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Mother Lode Home Inspector

Website: http://www.motherlodehomeinspector.com
Email: roysauls@motherlodehomeinspector.com
Phone: (209) 613-4737
FAX: (209) 586-9998
P.O. Box 206 
Twain Harte, CA 95383
Inspector: Roy Sauls

Sample Home Inspection Report
Client(s): Home Buyer
Property address: 12345 Main St.
Any Town, CA 00000
Inspection date: 1-1-2009
This report published on 5/5/2009 3:40:41 PM PDT

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This report is the exclusive property of MOTHER LODE HOME INSPECTOR and the client(s) listed in the report title. Use of this report by any unauthorized persons is prohibited.
IMPORTANT NOTICE TO THIRD PARTIES OR OTHER PURCHASERS OF THIS PROPERTY
RECEIPT OF THIS REPORT BY ANY PURCHASERS OF THIS PROPERTY (OTHER THAN THE ABOVE LISTED CLIENT(S), IS NOT AUTHORIZED BY MOTHER LODE HOME INSPECTOR. MOTHER LODE HOME INSPECTOR ADVISES AGAINST ANY RELIANCE ON THIS REPORT BY ANYONE OTHER THAN THE NAMED CLIENT. MOTHER LODE HOME INSPECTOR RECOMMENDS THAT ALL OTHERS RETAIN A QUALIFIED PROFESSIONAL INSPECTOR TO PROVIDE THEM WITH THEIR OWN INSPECTION REPORT ON THIS PROPERTY.
The purpose of this report is to give the named parties a detailed description of the condition of the named property as of the date of the inspection. The scope of this inspection is limited to visual accessibility. Those areas not visually accessible; e.g., under soil, carpets, furniture or fixtures, behind locked doors, wall interiors, or any other obstructions are not included in this inspection. This inspection does not include any dismantling of equipment systems. No maintenance services, removal of cowlings or destructive discovery have been performed. Soil conditions, trees and shrubbery, security alarms, solar heating systems, septic systems or wells, spas and pools are specifically EXCLUDED from the scope of this inspection.
The scope of this inspection report is limited to the items mentioned in the report. It is understood that this is not a code compliance inspection.
Conditions that may exist relating to any legal and/or public records are outside the scope of this inspection. This inspection does NOT include any research of public records such as zoning restrictions, seismic hazard zones, flood zones, ordinances or permit history of the property or any other conditions which are a matter of public record. This inspection shall not extend to chemical analysis or visual recognition of any condition relating to environmental hazards of any nature or the presence of hazardous materials of any nature.
If during the course of the inspection we operate or test an item that malfunctions during the inspection, we do not assume responsibility for its repair or replacement.
A working smoke detector is now required by Tuolumne County to be in each bedroom of a new construction home and in older homes, on each level and outside each bedroom.
* Approved, standardized testing for a smoke or CO detector has not been established. We only test using the manufacturers test function button, which specifically confirms only the siren/home operation. This does not guarantee the detector will actually operate under smoky or heated conditions.
If the main gas line or gas furnaces or gas appliances are shut off at the time of the inspection, we will not relight the pilot light. We recommend that the local propane company be contacted to relight pilots and perform equipment safety inspections. Upon taking possession of the property, it is recommended that the local propane company be called for safety checks of all gas hook-ups.
Two seismic straps are now required on all water heaters. Water temperatures over 125 degrees are not recommended for small children, elderly or disabled persons.
The heating and air conditioning system tests are conducted to test the thermostat, the heat and/or cold airflow to the visible ducts/registers and to verify that the duct lines are connected. The inner workings of the units are not tested. Tests are not made to determine if the size and/or age of the heating/air conditioning unit(s) are adequate for the square footage of the home. If any testing is desired other than these basic tests, it is recommended that a heating/air conditioning contractor be consulted.
The comment in the inspection report "What areas could be observed" normally refers to rooms or areas where household furnishings or storage is located. In these instances, we may not have been able to reach every wall electrical outlet, etc. We do not move large furniture or personal belongings to access any area hidden from view.
If concrete patio areas have been converted to enclosed rooms, we do not determine if there is proper footing under the patio perimeter.
Due to possible creosote buildup and/or other visual restrictions, it is not always possible to visually inspect the chimney flue liners/pipes for possible cracks. We recommend that most chimneys be cleaned and then inspected by a qualified trade's person. Spark arrestor caps or screens are recommended on all chimneys unless they have adequate built-in covering.All homes built on a hilltop, into the side of a hill or below a hill can be at risk if earth movement occurs. Our inspection of the structure and subsequent report does not address the stability of the ground under or around the house in all cases stated above. We recommend that a qualified soils engineer be consulted for professional study and/or opinions.
Some roofs will not be accessed due to either the roofs pitch, type of covering, or weather conditions. Our roof inspection is not a certified inspection. If we do not access the roof, if any problems are detected or if a roofing certification is desired, we recommend that a roofing contractor be consulted.
The client should be aware that this inspection reflects the condition of the house at the time of the inspection only. Due to the length of many escrow closings, when the client takes physical possession of the property, certain things may no longer function as they did at the time of the inspection.

 
How to Read this Report
This report is organized by the property's functional areas.  Within each functional area, descriptive information is listed first and is shown in bold type.  Items of concern follow descriptive information. Concerns are shown and sorted according to these types:
SafetyPoses a risk of injury or death 
Major DefectCorrection likely involves hiring a specialist and/or contractor 
Repair/ReplaceRecommend repairing or replacing 
Repair/MaintainRecommend repair and/or maintenance 
Minor DefectCorrection likely involves only a minor expense 
MaintainRecommend ongoing maintenance 
EvaluateRecommend evaluation by a specialist 
MonitorRecommend monitoring in the future 
CommentFor your information 

Structural Pest Inspection Concerns
Items of concern relating to the structural pest inspection are shown as follows:
WDO/WDI InfestationEvidence of infestation of wood destroying insects or organisms (Live or dead insect bodies, fungal growth, etc.) 
WDO/WDI DamageDamage caused by wood destroying insects or organisms (Rot, carpenter ant galleries, etc.) 
WDO/WDI Conducive
conditions
Conditions conducive for wood destroying insects or organisms (Wood-soil contact, shrubs in contact with siding, roof or plumbing leaks, etc.) 

Click here for a glossary of building construction terms.  Contact your inspector if there are terms that you do not understand, or visit the glossary of construction terms at http://www.reporthost.com/glossary.asp

Table of Contents
General Information
Grounds
Exterior / Foundation
Roof / Attic
Electric
Plumbing / Fuel Systems
Water Heater
Heating
Fireplaces / Stoves / Chimneys
Kitchen
Bathrooms / Laundry / Sinks
Interior Rooms / Areas

 
General Information Return to table of contents
Report number: 12345 Main
Inspector: Roy Sauls
Time started: 9:00 AM
Time finished: 12:00 PM
Inspector: Roy Sauls
Present during inspection: Client
Client present for discussion at end of inspection: Yes
Weather conditions: Clear
Temperature: Cool 54 degrees
Ground condition: Dry
Inspection fee: per fee schedule.
Payment method: Check at time of inspection.
Type of building: Single family
Age of building(s): 60 years
Source for building age: Seller
Front of building faces: South
Main entrance faces: South
Occupied: No
Property owner's name: Home Seller
1)   Structures built prior to 1980 may contain lead-based paint and/or asbestos in various building materials such as insulation, siding, and/or floor and ceiling tiles. Both lead and asbestos are known health hazards. Evaluating for the presence of lead and/or asbestos is not included in this inspection. The client should consult with specialists as necessary, such as industrial hygienists, professional labs and/or abatement contractors for this type of evaluation. For information on lead, asbestos and other hazardous materials in homes, visit:
http://www.epa.gov
http://www.cpsc.gov
http://www.cdc.gov

2)   Evidence of rodent infestation was found in the form of traps in one or more areas. For example, in the interior rooms. Recommend consulting with the property owner about this. A qualified person should make repairs to seal openings in the structure, set traps, and clean rodent waste as necessary. Recommend following guidelines in these Center for Disease Control articles:
http://www.cdc.gov/rodents/prevent_rodents/seal_up.htm
http://www.cdc.gov/rodents/prevent_rodents/trap_up.htm
http://www.cdc.gov/rodents/prevent_rodents/clean_up.htm A hole in the south wall of the lower area laundry room, appeared to have been chewed by a small animal.

Photo 20  
Hole in sidding leading to laundryroom.
 

3)   Based on substandard construction observed, modifications to this property may have been made without the owner having attained permits or inspections from the municipality. Work may have been performed by someone other than a qualified contractor or person. The client should consult with the property owner about this, and if necessary research permits.

At worst case, if substantial work was performed without permits, this knowledge must be disclosed when the building is sold in the future. This can adversely affect future sales. Also, the local municipality could require costly alterations to bring the building into legal compliance or even require that the additions or modifications be removed. Basement area has been converted to living space at some time in the past.

 
Grounds Return to table of contents
Limitations: The following items are not included in this inspection: swimming pools, spas, hot tubs, water features and related equipment; playground, recreation or leisure equipment; landscape lighting; areas below exterior structures with less than three feet of vertical clearance; irrigation systems; invisible fencing; sea walls, docks and boathouses. Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not test or determine the adequacy of drainage systems for grounds, walkways, below-grade stairs and roof downspouts. The inspector does not provide an evaluation of geological conditions and/or site stability, compliance of pool or spa fencing with municipal requirements, or determination that deck, balcony and/or stair membranes are watertight.
The following items are excluded from this inspection: Shed
Condition of fences and gates: No fences on property.
Condition of retaining walls: Required repairs, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Retaining wall material: Concrete, Rock Some retaining walls had broken bricks laid on top of concrete blocks.
Site profile: Moderate slope
Condition of driveway: Appeared serviceable
Driveway material: Asphalt
Condition of sidewalks and/or patios: Required repairs, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Sidewalk material: Poured in place concrete
Condition of decks, porches and/or balconies: Required repairs, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Condition of guardrails: Required repairs, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Deck, porch and/or balcony material: Wood, Concrete
4)   One or more large trees on the property may be likely to fall on the building, and are a potential safety hazard. Recommend consulting with a qualified arborist to determine if tree(s) need to be removed and/or pruned. See photos.

Photo 1  
Poor drainage off concrete patio. Water drains under deck and tree is leaning over house.

Photo 5  
Treeis trimed on one side causing tree to lean over house.

5)   One or more trip hazards were found in sidewalk and/or patio sections due to cracks, settlement, heaving and/or deterioration. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair or replace sections as necessary to eliminate trip hazards. See photos.

Photo 2  
Poor Drainage off concrete patio. Water drains next to house.

Photo 6  
Missing board on concrete step, trip hazard.

6)   One or more decks, porches and/or balconies were unstable due to missing or substandard bracing, or lack of attachment to main structure. This is a safety hazard since severe movement may cause the decks, porches or balconies to collapse. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary. See photos.

Photo 16  
Improperly repaired deck joists.

Photo 17  
Improperly repaired deck joists.

Photo 28  
Warped deck support.
 

7)   One or more guardrails were wobbly. This is a safety hazard. Standard building practices require that they:

  • Be installed where walking surfaces are more than 30 inches above the surrounding grade
  • Be securely and permanently attached
  • Be at least 36 inches in height
  • Not be climbable by children
  • Not have gaps or voids that allow passage of a sphere equal to or greater than four inches in diameter

    A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair, replace or install guardrails as necessary, and as per standard building practices. See photos.
    8)   Flashing was missing from above one or more deck ledger boards. See photos. This can cause moisture to accumulate between the ledger board(s) and the building. Rot may result in this area and cause the ledger board fasteners to fail. The deck may separate from the building in this event and poses a significant safety hazard. A qualified contractor should install flashing above ledger board(s) where necessary. For more information on installing deck ledger boards visit:
    http://www.google.com/search?q=installing+a+ledger+board

    And for more information on building safe decks in general, visit: http://www.google.com/search?q=building+a+safe+deck

    Photo 11  
    No flashing around parts of deck.

    Photo 12  
    Improperly installed flashing around parts of deck.

    Photo 13  
    Improperly installed flashing around parts of deck.
     

    9)   Guardrails in one or more areas were damaged, loose. This is a safety hazard. A qualified person should repair or replace as necessary, and as per standard building practices. See Photos.

    Photo 7  
    Unattached balluster on deck railing.
     

    10)   Cracks, deterioration, leaning and/or bowing were found in one or more retaining walls. A qualified person should evaluate and repair or replace sections as necessary. See photos.

    Photo 3  
    Retaining wall is leaning.
     

    11)   Evidence of poor drainage was found in one or more sections of the Patio in the form of dead vegetation, Water Stains. No drains were visible in these areas. A qualified person should evaluate and make repairs as necessary to prevent water from accumulating in the future. For example, installing drains and drain lines. See photos

    Photo 1  
    Poor drainage off concrete patio. Water drains under deck and tree is leaning over house.

    Photo 2  
    Poor Drainage off concrete patio. Water drains next to house.

    Photo 4  
    Concrete steps are sloped, causing possible slipping.
     

    12)   One or more decks, porches and/or balconies were damaged, deteriorated, substandard, with loose fasteners or decking boards. A qualified person should evaluate and repair or replace as necessary. See photos.

    Photo 9  
    Loose and damaged boards on deck.

    Photo 10  
    Loose and damaged boards on deck.

    13)   Rot or water damage was found at one or more decks, porches or balconies in decking boards. A qualified person should evaluate and repair as necessary. All rotten wood should be replaced. See photos.
    14)   Fasteners for hardware at decks, porches or balconies were missing, substandard. For example, at support post brackets. All nail holes for this type of hardware should be filled with appropriate fasteners such as joist hanger (tico) nails, common nails or screws rated for structural applications. Fasteners should be rated for outdoor exposure. A qualified person should evaluate and repair as necessary. See photos.

    Photo 8  
    Loose and unattached post support hardware,
     

    15)   Soil was in contact with or too close to wooden beams, joists, support posts. This is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects and organisms. Standard building practices require the following clearances to soil below:

  • 12 inches between beams and the soil below
  • 18 inches between joists and the soil below
  • 6 inches between support post bases and the soil below
  • Not in contact with any wood

    Soil should be graded and/or removed to maintain these clearances. If this is not practical, then installing borate based Impel rods may help to prevent infestation and damage. For more information, visit:
    http://www.google.com/search?q=impel+rods See Photos.

    Photo 14  
    Deck joists sitting in dirt.

    Photo 23  
    Untreated wood sitting in dirt.

    16)   The perimeter grading sloped towards the building in one or more areas. This can result in water accumulating around the building foundation. Recommend grading soil so it slopes down and away from the structure with a slope of at least 5% (10% or better is optimal) for at least 6 feet. See photos.

    Photo 2  
    Poor Drainage off concrete patio. Water drains next to house.

    Photo 4  
    Concrete steps are sloped, causing possible slipping.

    17)   One or more large trees were very close to the foundation. Tree roots can cause significant structural damage to foundations. Recommend having a qualified tree service contractor or arborist remove trees as necessary to prevent damage to the building's foundation. See photos.

    Photo 1  
    Poor drainage off concrete patio. Water drains under deck and tree is leaning over house.
     

    18)   Trees were in contact with or were close to the building in one or more areas. Damage may result, especially during high winds. Vegetation can also act as a conduit for wood destroying insects. Vegetation should be pruned back and/or removed as necessary to prevent damage and infestation by wood destroying insects. See photos.
    19)   Wooden deck, porch and/or balcony surfaces, railings should be cleaned and sealed by a qualified person.
    20)   One or more significantly sized diseased or dead trees were found on the property grounds. The client may wish to have them removed, or to have them evaluated by a qualified arborist.
    21)   Minor cracks, settlement, heaving and/or deterioration were found in one or more sidewalk or patio sections. However they don't appear to be a structural concern and no trip hazards were found. No immediate action is recommended, but the client may wish to have repairs made or have cracked sections replaced for aesthetic reasons.
     
    Exterior / Foundation Return to table of contents
    Limitations: The following items are not included in this inspection: below-grade foundation walls and footings, or those obscured by vegetation or building components; exterior building surfaces or components obscured by vegetation, stored items or debris. Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Some amount of cracking is normal in concrete slabs and foundation walls due to shrinkage and drying. Note that the inspector does not determination the adequacy of sump pumps, seismic reinforcement, nor determine if support posts, columns, beams, joists, studs, trusses, etc. are of adequate size, spanning or spacing.
    Condition of wall covering: Required repairs, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
    Apparent wall structure: Wood frame
    Wall covering: Wood, Wood fiber
    Condition of foundation and footings: Required repairs, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
    Foundation type: Finished basement, Post and pier
    Foundation material: Poured in place concrete, Post and pier
    Footing material: Poured in place concrete
    Anchor bolts for seismic reinforcement: Installed
    Anchor bolts for seismic reinforcement were observed at: Slab perimeter
    Shear panels for seismic reinforcement: Not determined
    Tie downs for seismic reinforcement installed: No
    Condition of floor substructure: Appeared serviceable
    Pier or support post material: Wood
    Beam material: Solid wood
    Floor structure: Solid wood joists
    Condition of crawl space: Appeared serviceable
    Crawl space inspection method: Partially traversed
    Insulation material underneath floor above: None visible
    Ventilation: None visible
    Condition of the basement: Appeared serviceable
    22)   No insulation was installed under the floor in the crawl space. A qualified contractor should install insulation for better energy efficiency and as per standard building practices with an R rating recommended for this area. See photos. For more information, visit:
    http://www.eere.energy.gov/consumer/tips/insulation.html

    23)   Untreated wood siding and/or trim was in contact with concrete or masonry in one or more wet areas. This is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects. A qualified person should evaluate and repair as necessary. See photos.

    Photo 18  
    Sidding sitting in dirt.

    Photo 23  
    Untreated wood sitting in dirt.

    Photo 24  
    Possible water damage to sidding.
     

    24)   Some sections of siding and/or trim were deteriorated. A qualified person should evaluate and repair, replace or install siding or trim as necessary.See photos.

    Photo 19  
    Cracks in siding.
     

    25)   Flashing in one or more areas was missing, substandard. Leaks may occur as a result. A qualified person should evaluate and repair, replace or install as necessary, and as per standard building practices. See photos.

    Photo 11  
    No flashing around parts of deck.

    Photo 12  
    Improperly installed flashing around parts of deck.

    Photo 13  
    Improperly installed flashing around parts of deck.
     

    26)   One or more exhaust duct end caps were deteriorated. Their purpose is to prevent unconditioned air from entering the building, and keep out birds, rodents and bugs. Blocked ducts can cause fan motors and/or clothes dryers to overheat and may pose a fire hazard. A qualified person should evaluate and repair as necessary.
    27)   Seismic reinforcements such as anchor bolts, hold-downs and/or metal straps were missing in one or more locations. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair, replace or install as necessary, and as per standard building practices.
    28)   The vapor barrier in the crawl space was missing in areas. This is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects and organisms due to the likelihood of water evaporating into the structure from the soil. A qualified person should evaluate and replace or repair sections as necessary. Standard building practices require the following:

  • The soil below the vapor barrier should be smooth and free from sharp objects.
  • Seams should overlap a minimum of 12 inches.
  • The vapor barrier should lap up onto the foundation side walls.

    Better building practices require that:

  • Seams and protrusions should be sealed with a pressure sensitive tape.
  • The vapor barrier should be caulked and attached tightly to the foundation side walls. For example, with furring strips and masonry nails.
    29)   Gaps existed at one or more openings around the exterior, such as those where outside faucets, refrigerant lines, and/or gas supply pipes penetrate the exterior. Gaps should be sealed as necessary to prevent moisture intrusion and entry by vermin.
    30)   Soil was in contact with or too close to wooden support posts. This is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects and organisms. See photos. Standard building practices require the following clearances to soil below:

  • 12 inches between beams and the soil below
  • 18 inches between joists and the soil below
  • 6 inches between support post bases and the soil below
  • Not in contact with any wood

    Soil should be graded and/or removed to maintain these clearances. If this is not practical, then installing borate based Impel rods may help to prevent infestation and damage. For more information, visit:
    http://www.google.com/search?q=impel+rods See photos.

    Photo 15  
    Deck supports with dirt around wood.
     

    31)   No vapor barrier was installed in the crawl space. This is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects and organisms due to the likelihood of water evaporating into the building from the soil. A qualified person should install a vapor barrier as per standard building practices.
    32)   Soil was in contact with or less than six inches from siding and/or trim. This is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects and organisms. Soil should be graded and/or removed as necessary so there are at least six inches of space between the siding and trim and the soil below. See photos.

    Photo 18  
    Sidding sitting in dirt.

    Photo 19  
    Cracks in siding.

    Photo 23  
    Untreated wood sitting in dirt.

    Photo 24  
    Possible water damage to sidding.

    33)   This property was clad with composition wood fiber siding. Many brands of this type of siding by different manufacturers are known to deteriorate and/or fail prematurely due to moisture penetration. Failure is typically visible in the form of swelling, cracking and delamination, especially at the bottom edges. Class action lawsuits have been filed or are being filed against most manufacturers of this material.

    Some areas of siding on this structure show the symptoms described above, but it appears that the siding hasn't deteriorated to the point of needing replacement. Some manufacturers (Louisiana Pacific) recommend a repair process for this siding where affected areas are sealed with "Permanizer Plus", a flexible primer made by Pittsburgh Paint, followed by two coats of 100% acrylic latex paint. This sealant must be applied to the bottom edges using a brush. The face of the siding can be sprayed. The "Permanizer Plus" sealer isn't required for edges that aren't swollen, cracked or deteriorated, but the acrylic latex should still be brushed on these edges.

    At a minimum, recommend having a qualified contractor seal and repaint as described above, or by other methods specified by the siding's manufacturer. The client may wish to have a qualified contractor evaluate further to determine if some or all of the siding should be replaced.

    For more information, visit:
    http://www.google.com/search?q=permanizer+plus
    http://www.siding4u.com/failing_siding_help.htm

    34)   Caulk was missing, deteriorated in some areas. For example, around windows, around doors, at siding-trim junctions. A qualified person should repair or replace as necessary. For more information, visit:
    http://www.reporthost.com/_docs/FPL_Caulking_Ins_Outs.pdf

    35)   One or more minor cracks (1/8 inch or less) were found in the foundation. These don't appear to be a structural concern, but recommend sealing them to prevent water infiltration and monitoring them in the future. Numerous products exist to seal such cracks including hydraulic cement, resilient caulks and epoxy sealants. See photos.

    Photo 26  
    Loose and lint filled dryer vent.
     

    36)   The exterior finish in some areas was failing. A qualified contractor should prep (pressure wash, scrape, sand, prime caulk, etc.) and repaint or restain areas as needed and as per standard building practices.
    37)   All concrete slab floor sections were obscured by carpeting and couldn't be fully evaluated.
    38)   Many crawl space sections were not evaluated due to lack of access from the following conditions: height under 18 inches, ducts or pipes blocking.
     
    Roof / Attic Return to table of contents
    Limitations: The following items or areas are not included in this inspection: areas that could not be traversed or viewed clearly due to lack of access; areas and components obscured by insulation; solar roofing components; any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not determination if rafters, trusses, joists, beams, etc. are of adequate size, spanning or spacing. The inspector does not provide an estimate of remaining roof surface life, does not determine that the roof has absolutely no leaks at the time of the inspection, and does not determine that the roof won't leak in the future. Only active leaks and evidence of past leaks observed during the inspection are reported on as part of this inspection. To absolutely determine than no leaks exist, complete access to all roof structure areas must be available during a wide variety of weather conditions, including prolonged heavy rain, high wind from varying directions, heavy accumulations of snow and/or ice, and melting snow and ice.
    Condition of roof structure: Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
    Roof type: Gable
    Age of roof surface(s): Unknown
    Source for building age: Home seller
    Roof inspection method: Viewed from eaves on ladder
    Condition of shingle and/or shake roof surface materials: Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below), Near, at or beyond service life
    Roof surface material: Asphalt or fiberglass composition shingles
    Apparent number of layers of roof surface material: One
    Condition of gutters, downspouts and extensions: Appeared serviceable
    Gutter and downspout material: Metal
    Gutter and downspout installation: Partial
    Condition of attic: Required repair and/or evaluation (see comments below)
    Attic inspection method: Viewed from hatch(es)
    Roof structure type: Rafters
    Ceiling structure: Ceiling beams
    Ceiling insulation material: Fiberglass roll or batt
    Ceiling insulation depth: 3.5 inches
    Vapor retarder: None visible
    Roof ventilation: Substandard
    39)   One or more downspouts or downspout extensions drained onto walkways. This may result in ice or moss forming on walkways, and may pose a fall hazard. A qualified person should evaluate and install or modify extensions as necessary so rainwater isn't directed onto walkways.
    40)   Most sections of the composition shingle roof surface appeared to be near the end of their service life and will likely need replacing in the near future, even with repairs. The client should budget for a replacement roof surface, and may want to have a qualified roofing contractor evaluate and attempt to issue a "5 year roof certificate".
    41)   The roof structure needed repair in one or more areas due to the following conditions: damage, over spanning and sagging, missing or substandard bracing, substandard construction. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary, and as per standard building practices. See photos.

    Photo 45  
    Rafters separated from ridge board.
     

    42)   Roof repairs were needed because most composition shingles had the following conditions: lifting, curling, cupping. Leaks may occur as a result. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary.
    43)   Roof flashings was missing. Leaks may occur as a result. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary.
    44)   Flashings at the base of one or more chimneys were substandard. Leaks may occur as a result. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary.
    45)   Some downspouts were substandard. Water may accumulate around the building foundation as a result. A qualified person should evaluate and repair as necessary.See photos.

    Photo 1  
    Poor drainage off concrete patio. Water drains under deck and tree is leaning over house.
     

    46)   Extensions such as splash blocks or drain pipes for some downspouts were missing, substandard. Water may accumulate around the building foundation as a result. A qualified person should evaluate and repair, replace or install as necessary
    47)   Ventilation was substandard in the attic. This may result in high attic and roof surface temperatures, reduce the life of the roof covering materials and increase cooling costs. High levels of moisture are also likely, and can be a conducive condition for wood destroying insects and organisms. Standard building practices require one square foot of vent area for 150 to 200 square feet of attic space. Vents should be evenly distributed between soffits, ridges and at corners to promote air circulation. A qualified contractor should evaluate and install vents as per standard building practices.
    48)   One or more chimneys were wider than two feet and no cricket was installed. A cricket is a small peaked saddle on top of the basic roof and behind the chimney that sheds water off to the sides. Debris such as leaves, needles, moss, etc. is likely to accumulate above the chimney because of the wide chimney. Leaks may occur as a result. The client should monitor this area for accumulated debris in the future. If debris is found to accumulate above the chimney, then a qualified contractor should install a cricket.
    49)   The ceiling insulation's R rating was significantly less than what's recommended for this area. Recommend having a qualified contractor install additional insulation as per standard building practices for better energy efficiency. For more information, visit:
    http://www.eere.energy.gov/consumer/tips/insulation.html

    50)   The attic access hatch was too small to allow easy access for periodic evaluation of the attic. Standard building practices require hatches to be at least 22 by 30 inches in size, and in accessible areas. Recommend having a qualified contractor enlarge the attic access as per standard building practices.
    51)   Attic vents were blocked by debris. This can reduce air flow through the attic, reduce the life of the roof surface because of high temperatures, and/or increase moisture levels in the attic. Materials or items blocking vents should be removed as necessary.
    52)   No weatherstrip was installed around one or more attic access hatches. Weatherstrip should be installed around hatches where missing to prevent heated interior air from entering attic. For more information, visit:
    http://www.reporthost.com/_docs/atticaccess.pdf

    53)   Debris had accumulated in one or more gutters. This is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects since gutters may overflow and cause water to come in contact with the building exterior or make water accumulate around the foundation. Gutters should be cleaned now and as necessary in the future.
    54)   One or more downspouts are clogged with debris. This is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects since gutters may overflow and cause water to come in contact with the building exterior or make water accumulate around the foundation. Downspouts should be cleared now and as necessary in the future. See photos.
    55)   Debris such as leaves, needles, seeds, etc. had accumulated on the roof. This is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects and organisms since water may not flow easily off the roof, and may enter gaps in the roof surface. Leaks may occur as a result. Debris should be cleaned from the roof now and as necessary in the future.
    56)   Moss was growing on the roof. As a result, shingles may lift or be damaged. Leaks may result and/or the roof surface may fail prematurely. This is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects and organisms. Efforts should be taken to kill the moss during its growing season (wet months). Typically zinc-based chemicals are used for this, and must be applied periodically. For information on various moss treatment products and their pros and cons, visit:
    http://www.google.com/search?q=moss+on+roof

    57)   Trees were overhanging roof and were within 10 feet of roof vertically. This is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects and organisms since organic debris such as leaves or needles are more likely to accumulate on the roof surface. Accumulated debris may cause water to enter gaps in the roof surface and leak into attic and/or interior spaces. Trees should be pruned so they are at least 10 feet above roof, or don't overhang the roof.
    58)   Because of roof sagging, caused by separated rafter supports , the inspector was unable to traverse the roof and wasn't able to fully evaluate the entire roof.
     
    Electric Return to table of contents
    Limitations: The following items are not included in this inspection: generator systems, surge suppressors, inaccessible or concealed wiring; underground utilities and systems; low voltage lighting or lighting on timers or sensors. Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not determine the adequacy of grounding or bonding, does not determine if this system has an adequate capacity for the client's specific needs, nor determine if this system has any reserve capacity for additions or expansion. The inspector does not operate circuit breakers as part of the inspection, install or change light bulbs, nor determine the operability of every wall switch.
    Electric service condition: Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
    Primary service type: Overhead
    Number of service conductors: 2
    Service voltage (volts): 120
    Service amperage (amps): 100
    Primary service overload protection type: Circuit breakers
    Service entrance conductor material: Not determined
    Main disconnect rating (amps): 100
    System ground: Not determined
    Condition of main service panel: Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
    Location of main service panel #A: Under House.
    Location of main disconnect: Breaker at bottom of main service panel
    Condition of branch circuit wiring: Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
    Solid strand aluminum branch circuit wiring present: Not determined
    Condition of smoke detectors: Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
    Smoke detectors present: One
    Carbon monoxide detectors present: No
    Smoke detector power source: Battery
    59)   Inadequate working space existed for panel #. Standard building practices require the following clearances:

  • An area 30 inches wide by 3 feet deep exists in front of the panel
  • The panel is at least 5 1/2 feet above the floor
  • There is at least 6 feet 6 inches of headroom in front of the panel
  • The wall below the panel is clear to the floor

    A qualified contractor and/or electrician should evaluate and make modifications as necessary.
    60)   Non-metallic sheathed wiring was routed in one or more areas so it is subject to damage, such as on wall or ceiling surfaces. The insulation can be damaged by objects coming in contact with it and/or it being repeatedly moved. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock and fire. A qualified electrician should evaluate and repair as necessary. For example, rewire using conduit, or re-routing through wall cavities.See photos.

    Photo 31  
    Wiring loose and not terminated properly.

    Photo 32  
    Open junction boxes with improper splices.

    Photo 36  
    Damaged insulation, open junction boxes and loose wires.
     

    61)   Some wiring was loose, unsupported, or inadequately supported. Standard building practices require non-metallic sheathed wiring to be trimmed to length, attached to runners or to solid backing with fasteners at intervals of 4-1/2 ft. or less. Fasteners should be installed within 12 inches of all enclosures. A qualified, licensed electrician should evaluate and repair as necessary. For example, trim wire to length and/or install staples as needed.See photos.
    62)   One or more sections of wiring that weren't terminated were found. This is a potential safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate and repair as necessary. For example, cutting the wire to length and terminating the wire with wire nuts in a securely anchored, covered, properly sized junction box.See photos.
    63)   Wire splices were exposed due to not being contained in a covered junction box. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock and fire. A qualified electrician should evaluate and make repairs as necessary. For example, install securely mounted junction boxes with cover plates where needed to contain wiring splices.See photos.
    64)   Extension cords were being used as permanent wiring in one or more areas. They should only be used for portable equipment on a temporary basis. Using extension cords as permanent wiring poses a fire and shock hazard, and is an indication that wiring is inadequate and should be updated. Extension cords may be undersized. Connections may not be secure, resulting in power fluctuations, damage to equipment, and sparks that could start a fire. Extension cords should be removed as necessary, or a qualified electrician should evaluate and make repairs as necessary. For example, install additional circuits and/or electric receptacles.See photos.

    Photo 44  
    Improper wiring in attic
     

    65)   Substandard wiring was found in the attic, crawl space. For example, exposed wiring, loose wiring, unterminated wires, exposed splices, missing cover plates. This is a safety hazard. A qualified electrician should evaluate and repair as necessary and as per standard building practices. See photos.
    66)   This property had "knob and tube" wiring, which was commonly installed prior to 1950. It is ungrounded, and considered unsafe by today's standards. Over time, the wire's insulation may become brittle and fall apart or wear thin, resulting in exposed conductors and a risk of shock and/or fire. This wiring is also easily damaged by covering it with insulation (a common practice), and incorrectly tapping new wiring into it.

    Some energized knob and tube wiring was found during the inspection. It is not within the scope of this inspection to determine what percentage of this property's wiring is of the knob and tube type, or to determine what percentage of the knob and tube wiring is energized vs. abandoned. A qualified electrician should evaluate this wiring and make repairs or replace wiring as necessary.

    Note that some insurance companies may be unwilling to offer homeowner's insurance for properties with knob and tube wiring. Recommend that the client(s) consult with their insurance carrier regarding this.

    67)   Many receptacles were worn. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock and fire. A qualified electrician should evaluate and repair or replace as necessary.

    Photo 55  
    Missing components to light switch.

    Photo 61  
    Outlet installed upside down.

    68)   One or more electric receptacles and/or the boxes they are installed in were loose and/or not securely anchored. Wire conductors may be damaged due to repeated movement and/or tension on wires, or insulation may be damaged. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock and fire. A qualified electrician should evaluate and repair as necessary.
    69)   Many open ground, three-pronged grounding type receptacles were found. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate and make repairs as necessary.

    Grounding type receptacles were first required in residential structures during the 1960s. Based on the age of this structure and/or the absence of 2-pronged receptacles, repairs should be made by correcting wiring circuits as necessary so all receptacles are grounded as per standard building practices. Replacement of three-pronged receptacles with 2-pronged receptacles is not an acceptable solution.See photos.

    Photo 54  
    Example of open ground test.
     

    70)   One or more ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) type receptacles were found to have an open ground. GFCI protection will still work with an open ground, but ideally repairs should be made as necessary so grounding is correct with these receptacles. A qualified electrician should evaluate and make repairs as necessary.
    71)   One or more ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) electric receptacles wouldn't trip at the following "wet" locations: bathroom(s). This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate and repair as necessary.
    72)   One or more electric receptacles at the kitchen, bathroom(s), laundry room, basement had no visible ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate to determine if GFCI protection exists, and if not, repair as necessary. For more information, visit:
    http://www.mikeholt.com/documents/nec/pdf/GFCI_requirement_page2.pdf

    73)   Many switches were damaged, worn. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock and fire. A qualified electrician should evaluate and repair or replace as necessary.
    74)   One or more wall-mounted electric switches were within reach of shower stalls. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. At a minimum, the client should be aware of the shock hazard this represents and never operate such switches while showering. Ideally, a qualified electrician should evaluate and move switches as necessary, or a qualified contractor should make modifications as necessary so wall switches are unreachable from shower stalls.
    75)   One or more light fixtures used at the building exterior were substandard. This is a potential safety hazard for shock and/or fire. A qualified electrician should evaluate and repair as necessary. See photos.

    Photo 66  
    Improperly installed light fixture outside downstairs door.
     

    76)   The service drop wires were in contact with trees or vegetation. The utility company should prune or remove trees as necessary to prevent straining or abrading the service drop wires.
    77)   Smoke detectors were missing from bedrooms, from hallways leading to bedrooms, on one or more levels. Additional smoke detectors should be installed as necessary so a functioning one exists in each hallway leading to bedrooms, in each bedroom, and one each level of the building. For more information, visit:
    http://www.cpsc.gov/cpscpub/pubs/5077.html

    Photo 56  
    One non-working smoke detector in whole house.
     

    78)   Junction box cover plates were missing. They are intended to contain fire and prevent electric shock from exposed wires. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of fire and shock. A qualified person should repair as necessary. See photos.

    Photo 32  
    Open junction boxes with improper splices.
     

    79)   One or more wall-mounted exterior light fixtures had wiring that's subject to water intrusion due to caulk not being installed around the light fixture's back plate. Caulk should be applied around the perimeter of back plates where missing. A gap should be left at the bottom for condensation to drain out.See photos.
    80)   One or more ground fault circuit interrupter protection devices were defective. Because one GFCI device may in turn provide GFCI protection for other electric receptacles on the same circuit, the inspector was unable to determine if all electric receptacles that serve countertop surfaces within six feet of sinks are protected with a GFCI device. If they are not, a safety hazard due to the risk of shock exists. After repairs are made to the defective GFCI device(s), a qualified electrician should evaluate, determine if all receptacles that serve countertop surfaces within six feet of sinks are protected by GFCI devices, and make repairs if necessary.
    81)   The electric service to this property appeared to be rated at substantially less than 200 amps, and may be inadequate for the client's needs. Recommend consulting with a qualified electrician about upgrading to a 200 amp service.
    82)   The legend for overcurrent protection devices (breakers or fuses) in panel # was missing. Recommend installing, updating or correcting the legend as necessary so it's accurate. Evaluation by a qualified electrician may be necessary.
    83)   Some light fixtures were inoperable. Recommend further evaluation by replacing bulb(s) and/or consulting with the property owner. Repairs or replacement of the light fixture(s) by a qualified electrician may be necessary.
    84)   Some bulbs in light fixtures were missing, inoperable. As a result, some light fixtures couldn't be fully evaluated. Recommend replacing bulbs to fully evaluate fixtures where necessary.
    85)     Many switches appeared beyond their intended service life and may pose a hazard for shock or fire. A qualified electrician should evaluate and replace components if necessary.
    86)     One or more smoke detectors didn't respond when tested. A qualified person should evaluate and replace smoke detectors, replace batteries or make repairs as necessary. For more information, visit:
    http://www.cpsc.gov/cpscpub/pubs/5077.html

     
    Plumbing / Fuel Systems Return to table of contents
    Limitations: The following items are not included in this inspection: private wells and sewage disposal systems; main, side and lateral sewer lines; gray water systems; pressure boosting systems; incinerating or composting toilets; fire suppression sprinkler systems; water softeners, conditioners or filtering systems; plumbing components concealed within the foundation or building structure, or in inaccessible areas such as below tubs; underground utilities and systems; overflow drains for tubs and sinks; backflow prevention devices. Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not operate water supply or shut-off valves due to the possibility of valves leaking or breaking when operated. The inspector does not test for lead in the water supply, the water pipes or solder, does not determine if plumbing and fuel lines are adequately sized, and does not determining the existence or condition of underground or above-ground fuel tanks.
    Condition of service and main line: Appeared serviceable
    Location of main water meter: Near street in front of house.
    Location of main water shut: At Meter.
    Water service: Public
    Water pressure (psi): 45
    Service pipe material: Galvanized steel
    Condition of supply lines: Appeared serviceable
    Supply pipe material: Galvanized steel
    Condition of waste lines: Appeared serviceable
    Waste pipe material: Plastic, Galvanized steel
    Condition of fuel system: Appeared serviceable
    Location of main fuel shut: At Tank.
    Condition of service and main line: Appeared serviceable
    Location of main water meter: Near street in front of house.
    Location of main water shut: At Meter.
    Water service: Public
    Water pressure (psi): 45
    Service pipe material: Galvanized steel
    Condition of supply lines: Appeared serviceable
    Supply pipe material: Galvanized steel
    Condition of waste lines: Appeared serviceable
    Waste pipe material: Plastic, Galvanized steel
    Condition of fuel system: Appeared serviceable
    Location of main fuel shut: At Tank.
    87)   Based on gas odors, gas appeared to be leaking at In kitchen Area.. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of explosion. A qualified contractor and/or the gas utility company should evaluate and repair immediately.
    88)   One or more flexible gas supply connectors were installed where they are subject to damage. For example, from foot traffic, stored items being moved, pets, or use of gardening tools. Leaks may occur as a result. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs and/or modifications as necessary.
    89)   Based on gas odors, gas appeared to be leaking at In kitchen Area.. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of explosion. A qualified contractor and/or the gas utility company should evaluate and repair immediately.
    90)   One or more flexible gas supply connectors were installed where they are subject to damage. For example, from foot traffic, stored items being moved, pets, or use of gardening tools. Leaks may occur as a result. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs and/or modifications as necessary.See photos.

    Photo 29  
    Hot water heater with too many elbows.
     

    91)   One or more outside faucets were missing backflow prevention devices. These devices reduce the likelihood of polluted or contaminated water entering the potable water supply. This condition can occur when an outside faucet is left in the "on" position with a hose connected and the sprayer head turned off. When pressure in the system fluctuates, water can be drawn back into the water supply pipes from the building. If a chemical sprayer is being used with the hose, those chemicals can enter the water supply pipes. Recommend installing backflow prevention devices on all exterior hose bibs where missing. They are available at most home improvement stores and are easily installed.
    92)   All water supply pipes in the crawl space were uninsulated. Recommend insulating pipes as per standard building practices for better energy efficiency and to prevent water pipes from freezing.
    93)   No drip leg was installed in the gas supply line at the furnace, water heater. Drip legs are intended to prevent damage to gas-fired appliances by trapping oil, scale, water condensation and/or debris. A qualified contractor should install a drip leg as per standard building practices.
    94)   Based on the apparent age of the water supply lines and/or observations made during the inspection, some of the water supply lines in this building were near the end of their service life. The clients should monitor these lines for leaks and budget for replacing supply lines as necessary in the near future.
     
    Water Heater Return to table of contents
    Limitations: The following items are not included in this inspection: solar water heating systems; circulation systems. Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not provide an estimate of remaining life on water heaters, does not determine if water heaters are appropriately sized, or perform any evaluations that require a pilot light to be lit.
    Condition of water heater: Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
    Type: Tank
    Estimated age: 18 years
    Energy source: Propane
    Capacity (in gallons): 40
    Manufacturer: State
    Model: 42fw
    Location of water heater: Laundryroom
    Water temperature (degrees Fahrenheit): 138.5 degrees
    Condition of burners: Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
    Condition of venting system: Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
    95)   The temperature/pressure relief valve drain line had more than 4 elbows. This is a potential safety hazard due to the risk of explosion from restricted flow. A qualified plumber should evaluate and repair as necessary so the drain line complies with the temperature-pressure relief valve manufacturer's installation instructions. For more information, visit: http://www.reporthost.com/_docs/TPvalve.pdf

    Photo 29  
    Hot water heater with too many elbows.
     

    96)   Excessive scale was found on the burner or pilot assemblies. This may be caused by condensation in the exhaust flue due to improper drafting and/or continuous use due to the water heater being undersized. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair or replace the water heater as necessary.See photos.
    97)   The water heater flame was yellow rather than blue. This may be caused by scale on top of the burner, a dirty burner orifice, the flue being clogged, and/or improper gas pressure. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary.
    98)   The water heater flame was noisy (whistling sound). This may be caused by improper gas pressure and/or a dirty burner orifice. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary.
    99)   The water heater flame was too high. This may be caused by improper gas pressure or the wrong orifice being installed. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary.
    100)   Flue pipe sections or connections were substandard. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of carbon monoxide poisoning. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary.
    101)   One or more sections of metal flue pipe were reverse-sloped or had a substandard rise. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of leaking exhaust gases. Standard building practices typically require flue pipes to rise a minimum of 1/4 inch per foot of length. This minimizes accumulation of corrosive condensation in the flue pipe and ensures that exhaust gases vent up through the flue pipe as intended. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary.See photos.
    102)   The metal flue cap was deteriorated. Standard building practices require that metal flues terminate with a bird and weatherproof cap. A qualified person should evaluate and install, repair or replace cap(s) as necessary.
    103)   The upper, lower air vent for the water heater was missing. All gas appliances require adequate air (approximately one square inch per 1000 BTU) for combustion, dilution and ventilation. Standard building practices require that vents be installed at both the top and the bottom of closet enclosures, and be left open at all times. This is a potential safety hazard, and may result in combustion fumes entering living spaces. A qualified person should evaluate and repair as necessary and as per standard building practices, or remove blockages as necessary.
    104)   The water heater did not have seismic straps or struts installed. This is a potential safety hazard. Leaks may also occur in water supply pipes. A qualified person should install seismic straps or struts as necessary and as per standard building practices.
    105)   The outer flame shield for the water heater combustion chamber was loose. This is a potential fire hazard. A qualified person should repair or replace as necessary.
    106)   The hot water temperature was greater than 120 degrees Fahrenheit. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of scalding. The thermostat should be adjusted so the water temperature doesn't exceed 120 degrees. For more information on scalding dangers, visit:
    http://www.cpsc.gov/CPSCPUB/PUBS/5098.pdf

    107)   Significant corrosion was found at the water heater casing. A qualified plumber should evaluate and repair or replace as necessary. See photos.

    Photo 30  
    Rusted hot water heater casing
     

    108)   No water supply shut-off valve was visible for the water heater. A shut-off valve allows the supply to the water heater to be turned off when the water heater needs repair or replacement, while allowing the remainder of the plumbing system to be operable (toilets, sinks, etc.). Recommend having a qualified, licensed plumbing contractor determine if a water supply shut-off valve exists, and install one if it is missing.
    109)   The flue pipe termination was too close to the roof surface. The flue may not draw correctly in some conditions as a result. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair if necessary, and as per standard building practices.
    110)   The water heater was installed in an unheated space and was not resting on an insulated pad. Recommend installing an insulated pad under the water heater for better energy efficiency.
    111)   The estimated useful life for most water heaters is 8 to 12 years. This water heater appears to be beyond this age and/or its useful lifespan and may need replacing at any time. Recommend budgeting for a replacement in the near future.
    112)   Based on the capacity of the water heater, the number of bedrooms in this structure and the number of occupants expected to live in this structure, this water heater may be undersized. The client should consult with a qualified plumbing contractor or water heater distributor for more information, and may wish to upgrade the size of the water heater.
     
    Heating Return to table of contents
    Limitations: The following items are not included in this inspection: humidifiers, dehumidifiers, electronic air filters; solar, coal or wood fired heat systems; thermostat or temperature control accuracy and timed functions; heating components concealed within the building structure or in inaccessible areas; underground utilities and systems; safety devices and controls (due to automatic operation). Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not provide an estimate of remaining life on heating system components, does not determine if heating systems are appropriately sized, or perform any evaluations that require a pilot light to be lit. It is beyond the scope of this inspection to determine if furnace heat exchangers are intact and free of leaks.
    Condition of heating system: Appeared serviceable
    Location of heating system: Crawl space
    Heating type: Forced air
    Fuel type: Propane gas
    Approximate BTUs: Unknown
    Manufacturer: Bryant
    Last service date: Unknown
    Model: Unknown
    Condition of distribution system: Appeared serviceable
    Distribution system: Ducts and registers
    Condition of air filters: Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
    Location of air filters: At top of air handler
    113)   The metal flue cap was damaged. Standard building practices require that metal flues terminate with a bird and weatherproof cap. A qualified person should evaluate and install, repair or replace cap(s) as necessary.See photos.
    114)   The air vent for the furnace was missing. All gas appliances require adequate air (approximately one square inch per 1000 BTU) for combustion, dilution and ventilation. Standard building practices require that vents be installed at both the top and the bottom of closet enclosures, and be left open at all times. This is a potential safety hazard, and may result in combustion fumes entering living spaces. A qualified person should evaluate and repair as necessary and as per standard building practices, or remove blockages as necessary.
    115)   One or more air ducts were lying on the ground. Ducts should be supported (typically with straps or hangers) so that they are not in contact with the ground and subject to damage from moisture. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary so ducts are suspended as per standard building practices, and not in contact with the ground.

    Photo 34  
    Ducting sitting on dirt.
     

    116)   One or more air filters were dirty. A qualified person should filter(s) as necessary. Filters should be checked monthly and maintained as necessary in the future.
     
    Fireplaces / Stoves / Chimneys Return to table of contents
    Limitations: The following items are not included in this inspection: coal stoves, gas logs, chimney flues (except where visible). Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not determine the adequacy of drafting or sizing in fireplace and stove flues, nor determine if prefabricated or zero clearance fireplaces are installed in accordance with the manufacturer's specifications. The inspector does not perform any evaluations that require a pilot light to be lit.
    Condition of fireplaces, stoves: Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
    Location #A: Livingroom
    Fireplace type: Masonry
    Fuel type: Propane
    Condition of chimneys: Appeared serviceable
    Chimney type: Masonry
    117)   No metal liner was installed in the masonry chimney at location #A, and one or more gas appliances use the chimney for a flue. Standard building practices require that a metal liner be installed in masonry chimneys used to vent gas appliances such as furnaces and water heaters. The purpose of the metal liner is to ensure a correct draft, and to prevent damage to the masonry flue from corrosive exhaust deposits and moisture in the exhaust gases. A qualified chimney service contractor should evaluate and install a metal liner as necessary. For more information search for "gas liner" at:
    http://www.csia.org/

    118)   Because of the flue, wood stove or fireplace configuration, the inspector was unable to determine if flue(s) at location # A had significant amounts of accumulated creosote. Recommend that a qualified contractor inspect, and clean and repair if necessary.
    119)   The fireplace at location #A was equipped with a gas burner and had a damper that can be closed. This is a safety hazard due to the possibility of burner or pilot light exhaust gases entering living spaces. A qualified chimney service contractor should make repairs as necessary so the damper is made permanently open. Typically a bracket or bolt is installed for this purpose.
    120)   The masonry chimney at location # showed evidence of deterioration, including deteriorated, spalled mortar. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary.
    121)   The gas at location # A was not fully evaluated because of the following conditions: gas leak detected, Kitchen area.. As per the Standards of Practice for both the National Association of Certified Home Inspectors (NACHI) and the American Society of Home Inspectors (ASHI) the inspector does not operate gas shut off valves or light pilot lights during inspections.
    122)   No blower was visible in the gas fireplace at location #A. The client may want to consider installing a blower for better energy efficiency.
     
    Kitchen Return to table of contents
    Limitations: The following items are not included in this inspection: free-standing or portable appliances such as dishwashers, trash compactors, refrigerators, freezers, ice makers; specialty appliances such as hot water dispensers, water filters and trash compactors; appliance timers, clocks, cook functions, self and/or continuous cleaning operations, thermostat or temperature control accuracy, and lights. Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not provide an estimate of the remaining life of appliances, and does not determine the adequacy of operation of appliances such as dishwashers, garbage disposals, trash compactors, ovens, broilers, etc.
    Condition of counters: Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
    Condition of cabinets: Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
    Condition of sinks and related plumbing: Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
    Condition of garbage disposal: Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below), Near, at or beyond service life
    Condition of range, cooktop: Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)Not Teasted due to possible gas leak.
    Range, cooktop type: Propane
    Condition of refrigerator: Appeared serviceable
    123)   Substandard wiring was found for the garbage disposal including unprotected wiring. This is a potential safety hazard for shock. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary.
    124)   Electrical conduit for the garbage disposal was unsafe due to the following conditions: substandard repairs or installation. This is a potential safety hazard for shock. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary.
    125)   One or more sink faucets were loose. A qualified person should repair as necessary.
    126)   Drawers were damaged in one or more cabinets. A qualified person should evaluate and repair as necessary.
    127)   Stains were found in the shelving or cabinet components below one or more sinks. Plumbing leaks may have occurred in the past. Recommend consulting with the property owner about this, and if necessary, having a qualified person evaluate and repair. See photos.

    Photo 51  
    Water stains under kitchen sink.
     

    128)   The garbage disposal was noisy or vibrated excessively. A qualified plumber or contractor should evaluate and repair or replace the food disposal as necessary.
    129)   The cooktop exhaust fan was noisy or vibrated excessively. A qualified person should evaluate and repair or replace as necessary.
    130)   Many counters showed moderate wear, deterioration, damage.

    Photo 46  
    Damage to kitchen counter.

    Photo 47  
    Damage to kitchen counter.

    Photo 48  
    Damage to kitchen counter.
     

    131)   Hardware such as hinges, latches or pulls were loose and/or missing at one or more cabinets. A qualified person should repair as necessary.

    Photo 49  
    Kitchen cabinet door won't close.

    Photo 50  
    Kitchen cabinet door won't close.

    132)   Water damage was found in the shelving or cabinet components below one or more sinks. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary.
    133)   One or more filters for the cooktop exhaust fan were damaged. Filters should be replaced as necessary.
    134)   The duct for the cooktop exhaust fan was not determined because duct was enclosed in wood box. Exhaust air may enter living spaces as a result. A qualified person should repair as necessary.
    135)   Many cabinet surfaces, drawers and/or doors showed moderate wear.
    136)   Caulk was missing where counters met backsplashes. A qualified person should repair as necessary.
    137)   Caulk was missing around the sink. A qualified person should repair as necessary.
    138)   The estimated useful life for most kitchen appliances is 10 to 15 years. One or more appliances (range, garbage disposal) appeared to be near, at or beyond their service life. Recommend budgeting for replacements in the near future.
    139)   Minor deterioration was found at the kitchen sink.
    140)   One or more light bulbs were missing in the range hood light fixture. The inspector was unable to determine if the light fixture is fully operable.
     
    Bathrooms / Laundry / Sinks Return to table of contents
    Limitations: The following items are not included in this inspection: overflow drains for tubs and sinks; bidets, heated towel racks, saunas, steam generators, clothes washers, clothes dryers. Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not determine the adequacy of washing machine drain lines, washing machine catch pan drain lines, or clothes dryer exhaust ducts. The inspector does not operate water supply or shut-off valves for sinks, toilets, bidets, clothes washers, etc. due to the possibility of valves leaking or breaking when operated. The inspector does not determine if shower pans or tub and shower enclosures are water tight, or determine the completeness or operability of any gas piping to laundry appliances.
    Location #A: Upstairs
    Location #B: Downstairs
    Condition of counters: Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
    Condition of cabinets: Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
    Condition of sinks and related plumbing: Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
    Condition of toilets: Appeared serviceable
    Condition of shower(s) and related plumbing: Appeared serviceable, Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
    Condition of ventilation systems: Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
    Condition of laundry facilities: Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
    Gas supply for laundry equipment present: Not determined
    240 volt receptacle for laundry equipment present: No
    141)   The inspector was unable to verify that the glass used in one or more windows, enclosure walls by the shower at locations #A, B was approved safety glass. Glazing that is not approved safety glass located in areas subject to human impact is a safety hazard. Standard building practices require that approved safety glass be used in enclosures for bathtubs, showers, spas, saunas and steam rooms, and in windows where the bottom edge of the window is less than 60 inches above the drain inlet or standing surface. Wire-reinforced glass is not acceptable. A qualified contractor should evaluate and replace glass if necessary, and as per standard building practices.
    142)   The clothes dryer was equipped with a foil, accordion-type, flexible exhaust duct. The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission considers these types of ducts to be unsafe, and a fire hazard. These types of ducts can trap lint and are susceptible to kinks or crushing, which can greatly reduce the air flow. This duct should be replaced with a rigid or corrugated semi-rigid metal duct, and by a qualified contractor if necessary. Most clothes dryer manufacturers specify the use of a rigid or corrugated semi-rigid metal duct. For more information on dryer safety issues, visit:
    http://www.cpsc.gov/CPSCPUB/PUBS/5022.html

    143)   The clothes dryer exhaust duct was crushed. Air flow will be restricted as a result. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of fire. A qualified person should evaluate and replace or repair as necessary. For more information, visit:
    http://www.cpsc.gov/CPSCPUB/PUBS/5022.html
    http://chimneykeepers.com/dryerclean.html

    144)   The clothes dryer exhaust duct appeared to need cleaning. Significant amounts of lint build up were found. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of fire from decreased air flow. This duct should be cleaned now and annually, or more often if necessary in the future. Some chimney sweeps or heating/cooling duct cleaners perform this service. For more information, visit:
    http://www.cpsc.gov/CPSCPUB/PUBS/5022.html
    http://chimneykeepers.com/dryerclean.html

    145)   Minor moisture damage was found in areas by the shower at location #A, . A qualified person should evaluate and repair as necessary.
    146)   The following conditions were found at the shower enclosure or door at location #A: deterioration. A qualified person should evaluate and repair or replace as necessary.
    147)   The shower door at location #A was difficult to operate. A qualified person should evaluate and repair as necessary.
    148)   The exhaust fan at location #A was noisy or vibrated excessively. Moisture may accumulate as a result. A qualified person should evaluate and repair or replace as necessary.
    149)   The clothes washer drain standpipe was too narrow. Standard building practices require that the stand pipe be:

  • A minimum of two inches in diameter
  • At least 33 inches tall for a top loading clothes washer
  • At least 24 inches tall for a front loading clothes washer

    A qualified person should evaluate and repair as necessary, and as per standard building practices.
    150)   Hardware such as hinges, latches or pulls were loose and/or missing at one or more cabinets at location #A, B. A qualified person should repair as necessary.
    151)   Water damage was found in the shelving or cabinet components below one or more sinks at location #A, B. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary.

    Photo 52  
    Water stains under upstairs bathroom sink.
     

    152)   The sink drain stopper mechanism at location #B was missing. A qualified person should repair or replace as necessary.
    153)   The bathroom with a shower at location #B didn't have an exhaust fan installed. Moisture accumulation will occur and may damage the structure. Even if the bathroom has a window that opens, it likely does not provide adequate ventilation, especially during cold weather when the window is closed. A qualified contractor should install exhaust fans as per standard building practices where missing in bathrooms with showers.
    154)   The window at location #B won't open. Ventilation may be inadequate as a result. A qualified person should repair as necessary.
    155)   Caulk was missing, deteriorated at location #A, B. A qualified person should repair as necessary.
    156)   The caulk between the shower enclosure and the floor at location #A, Bwas deteriorated. A qualified person should repair as necessary.
    157)   The exhaust fan cover at location #A needed cleaning.
    158)   Stains were found in the shelving or cabinet components below the sink at location #A, B. Plumbing leaks may have occurred in the past. Recommend consulting with the property owner about this, and if necessary, having a qualified person evaluate and repair.

    Photo 64  
    Water stains under downstairs bathroom sink.
     

    159)   Counters showed minor wear, deterioration at location #A, B.
    160)   Cabinet surfaces, drawers and/or doors showed minor wear, deterioration, damage at location #A, B.
    161)   Minor wear, deterioration was found at the sink at location #A, B.
     
    Interior Rooms / Areas Return to table of contents
    Limitations: The following items are not included in this inspection: security, intercom and sound systems; communications wiring; central vacuum systems; elevators and stair lifts; sources of obnoxious odors; cosmetic deficiencies due to normal wear and tear in wall, floor and ceiling surfaces and coverings, or in equipment; deficiencies relating to interior decorating; low voltage and gas lighting systems. Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not evaluate any areas or items which require moving stored items, furnishings, debris, equipment, floor coverings, insulation or similar materials. The inspector does not test for asbestos, lead, radon, mold, hazardous waste, urea formaldehyde urethane, or any other toxic substance. Some items such as window operability are tested on a sampled basis. The client should be aware that paint may obscure wall and ceiling defects, floor coverings may obscure floor defects, and furnishings may obscure wall, floor and floor covering defects. If furnishings were present during the inspection, recommend a full evaluation of walls, floors and ceilings that were previously obscured when possible. Determining the cause of odors is not within the scope of this inspection.
    Condition of exterior entry doors: Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
    Condition of interior doors: Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
    Type of windows: Aluminum, Wood, Single pane
    Condition of windows: Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
    Wall type or covering: Drywall, Paneling, Wood
    Condition of walls: Required repairs, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
    Ceiling type or covering: Plaster, Acoustic spray, Wood & beam
    Condition of ceilings: Required repairs, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
    Flooring type or covering: Carpet, Vinyl
    Condition of flooring: Appeared serviceable
    162)   The inspector was unable to verify that the glass used in many windows was approved safety glass where required. Window glazing that is not approved safety glass located in areas subject to human impact is a safety hazard. Standard building practices generally require that approved safety glass be used in but not limited to the following conditions:

  • Windows with a pane larger than nine square feet, having a bottom edge closer than 18 inches to the floor and a top edge higher than 36 inches above the floor within 36 inches, horizontally, of a walking surface
  • Windows that are both within a 24 inch arc of a door and within 60 inches of the floor
  • Glazing in walls enclosing stairway landings or within five feet of the bottom and top of stairways where the bottom edge of the glass is less than 60 inches above the floor

    Note that "art glass" (leaded, faceted, carved or decorative) may be an acceptable alternative for safety glass due to its visibility. Also, a 1 1/2 inch wide protective bar on the accessible side of the glass placed 34 to 38 inches above the floor may serve as an acceptable substitute for safety glass.

    A qualified contractor should evaluate and replace glass or make modifications if necessary and as per standard building practices.
    163)   One or more guardrails were wobbly. This is a safety hazard. Standard building practices require that they:

  • Be installed where walking surfaces are more than 30 inches above the surrounding grade
  • Be securely and permanently attached
  • Be at least 36 inches in height
  • Not be climbable by children
  • Not have gaps or voids that allow passage of a sphere equal to or greater than four inches in diameter

    A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair, replace or install guardrails as necessary, and as per standard building practices.
    164)   Guardrails in one or more areas were loose. This is a safety hazard. A qualified person should repair or replace as necessary, and as per standard building practices.

    Photo 63  
    Loose railing at top of metal spiral stirs.
     

    165)   This structure was built prior to 1979 and may contain lead paint. Laws were enacted in 1978 in the US preventing the use of lead paint in residential structures. Lead is a known safety hazard, especially to children but also to adults. The paint found in and around this structure appeared to be intact and may be encapsulated by more recent layers of paint that are not lead-based. Regardless, recommend following precautions as described in the following links to Consumer Products Safety Commission website articles regarding possible lead paint:
    http://www.cpsc.gov/CPSCPUB/PUBS/5054.html
    http://www.cpsc.gov/CPSCPUB/PUBS/5055.html

    166)   The front door's doorbell appeared to be inoperable. A qualified person should evaluate and repair as necessary.
    167)   Some interior doors wouldn't latch. A qualified person should evaluate and repair as necessary.

    Photo 53  
    Bedroom door with missing and loose hardware.
     

    168)   Some windows that were built to open wouldn't open, were difficult to open and close. A qualified person should evaluate and repair as necessary.
    169)   Many windows were deteriorated. A qualified person should evaluate and repair or replace as necessary.
    170)   Screens in some windows were damaged, deteriorated. A qualified person should evaluate and repair or replace as necessary.See photos.

    Photo 57  
    Damaged screen.

    Photo 58  
    Damaged screen.

    171)   Floors in one or more areas were not level. Significant repairs may be needed to make floors level, such as repairs to the foundation. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary.
    172)   Squeaking or creaking noises occur when walking on one or more sections of flooring. This is usually caused by substandard construction practices where the subfloor decking is not adequately fastened to the framing below. For example, not enough glue was used and/or nails were used rather than screws. In most cases, this is only an annoyance rather than a structural problem. Various solutions such as Squeeeeek No More and Counter Snap fasteners exist to correct this. Repairs to eliminate the squeaks or creaks may be more or less difficult depending on the floor covering, and the access to the underside of the subfloor. Recommend having a qualified contractor evaluate and repair as necessary. For more information, visit:
    http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q=squeaky+floors

    173)   One or more exterior doors had minor damage, deterioration. A qualified person should repair or replace as necessary.
    174)   Trim or jambs around one or more exterior doors was deteriorated. A qualified person should repair, replace or install as necessary.See photos.

    Photo 25  
    Cracked trim around front door.

    Photo 60  
    Broken trim around downstairs door.

    175)   The weatherstrip around one or more exterior doors was damaged, deteriorated. A qualified person should repair or replace as necessary.
    176)   Thresholds at one or more exterior doors are deteriorated. A qualified person should repair, replace or install as necessary.
    177)   Some exterior door hardware, including locksets, deadbolts were loose. A qualified person should repair or replace as necessary.
    178)   Many interior doors were damaged, deteriorated. A qualified person should repair or replace as necessary.

    Photo 40  
    Loose door to crwlspace.

    Photo 59  
    Broken downstairs door

    Photo 65  
    Broken and missing door hardware.
     

    179)   Some interior door hardware, including locksets were inoperable, loose. A qualified person should repair or replace as necessary.
    180)   Lock mechanisms on windows were damaged, deteriorated. A qualified person should repair as necessary.
    181)   Significant damage (holes, etc.) were found in one or more wall sections. A qualified person should repair as necessary.

    Photo 20  
    Hole in sidding leading to laundryroom.
     

    182)   Substandard repairs were found in one or more wall sections. Recommend asking the property owner about the repairs, and having a qualified person repair as per standard building practices.

    Photo 62  
    Damage to wood paneling downstairs.
     

    183)   Trim was loose, missing, damaged in some areas. A qualified person should repair as necessary.
    184)   Vinyl floor tiles were installed in one or more "wet" areas such as bathrooms or kitchens. Water can easily leak through seams between the tiles and damage the sub-floor below. Recommend having a qualified contractor replace these tiles with a waterproof flooring material such as sheet vinyl.
    185)   Some sections of vinyl flooring had minor deterioration or damage. For example, . A qualified person should replace or repair flooring as necessary.
    186)   Minor cracks and/or holes were found in walls in one or more areas. They do not appear to be a structural concern, but the client may wish to repair these for aesthetic reasons.

    Photo 38  
    holes in walls in laundry room.

    Photo 39  
    Damaged drywall in laundryroom.

    187)   Minor cracks and/or holes were found in ceilings in one or more areas. They do not appear to be a structural concern, but the client may wish to repair these for aesthetic reasons.
    188)   All exterior doors didn't have a screen door.
    189)   Many windows used single-pane glass. Single-pane windows are one of the largest sources of heat loss in winter and heat gain in the summer due to their low insulating ability and high air leakage rates. They're estimated to be responsible for 25 to 50 percent of the energy used to heat and cool homes. The client should consider replacing single-pane windows with new, multi-pane windows.
    190)   Screens in some windows were missing.
     

    Photo 21  
    Water from hot water heater TPR valve staining and possible damage to sidding.

    Photo 22  
    Sidding sitting in dirt.

    Photo 27  
    Inproperly installed flashing.

    Photo 33  
    Lights not working in crwl space.

    Photo 35  
    Construction on downstairs shower not completed, exposed fiberglass tub.

    Photo 37  
    Improperly installed piping in laundryroom.

    Photo 41  
    Numerous water shutoff valves under house.

    Photo 42  
    Sagging roof and debis on roof.

    Photo 43  
    Improper and damaged vent and flue caps.
     

     
    Roy Sauls Mother Lode Home Inspector (209)613-4737