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Rock To Roof Home Inspections

Website: http://www.rocktoroofhomeinspections.com
Email: rocktoroof@gmail.com
Phone: (360) 371-2858 · (844) 752-7663
Inspector's phone: (360) 371-2858
PO Box 481 
Blaine WA 98231-0481
Inspector: Eric Skibsrud

Property Inspection Report
WSDA ICN 4059Bxxxx

Client(s):  Anita Inspecion
Property address:  123 Any Road,
Bellingham WA 98229-4510
Inspection date:  Friday, May 23, 2014

This report published on Monday, August 04, 2014 10:34:35 AM PDT

Rock To Roof Home Inspections, LLC
Eric Skibsrud
Washington State Licensed Home Inspector #1088
Washington State Licensed Structural Pest Inspector #86711

Thank you for using ROCK TO ROOF HOME INSPECTIONS, LLC as your home inspection service. I understand buying a home is an enormous milestone and financial responsibility and I hope I have made your decision to purchase somewhat easier. Your business is very important to me. Please do not hesitate to contact me at the phone number or email provided on this report if you have any questions or concerns in the future. If you find this report useful and informative please refer ROCK TO ROOF HOME INSPECTIONS, LLC to your friends, family, your realtor and anyone you believe could benefit from my services. ROCK TO ROOF HOME INSPECTIONS, LLC not only performs inspections for purchasers, but also for people planning to sell a home who wish to estimate the amount of work that needs to be completed before listing the house.

A home inspection is a visual, and not an exhaustive or invasive, inspection of a home by a trained and impartial inspector. The inspector’s role in a home inspection is to find issues and deficiencies in the home and property. As a result, this report may seem negative in content. Please read the full report in its entirety and not just the summary.

An inspector is looking for significant issues. Pointing out primarily cosmetic details or inexpensive and simple repairs is not the goal of this home inspection. Any minor defects listed in an inspection report are at the discretion of the home inspector. Only the normal operating controls will be tested on any appliance. No appliances, mechanical or electrical devices, or parts of the structure, will be disassembled during the home inspection with two exceptions: (1) the cover will be removed from the electric panel when possible; (2) cover panels will be removed from the furnace when possible. It is possible that some defects are concealed, weather related, intermittent or slow developing, so they may not be active or visible at the time of the inspection. The home inspector makes every effort to perform a thorough inspection, within the limitations specified, but makes no warranties about the home other than reporting on the conditions visible and apparent at the time of inspection. Conditions in a home can, and will, change from day to day.

A home inspection is a common sense approach to evaluating visual deficiencies found at a home. Your inspector is not inspecting based on current or past "codes.” Recommendations made on the home inspection report are not always "mandatory" repairs. A code inspection would, by definition, fail to point out a number of deficiencies just as long as the home met the various applicable codes. This type of code inspection might leave out a number of maintenance issues that are addressed in a home inspection. Also it is unfair, except with critical safety issues, to expect a home built prior to the “code” to meet the most recent codes.

This report includes an inspection for wood destroying organisms (WDOs). More detailed information on this topic and a suggestion as to how to more effectively use Form 17, the Real Property Transfer Disclosure Statement, is provided under the General Information section in this report. By law the State of Washington mandates that I inspect for, and report on, WDO infestations or conditions that are conducive to attracting WDO's.

Every ROCK TO ROOF HOME INSPECTIONS report includes photos and descriptions detailing the locations of areas of concern as noted by the inspector. If during this inspection wood destroying organisms or conditions conducive to wood destroying organisms were found, you should know that WAC 16-228-2045 REQUIRES THAT A DIAGRAM BE PREPARED FOR WDO INSPECTION REPORTS. A COPY IS AVAILABLE UPON REQUEST, FOR AN ADDITIONAL FEE.

SUMMARY: NEAR THE TOP OF THE REPORT YOU MAY CLICK ON "SUMMARY". THIS WILL SHOW ONLY THE MOST SIGNIFICANT ISSUES WHICH ARE TAKEN FROM THE MAIN REPORT BASED ON PRIORITY. THE SUMMARY LEAVES CONCERNS NUMBERED AS THEY ARE IN THE FULL REPORT, SO THEY ARE EASY TO LOCATE IN THE BODY OF THE REPORT. FOR THIS REASON, THE SUMMARY WILL NOT BE SEQUENTIALLY NUMBERED.

This report is the exclusive property of ROCK TO ROOF HOME INSPECTIONS, LLC and the client(s) listed in the report title. Use of this report by any unauthorized person is prohibited.
How to Read this Report
This report is organized by the property's functional areas.  Within each functional area, descriptive information is listed first and is shown in bold type.  Items of concern follow descriptive information. Concerns are shown and sorted according to these types:
Concern typeSafetyPoses a safety hazard
Concern typeMajor DefectCorrection likely involves a significant expense
Concern typeRepair/ReplaceRecommend repairing or replacing
Concern typeRepair/MaintainRecommend repair and/or maintenance
Concern typeMinor DefectCorrection likely involves only a minor expense
Concern typeMaintainRecommend ongoing maintenance
Concern typeEvaluateRecommend evaluation by a specialist
Concern typeMonitorRecommend monitoring in the future
Concern typeCommentFor your information
Concern typeDamageDamage caused by wood destroying insects or organisms (Rot, carpenter ant galleries, etc.)
Concern typeConducive conditionsConditions conducive for wood destroying insects or organisms (Wood-soil contact, shrubs in contact with siding, roof or plumbing leaks, etc.)

Click here for a glossary of building construction terms.Contact your inspector If there are terms that you do not understand, or visit the glossary of construction terms at http://www.reporthost.com/glossary.asp

Table of Contents
General Information
Grounds
Exterior and Foundation
Crawl Space
Roof
Attic and Roof Structure
Garage
Electric
Plumbing / Fuel Systems
Water Heater
Heating, Ventilation and Air Condition (HVAC)
Fireplaces, Stoves, Chimneys and Flues
Kitchen
Bathrooms, Laundry and Sinks
Interior, Doors and Windows


General Information
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Report number: xxxxx
Time started: 3:00 pm
Time finished: 6:00 pm
Present during inspection: Client/ Property owner
Client present for discussion at end of inspection: Yes
Weather conditions during inspection: Sunny
Temperature during inspection: Warm
Ground condition: Damp
Recent weather: Rain
Overnight temperature: Cool
Type of building: Single family
Buildings inspected: House with attached garage
Number of residential units inspected: 1
Age of main building: 1971
Source for main building age: Property listing
Square footage of building: 1,788
Source of square footage: Property listing
Front of building faces: North
Main entrance faces: North
Occupied: Yes, Furniture and stored items were present
Limitations to wood-destroying organisms (WDOs) inspection: This report only includes findings from accessible and visible areas on the day of the inspection. In addition to the inaccessible areas documented in this report, examples of other inaccessible areas include: sub areas less than 18 inches in height; attic areas less than 5 feet in height, areas blocked by ducts, pipes or insulation; areas where locks or permanently attached covers prevent access; areas where insulation would be damaged if traversed; areas obscured by vegetation. All inaccessible areas are subject to infestation or damage from wood-destroying organisms. The inspector does not move furnishings, stored items, debris, floor or wall coverings, insulation, or other materials as part of the inspection, nor perform destructive testing. Wood-destroying organisms may infest, re-infest or become active at any time. No warranty is provided as part of this inspection.
1) Hornet, bee or wasp nests were found at the building exterior West side at gable (under ridge of roof) and South end at gable. These can pose a safety hazard. A qualified person should remove nests or exterminate as necessary.
2) Structures built prior to the mid 1980s may contain lead and/or asbestos. Lead is commonly found in paint and in some plumbing components. The EPA does not recognize newer coats of paint as encapsulating older coats of lead-based paint. Asbestos is commonly found in various building materials such as insulation, siding, and/or floor and ceiling tiles. Laws were passed in 1978 to prohibit usage of lead and asbestos, but stocks of materials containing these substances remained in use for a number of years thereafter. Both lead and asbestos are known health hazards. Evaluating for the presence of lead and/or asbestos is beyond the scope of this inspection. Any mention of these materials in this report is made as a courtesy only, and meant to refer the client to a specialist. Consult with specialists as necessary, such as industrial hygienists, professional labs and/or abatement specialists for this type of evaluation. For information on lead, asbestos and other hazardous materials in homes, visit:
http://www.reporthost.com/?EPA
http://www.reporthost.com/?CPSC
http://www.reporthost.com/?CDC
3) Evidence of rodent infestation was found in the form of feces, dead rodents, damaged insulation and visual confirmation by inspector of active infestation in the crawl space. Consult with the property owner about this. A qualified person should make repairs to seal openings in the structure, set traps, and clean rodent waste as necessary. Recommend following guidelines in these Center for Disease Control articles:
http://www.reporthost.com/?SEALUP
http://www.reporthost.com/?TRAPUP
http://www.reporthost.com/?CLEANUP
4) Microbial growths were found at window wells in interior rooms. It is beyond the scope of this inspection to identify what substance or organism this staining is. However such staining is normally caused by excessively moist conditions, which in turn can be caused by plumbing or building envelope leaks and/or substandard ventilation. These conducive conditions should be corrected before making any attempts to remove or correct the staining. Normally affected materials such as drywall are removed, enclosed affected spaces are allowed to dry thoroughly, a mildewcide may be applied, and only then is drywall reinstalled. For evaluation and possible mitigation, consult with a qualified industrial hygienist or mold/moisture mitigation specialist. For more information, visit:
http://www.reporthost.com/?MOLDCDC
http://www.reporthost.com/?MOLDEPA
5) Many areas and items at this property were obscured by furniture and stored items. This often includes but is not limited to walls, floors, windows, inside and under cabinets, under sinks, on counter tops, in closets, behind window coverings, under rugs or carpets, and under or behind furniture. Areas around the exterior, under the structure, in the garage and in the attic may also be obscured by stored items. The inspector in general does not move personal belongings, furnishings, carpets or appliances. When furnishings, stored items or debris are present, all areas or items that are obscured, concealed or not readily accessible are excluded from the inspection. The client should be aware that when furnishings, stored items or debris are eventually moved, damage or problems that were not noted during the inspection may be found.
6) Form 17 is a required seller disclosure statement at all real estate transactions conducted in the State of Washington unless expressly waived by the potential homebuyer or does not pertain to the sale as defined by RCW 64.06.010. By law, a seller is required to disclose to the buyer details about the home and property, many of which may not be observable at the time of inspection, such as, hidden defects in materials or products used in the construction of the home; known health or environmental concerns such as mold, well or water supply problems, underground fuel storage tanks, and chemical pollutants; past fire damage; or a history of seasonal water, flooding, or pest infestations. For more information regarding Form 17, visit:
http://apps.leg.wa.gov/RCW/default.aspx?cite=64.06
To review the questions asked of and provided by the seller, see RCW 64.06.020, visit:
http://apps.leg.wa.gov/RCW/default.aspx?cite=64.06.020


Grounds
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Limitations: Unless specifically included in the inspection, the following items and any related equipment, controls, electric systems and/or plumbing systems are excluded from this inspection: detached buildings or structures; fences and gates; retaining walls; underground drainage systems, catch basins or concealed sump pumps; whether deck, balcony and/or stair membranes are watertight; trees, landscaping, properties of soil, soil stability, erosion and erosion control; irrigation or yard sprinkler systems; areas below the exterior structures with less than 3 feet of vertical clearance; invisible fencing; retractable awnings. Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only.
Condition of fences and gates: Required repairs, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Fence and gate material: Wood
Site profile: Minor slope
Condition of driveway: Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Driveway material: Poured in place concrete
Condition of front entrance walkway/step: Appeared serviceable
Front entrance walkway/step material: Poured in place concrete
Condition of deck: Required repairs, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Deck material: Wood
Condition of deck steps: Required repairs, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Exterior step material: Wood, Concrete, Soil/earth
7) The attachment method of the deck to the main structure was substandard. No ledger board was installed. This may result in deck separating from the building and is a potential safety hazard. Modern standards call for a ledger board to be installed with 1/2 inch lag screws or bolts into solid backing, and brackets such as Simpson Strong Tie DTT2 brackets and threaded rod, connecting interior and exterior joists. Recommend that a qualified contractor repair per standard building practices. For more information, visit:
http://www.reporthost.com/?LB
http://www.reporthost.com/?SD
8) Damage Fungal rot was found in decking boards at South end of deck. Conducive conditions for this should be corrected, such as wood being in contact with concrete, allowing debris and water to collect and seep in at ends of boards. Recommend that a qualified contractor evaluate and repair as necessary. All rotten wood should be replaced.
Photo
Photo 8-1
No gap between decking boards and step; debris accumulation
 

9) Damage Fungal rot was found in treads at exterior steps leading to deck. Also a buildup of moss may make steps slippery especially when wet and pose a safety hazard for falling. Recommend that a qualified person evaluate and repair as necessary. All rotten wood should be replaced.
10) Damage Landscaping timbers near building were rotten or damaged by wood-destroying insects. Recommend that landscaping timbers be removed or replaced as necessary.
11) Conducive conditions Soil was in contact with wooden deck substructure components. This is a conducive condition for wood-destroying organisms. Clearances to soil should be as follows:Pressure treated wood is typically rated for 25 year contact with soil, but the cut ends hidden below grade may not have been treated and can rot quickly. Support posts should be elevated above grade on concrete piers or footings, and be separated from the concrete by metal brackets or an impermeable membrane such as shingle scraps. For other components, soil should be graded and/or removed to maintain these clearances if possible. Otherwise, replacing non-treated wood with treated wood, or installing borate-based products such as Impel rods may help to prevent infestation and damage. For more information, visit:
http://www.reporthost.com/?IMPEL
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Photo 11-1
 

12) Cracks, settlement and/or heaving were found in the driveway. Recommend that qualified contractor repair as necessary.
Photo
Photo 12-1
Photo
Photo 12-2

13) Some nails securing decking boards were loose and were not flush with the surfaces of boards. Boards are more likely to loosen and warp. This may pose a safety hazard to those with bare feet. Recommend that a qualified person repair as necessary. For example, by replacing nails or installing screws. Note that existing nails that are simply pounded back in will be likely to loosen again.
14) Conducive conditions The soil or grading sloped down towards building perimeters at backyard. This can result in water accumulating around building foundations or underneath buildings. It is a conducive condition for wood-destroying organisms. Recommend grading soil so it slopes down and away from buildings with a slope of at least 1 inch per horizontal foot for at least 6 feet out from buildings.
Photo
Photo 14-1
 

15) Wooden deck surfaces and railings were overdue for normal maintenance. Recommend that a qualified person clean and preserve as necessary. For more information about deck maintenance, visit:
http://www.reporthost.com/?DKMAIN
16) No outbuildings or detached structures were evaluated. They are excluded from this inspection.
17) Most areas of the deck substructure was inaccessible due to limited space below. These areas couldn't be evaluated and are excluded from the inspection.


Exterior and Foundation
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Limitations: The inspector performs a visual inspection of accessible components or systems at the exterior. Items excluded from this inspection include below-grade foundation walls and footings; foundations, exterior surfaces or components obscured by vegetation, stored items or debris; wall structures obscured by coverings such as siding or trim. Some items such as siding, trim, soffits, vents and windows are often high off the ground, and may be viewed using binoculars from the ground or from a ladder. This may limit a full evaluation. Regarding foundations, some amount of cracking is normal in concrete slabs and foundation walls due to shrinkage and drying. Note that the inspector does not determine the adequacy of seismic reinforcement.
Wall inspection method: Viewed from ground, from a ladder
Condition of wall exterior covering: Required repairs, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Apparent wall structure: Wood frame
Wall covering: Wood, Brick veneer (at front)
Apparent foundation type: Crawl space, Post and pier, Concrete garage slab
Foundation/stem wall material: Poured in place concrete
Footing material (under foundation stem wall): Poured in place concrete
18) Conducive conditions The masonry (brick) veneer at front was deteriorated or damaged in some areas. Where cracks or openings are exposed, water can enter the wall structure causing mold, fungal growth and structural damage. This is a conducive condition for wood-destroying organisms. Recommend that a qualified contractor repair as necessary. For example, by repointing mortar or replacing broken masonry.
Photo
Photo 18-1
Brick veneer requires caulking at separation with trim
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Photo 18-2
Cracks in brick

19) The exhaust duct end cap for the clothes dryer at the West side exterior was damaged. Its purpose is to prevent unconditioned air from entering the building, and keep out birds, rodents and bugs. Blocked ducts can cause fan motors and/or clothes dryers to overheat and can pose a fire hazard. Recommend that a qualified person repair or replace cap as necessary.
20) No holes or gaps were visible by normal means to inspector at time of inspection, however rodents have gained access to the buildings substructure. The North-West section of crawl space could not be fully traversed due to inaccessibility by vents and plumbing and crawl space vents had been intentionally blocked at exterior, hiding any holes or defects in screens that may allow vermin access. Recommend that a qualified pest control operator/exterminator evaluate and remove rodents. All access points should then be repaired and dead rodents and feces cleaned from crawl space.
21) Conducive conditions Soil was in contact with and less than 6 inches from siding and trim. Regardless of what material is used for siding, it should not be in contact with the soil. Because it is made of wood, siding and trim will eventually rot. Wood-destroying insects are likely to infest and damage the wall structure. This is a conducive condition for wood-destroying organisms. Recommend grading or removing soil as necessary to maintain a 6-inch clearance.
If not possible, then recommend replacing untreated wood with pressure-treated wood. Installation of borate-based products such as Impel rods can also reduce the likelihood of rot or infestation if soil cannot be removed. Note that damage from fungal rot and/or insects may be found when soil is removed, and repairs may be necessary.
Photo
Photo 21-1
 

22) Conducive conditions Fences were attached to and in contact with the building exterior. Such attachments can serve as a pathway for wood-destroying insects and can retain moisture against the exterior after it rains. This is a conducive condition for wood-destroying organisms. Recommend that a qualified person repair as necessary so there is at least a 2-inch gap between fences and building exteriors.
Photo
Photo 22-1
Fungal rot found at fences
 

23) "Honeycombing" was found at the West and East sections of the concrete foundation. This occurs when aggregate and sand in the concrete mixture bunches into clusters and fails to mix with the cement paste. This can be caused because the concrete mix was too stiff, by inadequate consolidation (insufficient use of a mechanical concrete vibrator) and/or pouring the concrete from too high of an elevation. In many cases honeycombing is only a cosmetic issue, but it does make concrete susceptible to water infiltration. Where honeycombing is accessible, recommend that a qualified person fill voids with an approved material such as hydraulic cement or non-shrinking grout.

The client should be aware that when honeycombing is visible, it may also exist in hidden areas. Honeycombing can result in mold growth in absorbent flooring materials (e.g. carpeting and mortar joints), and can cause rigid flooring materials to warp and buckle.
Photo
Photo 23-1
 

24) Conducive conditions Vegetation such as shrubs was in contact with the building exterior. Vegetation can serve as a pathway for wood-destroying insects and can retain moisture against the exterior after it rains. This is a conducive condition for wood-destroying organisms. Recommend pruning, moving or removing vegetation as necessary to maintain at least 6 inches of space between it and the building exterior. A 1-foot clearance is better.
25) Conducive conditions Caulk was missing or deteriorated in some areas. For example, around windows, around doors, at siding butt joints, and at siding-trim junctions. Recommend that a qualified person renew or install caulk as necessary. Where gaps are wider than 1/4 inch, an appropriate material other than caulk should be used. For more information, visit:
http://www.reporthost.com/?CAULK
Photo
Photo 25-1
Many areas where siding meets siding requires caulking
 


Crawl Space
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Limitations: The inspector does not determine if support posts, columns, beams, joists, studs, trusses, etc. are of adequate size, spanning or spacing. The inspector does not guarantee or warrant that water will not accumulate in the crawl spaces in the future. Complete access to all crawl space areas during all seasons and during prolonged periods of all types of weather conditions (e.g. heavy rain, melting snow) would be needed to do so. The inspector attempts to locate all crawl space access points and areas. Access points may be obscured or otherwise hidden by furnishings or stored items. In such cases, the client should ask the property owner where all access points are that are not described in this inspection, and have those areas inspected. Note that crawl space areas should be checked at least annually for water intrusion, plumbing leaks and pest activity.
Crawl space inspection method: Partially traversed - due to ductwork and piping, the inspector was unable to fully traverse the crawl space at the West side of location #A; due to active rodent activity, was unable to fully traverse the West side of location #B
Location of crawl space access point #A: Building exterior, SE corner
Location of crawl space access point #B: Building exterior, space between living area and deck
Condition of floor substructure above: Required repairs, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Pier or support post material: Wood, Concrete
Beam material: Solid wood
Floor structure above: Solid wood joists
Condition of insulation underneath floor above: Not applicable, none installed
Condition of vapor barrier: Required repairs, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Vapor barrier present: Yes
Condition of crawl space ventilation: Required repairs, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Ventilation type: Vented (seasonal blocks in place at time of inspection)
26) Evidence of rodent infestation was found in the form of feces, dead rodents, damaged insulation on ducts and visual confirmation of live rodent(s) in the crawl space. A qualified person should make repairs to seal openings in the structure, set traps, and clean rodent waste as necessary. Recommend following guidelines in these Center for Disease Control articles:
http://www.reporthost.com/?SEALUP
http://www.reporthost.com/?TRAPUP
http://www.reporthost.com/?CLEANUP
27) No insulation was installed under the floor above the crawl space. Recommend that a qualified person install insulation for better energy efficiency and per standard building practices. Typically this is R-19 rated fiberglass batt with the attached facing installed against the warm (floor) side.
28) Conducive conditions The plastic vapor barrier installed over the soil in the crawl space was wrapped around or in contact with the sides of wooden support posts. Condensation under the vapor barrier is likely to deposit water at the base of these support posts, and can cause fungal rot. This is a conducive condition for wood-destroying organisms. Recommend that a qualified person trim the plastic vapor barrier where necessary so it's not in contact with any support posts, or any other wooden substructure components.
29) Conducive conditions The vapor barrier in some areas of the crawl space was damaged, loose or askew. Soil was exposed as a result and will allow water from the soil to evaporate up into the structure. This is a conducive condition for wood-destroying organisms. A 6 mil black plastic sheet should be placed over all exposed soil with seams overlapped to 24 inches, and not in contact with any wood structural components. The sheeting should be held in place with bricks or stones, not wood. Recommend that a qualified person replace or repair the vapor barrier where necessary and per standard building practices.
30) The #A outdoor crawl space access hatch was damaged or deteriorated. Water and/or vermin could enter the crawl space. Recommend that a qualified person replace or repair hatch where necessary.
31) Conducive conditions Cellulose material such as scrap wood at location #A was found in the crawl space. This is a conducive condition for wood-destroying organisms. Recommend removing all cellulose-based debris.
32) The NW sections of the crawl space at location #A were not evaluated due to lack of access because ducts and pipes were blocking, and live and dead vermin were present.
The West section of the crawl space at #B was not fully evaluated due to presence of live vermin.
33) Crawl space vents were intentionally blocked (e.g. rigid foam). This restricts ventilation in the crawl space and can result in increased levels of moisture inside. This is a conducive condition for wood-destroying organisms. Such vents should be left open at all times except during severe freezing weather. Recommend removing items blocking vents as necessary.


Roof
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Limitations: Note that the inspector does not provide an estimate of remaining life on the roof surface material, nor guarantee that leaks have not occurred in the roof surface, skylights or roof penetrations in the past. Regarding roof leaks, only active leaks, visible evidence of possible sources of leaks, and evidence of past leaks observed during the inspection are reported on as part of this inspection. The inspector does not guarantee or warrant that leaks will not occur in the future. Complete access to all roof and attic spaces during all seasons and during prolonged periods of all types of weather conditions (e.g. high wind and rain, melting snow) would be needed to do so. Regarding the roof drainage system, unless the inspection was conducted during and after prolonged periods of heavy rain, the inspector was unable to determine if gutters, downspouts and extensions performed adequately or were leak-free.
Roof inspection method: Traversed, Viewed from ground
Condition of roof surface material: Near, at or beyond service life
Roof surface material: Asphalt or fiberglass composition shingles
Roof type: Gable
Apparent number of layers of roof surface material: One
Condition of gutters, downspouts and extensions: Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Gutter and downspout material: Metal
Gutter and downspout installation: Full
34) Conducive conditions The roof surface was significantly deteriorated and appeared to be at or beyond its service life. It will likely need replacing in the near future even if repairs are made now. Most composition shingles were cracked and damaged such as loss of granules or to the point of the felt or base material being exposed. In this condition, asphalt (or composition) shingles can no longer provide adequate protection against the elements. Leaks can occur as a result. This is a conducive condition for wood-destroying organisms. Recommend discussing replacement options with a qualified contractor, and budgeting for a replacement roof surface in the near future. The client may also wish to consider having a qualified contractor attempt to issue a "5 year roof certificate."
Note that some structural repairs are often needed after old roof surfaces are removed and the structure becomes fully visible. Related roofing components such as flashings and vents should be replaced or installed as needed and per standard building practices.
Photo
Photo 34-1
Exposed felt (base material of shingles)
 

35) Conducive conditions Gaps were found between drip edge flashing and some gutters. Rainwater can get behind gutters and come in contact with the building exterior or accumulate around the foundation as a result. The edge of the roof structure may become damaged by rot or water. This is a conducive condition for wood-destroying organisms. Recommend that a qualified person evaluate and repair as necessary. For example, by installing flashing, fascia boards and/or tightening loose gutters.
Photo
Photo 35-1
Gaps found between drip edge and gutters at N end
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Photo 35-2
Nail holding gutter pulling away from structure

36) Skylights have been installed with substandard or non-standard construction methods. Flashing was applied in a way to allow water to get underneath shingles making them brittle and decking springy underfoot. Flashing was also corroded. This has a potential for leaks. Recommend that a qualified contractor, such as a licensed roofer, evaluate and repair as necessary, and per standard building practices.
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Photo 36-1
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Photo 36-2
Photo
Photo 36-3
 

37) Conducive conditions Kick-out flashing was installed at some locations. Because it was not raining at time of inspection, it could not be determined if such installation was required. Such flashing should be located at the bottom of slopes where roof surfaces intersect with exterior walls above. It directs rainwater away from exterior walls and into gutters so that rainwater is less likely to run down the front surfaces of siding or flow behind siding. The kick-out flashing was installed in a non-typical application and therefore not needed or further evaluation should be taken to determine it's usefulness. Flashings were secured on top of shingles with screw heads exposed which would require sealant and ongoing maintenance. Recommend that a qualified contractor remove or repair per standard building practices.
38) Conducive conditions Rubber or neoprene pipe flashings were split or cracked. Leaks can occur as a result. This is a conducive condition for wood-destroying organisms. Recommend that a qualified contractor replace flashings where necessary.
Photo
Photo 38-1
Failed rubber gasket and corroded flashing
 

39) Conducive conditions Some gutters were found loose, missing, clogged and had a substandard slope so that significant amounts of water accumulate in them rather than draining through the downspouts. This can cause gutters to overflow, especially when debris such as leaves or needles has accumulated in them. Rainwater can come in contact with the building exterior or accumulate around the foundation as a result. This is a conducive condition for wood-destroying organisms. Recommend that a qualified person repair as necessary. For example, by correcting the slope in gutters or installing additional downspouts and extensions.
Photo
Photo 39-1
East side gutter, South to North towards downspout
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Photo 39-2
South end of gutter full of water and debris
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Photo 39-3
Fallen gutter at SW
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Photo 39-4
Missing gutter at NW

40) Extensions such as splash blocks or drain pipes for some downspouts were missing, poorly sloped or obstructed. Water can accumulate around the building foundation or inside crawl spaces as a result. Recommend that a qualified person install, replace or repair extensions as necessary so rainwater drains away from the structure.
Photo
Photo 40-1
NW corner, restricted drainage
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Photo 40-2
SE corner
Photo
Photo 40-3
NE corner, missing, draining to foundation
 

41) Conducive conditions Barge boards, which are the trim boards at gable ends of roofs, were exposed at their lower ends and subject to rot from exposure to rain runoff. This is a conducive condition for wood-destroying organisms. Shingles or flashing should be installed over them to prevent rot. Recommend that a qualified person install shingles or flashing over exposed barge boards where missing and per standard building practices.
42) Gaps were found in or around roof soffits and can allow wasps or bees to enter the attic. Recommend that a qualified person repair as necessary to eliminate gaps.
43) Roof surface sections were designed so as to be prone to accumulating debris and/or snow. For example, where two slopes converged. Accumulated debris in these areas can result in leaks. At a minimum, monitor such areas for accumulated debris in the future and clean as necessary. Consult with a qualified contractor to determine what repairs or modifications may be possible to prevent leaks.
Photo
Photo 43-1
Debris accumulating at roof valley
 

44) Moss was growing on the roof, especially at the South-West section. As a result, shingles can lift or be damaged. Leaks can result and/or the roof surface can fail prematurely. Efforts should be made to kill the moss during its growing season (wet months). Typically, zinc or phosphate-based chemicals are used for this and must be applied periodically. For information on various moss treatment products and their pros and cons, visit:
http://www.reporthost.com/?MOSS
45) Nail heads were exposed at multipe shingles, especially along ridge line of roof. More than just a few exposed nail heads may indicate a substandard roof installation or repairs. Recommend applying an approved sealant over exposed nail heads now and as necessary in the future to prevent leaks.
Photo
Photo 45-1
 


Attic and Roof Structure
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Limitations: The following items or areas are not included in this inspection: areas that could not be traversed or viewed clearly due to lack of access; areas and components obscured by insulation. Any comments made regarding these items are made as a courtesy only. The inspector does not determine the adequacy of the attic ventilation system. Complete access to all roof and attic spaces during all seasons and during prolonged periods of all types of weather conditions (e.g. high/low temperatures, high/low humidity, high wind and rain, melting snow) would be needed to do so. The inspector is not a licensed engineer and does not determine the adequacy of roof structure components such as trusses, rafters or ceiling beams, or their spacing or sizing.
Attic inspection method: Partially traversed - the inspector was only able to traverse above garage entry point and kitchen eating area and West bedroom; because of restricted access, due to height of trusses and insulation, only this area was evaluated; no other attic access hatch was discovered
Location of attic access point: Garage
Condition of roof structure: Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Roof structure type: Trusses
Ceiling structure: Trusses
Condition of insulation in attic (ceiling, skylight chase, etc.): Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Ceiling insulation material: Fiberglass loose fill, Fiberglass roll or batt, Mineral wool loose fill, Vermiculite loose fill
Approximate attic insulation R value (may vary in areas): R-38 above South living room
Vermiculite insulation present: Yes
Vapor retarder: None visible
Condition of roof ventilation: Appeared serviceable
Roof ventilation type: Gable end vents, Open soffit vents
46) What appeared to be vermiculite insulation was found in the attic. Vermiculite produced prior to 1991 may contain asbestos, less so if mined after 1991. When vermiculite insulation is present in attics, the EPA recommends that it be left undisturbed and that the attic not be used for storage, and that people (especially children) should not enter the attic. If the client is concerned about this material posing a safety hazard, then consult with a qualified asbestos abatement specialist or industrial hygienist. For more information, visit:
http://www.reporthost.com/?VERMINS
http://www.reporthost.com/?AITH
47) Attic spaces greater than 30 inches in height appeared to exist East of garage attic hatch, but no access points were found. Standard building practices require that access points be installed for attic spaces more than 30 inches in height for periodic evaluation. Recommend that a qualified person install attic access points where missing and per standard building practices (e.g. adequate size, insulated, weatherstripped). A qualified person should fully evaluate these attic spaces and roof structures. These areas are excluded from this inspection.
48) The return air duct in the attic was not insulated. This can result in moisture forming inside the duct or "sweating" on the outside of the duct depending on the surrounding air temperature and the exhaust air temperature. Recommend that a qualified person install insulation on exhaust ducts per standard building practices (typically R-4 rating).
49) The metal chimney for the fireplace was in contact with the roof decking. Metal chimneys or vents for wood-burning appliances require a 2 inch separation or clearance from combustible materials. Recommend that qualified contractor repair as needed.
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Photo 49-1
 

50) Conducive conditions Holes or gaps in roof's ridge were visible from attic. Water, insects, birds, and vermin may enter the attic as a result. Recommend repair at roof by a qualified contractor where necessary.
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Photo 50-1
 

51) The ceiling insulation between the area above the garage and surrounding area to the South in the attic was compacted or uneven. Heating and cooling costs may be higher due to reduced energy efficiency. Recommend that a qualified person repair, replace or install insulation as necessary and per standard building practices (typically R-38).
52) What appeared to be past water stains on the ceiling drywall in the attic above the West bedroom were visible. However, no elevated levels of moisture were found at these stains during the inspection. The stains may have been caused by a past leak. Monitor these areas in the future, especially after heavy rains to determine if active leaks exist. If leaks are found, recommend that a qualified contractor evaluate and repair as necessary.
53) All attic areas and roof structures more than 10 feet from attic access point were inaccessible due to ducts blocking and limited height. These areas were not evaluated and are excluded from the inspection.


Garage
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Limitations: The inspector does not determine the adequacy of firewall ratings.
Type: Attached garage
Condition of door between garage and house: Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Type of door between garage and house: Wood
Condition of garage vehicle door: Required repair and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Type of garage vehicle door: Tilt-up
Number of vehicle doors: 1
Condition of automatic opener: Required repair or evaluation (see comments below)
Condition of garage floor: Appeared serviceable
54) Appliances such as the water heater and furnace were subject to damage from vehicles because no protective barrier was installed in front of them. This is a potential safety hazard for fire and/or shock. A qualified contractor should install a barrier per standard building practices. For example, a steel post or specially made wood partition anchored in the concrete slab floor.
55) The door between the garage and the house didn't self-latch when closed via the self-closing device. House to garage doors prevent fire and fumes from spreading from the garage to the house. Self-closing devices keep the door closed for this purpose. Recommend that a qualified person repair as necessary.
56) Weatherstripping around and at the base of the door between the garage and the house was substandard (e.g. damaged, missing). House to garage doors should prevent fire and fumes from spreading from the garage to the house. Weatherstripping should form a seal around this door. This is a potential safety hazard. Recommend that a qualified person replace and install weatherstripping as necessary.
57) Extension springs supporting garage vehicle door had no safety containment cables installed. These cables prevent injury to people located nearby when springs eventually break. This is a potential safety hazard. Recommend that a qualified contractor install cables where missing per standard building practices. For more information, visit:
http://www.reporthost.com/?GDSC
58) The wall-mounted control for the automatic garage vehicle door opener was less than 5 feet off the floor, or within reach of children. This is a safety hazard. Children should not be able to operate automatic garage vehicle door openers. A qualified person should relocate controls for door opener so that it is at least 5 feet above floor and/or out of reach of children. For more information on garage door safety issues, visit:
http://www.reporthost.com/?NRGD
59) Paper facing on batt insulation in the garage was exposed. The paper facing is flammable and poses a safety hazard due to the risk of fire. Drywall is normally installed over this flammable facing. A qualified person should install a wall covering such as fire-resistant drywall over the paper facing per the manufacturer's instructions and per standard building practices. Otherwise the paper facing or insulation should be removed.
60) Significant gaps were found below and around garage vehicle door. Weatherstripping at the sides and bottom were substandard. Vermin and insects can enter the garage as a result. Recommend that a qualified person repair, replace or install weatherstripping as necessary to eliminate or minimize gaps.
61) Minor cracks were found in the concrete slab floor. These are common and appeared to be only a cosmetic issue.


Electric
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Limitations: The following items are not included in this inspection: generator systems, transfer switches, surge suppressors, inaccessible or concealed wiring; underground utilities and systems; low-voltage lighting or lighting on timers or sensors. Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not determine the adequacy of grounding or bonding, if this system has an adequate capacity for the client's specific or anticipated needs, or if this system has any reserve capacity for additions or expansion. The inspector does not operate circuit breakers as part of the inspection, and does not install or change light bulbs. The inspector does not evaluate every wall switch or outlet, but instead tests a representative number of them per various standards of practice. When furnishings, stored items or child-protective caps are present some receptacles are usually inaccessible and are not tested; these are excluded from this inspection. Receptacles that are not of standard 110 volt configuration, including 240-volt dryer receptacles, are not tested and are excluded. The functionality of, power source for and placement of smoke and carbon monoxide alarms is not determined as part of this inspection. Upon taking occupancy, proper operating and placement of smoke and carbon monoxide alarms should be verified and batteries should be changed. These devices have a limited lifespan and should be replaced every 10 years. The inspector attempts to locate and evaluate all main and sub-panels. However, panels are often concealed. If panels are found after the inspection, a qualified electrician should evaluate and repair if necessary. The inspector attempts to determine the overall electrical service size, but such estimates are not guaranteed because the overall capacity may be diminished by lesser-rated components in the system. Any repairs recommended should be made by a licensed electrician.
Electric service condition: Appeared serviceable
Primary service type: Underground
Number of service conductors: 3
Service voltage (volts): 120-240
Estimated service amperage: 150
Primary service overload protection type: Circuit breakers
Service entrance conductor material: Stranded aluminum
System ground: Not determined, not readily apparent
Condition of main service panel: Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Location of main service panel: Master bathroom
Location of main disconnect: Top bank of breakers in main service panel (split bus)
Branch circuit wiring type: Non-metallic sheathed, Copper
Solid strand aluminum branch circuit wiring present: None visible
Ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection present: No
Arc fault circuit interrupter (AFCI) protection present: No
62) Significant amounts of contaminants or foreign material such as drywall texture and paint were found in panel. No approved method exists for cleaning contaminants from panel interiors or components such as bus bars and circuit breakers. The panel and components inside may need replacing. Recommend that a qualified electrician evaluate and replace components if necessary.
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Photo 62-1
 

63) Electric outlets at the kitchen, bathrooms, garage, and exterior had no visible ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection. If not GFCI-protected, outlets in wet areas pose a shock hazard. Recommend that a qualified electrician evaluate and install GFCI protection if necessary and per standard building practices. General guidelines for GFCI-protected outlets include the following locations:For more information, visit:
http://www.reporthost.com/?GFCI
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Photo 63-1
GFCI protection needed for wet areas
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Photo 63-2
Exterior at deck, not GFCI protected, no cover

64) The electric circuit for the garbage disposal did not appear to be a "dedicated" circuit, and serviced other outlets or equipment. Permanently installed appliances like garbage disposals, should each have a dedicated circuit to prevent overloading and to prevent circuit breakers from "nuisance tripping." This is a potential fire hazard. Because legend indicating breakers at electric panel was missing, recommend that a qualified electrician further evaluate and repair per standard building practices.
65) Panel was located in a bathroom. This is not an approved location for electric panels. Recommend that a qualified electrician move the panel or make repairs per standard building practices.
66) Neutral wires were doubled or bundled together under the same lug on the neutral bus bar in panel. This is a potential safety hazard in the event that one of the circuits needs to be isolated during servicing. For one neutral to be disconnected, other neutrals from energized circuits sharing the same lug will be loosened. Power surges may result on the energized circuits and result in damage or fire. Also, multiple wires under the same lug may not be secure, resulting in loose wires, arcing, sparks and fire. Recommend that a qualified electrician repair per standard building practices. For more information, visit:
http://www.reporthost.com/?DTNB
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Photo 66-1
 

67) Handle ties were missing at ganged 1-pole circuit breakers at panel. Approved, "identified" handle ties should be installed to prevent one side from being turned off while the other is turned on. Nails, screws or wires or other nonconforming material are not permitted for use as handle ties. This is a potential shock hazard, especially for someone working on the system. Recommend that a qualified electrician repair per standard building practices.
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Photo 67-1
 

68) Non-metallic sheathed wiring in the attic was routed on surfaces within 6 feet of access hatch, and was subject to damage. Wiring can be damaged when it is in the path of possible foot traffic, when stored items are moved into or out of the attic, etc. This is a potential shock and/or fire hazard. Recommend that a qualified electrician repair per standard building practices.
69) Extension cord was being used as permanent wiring in garage for the automatic garage opener. Extension cords should only be used for portable equipment on a temporary basis. Using extension cords as permanent wiring is a potential fire and shock hazard, and indicates that wiring is inadequate and needs updating. Extension cords may be undersized. Connections may not be secure resulting in power fluctuations, damage to equipment, overheating and sparks that could start a fire. Recommend that a qualified electrician repair per standard building practices and eliminate extension cords for permanently installed equipment.
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Photo 69-1
 

70) Smoke alarms were missing from inside bedrooms and in the attached garage. Additional smoke alarms should be installed as necessary so a functioning alarm exists in each hallway leading to bedrooms, in each bedroom, and in attached garage. For more information, visit:
http://www.reporthost.com/?SMKALRM
71) The breaker panel cover or "dead cover" was not properly secured to breaker panel. The screws used to hold the cover did not properly align and the cover was held in place in such a way that the potential of shock or damage to breakers when removing and replacing cover was increased. Recommend that a qualified electrician evaluate and repair as necessary.
72) The face plate was missing and slots where circuit breakers are normally installed were open in panel. Energized equipment was exposed and is a shock hazard. Recommend that a qualified person install closure covers where missing.
73) Wall-mounted exterior light fixtures had no caulk installed above the back plate. Water can enter the space behind the back plate and contact wiring. This is a potential shock hazard. Recommend that a qualified person apply caulk above and around the back plate per standard building practices. A gap should be left at the bottom of the plate so that condensation can drain out.
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Photo 73-1
 

74) Carbon monoxide (CO) alarms were missing from sleeping areas. This is a potential safety hazard. CO alarms are to be installed in the vicinity of each sleeping area and in accordance with the manufacturer's recommendations. Recommend installing additional carbon monoxide alarms per these standards. For more information, visit:
http://www.reporthost.com/?COALRM
75) The legend for circuit breakers was missing. This is a potential shock or fire hazard in the event of an emergency when power needs to be turned off. Recommend correcting the legend so it's accurate, complete and legible. Evaluation by a qualified electrician may be necessary.
76) A "split bus" panel was installed as a main service panel. On such panels there is no single main disconnect switch to turn the power off. Instead, all breakers labeled "main" or "sub-main" (usually those on the upper half of the panel) must be turned off to turn all power off. These panels are common, but are no longer installed. The client should familiarize themselves with the operation of this panel and the procedure for turning all the power off in the event of an emergency. Consult with an electrician if necessary. Please see any other comments in this report related to the panel's legend.


Plumbing / Fuel Systems
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Limitations: The following items are not included in this inspection: private/shared wells and related equipment; private sewage disposal systems; main, side and lateral sewer lines; gray water systems; pressure boosting systems; fire suppression systems; water softeners, conditioners or filtering systems; plumbing components concealed within the foundation or building structure, or in inaccessible areas such as below tubs; underground utilities and systems; overflow drains for tubs and sinks; backflow prevention devices. Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not operate water supply or shut-off valves due to the possibility of valves leaking or breaking when operated. The inspector does not test for lead in the water supply, the water pipes or solder, does not determine if plumbing and fuel lines are adequately sized, and does not determine the existence or condition of underground or above-ground fuel tanks.
Condition of service and main line: Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Water service: Public
Location of main water meter: By street/ sidewalk in front yard
Location of main water shut-off: Crawl space, access point #A, North 15-20 ft
Service pipe material: Copper
Condition of supply lines: Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Supply pipe material: Copper
Drain pipe material: Plastic, Copper
Waste pipe material: Plastic, Copper
Location of plumbing clean-outs: Crawl space, access point #A
Vent pipe material: Plastic, Copper
Sump pump installed: None visible
Sewage ejector pump installed: None visible
Location of main fuel shut-off valve: At gas meter, At building exterior on West side
77) Hose bibs (outside faucets) were missing backflow prevention devices. These devices reduce the likelihood of gray water entering the potable water supply. Recommend installing backflow prevention devices on all hose bibs where missing. They are available at most home improvement stores and are easily installed. For more information, visit:
http://www.reporthost.com/?BKFLOW
78) Copper water supply pipes were installed. Copper pipes installed prior to the late 1980s may be joined with solder that contains lead, which is a known health hazard especially for children. Laws were passed in 1985 prohibiting the use of lead in solder, but prior to that solder normally contained approximately 50% lead. The client should be aware of this, especially if children will be using this water supply system. Note that the inspector does not test for toxic materials such as lead. The client should consider having a qualified lab test for lead, and if necessary take steps to reduce or remove lead from the water supply. Various solutions include:For more information visit:
http://www.reporthost.com/?LEADDW
http://www.reporthost.com/?LEAD
79) Pin holes and/or significant corrosion was visible in some copper water supply pipes or fittings seen in the garage and at the crawl space. This can occur with acidic water, and from flux applied at fittings for soldering when the pipes were installed or repaired. Leaks can occur from pinholes, and corrosion usually indicates past leaks. Recommend consulting with a qualified plumber about the local water supply's pH level, and researching solutions for this if necessary. Also recommend that a qualified plumber evaluate and replace water supply components if necessary.
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Photo 79-1
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Photo 79-2
Past water stains

80) Water supply pipes in the crawl space were not insulated. Recommend insulating pipes per standard building practices to prevent them from freezing during cold weather, and for better energy efficiency with hot water supply pipes.
81) At least one hanger strap for waste pipes was broken. Broken straps may result in a substandard flow or damage to pipes. The broken strap was seen at crawl space access point #A. At this location the waste pipe/cleanout may be further damaged from entering and exiting the crawl space. Recommend that a qualified person make permanent repairs per standard building practices.
82) Hose bibs (outside faucets) weren't anchored securely to the structure's exterior. Water supply pipes can be stressed when hose bibs are turned on and off and when hoses are pulled. Leaks may occur as a result. Recommend that a qualified person install fasteners per standard building practices.
Photo
Photo 82-1
 

83) What appeared to be the main water shut-off valve was located in the crawl space. This is an inconvenient location at best, and may prevent the water from being turned off in a timely manner in the event of a plumbing emergency. Consider having a qualified plumber relocate the shut-off valve to a more convenient location, such as in a closet or a cabinet under a sink.


Water Heater
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Limitations: Evaluation of and determining the adequacy or completeness of the following items are not included in this inspection: Energy Smart or energy saver controls. Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not provide an estimate of remaining life on water heaters, does not determine if water heaters are appropriately sized, or perform any evaluations that require a pilot light to be lit or a shut-off valve to be operated.
Condition of water heater: Appeared serviceable
Type: Tank
Energy source: Natural gas
Estimated age: 9 years (March, 2005)
Capacity (in gallons): 40
Temperature-pressure relief valve installed: Yes
Manufacturer: Bradford White
Model number: MI40T6FBN7
Serial number: BC6011697
Location of water heater: Garage
Hot water temperature tested: Yes
Water temperature (degrees Fahrenheit): 150 F
84) The water heater did not have earthquake straps or struts installed. This is a potential safety hazard in the event of an earthquake due to the risk of the water heater tipping over and gas lines breaking. Leaks can also occur in water-supply pipes. Recommend that a qualified person install earthquake straps or struts as necessary and per standard building practices.
85) Flexible connectors were used for the temperature-pressure relief valve drain line. Flex connectors can be bent or kinked so as to restrict the flow of the drain line and impair the operation of the valve. They typically are not rated for the temperature and pressure of water being discharged (potentially 150 psi and 210 degrees F). Flex connectors used this way pose a potential safety hazard for explosion. Recommend that a qualified plumber repair per standard building practices. For example, by installing a drain line made of rigid copper or CPVC plastic pipe.
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Photo 85-1
 

86) The temperature-pressure relief valve drain line was too short. This is a potential safety hazard due to the risk of scalding if someone is standing next to the water heater when the valve opens. Recommend that a qualified plumber repair per standard building practices. For example, by extending the drain line to within 6 inches of the floor. For more information, visit:
http://www.reporthost.com/?TPRVALVE
87) The water heater vent was not properly attached. Three screws at each connection point is a common rule. With poor connections, leakage of combustion products into the home is a possibility. Recommend that a qualified person repair as necessary.
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Photo 87-1
 

88) The hot water temperature was greater than 120 degrees Fahrenheit. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of scalding. The thermostat should be adjusted so the water temperature doesn't exceed 120 degrees. For more information on scalding dangers, visit:
http://www.reporthost.com/?SCALD
Photo
Photo 88-1
150.9 F
Photo
Photo 88-2
Tank was set at 'HOT'; change dial inbetween HOT and VACATION settings for daily use


Heating, Ventilation and Air Condition (HVAC)
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Limitations: The following items are not included in this inspection: humidifiers, dehumidifiers, electronic air filters; solar, coal or wood-fired heat systems; thermostat or temperature control accuracy and timed functions; heating components concealed within the building structure or in inaccessible areas; underground utilities and systems; safety devices and controls (due to automatic operation). Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not provide an estimate of remaining life on heating or cooling system components, does not determine if heating or cooling systems are appropriately sized, does not test coolant pressure, or perform any evaluations that require a pilot light to be lit, a shut-off valve to be operated, a circuit breaker to be turned "on" or a serviceman's or oil emergency switch to be operated. It is beyond the scope of this inspection to determine if furnace heat exchangers are intact and free of leaks. Condensation pans and drain lines may clog or leak at any time and should be monitored while in operation in the future. Where buildings contain furnishings or stored items, the inspector may not be able to verify that a heat source is present in all "liveable" rooms (e.g. bedrooms, kitchens and living/dining rooms).
General heating system types: Forced air natural gas furnace, Wood-burning stove, Factory-built wood-burning fireplace
General heating distribution type: Ducts and registers
Condition of forced air heating/(cooling) system: Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Forced air heating system fuel type: Natural gas
Estimated age of forced air furnace: 56 years old, 1968
Forced air heating system manufacturer: Airtemp (Chrysler)
Forced air furnace model #: 4311410
Forced air furnace serial number: 0K628886 (?), Data plate substandard, Requires further evaluation by a qualified HVAC professional
Location of forced air furnace: Garage
Forced air system capacity in BTUs: 105,000
Condition of forced air ducts and registers: Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Condition of burners: Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Condition of combustion air supply: Appeared serviceable
Type of combustion air supply: Intake duct
Condition of controls: Appeared serviceable
89) Significant amounts of dirt and/or dust were visible in sections of supply and return air ducts for the heating system. This can be a health hazard, especially for those with allergies or respiratory problems. The Environmental Protection Association (EPA) recommends considering having ducts professionally cleaned when "ducts are clogged with excessive amounts of dust and debris and/or particles are actually released into the home from your supply registers." At a minimum, the visible debris should be thoroughly cleaned. Recommend that a qualified contractor clean the ducts. For more information on duct cleaning in relation to indoor air quality, visit:
http://www.reporthost.com/?DUCTCLEAN
90) The last service date of the gas forced air furnace appeared to be more than 1 year ago, or the inspector was unable to determine the last service date. If this system was serviced more than 1 year ago, recommend that a qualified HVAC contractor inspect, clean, and service this system, and make repairs if necessary. For safety reasons, and because this system is fueled by gas, this servicing should be performed annually in the future. Any needed repairs noted in this report should be brought to the attention of the HVAC contractor when it's serviced. For more information visit:
http://www.reporthost.com/?ANFURINSP
91) The furnace burner flame was not blue in color. Various conditions can cause incorrect flames including incorrect drafting, dirty burner orifices and improper gas pressure. Recommend that a qualified heating contractor evaluate and repair as necessary.
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Photo 91-1
 

92) Because of the age and/or condition of the forced air furnace, recommend that a qualified HVAC contractor inspect the heat exchanger and perform a carbon monoxide test when it's serviced. Note that these tests are beyond the scope of a standard home inspection.
93) Heating air supply registers at South end of living room had a weak air flow. This may result in an inadequate air supply. Adjustable dampers in ducts may exist and may be reducing the flow. If dampers exist, then they should be opened to attempt to improve the air flow. If the property owner is unaware of such dampers, or if adjusting dampers does not improve the air flow, then recommend that a qualified HVAC contractor evaluate and repair or make modifications as necessary.
94) Heating ducts in an unconditioned space (e.g. crawl space) had damaged insulation. This can result in reduced energy efficiency, moisture inside heating ducts, and/or "sweating" on cooling ducts. Recommend that a qualified person repair per standard building practices. For example, by wrapping ducts in insulation with an R-value of R-8.
95) Hangers supporting metal heating ducts were substandard and missing in areas. This can result in loose or disconnected ducts, reduced energy efficiency, or increased moisture in unconditioned spaces. Normally, metal ducts require support every 3-6 feet. Recommend that a qualified person make permanent repairs per standard building practices.
96) The serviceman's switch that controls power to the furnace was not clearly labeled. Recommend permanently labeling this switch to avoid confusion and unintentional loss of power if the switch is mistaken for a light switch.
97) The estimated useful life for most forced air furnaces is 15-20 years. This furnace appeared to be beyond this age and/or its useful lifespan and may need replacing or significant repairs at any time. Recommend budgeting for a replacement in the near future.


Fireplaces, Stoves, Chimneys and Flues
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Limitations: The following items are not included in this inspection: chimney flues (except where visible). Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not determine the adequacy of drafting or sizing in fireplace and stove flues, and also does not determine if prefabricated or zero-clearance fireplaces are installed in accordance with the manufacturer's specifications. The inspector does not perform any evaluations that require a pilot light to be lit, and does not light fires. The inspector provides a basic visual examination of a chimney and any associated wood burning device. The National Fire Protection Association has stated that an in-depth Level 2 chimney inspection should be part of every sale or transfer of property with a wood-burning device. Such an inspection may reveal defects that are not apparent to the home inspector who is a generalist.
Condition of wood-burning fireplace, stove: Appeared serviceable
Wood-burning stove type: Freestanding
Condition of chimneys and flues: Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Wood-burning chimney type: Metal
Wood-burning fireplace type: Metal pre-fab
Blower installed in wood-burning fireplace: Yes
98) The metal chimney at South end extended higher than 5 feet above the roof surface, and supports for the flue were missing. This is a potential safety hazard due to the risk of the flue pipe moving and possibly being damaged or becoming loose. Surrounding flashing, roof sheathing and/or roof surface materials may also be overstressed during chimney movement. Recommend that a qualified person install bracing per standard building practices.
99) The wood stove's metal parts were significantly corroded. Over-firing may have occurred and efficiency may be reduced. Recommend that a qualified contractor evaluate and repair if necessary and if possible.
Photo
Photo 99-1
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Photo 99-2

100) Water stains on stovepipe vent were seen from interior. Indicates improper installation of exhaust vent through roof. Recommend further evaluation by monitoring vent during or after heavy rainfall. Repairs may be required by a qualified contractor.
Also, decorative ceiling collar was loose/not properly attached. Repair as needed.
Photo
Photo 100-1
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Photo 100-2


Kitchen
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Limitations: The following items are not included in this inspection: household appliances such as stoves, dishwashers, refrigerators, freezers, ice makers, hot water dispensers and water filters; appliance timers, clocks, cook functions, self and/or continuous cleaning operations, thermostat or temperature control accuracy, and lights. Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not provide an estimate of the remaining life of appliances, and does not determine the adequacy of operation of appliances. The inspector does not note appliance manufacturers, models or serial numbers and does not determine if appliances are subject to recalls. Areas and components behind and obscured by appliances are inaccessible and excluded from this inspection.
Permanently installed kitchen appliances present during inspection: Stove, Dishwasher, Refrigerator, Under-sink food disposal
Condition of counters: Appeared serviceable
Condition of cabinets: Appeared serviceable, 3 doors would not close flush with others
Condition of sinks and related plumbing: Appeared serviceable
Condition of under-sink food disposal: Appeared serviceable
Condition of dishwasher: Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Condition of range, cooktop or oven: Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Range, cooktop or oven type: Electric
Type of ventilation: Hood over range, ducted to exterior
Condition of refrigerator: Appeared serviceable
101) The stove could tip forward. An anti-tip bracket may not be installed. This is a potential safety hazard since the stove can tip forward when weight is applied to the open door, such as when a small child climbs on it or if heavy objects are dropped on it. Anti-tip brackets have been sold with all free-standing stoves since 1985. Recommend installing an anti-tip bracket to eliminate this safety hazard. For more information, visit:
http://www.reporthost.com/?ATB
102) The exhaust fan above stove was noisy and weak/slow. Recommend that a qualified person repair or replace as necessary.
103) The light in the exhaust hood was inoperable. Recommend replacing light bulb(s) or that repairs be made by a qualified person if necessary.
104) The countertops, areas below sink, dishwasher interior, range surface were obscured by stored items or dishes and couldn't be fully evaluated.
105) The estimated useful life for most kitchen appliances is 10-15 years. Appliances (dishwasher, refrigerator, stove) appeared to be near, at or beyond their service life. Even if operable, recommend budgeting for replacements in the near future.


Bathrooms, Laundry and Sinks
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Limitations: The following items are not included in this inspection: overflow drains for tubs and sinks; clothes washers, clothes dryers. Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not determine the adequacy of washing machine drain lines, washing machine catch pan drain lines, or clothes dryer exhaust ducts. The inspector does not operate water supply or shut-off valves for sinks, toilets, clothes washers, etc. due to the possibility of valves leaking or breaking when operated. The inspector does not determine if shower pans or tub and shower enclosures are water tight, or determine the completeness or operability of any gas piping to laundry appliances.
Location #A: Full bath, north east
Location #B: 3/4 bath, Master bath, south east
Location #C: Half bath, west
Condition of counters: Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Condition of cabinets: Appeared serviceable
Condition of flooring: Appeared serviceable
Condition of toilets: Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Condition of ventilation systems: Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Bathroom and laundry ventilation type: Windows, Spot exhaust fans
240 volt receptacle for laundry equipment present: Yes
106) The clothes dryer was equipped with a vinyl or mylar, accordion-type, flexible exhaust duct. The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission considers these types of ducts to be unsafe, and a fire hazard. They can trap lint and are susceptible to kinks or crushing, which can greatly reduce the air flow and cause overheating. Recommend that such ducts be replaced with a rigid or corrugated semi-rigid metal duct, and by a qualified contractor if necessary. For more information, visit:
http://www.reporthost.com/?DRYER
107) Conducive conditions The bathroom with a shower at location #B didn't have an exhaust fan installed. Moisture can accumulate and result in mold, bacteria or fungal growth. Even though the bathroom has a window that opens, it may not provide adequate ventilation, especially during cold weather when windows are closed or when wind blows air into the bathroom. Recommend that a qualified contractor install exhaust fans per standard building practices.
The exhaust fan at locations #A and C was weak or slow. Moisture may accumulate and result in mold, bacteria or fungal growth. Also, there was no termination vents to the exterior indicating the warm, moist area from the bathrooms, particularly location #A with the shower, is exhausted into the attic space. Recommend that a qualified person clean, repair or replace fans as necessary and further evaluate and repair exhaust termination points per standard building practices.
108) The hot and cold water supplies appeared to be reversed at the shower at location #B. Normally, cold water is controlled by turning the handle to the right and left for hot water. At a minimum this is an inconvenience, but it can also result in accidental scalding. Recommend that a qualified plumber repair as necessary.
109) The water valve handle for the clothes washer was missing. In case of malfunction or leak at clothes washer, water may need to be turned off manually and in a timely manner to limit damage by excessive water. Recommend repair or replacement of valve by a qualified person.
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Photo 109-1
 

110) Conducive conditions Substandard caulking was found between the shower enclosure and the walls at location #A. Water can penetrate these areas and cause damage. Recommend that a qualified person re-caulk or install caulking as necessary.
111) The sink at location #A drained slowly. Recommend clearing drain and/or having a qualified plumber repair if necessary.
112) The sink drain stopper mechanism at location #A was inoperable. Recommend that a qualified person repair or replace as necessary.
113) Caulk around the base of the toilet at locations #A, B, and C was missing. Modern standards require caulk to be installed around the entire toilet base where it meets the floor for sanitary reasons. Without it, soiled water can soak into flooring and sub-floor materials if the toilet overflows. Condensation from the toilet can also soak into the flooring. Recommend that a qualified person caulk around toilet bases per standard building practices.
114) The bathtub at location #A drained slowly. Recommend clearing drain and/or that a qualified plumber repair if necessary.
115) The countertops and areas below sinks at locations #A, B, and C were obscured by stored items and couldn't be fully evaluated.


Interior, Doors and Windows
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Limitations: The following items are not included in this inspection: security, intercom and sound systems; communications wiring; central vacuum systems; cosmetic deficiencies such as nail-pops, scuff marks, dents, dings, blemishes or issues due to normal wear and tear in wall, floor and ceiling surfaces and coverings, or in equipment; deficiencies relating to interior decorating; low voltage and gas lighting systems. Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not evaluate any areas or items which require moving stored items, furnishings, debris, equipment, floor coverings, insulation or similar materials. The inspector does not test for asbestos, lead, radon, mold, hazardous waste, urea formaldehyde urethane, or any other toxic substance. Some items such as window, drawer, cabinet door or closet door operability are tested on a sampled basis. The client should be aware that paint may obscure wall and ceiling defects, floor coverings may obscure floor defects, and furnishings may obscure wall, floor and floor covering defects. If furnishings were present during the inspection, recommend a full evaluation of walls, floors and ceilings that were previously obscured when possible. Determining the cause and/or source of odors is not within the scope of this inspection.
Condition of exterior entry doors: Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Exterior door material: Wood; Metal, Sliding glass
Condition of interior doors: Appeared serviceable
Condition of windows and skylights: Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Types of windows: Metal, Single-hung, Fixed
Condition of walls and ceilings: Required repairs, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Wall type or covering: Drywall
Ceiling type or covering: Drywall, Acoustic spray
Condition of flooring: Appeared serviceable
Flooring type or covering: Carpet, Vinyl, linoleum or marmoleum
116) Some ceilings in this structure had ceiling texture possibly installed prior to the mid-1980s. This material may contain asbestos, which is a known health hazard. Laws were passed in the United States in 1978 prohibiting use of asbestos in residential structures, but stocks of existing materials were used for some time thereafter. The client may wish to have this ceiling material tested by a qualified lab to determine if it does contain asbestos.

In most cases, when the material is intact and in good condition, keeping it encapsulated with paint and not disturbing it may reduce or effectively eliminate the health hazard. If the client wishes to remove the material, or plans to disturb it through remodeling, they should have it tested by a qualified lab and/or consult with a qualified industrial hygienist or asbestos abatement specialist. For more information, visit:
http://www.reporthost.com/?AITH
117) The front entrance exterior door was difficult to open or close, sticking at bottom threshold. Recommend that a qualified person repair as necessary.
118) Weatherstripping around front entrance exterior door was deteriorated or substandard. Water may enter the building, or energy efficiency may be reduced. Recommend that a qualified person repair or replace weatherstripping as necessary.
119) Floor guide was missing at one sliding closet door in the North-East bedroom.
120) Mildew was found around many windows. This is typically caused by high levels of indoor moisture coming in contact with cold, exterior surfaces, and can be controlled by heating and ventilation. Recommend the following:
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Photo 120-1
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Photo 120-2

121) No window screens were installed. Windows may not provide ventilation during months when insects are active.


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