Website: http://mylibertyhi.com
Email: libertyhi@netzero.com
Phone: (269) 925-3029 · (269) 930-3487
Inspector: Larry O'Connor

 

Certified Home Inspection Report For:
Client(s): Charles & Mary Smith
Property address: 6048 Roswell St.
Coloma, MI. 49038
Inspection date: 06/08/2009
This report published on Thursday, September 16, 2010 10:34:49 PM EDT

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Thank you for choosing Liberty Inspection Services (LIS). We are capable of acquainting you with the various components, electrical, and mechanical systems of your home.

We have a combined experience of fifteen years of residential maintenance, repair, and residential inspections. We also specialize in log home inspections. Our inspectors are graduates of a national certified home inspection training course and have been trained by members of NACHI (National Association of Certified Home Inspectors) and successfully passed the required online Home Inspection Examination. In addition, all inspectors are required to pass NACHI's Code of Ethics and Standards of Practice exams. Finally, all inspectors are required to maintain a minimum of 20 continuing education hours and pass NACHI's online exam on a yearly basis.

Our reports meet or exceed the Standards of Practice for the National Association of Certified Home Inspectors (NACHI), The American Society of Home Inspectors (ASHI), and the National Association of Home Inspectors (NAHI).

As Certified Residential Inspectors, it is our intent to provide a thorough and honest report. Your presence at the inspection will provide you with an introduction to the functionality and safety of your new investment. We will point out both the areas of concern and the positive aspects of your new home.

LIBERTY INSPECTION SERVICES cannot control the interpretation and use of its reports by third parties and shall not assume any legal responsibility or liability for third party interpretations of any part of this report beyond the date of the inspection. Since real estate conditions change on a daily basis in response to occupants use, deferred upkeep, and environmental conditions, third parties may read this report but shall not rely upon its contents for any purpose. Future buyers who enter into a purchase contract for this property should call LIBERTY INSPECTION SERVICES for a personal on-site review and update of the conditions described in this report. A discounted fee for the update is available as long as the update request is scheduled for a date within 60 days of the date of this report. Failure to comply with this request shall relieve and hold harmless individually, jointly, and/or otherwise, LIBERTY INSPECTION SERVICES, its directors, officers, employees, and agents, and their successors and assigns, of any responsibility or liability, moral or legal, to the eventual buyers in contract for any property condition, any lack of understanding, and/or any possible misinterpretation of disclosed conditions contained within this report.

LIBERTY INSPECTION SERVICES is available for re-inspection of appropriate items listed in this report at a cost of [one-half the original inspection fee]. Advance notice of at least two days is required.

We thank you for the opportunity to serve you.

Many Blessings in Your New Home.

Larry O'Connor
Certified Real Estate Inspector
Liberty Inspection Services

 
How to Read this Report
This report is organized by the property's functional areas.  Within each functional area, descriptive information is listed first and is shown in bold type.  Items of concern follow descriptive information.
Concerns are shown and sorted according to these types:
SafetyPoses a risk of injury or death 
Repair/ReplaceRecommend repairing or replacing 
Repair/MaintainRecommend repair and/or maintenance 
Minor DefectCorrection likely involves only a minor expense 
MaintainRecommend ongoing maintenance 
EvaluateRecommend evaluation by a specialist 
MonitorRecommend monitoring in the future 
CommentFor your information 

Wood Destroying Organism Concerns
Concerns relating to wood destroying organisms are shown as follows:
InfestationEvidence of infestation of wood destroying insects or organisms (Live or dead insect bodies, fungal growth, etc.) 
DamageDamage caused by wood destroying insects or organisms (Rot, carpenter ant galleries, etc.) 
Conducive conditionsConditions conducive for wood destroying insects or organisms (Wood-soil contact, shrubs in contact with siding, roof or plumbing leaks, etc.) 

Click here for a glossary of building construction terms.  Contact your inspector if there are terms that you do not understand, or visit the glossary of construction terms at http://www.reporthost.com/glossary.asp

Table of Contents
General information
Exterior
Roof
Built-in garage (Nortwest corner facing east)
Built-in garage (northeast corner facing north)
Electric service panel-upstairs
Main Electric service (NW garage-north wall)
Water heater south room behind stairs
Water heater in laundry room area
Heating and air conditioning
Attic
Plumbing
Basement
Well
Kitchen - Main floor
Kitchen - Upstairs
Bathroom - Upstairs
Bathroom - Main Floor
Laundry Room - In basement
Dining Room
Living Room
Bedroom #3 (upstairs on left)
Bedroom #5 (upstairs straight ahead)
Bedroom #2 (off of dining room)
Bedroom #4 (upstairs on right)
Bedroom #1 (Downstairs off living room)
 
General information Return to table of contents
Structures inspected: House and built in garages
Report number: LO060406
Time started: 0730 AM
Time finished: 11:30 AM
Present during inspection: Buyer, Realtor
Occupied: No
Age of building: Approx. 78 years old
Type of building: Single familyset up for 2 family before current owner
Weather conditions: Clear
Temperature: Warm
Ground condition: Dry
Main entrance faces: East
Foundation type: Finished basement
 
Exterior Return to table of contents
Footing material: Not visible
Foundation material: Concrete block
Apparent wall structure: Wood frame
Wall covering: asphalt based shingles
Driveway material: Dirt
Sidewalk material: Paving stones
Exterior door material: Solid core wood
1) Handrail(s) at stairs are ungraspable. Recommend repairing or replacing handrails where necessary so your hand can completely encircle them.
2) Gaps larger than 4" in guardrail(s) exist in some areas. This is a safety hazard, especially for small children. Recommend that a qualified contractor replace, modify or repair railing(s) as necessary such as installing additional balusters, so gaps in guardrail(s) don't exceed 4".
3) Damaged siding is seen in various areas. Recommend having siding contractor evaluate and recommend steps to repair or replace siding.

Photo 2  
Exterior siding damage over north dining room windows

Photo 3  
Exterior siding damage at rear of house

Photo 4  
Exterior siding damage at rear 2nd floor

4) No gutter system exist on this structure. Recommend having a qualified gutter and downspout contractor install gutters, and downspouts. Also recommend installing extensions such as splashblocks or a drain line where necessary to carry rain water away from the house.
5) No electrical outlets on exterior of building. If buyer decides to have them, have qualified electrical contractor install GFCI outlets where required.
6) Perimeter grading slopes towards building in one or more areas. Recommend grading soil so it slopes down and away from the building to direct rainwater away. Another alternative is to install drain tiles along the perimeter of foundation in assisting runoff of water away from foundation.
7) Some areas of the structure, such as window and door frames,need repainting due to peeling, cracking and/or blistering of paint. Recommend having a qualified painting contractor evaluate, prep (scrape, sand, prime and caulk) properly and repaint where necessary.
Some window frames are damaged or deteriorated in some areas. Recommend replacing this wood where required.

8) Window glazing putty is deteriorated in one or more windows. Recommend repairing or replacing putty where necessary.
9) One or more large trees are very close the foundation. Recommend removing such trees to prevent damage to the foundation.
10) One or more outside faucets need repair or replacement due to leaking or damage. Recommend that a qualified, licensed plumber repair or replace outside faucet(s) as necessary.
11) Front porch brickwork is deteriorating. Recommend having masonry contractor evaluate for repairs where necessary

Photo 7  
Brick deterioration at front porch

12) Minor cracks (1/8" or less) present in foundation. These don't appear to be a structural concern, but recommend sealing them to prevent water infiltration. Numerous products exist to seal such cracks including:
  • Hydraulic cement. Requires chiseling a channel in the crack to apply. See http://www.quickrete.com/catalog/HydraulicWater-StopCement.html for an example.
  • Resilient caulks (easy to apply). See http://www.quickrete.com/catalog/GrayConcreteRepair.html for an example.
  • Epoxy sealants (both a waterproof and structural repair). See http://www.mountaingrout.com/ for examples of these products.

    Photo 6  
    Several cracks at various areas of foundation

    13) Vegetation (trees, shrubs and/or vines) are in contact with building exterior. Recommend pruning or removing vegetation as necessary so there's at least a one foot gap between all vegetation and the building exterior. This gap should exist to allow exterior building materials to dry quickly after it rains, and to eliminate pathways to the structure for wood destroying insects.
    14) Recommend cleaning rear deck and treating with a waterproof sealant claiming to waterproof, block ultraviolet light, and stop mildew. Consumer Reports recommends these products:

  • Cabot Decking Stain and PTW Stain
  • Olympic Water Repellent Deck Stain
  • Thompson's House and Deck Stain
  • Wolman PTW Deck Stain
  • Akzo Sikkens Cetol DEK
  • Benjamin Moore Moorwood Clear Wood Finish
  • DAP Woodlife Premium
  • Olympic Natural Look Protector Plus
    15) Caulk is missing or deteriorated in some areas around window frames. Recommend caulking where necessary.
    16) A piece of 2 x 4 is attached to siding at rear deck area. Remove 2 x 4, and repair siding if necessary.

    Photo 5  
    2 x 4 piece of wood at rear deck area
     
    Roof Return to table of contents
    Roof inspection method: Viewed from eaves on ladder, Viewed from ground
    Roof type: Gable, Shed, Flat
    Roof covering: Asphalt or fiberglass composition shingles
    Estimated age of roof: Approx. 5-10 years
    Gutter & downspout material: None
    Roof ventilation: Inadequate
    17) A section of the roof is sloped down towards a flat section of the roof on the north side. Organic debris such as leaves or needles are more likely to accumulate in this area rather than rest of the roof and may result in leaks. Recommend monitoring this area for accumulated debris in the future and cleaning as necessary. Same flat roof will not allow proper runoff of water. Recommend installing gutter on soffit above this roof to allow rainwater to runoff away from structure. Buyer is considering utilizing this area as a deck area.

    Photo 8  
    Side roof at north side will not allow runoff of water

    18) Masonry chimney mortar is deteriorated. Recommend having a qualified chimney service contractor or mason evaluate chimney and repair as necessary. This will likely require repointing the mortar.
    19) Significant amounts of organic debris (leaves, needles, etc.) are on the roof. Recommend cleaning roof.
    20) Trees are overhanging roof and are within 10 feet of roof vertically. Recommend pruning trees so they're at least 10 feet above roof, or don't overhang the roof.

    Photo 9  
    Tree branches overhanging roof at various areas
     
    Built-in garage (Nortwest corner facing east) Return to table of contents

    21) The vehicle door is manual operated. It may need repairs to operate correctly. Recommend having a qualified garage door contractor evaluate and repair as necessary.
    22) Unable to observe outlets due to items stored along walls. Recommend having electrician evaluate and install GFCI outlets.
    23) Isolated wire is not terminated within a junction box. Recommend having qualified electrical contractor evaluate and terminate wire properly.

    Photo 11  
    Isolated wire not terminated.

    24) The inside perimeter of the garage is excluded from this inspection due to lack of access from stored items.
    Part of this garage has been utilized as an exercise room. Rest of garage is currently used for storage.

    25)   No Ground Fault Circuit Interrupter (GFCI) devices (outlets or circuit breakers) are visible in garage interior. GFCI devices help prevent electric shocks in areas that may have water present. Recommend having a qualified, licensed electrician install GFCI protection.
    Appliances that could be damaged or cause unreasonable inconvenience if power is lost, should not be plugged into GFCI outlets.

    GFCI's don't do well on circuits for motor driven appliances because they can become damaged by motor surges. Computers, security systems, and appliances like refrigerators, and freezers should not be plugged into GFCI outlets.
     
    Built-in garage (northeast corner facing north) Return to table of contents

    26) The garage vehicle door is a manual operated door. It may need to have some repairs performed. Recommend having a qualified garage door contractor evaluate and repair as necessary.
    27) Extension cords used throughout this area. Recommend having a qualified electrical contractor evaluate and install new outlets and wiring where required.
    28) Unprotected, surface-run, non-metallic sheathed wiring. Recommend having a qualified electrician evaluate and repair as necessary. Possible solutions include rewiring using exterior-rated conduit, or re-routing the wiring through wall cavities.
    29) Wire connections exposed due to missing cover plate(s) over one or more junction boxes. Recommend installing cover plates over boxes where missing.

    Photo 10  
    Open junction boxes at east garage

    30) The inside perimeter of the garage is excluded from this inspection due to lack of access from stored items.
    This area is currently used as a work shop and storage

    31)   No Ground Fault Circuit Interrupter (GFCI) devices (outlets or circuit breakers) are visible in garage interior. GFCI devices help prevent electric shocks in areas that may have water present. Recommend having a qualified, licensed electrician install GFCI protection.
    Appliances that could be damaged or cause unreasonable inconvenience if power is lost, should not be plugged into GFCI outlets.

    GFCI's don't do well on circuits for motor driven appliances because they can become damaged by motor surges. Computers, security systems, and appliances like refrigerators, and freezers should not be plugged into GFCI outlets.
     
    Electric service panel-upstairs Return to table of contents
    Primary service type: Overhead
    Primary service overload protection type: Circuit breakers
    Service amperage (amps): 200
    Service voltage (volts): 120-240
    Location of main service panel: 2nd floor northwest closet
    Location of main disconnect: Breaker at top of main panel
    Service conductor material: Aluminum
    Main disconnect rating (amps): 100
    Branch circuit wiring type: Non-metallic sheathed
    32) When attempting to energize a breaker from the "Off" position, the breaker tripped. Recommend having qualified electrician evaluate cause of trip, and all breakers, and recommend repais.
    33) Exposed wiring exists in the main service panel due to covers missing from open circuit breaker slots. Recommend installing covers in open slots. Open circuit breaker slots are covered with tape. Recommend installing proper slot covers.
     
    Main Electric service (NW garage-north wall) Return to table of contents
    Primary service type: Overhead
    Primary service overload protection type: Circuit breakers
    Service amperage (amps): 200
    Service voltage (volts): 120-240
    Location of main service panel: northwest garage north wall
    Location of sub panels: next to main service panel
    Location of main disconnect: Breaker at top of main panel
    Service conductor material: Aluminum
    Main disconnect rating (amps): 100
    Branch circuit wiring type: Non-metallic sheathed
    Solid strand aluminum branch circuit wiring present: No
    Smoke detectors present: Yes
    34) One or more circuit breakers are "double tapped", where 2 or more wires are clamped in a circuit breaker terminal, and the circuit breaker is only designed for 1 wire. This is a safety hazard since wires may loosen and cause arcing, sparking and fires. Recommend having a qualified, licensed electrician evaluate and repair.

    Photo 12  
    Double tapping at main service box in north garage

    35) One or more smoke detectors is damaged or missing, and an insufficient number of smoke detectors are installed. Recommend replacing inoperable smoke detectors as necessary, and installing additional smoke detectors as necessary so a functioning one exists in each hallway leading to bedrooms, and in each bedroom. For more information on smoke detectors visit http://www.cpsc.gov/cpscpub/pubs/5077.html

    http://store.yahoo.com/flyyourflag/smokecoalarm.html

    http://www.walmart.com/catalog/product.gsp?product_id=1586928

    http://www.cleansweepsupply.com/pages/skugroup27432.html
     
    Water heater south room behind stairs Return to table of contents
    Estimated age: 6 years
    Type: Tank
    Energy source: Electricity
    Capacity (in gallons): 30
    Brand & model: Whirlpool Model# E1F40RD045V s/n: 0043110246
     
    Water heater in laundry room area Return to table of contents
    Estimated age: 6 years
    Type: Tank
    Energy source: Electricity
    Capacity (in gallons): 30
    Brand & model: Whirlpool Model# E1F50RD045V s/n: 0041115329
    36) Area on copper pipe at water supply shut-off valve handle area is showing signs of corrosion. Recommend cleaning off with proper cleaner and monitor for further corrision.

    Photo 13  
    Corrision buildup at inlet valve area of hot water heater in laundry room
     
    Heating and air conditioning Return to table of contents
    Heating system energy source: Natural gas
    Heat system type: Forced air
    A/C energy source: Electric
    Air conditioning type: Split system
    Distribution system: Sheet metal ducts
    Brand & model: Armstrong Model# GUK075D14-2B s/n: 8496L14380
    Location of filter(s): Right side of furnace facing front
    37) Because of the age and/or condition of this furnace, recommend that a qualified heating and cooling technician inspect the heat exchanger and perform a Carbon Monoxide test when it's serviced.
    38) Last service date of this system is more than one year ago or is unable to be determined. Recommend asking seller when it was last serviced. If unable to determine or if more than one year ago, recommend that this system be inspected, cleaned, serviced and repaired if necessary by a qualified heating and cooling technician. Recommend that this servicing be made annually in the future.
    39) This system is equipped with throw-away filter(s). They appear to be dirty. Recommend replacing filter(s) now and every 2 months in the future if the thermostat's fan position is set to "Auto", or monthly if it's set to "On".
    40) Air Conditioning condenser unit is not level. This can lead to stress on piping, and improper operation of unit. Suggest having an HVAC technician evaluate.

    Photo 14  
    Air conditioning condenser unit not level
     
    Attic Return to table of contents
    Inspection method: Not inspected
    Roof structure type: Not visible
    Ceiling structure: Not visible
    Insulation material: None visible
    41) No accessible attic spaces found or inspected at this property.
     
    Plumbing Return to table of contents
    Location of main water shut-off valve: Southeast corner inside east garage
    Location of main water meter: N/A
    Location of main fuel shut-off: Upper right of furnace facing front
    Water service: Private
    Service pipe material: Copper, Galvanized steel
    Supply pipe material: Copper, Galvanized steel
    Vent pipe material: Plastic, Galvanized steel
    Drain pipe material: Plastic
    Waste pipe material: Plastic, Cast iron
    42) Recommend having septic tank inspected. Recommend pumping tank if last pumped more than 3 years ago.
     
    Basement Return to table of contents
    Insulation material underneath floor above: None visible
    Pier or support post material: Not visible
    Beam material: Built up wood
    Floor structure above: Not visible
    43) One or more open ground, 3-pronged outlets. Recommend having a qualified electrician evaluate and either replace these outlets with 2-pronged outlets or establish a proper ground wires as necessary.
    44) One or more hot-neutral reversed outlets. Recommend having a qualified electrician evaluate and repair as necessary.
    45) No handrails exist at stairs leading to basement. Recommend installing graspable handrails for safety considerations
    46) One or more outlets are loose. This situation can cause sparking and possible shock. Recommend having qualified electrician evaluate and repair outlets so they are anchored correctly.
    47) What appears to be a plumbing relief valve is shown coming through basement ceiling in the recreation room. Buyer may want to ask seller the purpose of this item.

    Photo 15  
    Not sure purpose of this pipe termination at ceiling of basement
     
    Well Return to table of contents
    Location of well equipment: Southeast interior corner of east garage.
    Location of tank shut off valve: Next to well tank
    48) Recommend having the well water tested for bacteria by a qualified lab.
     
    Kitchen - Main floor Return to table of contents

    49) One or more open ground, 3-pronged outlets. Recommend having a qualified electrician evaluate and either replace these outlets with 2-pronged outlets or establish a proper ground wires as necessary.
    50) One or more hot-neutral reversed outlets. Recommend having a qualified electrician evaluate and repair as necessary.
    51) No ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) devices (outlets or circuit breakers) are visible. GFCI devices help prevent electric shocks in areas that may have water present. Recommend having a qualified, licensed electrician install GFCI protection for outlets.

    Class A GFCIs are for personnel protection and are supposed to trip at 4 ma to 6 ma.

    Class B GFCIs are for equipment protection and are supposed to trip at 20 ma.

    52) Vinyl floor deteriorated (cracks or tears) in wet area. Recommend repairing or replacing vinyl floor to prevent water from infiltrating subfloor.
    53) The range hood fan vents into the kitchen rather than outside. If the client wants this fan vented outside, then recommend having a qualified contractor install a duct and vent cap, and make any other modifications as necessary and as per standard building practices.
     
    Kitchen - Upstairs Return to table of contents

    54) One or more open ground, 3-pronged outlets. Recommend having a qualified electrician evaluate and either replace these outlets with 2-pronged outlets or establish a proper ground wires as necessary.
    55) One or more outlets show no power. Recommend having qualified electrician evaluate and repair. (See "Electric Service-Upstairs") for further related electrical concerns.
    56) No ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) devices (outlets or circuit breakers) are visible. GFCI devices help prevent electric shocks in areas that may have water present. Recommend having a qualified, licensed electrician install GFCI protection for outlets.

    Class A GFCIs are for personnel protection and are supposed to trip at 4 ma to 6 ma.

    Class B GFCIs are for equipment protection and are supposed to trip at 20 ma.
     
    Bathroom - Upstairs Return to table of contents

    57) No electric outlets in bathroom. Recomend having a qualified electrician evaluate and install a GFCI outlet where required.
    58) Tiles show deterioration in grout. Suggest repair or replace grout where worn or missing.
    59) Tub drains slowly. Recommend clearing drain.
    60) Flexible drain pipe is installed at one or more sink drains. This type of pipe accumulates debris more readily than standard, smooth pipe and is known to clog easily. Recommend having a qualified, licensed plumbing contractor replace this flexible pipe with standard drain components.
    61) Door binds in jamb and is difficult to operate. Recommend repairing door so it opens and closes easily.
    62) Caulk above tub at wall is deteriorated. Recommend removing old caulk and applying a new bead of tub-tile caulk where tub meets wall surface to prevent water damage to wall materials.
    63) Caulk below tub at floor is deteriorated. Recommend removing old caulk and applying a new bead of tub-tile caulk where tub meets flooring to prevent water damage to floor materials.
    64) Recommend caulking around the base of the tub faucet to prevent water damage to wall materials.
     
    Bathroom - Main Floor Return to table of contents

    65) Tiles show deterioration in grout. Suggest repair or replace grout where worn or missing.
    66) One or more bathrooms with a shower don't have an exhaust fan installed. Even if a window that opens exists, it may not provide adequate ventilation, especially during cold weather when the window is less likely to be opened. Recommend having a qualified contractor install an exhaust fan, duct and vent cap as per standard building practices in bathrooms with showers where missing.
    67) Tub drains slowly. Recommend clearing drain.
    68) Caulk needs repair around the base one or more tub faucets. Recommend applying a bead of caulk around the base of tub faucets where necessary.
    69) Caulk above tub at wall is deteriorated. Recommend removing old caulk and applying a new bead of tub-tile caulk where tub meets wall surface to prevent water damage to wall materials.
    70) Caulk below tub at floor is deteriorated. Recommend removing old caulk and applying a new bead of tub-tile caulk where tub meets flooring to prevent water damage to floor materials.
    71) Recommend caulking around the base of the tub faucet to prevent water damage to wall materials.
     
    Laundry Room - In basement Return to table of contents
    Gas Pipe: Not Present
    72) No ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) devices (outlets or circuit breakers) are visible. GFCI devices help prevent electric shocks in areas that may have water present. Recommend having a qualified, licensed electrician install GFCI protection for outlets.

    Class A GFCIs are for personnel protection and are supposed to trip at 4 ma to 6 ma.

    Class B GFCIs are for equipment protection and are supposed to trip at 20 ma.

    73) The clothes dryer is equipped with a plastic (vinyl) or foil, accordion-type, flexible duct. The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission considers these types of ducts to be unsafe, and a fire hazard. The flexible plastic or foil type duct can more easily trap lint and is more susceptible to kinks or crushing, which can greatly reduce the airflow. Recommend replacing the duct with a rigid or corrugated semi-rigid metal duct. Most manufacturers specify the use of a rigid or corrugated semi-rigid metal duct, which provides maximum airflow. For more information on dryer safety issues, see http://www.cpsc.gov/CPSCPUB/PUBS/5022.html
    74) Laundry sink isn't anchored to wall or floor. Recommend having a qualified contractor securely anchor sink to wall and/or floor to prevent damage to water supply and/or drainage pipes and causing leaks.

    Photo 16  
    Laundry tub not anchored

    75) There is no exhaust fan in the laundry room. Recommend you install or have a professional install one. This will minimize any moisture and heat buildup in the room.
    76) Washer and dryer both present within this room.
     
    Dining Room Return to table of contents

    77) Relatively few outlets are installed in one or more interior rooms. This can result in "octopus" wiring with extension cords, which is a fire hazard. Recommend having a qualified electrician evaluate and install additional outlets as necessary and as per the current National Electric Code.
    78) One or more outlets are loose. This situation can cause sparking and possible shock hazard to occupants. Recommend having qualified electrician evaluate and repair so outlets are properly anchored.
    79) Minor cracks found in ceiling. Although these cracks appear cosmetic, suggest that a qualified dry wall contractor evaluate and recommend course of action.

    Photo 18  
    Dining room ceiling shows signs of needing repair

    80) Wallpaper at northeast corner of room is peeling. This may be the result of a moisture situation at wall. Recommend having a dry wall contractor evaluate and repair, if required.

    Photo 17  
    Wallpaper peeling off northeast corner of dining room
     
    Living Room Return to table of contents

    81) Relatively few outlets are installed in one or more interior rooms. This can result in "octopus" wiring with extension cords, which is a fire hazard. Recommend having a qualified electrician evaluate and install additional outlets as necessary and as per the current National Electric Code.
    82) 2-pronged outlets rather than 3-pronged, grounded outlets are installed in one or more interior rooms. This limits the ability to use appliances that require a ground (computers and some other electronic appliances) in these areas. If client intends to operate electronic devices requiring a ground, then recommend having a qualified electrian evaluate and install grounded outlets where necessary and as per the current National Electric Code.
    83) Minor cracks found in ceiling. Although these cracks appear minor, recommend having a dry wall contractor evaluate and make recommendations.
    84) Floor slopes in one direction or is uneven throughout the room. This may be caused by the transition of floor from front porch area into living room

    Sloping can be caused by foundation settlement and is normally not a problem with most homes, especially older homes. However consulting with a qualified carpenter or engineer would be suggested.

    Uneveness of floors can be caused by failure of floor joists, movement of beams moving up or the house moving down. Again, consulting a carpenter or engineer would be prudent.
     
    Bedroom #3 (upstairs on left) Return to table of contents

    85) One or more open ground, 3-pronged outlets. Recommend having a qualified electrician evaluate and either replace these outlets with 2-pronged outlets or establish a proper ground wires as necessary.
    86) One or more hot-neutral reversed outlets. Recommend having a qualified electrician evaluate and repair as necessary.
    87) Relatively few outlets are installed in one or more interior rooms. This can result in "octopus" wiring with extension cords, which is a fire hazard. Recommend having a qualified electrician evaluate and install additional outlets as necessary and as per the current National Electric Code.
    88) Door binds in jamb and is difficult to operate. Recommend repairing door so it opens and closes easily. Rubs against carpet.
    89) Carpeting in one or more rooms is loose. Recommend having a qualified carpeting installation contractor restretch carpet as necessary.
     
    Bedroom #5 (upstairs straight ahead) Return to table of contents

    90) One or more hot-neutral reversed outlets. Recommend having a qualified electrician evaluate and repair as necessary.
    91) Carpeting in one or more rooms is loose. Recommend having a qualified carpeting installation contractor restretch carpet as necessary.
     
    Bedroom #2 (off of dining room) Return to table of contents

    92) Relatively few outlets are installed in one or more interior rooms. This can result in "octopus" wiring with extension cords, which is a fire hazard. Recommend having a qualified electrician evaluate and install additional outlets as necessary and as per the current National Electric Code.
    93) Carpeting in one or more rooms is loose. Recommend having a qualified carpeting installation contractor restretch carpet as necessary.
     
    Bedroom #4 (upstairs on right) Return to table of contents

    94) One or more open ground, 3-pronged outlets. Recommend having a qualified electrician evaluate and either replace these outlets with 2-pronged outlets or establish a proper ground wires as necessary.
    95) One or more hot-neutral reversed outlets. Recommend having a qualified electrician evaluate and repair as necessary.
    96) Relatively few outlets are installed in one or more interior rooms. This can result in "octopus" wiring with extension cords, which is a fire hazard. Recommend having a qualified electrician evaluate and install additional outlets as necessary and as per the current National Electric Code.
    97) Window(s) won't lock. Recommend repairing locking hardware to allow window(s) to lock.
    98) Door binds in jamb and is difficult to operate. Recommend repairing door so it opens and closes easily.
    99) Carpeting in one or more rooms is loose. Recommend having a qualified carpeting installation contractor restretch carpet as necessary.
     
    Bedroom #1 (Downstairs off living room) Return to table of contents

    100) Relatively few outlets are installed in one or more interior rooms. This can result in "octopus" wiring with extension cords, which is a fire hazard. Recommend having a qualified electrician evaluate and install additional outlets as necessary and as per the current National Electric Code.
    101) The window pully mechanism does not allow window to stay open. Suggest you obtain the services of a professional to repair or replace.
    102) One or more doors don't latch when closed. Recommend making repairs as necessary, such as adjusting latch plates or lockset mechanisms as necessary.
    103) Carpeting in one or more rooms is loose. Recommend having a qualified carpeting installation contractor restretch carpet as necessary.
     
    Congratulations on the purchase of your new home. Although we never know who will be occupying or visiting a propert, whether it be children or the elderly; we ask you to consider following these general safety recommendations: Install smoke and carbon monoxide detectors, identify all excape and rescue points; rehearse an emergency evacuation of the home with ALL members og your family;upgrade older electrical systems by , at least, adding grounf fault outlets; never service any electrical equipment yourself. If you must, be sure to disconnect the power source;

    The Parties Understood and Agreed as follows:

    1. INSPECTOR GUARANTEES to perform a visual inspection of the home and to provide CLIENT with a written inspection report identifying the defects that INSPECTOR both observed and deemed material. INSPECTOR may offer comments as a courtesy, but these comments will not comprise the bargained-for report. The report is only supplementary to the sellers disclosure.

    2. INSPECTOR agrees to perform the inspection in accordance to the current Standards of Practice of the National Association of Certified Home Inspectors posted at http://www.nachi.org/sop.htm.

    3. CLIENT understands that the inspection will be performed in accordance to the aforementioned Standards, which contain certain limitations, exceptions, and exclusions.

    4. Log Home Disclaimer for General Home Inspection

    Hidden Wood Decay:
    Although the Inspector uses techniques such as resonance testing (tapping), probing and visual examination in an effort to determine the presence of wood decay in the logs of log structures, these techniques are not technically exhaustive and will not reveal the presence of wood decay hidden in inaccessible places, such as log cores and/or the intersections of log walls. For this reason, locating hidden decay in logs incorporated into the structure of log homes lies beyond the scope of the General Home Inspection.

    Compliance with Manufacturer’s Specifications:
    Because there exists a multitude of log home builders offering both Manufactured and Handcrafted homes, each using a method often of their own choosing and invention and often requiring that the contractor building or assembling the home adhere to a similar multitude of proprietary engineering specifications, the adherence to most of which cannot be confirmed without disassembly of the relevant home component, inspecting for compliance with Manufacturer’s Specifications lies beyond the scope of the General Home Inspection.

    Compliance to Standards:
    Confirming compliance with any Standards set forth by any organization or association relating to log home construction lies beyond the scope of The General Home Inspection.


    5. The inspection and report are performed and prepared for the use of CLIENT, who gives INSPECTOR permission to discuss observations with real estate agents, owners, repair persons and other interested parties. INSPECTOR accepts no responsibility for use or misinterpretation by third parties.

    6. INSPECTOR does not perform engineering, architectural, plumbing, or any other job function requiring an occupational license in the jurisdiction where the inspection is taking place, unless the inspector holds a valid occupational license, in which case he/she may inform the CLIENT that he/she is so licensed, and is therefore qualified to go beyond this basic home inspection, and for additional fee, perform additional inspections beyond those within the scope of the basic home inspection.

    7. In the event of a claim against INSPECTOR, CLIENT agrees to supply INSPECTOR with the following: (1) Written notification of adverse conditions within 14 days of discovery, and (2) Access to the premises. Failure to comply with the above conditions will release INSPECTOR and its agents from any and all obligations.

    8. HOLD HARMLESS AGREEMENT: CLIENT agrees to hold any and all real estate agents involved in the purchase of the property to be inspected harmless and keep them exonerated from all loss, damage, liability or expense occasioned or claimed by reasons of acts or neglects of the INSPECTOR or his employees or visitors or of independent contractors engaged or paid by INSPECTOR for the purpose of inspecting the subject home.

    9. In the event that CLIENT fails to prove any adverse claims against INSPECTOR in a court of law, then the CLIENT will pay all legal costs, expenses and fees of INSPECTOR in defending said claims.

    10. If any provision of this Agreement is declared invalid or unenforceable by any court, the remaining provisions will remain in effect. This agreement represents the entire agreement between the parties. No change or modification shall be enforceable against any party unless such change or modification is in writing and signed by the parties. This Agreement shall be binding upon and enforceable by the parties and their heirs, executors, administrators, successors and assigns. CLIENT shall have no cause of action against INSPECTOR after one year after from the date of the inspection.

    11. Payment, by CLIENT or CLIENTs representative, is due in full at the inspection site, upon completion of the on-site inspection. The CLIENT will pay all legal and time expenses incurred in collecting due payments.




    "A Home Inspection is a Non-Invasive Visual Examination of a Residential Dwelling. Components may include any combination of mechanical, structural, electrical, plumbing, or other essential systems or portions of the home, as identified and agreed to by the Client and Inspector, such as: Roof ~ Exterior ~ Basement / Foundation ~ Heating Cooling ~ Plumbing ~ Electrical ~ Fireplace ~ Attic & Insulation ~ Doors, Windows & Interior."
    From NACHI Standards of Practice


    "There are conditions that require the removal of some part of the building to observe, measure, or test otherwise concealed construction. Such intrusive inspections require some demolition and should be performed only with the permission of the owner and by experienced, qualified mechanics."
    -From the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development's
    Residential Rehabilitation Inspection Guide, 2000


    - HOMES BEING INSPECTED DO NOT "PASS" OR "FAIL" -
    A home inspector merely discloses his or her findings and reports those findings to the client. Everyone involved graduates to a state of higher learning, and the client can now make better informed decisions about the purchase of a home and its future needs of upkeep and repair.

    Four key areas of most home/building inspections cover the exterior, the basement or crawlspace areas, the attic or crawlspace areas and the living areas. Inspectors typically will spend sufficient time in all of these areas to visually look for a host of red flags, tell-tale clues and signs or defects and deficiencies.

    The inspected areas of a home/building will consist of all of the major visible and accessible electro-mechanical systems as well as the major visible and accessible structural systems and components of a building as they appeared and functioned at the time and date of the inspection.

    Inspectors typically do not provide warranties or guaranties with their inspections and reports. Buyers should therefore not rely on the inspection as any form of insurance policy against any latent, hidden, concealed or future defects and deficiencies.

    The following are also some key items that buyers should remember and consider when reviewing their inspection reports:
    * Inspections are not code compliance evaluations.
    * Inspection reports are not structural engineering reports.
    * Systems and components that are off during the inspection are not tested or reactivated.
    * Buyers should consult with and ask questions of owners and their representatives.
    * Roof inspections and their components are typically done from eaves or street level with binoculars.
    * Reports are confidential and are meant exclusively for buyers, and not brokers or owners.
    * Inspectors typically will not find each and every defect in a building, hence buyers should anticipate future typical defects and deficiencies.
    * Further evaluation by specialists is recommended for any areas showing defects/deficiencies.
    * A final walk-through inspection should be carried out the day before closing by the new owners to double check the condition of the building.



    Limitations:
    I. An inspection is not technically exhaustive.
    II. An inspection will not identify concealed or latent defects.
    III. An inspection will not deal with aesthetic concerns or what could be deemed matters of taste, cosmetic, etc.
    IV. An inspection will not determine the suitability of the property for any use.
    V. An inspection does not determine the market value of the property or its marketability.
    VI. An inspection does not determine the advisability or inadvisability of the purchase of the inspected property.
    VII. An inspection does not determine the life expectancy of the property or any components or systems therein.
    VIII. An inspection does not include items not permanently installed.
    IX. These Standards of Practice apply only to homes with four or fewer dwelling units.

    Exclusions:
    I. The inspectors are not required to determine:
    A. Property boundary lines or encroachments.
    B. The condition of any component or system that is not readily accessible.
    C. The service life expectancy of any component or system.
    D. The size, capacity, BTU, performance, or efficiency of any component or system.
    E. The cause or reason of any condition.
    F. The cause for the need of repair or replacement of any system or component.
    G. Future conditions.
    H. The compliance with codes or regulations.
    I. The presence of evidence of rodents, animals or insects.
    J. The presence of mold, mildew or fungus.
    K. The presence of air-borne hazards.
    L. The presence of birds.
    M. The presence of other flora or fauna.
    N. The air quality.
    O. The existence of asbestos.
    P. The existence of environmental hazards.
    Q. The existence of electro-magnetic fields.
    R. The presence of hazardous materials including, but not limited to, the presence of lead in paint.
    S. Any hazardous waste conditions.
    T. Any manufacturer recalls or conformance with manufacturer installation or any information included in the consumer protection bulletin.
    U. Operating costs of systems.
    V. Replacement or repair cost estimates.
    W. The acoustical properties of any systems.
    X. Estimates of how much it will cost to run any given system.

    II. The inspectors are not required to operate:
    A. Any system that is shut down.
    B. Any system that does not function properly.
    C. Or evaluate low voltage electrical systems such as, but not limited to:
    1. Phone lines.
    2. Cable lines.
    3. Antennae.
    4. Lights.
    5. Remote controls.
    D. Any system that does not turn on with the use of normal operating controls.
    E. Any shut off valve.
    F. Any electrical disconnect or over current protection devices.
    G. Any alarm systems.
    H. Moisture meters, gas detectors or similar equipment.



    III. The inspectors are not required to:

    A. Move any personal items or other obstructions,
    such as, but not limited to:

    1. Throw rugs.
    2. Furniture.
    3. Floor or wall coverings.
    4. Ceiling tiles
    5. Window coverings.
    6. Equipment.
    7. Plants.
    8. Ice.
    9. Debris.
    10. Snow.
    11. Water.
    12. Dirt.
    13. Foliage.
    14. Pets

    B. Dismantle, open, or uncover any system or component.
    C. Enter or access any area which may, in the opinion of the inspector, to be unsafe or risk personal safety.
    D. Enter crawlspaces or other areas that are unsafe or not readily accessible.
    E. Inspect underground items such as, but not limited to, underground storage tanks or other indications of their presence, whether abandoned or actively used.
    F. Do anything which, in the inspector's opinion, is likely to be unsafe or dangerous to the inspector or others or damage property, such as, but not limited to, walking on roof surfaces, climbing ladders, entering attic spaces or negotiating with dogs.
    G. Inspect decorative items.
    H. Inspect common elements or areas in multi-unit housing.
    I. Inspect intercoms, speaker systems, radio-controlled, security devices or lawn irrigation systems.
    J. Offer guarantees or warranties.
    K. Offer or perform any engineering services.
    L. Offer or perform any trade or professional service other than home inspection.
    M. Research the history of the property, report on its potential for alteration, modification, extendibility, or its suitability for a specific or proposed use for occupancy.
    N. Determine the age of construction or installation of any system structure, or component of a building, or differentiate between original construction or subsequent additions, improvements, renovations or replacements thereto.
    O. Determine the insurability of a property.