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NorthWest Inspections


Email: jasonposeyak@gmail.com
Inspector's email: jasonposeyak@gmail.com
Phone: (907) 244-7985
Inspector's phone: (907) 244-7985
7888 W Limelight St 
Boise ID 83714-6166
Inspector: Jason Posey

 

Property Inspection Report

Client(s):  Pam Hirigaray
Property address:  Rodda Paint 94 W Idaho Ave. Onterio OR
Inspection date:  Monday, September 11, 2017

This report published on Monday, September 11, 2017 1:47:28 PM MDT

This report is the exclusive property of this inspection company and the client(s) listed in the report title. Use of this report by any unauthorized persons is prohibited.
How to Read this Report
This report is organized by the property's functional areas.  Within each functional area, descriptive information is listed first and is shown in bold type.  Items of concern follow descriptive information. Concerns are shown and sorted according to these types:
Concern typeSafetyPoses a safety hazard
Concern typeMajor DefectCorrection likely involves a significant expense
Concern typeRepair/ReplaceRecommend repairing or replacing
Concern typeRepair/MaintainRecommend repair and/or maintenance
Concern typeMinor DefectCorrection likely involves only a minor expense
Concern typeMaintainRecommend ongoing maintenance
Concern typeEvaluateRecommend evaluation by a specialist
Concern typeMonitorRecommend monitoring in the future
Concern typeCommentFor your information

Click here for a glossary of building construction terms.Contact your inspector If there are terms that you do not understand, or visit the glossary of construction terms at http://www.reporthost.com/glossary.asp

Table of Contents
General Information
Grounds
Exterior and Foundation
Roof
Attic and Roof Structure
Garage or Carport
Electric
Plumbing / Fuel Systems
Water Heater
Heating, Ventilation and Air Condition (HVAC)
Fireplaces, Stoves, Chimneys and Flues
Bathrooms, Laundry and Sinks
Interior, Doors and Windows
Wood Destroying Organism Findings

View summary


General Information
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Time started: 0800
Present during inspection: Client, Tenant
Client present for discussion at end of inspection: Yes
Inspector: Jason E Posey
Weather conditions during inspection: Dry (no rain)
Temperature during inspection: Warm
Ground condition: Dry
Inspection fee: $400
Type of building: Commercial
Number of units inspected: 1
Building stories: 1
Front of building faces: North
Main entrance faces: North
Occupied: Yes, Furniture or stored items were present, Shelving

Grounds
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Site profile: Level
Condition of driveway: Appeared serviceable
Driveway material: Asphalt
Condition of sidewalks and/or patios: Appeared serviceable
Sidewalk material: Poured in place concrete
Condition of deck, patio and/or porch covers: Appeared serviceable
Deck, patio, porch cover material and type: Covered (Refer to Roof section)

1) One or more deck, patio and/or porch covers were damaged. Recommend that a qualified person repair or replace as necessary, and per standard building practices.

The damage did not appear to a concern for structural issues but may be a path for moisture to enter the structure.
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2) Cracks, holes, settlement, heaving and/or deterioration were found in the driveway. Recommend that qualified contractor repair as necessary.
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3) This property was accessed by a driveway or private road shared with nearby properties. Shared driveways or private roads are excluded from this inspection. Comments in this report related to them are made as a courtesy only and are not meant to be a substitute for a evaluation by a specialist if repairs are needed. Recommend that the client review the recorded agreements regarding the driveway, the deeds of the property owners involved, and easements permitting access to, use of, and maintenance of the driveway.

4) Minor deterioration (e.g. cracks, holes, settlement, heaving) was found in sidewalks or patios, but no trip hazards were found. The client may wish to have repairs made for cosmetic reasons.
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Exterior and Foundation
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Wall inspection method: Viewed from ground, from a ladder
Condition of wall exterior covering: Appeared serviceable
Apparent wall structure: Concrete block
Wall covering: Solid brick (not veneer)
Condition of foundation and footings: Appeared serviceable
Apparent foundation type: Concrete slab on grade
Footing material (under foundation stem wall): Poured in place concrete, Concrete slab

5) The masonry (brick or stone) was deteriorated or damaged in some areas. Where cracks or openings are exposed, water may enter the wall structure causing mold, fungal growth and structural damage. Recommend that a qualified contractor repair as necessary. For example, by repointing mortar or replacing broken or missing masonry.
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Roof
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Age of roof surface(s): Approx 7yrs.
Roof inspection method: Traversed
Condition of roof surface material: Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Roof surface material: Synthetic plasticized or rubberized single-ply membrane
Roof type: Flat or low slope
Condition of exposed flashings: Appeared serviceable

6) Ponding (pools of standing water) was found at one or more locations on the flat or low-slope roof surface. Even on a flat roof, water should be removed by a drainage system so that any remaining water evaporates within 48 hours after it rains. Prolonged standing water can result in roof leaks. This is a conducive condition for wood-destroying organisms. Recommend that a qualified contractor evaluate and repair as necessary to prevent ponding.
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Standing water is finding its way in the building. Visible in the inside ceiling at drain pipe and electric panels.
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7) No secondary drains were visible on one or more sections of flat roofs with parapet walls. Leaks or water damage can occur if the primary drain system is overwhelmed by rain or snow. Recommend further evaluation by a qualified contractor and repairs per standard building practices.

8) Water damage and/or evidence of past leaks was found at one or more skylights. Consult with the property owner to determine if leaks have occurred, or if repairs have been made. Recommend that a qualified contractor evaluate and repair as necessary.

9) Blisters were found in the flat or low-slope roof surface. Blisters can be caused by improper heating of asphalt, bad adhesion between plys, dry laps, and/or improper torching depending on what materials and methods of installation were used. Moisture and air trapped between layers can vaporize due to heat from the sun and result in blisters. It may not be necessary to repair all blisters, but in some cases, such as when blisters are large or near seams, repair may be needed. Recommend that a qualified contractor evaluate and repair as necessary.
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10) One or more scuppers at flat roof perimeters were clogged. Leaks and/or water damage can occur as a result. Recommend cleaning scuppers now and in the future as necessary.
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Standing water is finding its way in the building. Visible in the inside ceiling at drain pipe and electric panels.
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11)   Roof pictures.
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Standing water is finding its way in the building. Visible in the inside ceiling at drain pipe and electric panels.
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Attic and Roof Structure
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Condition of roof structure: Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Roof structure type: Rafters
Ceiling structure: Ceiling joists

12) What appeared to be past water stains were visible on the roof structure at one or more locations. However, no elevated levels of moisture were found at these stains during the inspection. The stains may have been caused by a past leak. Recommend asking the property owner about past leaks. Monitor these areas in the future, especially after heavy rains to determine if active leaks exist. If leaks are found, recommend that a qualified contractor evaluate and repair as necessary.
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13) One or more rafters in the roof structure were damaged or split. This may significantly weaken the roof structure. Recommend that a qualified contractor repair as necessary.
Located in the southeast corner of the building above the mezzanine.
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Garage or Carport
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Condition of exterior entry doors: Appeared serviceable
Exterior door material: Metal
Condition of garage vehicle door(s): Appeared serviceable
Type of garage vehicle door: Sectional
Number of vehicle doors: 2
Condition of automatic opener(s): Appeared serviceable
Mechanical auto-reverse operable (reverses when meeting reasonable resistance during closing): No
Condition of garage floor: Appeared serviceable
Condition of garage interior: Appeared serviceable

14) One or more support posts were not positively secured to the beam above and/or the foundation below. Recommend that a qualified contractor repair per standard building practices. For example, by installing metal plates, plywood gussets or dimensional lumber connecting posts and beams, and/or installing anchors to the slab/footing below. Note that some support posts have concealed fasteners at their bases that are not visible.
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15) Glass in one or more skylights was cracked, broken and/or missing. Recommend that a qualified contractor replace glass where necessary.

All four skylights in the warehouse area had broken or damaged glass.
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Severely cracked and could fall at any moment.

16) Minor cracks were found in the concrete slab floor. These are common and appeared to be only a cosmetic issue.
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Electric
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Electric service condition: Appeared serviceable
Primary service type: Overhead
Number of service conductors: 3
Service voltage (volts): 3 phase, 4 wire, 120
Estimated service amperage: 200
Primary service overload protection type: Circuit breakers
System ground: Ground rod(s) in soil
Condition of main service panel: Appeared serviceable
Location of main service panel #A: Retail area behind counter. On south wall.
Location of main service panel #B: Garage, Shop, East wall.
Condition of branch circuit wiring: Serviceable
Branch circuit wiring type: non-metallic sheathed
Solid strand aluminum branch circuit wiring present: None visible
Ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection present: No
Arc fault circuit interrupter (AFCI) protection present: No

17) The service entrance wire insulation was frayed, damaged or deteriorated. This is a potential shock hazard. Recommend that a qualified electrician evaluate and repair if necessary.
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18) One or more electric boxes and/or conduits or conduit fittings installed outside were loose, damaged, substandard and/or missing components. This is a potential shock and/or fire hazard. Recommend that a qualified electrician repair as necessary.
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19) One or more sections of outdoor wiring were exposed and not rated for exterior use and/or subject to damage. This is a potential shock hazard. Recommend that a qualified electrician repair per standard building practices. For example, by installing conduit, re-routing wires or replacing wiring.

Appeared to be the thermostat control wire. Water can travel through the conduit and enter the roof area.
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20) One or more knockouts were missing from panel(s) #A. Holes in panels are a potential fire hazard if a malfunction ever occurs inside the panel. Rodents can also enter panels through holes. Recommend that a qualified person install knockout covers where missing and per standard building practices.
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21) One or more wires inside panel(s) #B were loose, and were not terminated. This poses a safety hazard for shock and/or fire. Recommend that a qualified electrician remove any abandoned wiring or repair as necessary. For example, by trimming wires to length and installing wire nuts.
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22) One or more globes or covers for light fixtures were missing or damaged. Recommend replacing as necessary to avoid exposed bulbs. With closet lighting or where flammable stored objects are near light fixtures, missing or broken covers can be a fire hazard.

23) One or more light fixtures were inoperable (didn't turn on when nearby switches were operated). Recommend further evaluation by replacing bulbs and/or consulting with the property owner. If replacing bulbs doesn't work and/or no other switch(es) can be found, then recommend that a qualified electrician evaluate and repair or replace light fixtures as necessary.

24) Bulbs in one or more light fixtures were missing or broken. These light fixtures couldn't be fully evaluated. If replacement bulbs are inoperable, then recommend that a qualified electrician evaluate and repair or replace light fixtures as necessary.
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25)   Pictured are the main and sub panels, meter and the power entering the structure. They all appeared serviceable with only a few minor concerns noted above.
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Plumbing / Fuel Systems
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Condition of service and main line: Appeared serviceable
Water service: Public
Location of main water meter: By street
Service pipe material: Galvanized steel
Condition of supply lines: Appeared serviceable
Supply pipe material: Galvanized steel
Vent pipe condition: Appeared serviceable
Vent pipe material: Cast iron
Condition of fuel system: Appeared serviceable
Location of main fuel shut-off valve: At gas meter

Water Heater
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Condition of water heater: Appeared serviceable
Type: Tank
Energy source: Electricity
Capacity (in gallons): 5gal
Location of water heater: Under sink in break area.

26) Significant corrosion or rust was found at the supply pipes or fittings and/or shut-off valve. This can indicate past leaks, or that leaks are likely to occur in the future. Recommend that a qualified plumber evaluate and replace components or make repairs as necessary.

27) The estimated useful life for most water heaters is 8-12 years. The inspector was unable to determine the age of the water heater due to the manufacturer's label being obscured, no serial number being visible, or the serial number not clearly indicating the age. The client should be aware that this water heater may be near, at or beyond its useful life and may need replacing at any time. Recommend attempting to determine the water heater's age.

If found to be near, at or beyond its useful lifespan, recommend budgeting for a replacement in the near future, or considering replacement now before any leaks occur. The client should be aware that significant flooding can occur if the water heater does fail. If not replaced now, consider having a qualified person install a catch pan and drain or a water alarm to help prevent damage if water does leak.
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Heating, Ventilation and Air Condition (HVAC)
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General heating system type(s): Forced air, Furnace
General heating distribution type(s): Ducts and registers
Condition of forced air heating/(cooling) system: Appeared serviceable
Forced air heating system fuel type: Natural gas
Forced air heating system manufacturer: Carrier
Location of forced air furnace: Roof
Forced air system capacity in BTUs or kilowatts: 58000
Condition of cooling system and/or heat pump: Appeared serviceable
Cooling system and/or heat pump fuel type: Electric
Location of heat pump or air conditioning unit: Roof
Estimated age of heat pump or air conditioning unit: 8yrs
Manufacturer of cooling system and/or heat pump: Carrier
Condition of controls: Appeared serviceable

28) The estimated useful life for most forced air furnaces is 15-20 years. The inspector was unable to determine the age of the furnace. Be aware that this furnace may be near, at, or beyond its useful life and may need replacing or significant repairs at any time. Recommend attempting to determine the furnace's age (ask property owner or service technician), and budgeting for a replacement if necessary.
Looking at the SN of the roof heating/cooling unit. It appeared to of been build in 2009. That makes it 8yrs old. About halfway through it's expected life.
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29) The cooling fins at the heat pump or air conditioning condensing unit were dirty. Energy efficiency can be reduced as a result. Recommend that a qualified person clean fins as necessary.
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A/C fins clogged

30) The cooling fins at the air handler evaporator coils were dirty. Recommend that a qualified person clean fins as necessary.

Fireplaces, Stoves, Chimneys and Flues
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Condition of chimneys and flues: Appeared serviceable
Wood-burning chimney type: Metal

Bathrooms, Laundry and Sinks
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Location #A: Half bath, first floor
Condition of flooring: Appeared serviceable
Condition of sinks and related plumbing: Appeared serviceable
Condition of toilets: Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Condition of ventilation systems: Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Bathroom and laundry ventilation type: with individual ducts

31) The toilet at location(s) #A ran water continuously or didn't shut off after being flushed, and water leaked from the tank into the bowl. Significant amounts of water can be lost through such leaks. If this system uses a septic system, the septic system can be overloaded and cause significant and potentially expensive damage. A qualified person should repair or replace components as necessary.
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32) The exhaust fan at location(s) #A was noisy or vibrated excessively and/or weak or slow. Moisture may accumulate and result in mold, bacteria or fungal growth. Recommend that a qualified person clean, repair or replace fans as necessary.
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Interior, Doors and Windows
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Condition of exterior entry doors: Appeared serviceable
Exterior door material: Glass panel
Condition of interior doors: Appeared serviceable
Condition of windows and skylights: Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Type(s) of windows: Metal
Condition of walls and ceilings: Appeared serviceable
Wall type or covering: Drywall, Masonry
Ceiling type or covering: Drywall
Condition of flooring: Appeared serviceable
Condition of concrete slab floor(s): Appeared serviceable
Flooring type or covering: Tile

33) The risers for stairs at one or more locations varied in height and pose a fall or trip hazard. Risers within the same flight of stairs should vary by no more than 3/8 inch. At a minimum, be aware of this hazard, especially when guests who are not familiar with the stairs are present. Recommend that a qualified contractor repair per standard building practices.
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34) Handrails at one or more flights of stairs were not graspable and posed a fall hazard. Handrails should be 1 1/4 - 2 inches in diameter if round, or 2 5/8 inches or less in width if flat. Recommend that a qualified person install graspable handrails or modify existing handrails per standard building practices.
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35) Handrails at one or more flights of stairs were loose, wobbly, damaged and/or deteriorated. This is a safety hazard. Recommend that a qualified person repair as necessary.

36) Guardrails at one or more locations with drop-offs higher than 30 inches were loose, wobbly, damaged, deteriorated and/or missing components, and pose a fall hazard. Recommend that a qualified person repair guardrails as necessary.

37) One or more skylight wells (the inside structure around skylights) was damaged, possibly by past condensation or water leaks. Recommend that a qualified person repair as necessary.
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38) Minor cracks, nail pops and/or blemishes were found in walls and/or ceilings in one or more areas. Cracks and nail pops are common, are often caused by lumber shrinkage or minor settlement, and can be more or less noticeable depending on changes in humidity. They did not appear to be a structural concern, but the client may wish to repair these for aesthetic reasons. For recurring cracks, consider using an elastic crack covering product:
http://www.reporthost.com/?ECC
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39) Minor cracks were found in the concrete slab floor. These are common and appeared to be only a cosmetic issue.

Wood Destroying Organism Findings
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Visible evidence of active wood-destroying insects: No
Visible evidence of active wood decay fungi: Yes
Visible evidence of past wood-destroying insects: No
Visible evidence of past wood decay fungi: Yes
Visible evidence of damage by wood-destroying insects: No
Visible evidence of damage by wood decay fungi: Yes
Visible evidence of conditions conducive to wood-destroying organisms: Yes

40)   Top of stares at mezzanine.
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