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NorthWest Inspections

Website: http://www.reporthost.com/nwi
Email: jasonposeyak@gmail.com
Inspector's email: jasonposeyak@gmail.com
Phone: (907) 244-7985
Inspector's phone: (907) 244-7985
7888 W Limelight St 
Boise ID 83714-6166
Inspector: Jason Posey

 

Property Inspection Report

Client(s):  Dave Benoit
Property address:  3626 Hilcrest drive. Boise ID 83705
Inspection date:  Sunday, April 8, 2018

This report published on Sunday, April 8, 2018 8:24:21 PM MDT

This report is the exclusive property of this inspection company and the client(s) listed in the report title. Use of this report by any unauthorized persons is prohibited.
A review on Google, Yelp or Thumbtack would be greatly appreciated.
How to Read this Report
This report is organized by the property's functional areas.  Within each functional area, descriptive information is listed first and is shown in bold type.  Items of concern follow descriptive information. Concerns are shown and sorted according to these types:
Concern typeSafetyPoses a safety hazard
Concern typeMajor DefectCorrection likely involves a significant expense
Concern typeRepair/ReplaceRecommend repairing or replacing
Concern typeRepair/MaintainRecommend repair and/or maintenance
Concern typeMaintainRecommend ongoing maintenance
Concern typeEvaluateRecommend evaluation by a specialist
Concern typeMonitorRecommend monitoring in the future
Concern typeServiceableItem or component is in serviceable condition
Concern typeCommentFor your information

Click here for a glossary of building construction terms.Contact your inspector If there are terms that you do not understand, or visit the glossary of construction terms at https://www.reporthost.com/glossary.asp

Table of Contents
General Information
Grounds
Exterior and Foundation
Basement
Roof
Attic and Roof Structure
Garage or Carport
Electric
Plumbing / Fuel Systems
Water Heater
Heating, Ventilation and Air Condition (HVAC)
Fireplaces, Stoves, Chimneys and Flues
Kitchen
Bathrooms, Laundry and Sinks
Interior, Doors and Windows
Wood Destroying Organism Findings

View summary


General Information
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Time started: 1430
Present during inspection: Client, Property owner
Client present for discussion at end of inspection: Yes
Weather conditions during inspection: Dry (no rain)
Temperature during inspection: Cool
Type of building: Single family, Single family
Buildings inspected: One house
Number of residential units inspected: 1
Front of building faces: South
Main entrance faces: South
Occupied: Yes, Furniture or stored items were present

Grounds
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Site profile: Level
Condition of driveway: Appeared serviceable
Driveway material: Poured in place concrete
Condition of sidewalks and/or patios: Appeared serviceable
Sidewalk material: Poured in place concrete
Condition of deck, patio and/or porch covers: Appeared serviceable
Deck, patio, porch cover material and type: Covered (Refer to Roof section)
Condition of decks, porches and/or balconies:
Deck, porch and/or balcony material: Concrete

1) Cracks, holes, settlement, heaving and/or deterioration were found in sidewalks and/or patios. Recommend that qualified contractor repair as necessary.
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2) Minor deterioration (e.g. cracks, holes, settlement, heaving) was found in the driveway, but no trip hazards were found. The client may wish to have repairs made for cosmetic reasons.
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Exterior and Foundation
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Wall inspection method: Viewed from ground, from a ladder
Condition of wall exterior covering: Appeared serviceable
Apparent wall structure: Wood frame
Wall covering: Brick veneer
Condition of foundation and footings: Appeared serviceable
Apparent foundation type: Finished basement
Foundation/stem wall material: Poured in place concrete
Footing material (under foundation stem wall): Poured in place concrete

3) Many sections of siding and/or trim were deteriorated. Recommend that a qualified person repair, replace or install siding or trim as necessary.
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Basement
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Condition of floor substructure above: Appeared serviceable
Pier or support post material: Wood
Beam material: Solid wood
Floor structure above: Solid wood joists
Condition of insulation underneath floor above: Appeared serviceable
Insulation material underneath floor above: Fiberglass roll or batt

4) One or more exhaust ducts (e.g. bathroom fan, clothes dryer) in the basement have come apart, were loose or have fallen down. This can result in increased moisture levels inside the structure and is a conducive condition for wood-destroying organisms. Recommend that a qualified person make permanent repairs as necessary.
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Roof
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Roof inspection method: Traversed
Condition of roof surface material: Near, at or beyond service life
Roof surface material: Asphalt or fiberglass composition shingles
Roof type: Hipped, Flat or low slope
Apparent number of layers of roof surface material: One
Condition of exposed flashings: Appeared serviceable
Condition of gutters, downspouts and extensions: Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below), Near, at or beyond service life

5) The roof surface was significantly deteriorated and appeared to be at or beyond its service life. It needs replacing now. This is a conducive condition for wood-destroying organisms. Consult with a qualified contractor to determine replacement options. Note that some structural repairs are often needed after old roof surfaces are removed and the structure becomes fully visible. Related roofing components such as flashings and vents should be replaced or installed as needed and per standard building practices.
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6) Substandard repairs were found at one or more locations on the roof surface. Leaks can occur as a result. This is a conducive condition for wood-destroying organisms. Recommend that a qualified contractor evaluate and repair per standard building practices.

7) One or more rubber or neoprene pipe flashings were split or cracked. Leaks can occur as a result. This is a conducive condition for wood-destroying organisms. Recommend that a qualified contractor replace flashings where necessary.
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8) Lead flashing at one or more plumbing vent pipes was improperly installed. For example, shorter than the vent pipe or not bent over the edge of the vent pipe. Properly installed, the flashing should extend up and over the top edge of the pipe, and be bent down into the pipe. Otherwise, rain water can flow between the pipe and the flashing, resulting in leaks. This is a conducive condition for wood-destroying organisms. Recommend that a qualified person repair per standard building practices.

9) One or more gutters had a substandard slope so that significant amounts of water accumulate in them rather than draining through the downspouts. This can cause gutters to overflow, especially when debris such as leaves or needles has accumulated in them. Rainwater can come in contact with the building exterior or accumulate around the foundation as a result. This is a conducive condition for wood-destroying organisms. Recommend that a qualified person repair as necessary. For example, by correcting the slope in gutters or installing additional downspouts and extensions.

10) Fungal rot or significant water damage was found at one or more roof areas at fascia boards and/or soffits. Recommend that a qualified contractor repair as necessary. For example, by replacing all rotten wood, priming and painting new wood and installing flashing.
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Wood rot above front door.
 

11) Many composition shingles were cracked, broken, missing, loose and/or damaged. Leaks can occur as a result. This is a conducive condition for wood-destroying organisms. Recommend that a qualified contractor repair as necessary. For example, by replacing shingles.
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12) Extensions such as splash blocks or drain pipes for one or more downspouts were missing, clogged, substandard and/or damaged. Water can accumulate around the building foundation or inside crawl spaces or basements as a result. Recommend that a qualified person install, replace or repair extensions as necessary so rainwater drains away from the structure.
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The downspout directs water directly in to the A/C unit.

13) One or more roofing nails weren't fully seated and shingles were lifting or nail heads were protruding through shingle surfaces. The nails may have loosened, or were not pounded in fully when installed. Shingles are likely to be wind damaged, and leaks can occur as a result. This is a conducive condition for wood-destroying organisms. Recommend that a qualified contractor repair as necessary. For example, by replacing shingles.
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14) One or more gutters and/or downspouts were loose, incomplete, leaking, corroded and/or damaged. Rainwater can come in contact with the building exterior or accumulate around the building foundation as a result. This is a conducive condition for wood-destroying organisms. Recommend that a qualified person repair as necessary.
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15) Significant amounts of debris have accumulated in one or more gutters or downspouts. Gutters can overflow and cause water to come in contact with the building exterior, or water can accumulate around the foundation. This is a conducive condition for wood-destroying organisms. Recommend cleaning gutters and downspouts now and as necessary in the future.

16) Significant amounts of debris such as leaves, needles, seeds, etc. have accumulated on the roof surface. Water may not flow easily off the roof, and can enter gaps in the roof surface. Leaks can occur as a result. This is a conducive condition for wood-destroying organisms. Recommend cleaning debris from the roof surface now and as necessary in the future.

17) Nail heads were exposed at one or more shingles. More than just a few exposed nail heads may indicate a substandard roof installation. Recommend applying an approved sealant over exposed nail heads now and as necessary in the future to prevent leaks.

18) Stains were found on one or more gutters that indicate past leaks have occurred. However, the inspector was unable to verify that the gutters do or don't leak because of lack of recent rainfall. Monitor the gutters in the future while it's raining to determine if gutters leak. If they do, then recommend that a qualified person repair as necessary to prevent water from coming in contact with the building or accumulating around the building foundation.
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19) Stains were found at the front of one or more gutters and indicate that the gutters have overflowed. If they have overflowed, it's usually due to debris clogging gutters or downspouts. The inspector was unable to verify that the gutters and downspouts drained adequately due to lack of recent, significant rainfall. Monitor the roof drainage system in the future while it's raining to determine if problems exist. Then if necessary, recommend that a qualified person clean, repair or replace gutters, downspouts and/or extensions.

Attic and Roof Structure
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Attic inspection method: Traversed
Condition of roof structure: Appeared serviceable
Roof structure type: Trusses, Rafters
Ceiling structure: Ceiling joists, Ceiling beams
Condition of insulation in attic (ceiling, skylight chase, etc.): Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Ceiling insulation material: Cellulose loose fill, Vermiculite loose fill
Approximate attic insulation R value (may vary in areas): R-19
Vermiculite insulation present: Yes
Condition of roof ventilation: Appeared serviceable
Roof ventilation type: Box vents (roof jacks)

20) What appeared to be vermiculite insulation was found in the attic. Vermiculite produced prior to 1991 may contain asbestos, less so if mined after 1991. When vermiculite insulation is present in attics, the EPA recommends that it be left undisturbed and that the attic not be used for storage, and that people (especially children) should not enter the attic. If the client is concerned about this material posing a safety hazard, then consult with a qualified asbestos abatement specialist or industrial hygienist. For more information, visit:
http://www.reporthost.com/?VERMINS
http://www.reporthost.com/?AITH
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21) The roof decking was spongy, soft or springy in one or more areas when the inspector walked on those areas. This may be caused by deteriorated sheathing, damaged rafters or trusses, and/or otherwise substandard construction. Recommend that a qualified contractor evaluate and repair as necessary.

22) One or more rafters in the roof structure were damaged or split. This may significantly weaken the roof structure. Recommend that a qualified contractor repair as necessary.
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The crack appeared to be 3+ feet and go over 50% through the rafter.
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23) The ceiling insulation installed in the attic was substandard and appeared to have an R rating that's significantly less than current standards (R-38). Heating and cooling costs will likely be higher due to poor energy efficiency. Recommend that a qualified contractor install insulation for better energy efficiency and per standard building practices.
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24) The ceiling insulation in one or more areas of the attic was compacted or uneven and/or substandard. Heating and cooling costs may be higher due to reduced energy efficiency. Recommend that a qualified person repair, replace or install insulation as necessary and per standard building practices (typically R-38).

25)   Evedence of past or present roof water leak was noted during the attic inspection. The roof sheathing appeared to be beyond the expected life and many concerns were noted. It is likely the leak is active.
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Garage or Carport
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Condition of door between garage and house: Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Type of door between garage and house: Wood
Condition of garage vehicle door(s): Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Type of garage vehicle door: Sectional
Number of vehicle doors: 2
Condition of automatic opener(s): Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Mechanical auto-reverse operable (reverses when meeting reasonable resistance during closing): No
Condition of garage floor: Appeared serviceable
Condition of garage interior: Appeared serviceable
Garage ventilation: Exists

26) The door between the garage and the house did not appear to be fire resistant, or the inspector was unable to verify that it was via a label. This is a potential safety hazard. House to garage doors, to prevent fire and fumes from spreading from the garage into interior living space, should be constructed of fire-resistant materials. Doors, generally considered to be suitable for the purpose, are solid core wood, steel, honeycomb steel or a door that has been factory labeled as fire rated. Recommend that a qualified contractor replace or repair the door and, at that time, make any other corrections that might be required to provide suitable fire resistance between the garage and the dwelling per standard building practices. For more information, visit:
http://www.reporthost.com/?AGFR

27) The door between the garage and the house has been modified with a pet door, and is no longer fire-resistant. This is a potential safety hazard. House to garage doors, to prevent fire and fumes from spreading from the garage into interior living space, should be constructed of fire-resistant materials. Doors, generally considered to be suitable for the purpose, are solid core wood, steel, honeycomb steel or a door that has been factory labeled as fire rated. Recommend that a qualified contractor replace or repair the door and, at that time, make any other corrections that might be required to provide suitable fire resistance between the garage and the dwelling per standard building practices. For more information, visit:
http://www.reporthost.com/?AGFR
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28) One or more pet doors and/or areas with missing or substandard surface materials were found in the attached garage walls or ceilings. Current standard building practices call for wooden-framed ceilings and walls that divide the house and garage to provide limited fire-resistance rating to prevent the spread of fire from the garage to the house. Recommend that a qualified person repair per standard building practices. For example, by patching openings or holes, firestopping holes or gaps with fire-resistant caulking, and/or installing fire-resistant wall covering (e.g. Type X drywall). For more information, visit:
http://www.reporthost.com/?AGFR

29) One or more garage vehicle doors were damaged or deteriorated. Recommend that a qualified contractor replace door(s) as necessary.

30) One or more garage vehicle doors were difficult or unable to open or close. Vehicle doors should open and close smoothly and easily. A qualified person should evaluate and repair as necessary. This may require lubrication or repair to hardware such as rollers or brackets.

31) Minor cracks were found in the concrete slab floor. These are common and appeared to be only a cosmetic issue.

Electric
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Electric service condition: Appeared serviceable
Primary service type: Overhead
Service voltage (volts): 120-240
Estimated service amperage: 200
Primary service overload protection type: Circuit breakers
Service entrance conductor material: Stranded copper
Main disconnect rating (amps): 200
System ground: Ground rod(s) in soil
Condition of main service panel: Appeared serviceable
Condition of sub-panel(s): Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Location of main service panel #A: Garage
Location of sub-panel #C: Basement
Location of sub-panel #D: Basement
Condition of branch circuit wiring: Serviceable
Branch circuit wiring type: non-metallic sheathed
Smoke alarms installed: No, recommend install

32) Panel(s) #C were manufactured by the Zinsco company. These panels and their circuit breakers have a history of problems including bus bars made from aluminum that oxidize and corrode, breakers that don't trip under normal overload conditions, and breakers that appear to be tripped when they're not. This is a potential safety hazard for shock and/or fire. Recommend that a qualified electrician carefully evaluate all Zinsco brand panels and components and make repairs as necessary. Consider replacing Zinsco panels with modern panels that offer more flexibility for new, safer protective technologies like arc fault circuit interrupters (AFCls). For more information, visit:
http://www.reporthost.com/?ZINSCO1
http://www.reporthost.com/?ZINSCO2
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33) Substandard wiring was found at the basement. For example, exposed wiring, unterminated wires, exposed splices, missing or broken cover plates, loose or substandard conduit and/or missing bushings. This is a safety hazard. Recommend that a qualified electrician evaluate and repair as necessary and per standard building practices.
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34) Wire splices were exposed and were not contained in a covered junction box. This is a potential shock or fire hazard. Recommend that a qualified electrician repair per standard building practices. For example, by installing permanently mounted junction boxes with cover plates where needed to contain wiring splices.
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35) No permanently installed smoke alarms were found. This is a potential safety hazard. A qualified electrician should install smoke alarms per standard building practices (e.g. in hallways leading to bedrooms, in each bedroom, on each floor and in attached garages). For more information, visit:
http://www.reporthost.com/?SMKALRM

36) One or more wires inside panel(s) #C were loose, and were not terminated. This poses a safety hazard for shock and/or fire. Recommend that a qualified electrician remove any abandoned wiring or repair as necessary. For example, by trimming wires to length and installing wire nuts.
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37) One or more cover plates for switches, receptacles or junction boxes were missing or broken. These plates are intended to contain fire and prevent electric shock from occurring due to exposed wires. Recommend that a qualified person install cover plates where necessary.
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38) Branch circuit wiring installed in buildings built prior to the mid 1980s is typically rated for a maximum temperature of only 60 degrees Celsius. This includes non-metallic sheathed (Romex) wiring, and both BX and AC metal-clad flexible wiring. Knob and tube wiring, typically installed in homes built prior to 1950, may be rated for even lower maximum temperatures. Newer electric fixtures including lighting and fans typically require wiring rated for 90 degrees Celsius. Connecting newer fixtures to older, 60-degree-rated wiring is a potential fire hazard. Repairs for such conditions may involve replacing the last few feet of wiring to newer fixtures with new 90-degree-rated wire, and installing a junction box to join the old and new wiring.

It is beyond the scope of this inspection to determine if such incompatible components are installed, or to determine the extent to which they're installed. Based on the age of this building, the client should be aware of this safety hazard, both for existing fixtures and when planning to upgrade with newer fixtures. Consult with a qualified electrician for repairs as necessary.

39) One or more wall switches were broken or damaged. Recommend that a qualified electrician replace wall switches as necessary.

40) The legend for circuit breakers or fuses in panel(s) #C was missing, incomplete, illegible or confusing. This is a potential shock or fire hazard in the event of an emergency when power needs to be turned off. Recommend correcting the legend so it's accurate, complete and legible. Evaluation by a qualified electrician may be necessary.

Plumbing / Fuel Systems
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Condition of service and main line: Appeared serviceable
Water service: Public
Location of main water shut-off: Basement
Condition of supply lines: Appeared serviceable
Supply pipe material: Galvanized steel
Condition of drain pipes: Appeared serviceable
Drain pipe material: Plastic
Condition of waste lines: Appeared serviceable
Waste pipe material: Plastic
Vent pipe condition: Appeared serviceable
Vent pipe material: Plastic
Type of irrigation system supply source: Reclaimed water

41) The main water service pipe material was made of galvanized steel. Based on the age of the building, the apparent age of the pipe and/or the low-flow condition of the water supply system, this service pipe may have significant corrosion or rust on the inside and need replacing. Replacing the service pipe can significantly increase flow to the water supply pipes. Recommend consulting with a qualified plumber about replacing the main service pipe. Note that this can be an expensive repair since excavation is typically required.

42) Water pressure was 75psi at the time of the inspection.
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Water Heater
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Condition of water heater: Appeared serviceable
Type: Tank
Energy source: Natural gas
Capacity (in gallons): 40
Hot water temperature tested: Yes
Water temperature (degrees Fahrenheit): 120deg f.
Condition of burners: Appeared serviceable
Condition of venting system: Appeared serviceable

43) Significant corrosion or rust was found at the supply pipes or fittings and/or shut-off valve. This can indicate past leaks, or that leaks are likely to occur in the future. Recommend that a qualified plumber evaluate and replace components or make repairs as necessary.
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44) The estimated useful life for most water heaters is 8-12 years. This water heater appeared to be beyond this age and/or its useful lifespan and may need replacing at any time. Recommend budgeting for a replacement in the near future, or considering replacement now before any leaks occur. The client should be aware that significant flooding can occur if the water heater fails. If not replaced now, consider having a qualified person install a catch pan and drain or a water alarm to help prevent damage if water does leak.
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45) Based on the capacity of the water heater, the number of bedrooms in this structure and the number of occupants expected to live in this structure, this water heater may be undersized. Consult with a qualified plumber or water heater distributor for more information, and may wish to upgrade the size of the water heater.
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Heating, Ventilation and Air Condition (HVAC)
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General heating system type(s): Forced air
General heating distribution type(s): Ducts and registers
Condition of forced air heating/(cooling) system: Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below), Near, at or beyond service life
Forced air heating system fuel type: Natural gas
Location of forced air furnace: Basement
Condition of furnace filters: Appeared serviceable
Location for forced air filter(s): At base of air handler
Condition of forced air ducts and registers: Appeared serviceable
Condition of burners: Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Type of combustion air supply: Intake duct
Condition of venting system: Appeared serviceable
Condition of cooling system and/or heat pump: Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Cooling system and/or heat pump fuel type: Electric
Location of heat pump or air conditioning unit: east
Condition of controls: Appeared serviceable

46) The last service date of the gas or oil-fired forced air furnace appeared to be more than 1 year ago, or the inspector was unable to determine the last service date. Ask the property owner when it was last serviced. If unable to determine the last service date, or if this system was serviced more than 1 year ago, recommend that a qualified HVAC contractor inspect, clean, and service this system, and make repairs if necessary. For safety reasons, and because this system is fueled by gas or oil, this servicing should be performed annually in the future. Any needed repairs noted in this report should be brought to the attention of the HVAC contractor when it's serviced. For more information visit:
http://www.reporthost.com/?ANFURINSP

47) Because of the age and/or condition of the forced air furnace, recommend that a qualified HVAC contractor inspect the heat exchanger and perform a carbon monoxide test when it's serviced. Note that these tests are beyond the scope of a standard home inspection.
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48) The estimated useful life for most forced air furnaces is 15-20 years. This furnace appeared to be beyond this age and/or its useful lifespan and may need replacing or significant repairs at any time. Recommend budgeting for a replacement in the near future.
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49) The estimated useful life for most heat pumps and air conditioning condensing units is 10-15 years. This unit appeared to be near this age and/or its useful lifespan and may need replacing or significant repairs at any time. Recommend budgeting for a replacement in the near future.

50) Vegetation such as trees, shrubs and/or vines were too close to the heat pump or air conditioning condensing unit. There should be at least 12 inches of clearance on all sides and at least 4-6 feet above. Inadequate clearance around and above can result in reduced efficiency, increased energy costs and/or damage to equipment. Recommend pruning and/or removing vegetation as necessary.

51) The cooling fins at the air handler evaporator coils were damaged. Recommend that a qualified HVAC contractor repair fins as necessary.
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Fireplaces, Stoves, Chimneys and Flues
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Condition of wood-burning fireplaces, stoves: Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Wood-burning fireplace type: Ceramic and masonry
Condition of gas-fired fireplaces or stoves: Appeared serviceable
Gas fireplace or stove type: Converted wood-burning fireplace
Condition of chimneys and flues: Near, at or beyond service life
Wood-burning chimney type: Masonry, Metal
Gas-fired flue type: Masonry with metal liner

52) The only visible gas supply shut-off valve for the fireplace burner was located inside the fireplace's firebox. The valve may be inaccessible in the event of a malfunction or a blaze inside the firebox. This is a potential safety hazard. A shut-off valve should be located outside of the firebox and within 6-10 feet from the fireplace. Recommend that a qualified contractor repair per standard building practices.
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53) The brick chimney was severely deteriorated. For example, loose or missing mortar, cracked, broken, loose or spalled bricks. Loose bricks can pose a safety hazard, and deteriorated masonry can allow water to infiltrate the chimney structure and cause further damage. Recommend that a qualified contractor repair as necessary.
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54) One or more masonry chimney crowns were cracked, deteriorated and/or substandard. Crowns are meant to keep water off of the chimney structure and prevent damage from freeze-thaw cycles. Chimney crowns are commonly constructed by mounding concrete or mortar on the top chimney surface, however this is substandard. A properly constructed chimney crown should:
  • Be constructed using either precast concrete slabs, cast-in-place steel reinforced concrete, solid stone, or metal
  • Be sloped down from the flue a minimum of 3 inches of fall per foot of run
  • Extend a minimum of 2 1/2 inches beyond the face of the chimney on all sides
  • Not directly contact the flue liner (if installed), with the gap filled with flexible caulk
  • Have flashing installed between the bottom of the crown and the top of the brick chimney
Recommend that a qualified contractor repair or replace crowns as necessary, and per standard building practices.

55) Mortar at the brick chimney was deteriorated (e.g. loose, missing, cracked). As a result, water is likely to infiltrate the chimney structure and cause further damage. Recommend that a qualified contractor repair as necessary. For example, by repointing the mortar.

Kitchen
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Condition of counters: Appeared serviceable
Condition of cabinets: Appeared serviceable
Condition of sinks and related plumbing: Appeared serviceable
Condition of under-sink food disposal: Appeared serviceable
Condition of dishwasher: Appeared serviceable
Condition of range, cooktop or oven: Appeared serviceable
Range, cooktop or oven type: Electric
Condition of refrigerator: Appeared serviceable
Condition of built-in microwave oven: Appeared serviceable

Bathrooms, Laundry and Sinks
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Location #A: Full bath, first floor
Location #B: Full bath, first floor
Location #C: Laundry room/area, first floor
Location #D: Full bath, basement
Condition of counters: Appeared serviceable
Condition of cabinets: Appeared serviceable
Condition of flooring: Appeared serviceable
Condition of sinks and related plumbing: Appeared serviceable
Condition of toilets: Appeared serviceable
Condition of bathtubs and related plumbing: Appeared serviceable
Condition of shower(s) and related plumbing: Appeared serviceable
Condition of ventilation systems: Appeared serviceable
Bathroom and laundry ventilation type: Windows
Gas supply for laundry equipment present: No
240 volt receptacle for laundry equipment present: Yes

56) The bathroom with a shower or bathtub at location(s) #D didn't have an exhaust fan installed. Moisture can accumulate and result in mold, bacteria or fungal growth. Even if the bathroom has a window that opens, it may not provide adequate ventilation, especially during cold weather when windows are closed or when wind blows air into the bathroom. Recommend that a qualified contractor install exhaust fans per standard building practices where missing in bathrooms with showers or bathtubs.

57) Tile and/or grout in the shower enclosure at location(s) #B were deteriorated (e.g. loose or cracked tiles, missing grout) or substandard. Water can damage the wall structure as a result. Recommend that a qualified contractor repair as necessary.
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58) The floor and/or wall by the bathtub at location(s) #D was water-damaged. Recommend that a qualified person repair as necessary.
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Interior, Doors and Windows
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Condition of exterior entry doors: Appeared serviceable
Exterior door material: Wood, Glass panel
Condition of interior doors: Appeared serviceable
Condition of windows and skylights: Appeared serviceable
Type(s) of windows: Vinyl
Condition of walls and ceilings: Appeared serviceable
Wall type or covering: Drywall
Ceiling type or covering: Drywall
Condition of flooring: Appeared serviceable
Flooring type or covering: Carpet, Vinyl, linoleum or marmoleum, Wood or wood products, Tile
Condition of stairs, handrails and guardrails: Appeared serviceable

59) One or more walls and/or ceilings were damaged and/or had substandard repairs. Recommend that a qualified person repair as necessary.
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Photo 59-1
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Photo 59-2
Wall cut out.
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Photo 59-3
 

60) Wood flooring in one or more areas was cupping and/or crowning. This may indicate that the floor has been exposed to water or that the flooring was not allowed to equalize in moisture content before being installed. Consult with the property owner and/or have a qualified specialist evaluate. It's likely that affected areas of the wood flooring will need to be refinished to obtain a flat surface. For more information, visit:
http://www.reporthost.com/?WDFLRPRB
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Photo 60-1
 

61) Wood floors were installed in one or more "wet" areas (e.g. kitchen, mud room, bathroom, laundry room). Spilled water can penetrate seams and damage the sub-floor. Recommend that a qualified contractor install continuous waterproof flooring in wet areas as necessary.

62) Lock mechanisms on one or more windows were damaged and/or inoperable. This can pose a security risk. Recommend that a qualified person repair as necessary.
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Photo 62-1
Broken lock/latch.
 

63) One or more window screens were damaged or deteriorated. These window(s) may not provide ventilation during months when insects are active. Recommend replacing window screens as necessary.

64) Wood flooring in one or more areas was significantly worn, deteriorated or damaged. Recommend that a qualified contractor refinish wood flooring as necessary.
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Photo 64-1
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Photo 64-2

65) One or more exterior doors had minor damage and/or deterioration. Although serviceable, the client may wish to repair or replace such doors for appearances' sake.

Wood Destroying Organism Findings
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Visible evidence of active wood-destroying insects: No
Visible evidence of active wood decay fungi: No
Visible evidence of past wood-destroying insects: No
Visible evidence of past wood decay fungi: No
Visible evidence of damage by wood-destroying insects: No
Visible evidence of damage by wood decay fungi: No
Visible evidence of conditions conducive to wood-destroying organisms: No

Thank you for using NorthWest Inspections. Feel free to call me if you have any questions.
Inspection performed and report written by.
Jason E Posey
NorthWest Inspections
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