked on or through the insulation or vermin damage. Recommend installing additional insulation where necessary to restore the original R rating.

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    Laundry Return to table of contents
    Location of laundry area: First floor
    Washer hookups: Multi port - supply and drain in enclosed water tight port, 110 volt grounded outlet, Wall drain
    Dryer hookups: 220 volt outlet, Vented to outside
    Washer present at inspection?: Yes
    Dryer present at inspection?: Yes
    Washer hookups: Throw valve, Wall drain
    47) The outlet for the washing machine is too close to a water source (ie. sink), and should be a GFCI (Ground Fault Circuit Interruption) outlet. Recommend a qualified electrician replace this outlet with a GFCI outlet.

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    48) The corregated duct is in poor condition. Recommend replacing the duct with a rigid or corrugated semi-rigid metal duct. Most manufacturers specify the use of a rigid or corrugated semi-rigid metal duct, which provides maximum airflow. For more information on dryer safety issues, see http://www.cpsc.gov/CPSCPUB/PUBS/5022.html

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    Kitchen Return to table of contents
    Ceilings: Drywall
    Walls: Drywall
    Interior Doors: Panel
    Windows: Typical flaws - minor cracks, imperfections
    Light Fixtures: Operated as designed
    Outlets: GFCI present
    Floors: Wood
    Heat Source: Duct vented to room
    Cabinets: Typical flaws
    Counter tops: Marble/ stone
    49) Appliances are not part of the typical home inspection, as per State of CT standards of practice, however we did observe dishwasher(s) appears to be inoperable or old. One of the stove tops was operated and appeared to require maintenance.

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    50) The cabinets displayed typical flaws such as:
  • Minor scratches, chips and dings in the finish of cabinets
  • An occasional loose hardware or hinge that needs adjustment
  • Minor wear on surface of cabinets/drawers
  • An occasional drawer that does not open/close smoothly
  • An occasional door that does not close completely or opens with difficulty

    These conditions are considered typical maintenance items and can be addressed upon occupying the home.
     
    Bathrooms Return to table of contents
    Ceilings: Drywall
    Walls: Drywall
    Interior Doors: Panel
    Windows: Typical flaws - minor cracks, imperfections
    Light Fixtures: Operated as designed
    Outlets: GFCI present
    Floors: Tile
    Heat Source: Duct vented to room
    51) No ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) devices (receptacles or circuit breakers) are visible in one or more bathrooms or they were defective. GFCI devices help prevent electric shocks in areas that may have water present. Recommend having a qualified, licensed electrician install GFCI protection for receptacles over counter tops and around sinks as per standard building practices.

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    52) Cracked tiles were evident on some of the floor surfaces. This is usually an indication of poor underlayment practices. A tile contractor should be consulted.

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    53) The bathroom fixtures in this home are aging. We observed many defects including:
  • worn plating on valves and fixtures
  • dripping faucets
  • shower valve defects
  • drain stoppers defects
  • faucet defects

    It is likely that upgrading many of the fixtures will be necessary. Consult with a plumber.

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    Stopper not operating in one or more sinks.

    54) An upstairs toilet is clogged and would not flush. One downstairs toilet runs on. A plumber should be consulted.

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    55) One or more exhaust fans appears to be inoperable. Recommend having a qualified, licensed electrician evaluate and repair to prevent excessive moisture accumulation.

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    56) The whirlpool or jetted tub did not operate on the day of the inspection. Consult with the seller as to whether the unit has operated, as there may be a switch or breaker that was not on. If the seller reports that the unit is operational, ask for a demonstration of the operation at the pre-closing walk-through. Otherwise, repairs may be needed.

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    57) The tub or showers displayed typical flaws that need maintenance, such as:
  • Stains
  • Minor surface cracks
  • Hairline cracks in grout between tiles
  • Small voids between tiles that need filling
  • Voids where tub or shower meets surround or floor (needs caulk)
  • Other imperfections to tub or shower such as chips, scratches, etc.

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    58) The toilet has some minor damage noted, such as chips or cracks, or missing/broken hardware. Repair may be needed. Consult with a plumber.
    59) The electrical components displayed some typical, minor flaws that need maintenance, such as:
  • cover plates missing on mimimal number of outlets or switches
  • an occasional outlet or switch does not operate
  • loose outlets or switches that should be resecured
  • a minimal number of outlets is ungrounded
  • a minimal number of outlets is reversed polarity
  • minor cracks, scratches or flaws to outlets, switches or fixtures

    These are considered typical maintenance items in a home and should be addressed once you move in to the home.

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    60)   The cabinets and surfaces displayed typical flaws such as:
  • Minor scratches, chips and dings in the finish of cabinets
  • An occasional loose hardware or hinge that needs adjustment
  • Minor wear on surface of cabinets/drawers
  • An occasional drawer that does not open/close smoothly
  • An occasional door that does not close completely or opens with difficulty

    These conditions are considered typical maintenance items and can be addressed upon occupying the home.

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    Interior rooms Return to table of contents
    Smoke detectors: Present
    Ceilings: Drywall
    Walls: Drywall
    Interior Doors: Wood, Panel
    Windows: Typical flaws - minor cracks, imperfections
    Light Fixtures: Operated as designed
    Outlets: Generally in good condition
    Floors: Carpet, Wood
    Heat Source: Duct vented to room
    Stairs: Hand rails present
    Interior Doors: Adjustments to hardware may be needed
    61) Open ground, 3-pronged receptacles were found. Recommend that a qualified, licensed electrician evaluate and make repairs as necessary. For example, replacing receptacles or correcting wiring circuits.

    Consult with an electrician for a proper remedy. Many appliances require grounded receptacles, so caution should be observed when using these ungrounded outlets until repairs can be done.

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    62) Cover plate(s) are missing from one or more electric receptacle, switch and/or junction boxes. They are intended to contain fire and prevent electric shock from exposed wires. This is a safety hazard and poses a risk of both fire and shock. Recommend installing cover plates over boxes where missing.

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    63) The hardware on the window(s) is damaged or broken and needs repair or replacement. Window hardware should be repaired so that windows easily open and close and are able to be locked.

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    64) Wood flooring in one or more rooms is worn or damaged. The client may want to have this flooring refinished and/or repaired.

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    65) The wall switch in one or more rooms is not operating correctly, recommend replacement by a qualified electrician.

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    66) Water stains visible in ceiling. It appears that they are from a previous leak, as they appeared dry at the time of the inspection. Consult with seller as to cause of stains and confirm that leakage was repaired. Seal stains with KILZ or BINZ or some other stain sealer and repaint ceiling.

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    67) One or more interior doors are in need of repair or maintenance. The inspector noted loose hardware, excessive gaps when closed, not closing and latching. Recommend a carpenter repair as required.

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    68) Cracking was notices in tile flooring in one or more floors, recommend a contractor evaluate and repair as necessary.

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    69) Many screens are missing. Some are damaged, while some are stored in basement.

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    70) The ceilings in one or more rooms displayed typical flaws which may include some of the following:
  • minor cracks
  • minor stains
  • popped nails
  • loose or dried out taping seams
  • small, cosmetic holes that may need filling
  • limited areas of peeling paint

    These are considered regular maintenance issues and can be addressed upon occupying home.

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    Speaker requires securing.

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    71) The walls in one or more rooms displayed typical flaws which may include some of the following:
  • minor cracks
  • minor stains
  • popped nails
  • loose or dried out taping seams
  • small, cosmetic holes that may need filling
  • limited areas of peeling paint

    These are considered regular maintenance items and can be addressed upon occupying the home.

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    72)   Some windows will not stay open without being propped. This can be a safety hazard, as fingers could be caught in the sill when the sash drops open. Recommend repairing sash cords, springs or weights, as needed to assure proper working of windows.

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    Interior stairs Return to table of contents
    Stairs, steps, railings: Basement, Interior
    73) Gaps larger than 4" were found in one or more attic or stair rails. This is a safety hazard, especially for small children. Recommend that a qualified contractor make modifications as necessary, such as installing additional balusters, so gaps in rails don't exceed 4".

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    Fireplaces and Wood Stoves Return to table of contents
    Fireplace type: Masonry
    Chimney type: Masonry - tile lined
    Fireplace surround: Stone, Brick, Other
    Hearth type: Flush with floor
    74) The gas fireplace insert was not tested during the inspection, recommend the seller be consulted during the walk-through closing for operation instructions.
     
    As part of this inspection, the client is given a copy of the State of Connecticut Regulations pertaining to Home Inspections, as well as an Inspection Agreement, that explains what is covered, and what is not covered in this Home Inspection.
    An inspection of the sewage system is outside the scope of this inspection, unless specifically contracted for prior to the inspection date.
    An inspection of the pool is outside the scope of this inspection.
    A representative sampling of components was inspected rather than every occurrence of components.
    The inspection does not include an assessment of geological, geotechnical, or hydrological conditions, or environmental hazards.
    Screening, shutters, awnings, or similar seasonal accessories, fences, recreational facilities, outbuildings, seawalls, break-walls, docks, erosion control and earth stabilization measures are not inspected.
    Photo Inspect does not test for Indoor Air Quality and does not test for mold as part of this inspection. This service is available for an additional fee.