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Level Home Consultants


245 N Sigsbee St 
Indianapolis IN 46214-3885
Inspector: Steven Everhart
HI00500478

  

Property Inspection Report

Client(s):  Krusnic
Property address:  11522 Newport Dr.
Indianapolis, IN
Inspection date:  Saturday, April 18, 2015

This report published on Saturday, April 18, 2015 11:13:14 PM EDT

This report is issued for the sole and exclusive use of the client listed above, and is an impartial opinion, which is not a warranty that the items listed within are defect free, or that latent or concealed defects may exist as of the date of this inspection, or which may have existed in the past or may exist in the future. The report is limited to the components of the property which were visible to the inspector on the date of the inspection and his opinion of their condition at the time of this inspection. The client has read and signed the attached contract which is part of this inspection report.
How to Read this Report
This report is organized by the property's functional areas.  Within each functional area, descriptive information is listed first and is shown in bold type.  Items of concern follow descriptive information. Concerns are shown and sorted according to these types:
SafetyPoses a risk of injury or death
Major DefectCorrection likely involves a significant expense
Repair/ReplaceRecommend repairing or replacing
Repair/MaintainRecommend repair and/or maintenance
Minor DefectCorrection likely involves only a minor expense
MaintainRecommend ongoing maintenance
EvaluateRecommend evaluation by a specialist
MonitorRecommend monitoring in the future
CommentFor your information

Click here for a glossary of building construction terms.Contact your inspector If there are terms that you do not understand, or visit the glossary of construction terms at http://www.reporthost.com/glossary.asp

Table of Contents
General information
Roof
Exterior
Garage
Electric service
Heating and cooling
Water heater
Fireplaces, woodstoves and chimneys
Kitchen
Bathrooms
Interior rooms
Attic
Crawl space


General information
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Report number: 15083
Structures inspected: House and attached garage
Type of building: Single family
Age of building: 60
Time started: 9am
Time finished: 11:30am
Inspection Fee: $350.00
Payment method: Check
Present during inspection: Client(s), Realtor(s)
Occupied: Yes
Weather conditions during inspection: Dry (no rain)
Weather conditions: Partly cloudy
Temperature: Warm
Ground condition: Damp
Main entrance faces: East
Foundation type: Crawlspace
The following items are excluded from this inspection: Security system, Shed, Low voltage outdoor lighting, Water filtration system, Water softener system, Intercom system
Roof
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Roof inspection method: Traversed
Roof type: Cross-hipped
Roof covering: Asphalt or fiberglass composition shingles
Estimated age of roof: 3-5
Gutter & downspout material: Aluminum
Roof ventilation: Adequate
1) Repair/Maintain, Monitor - There is no flashing on the electrical masthead.
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Photo 1-1
 

2) Maintain - Trees and/or shrubs are in contact with or are close to the roof edge(s) in one or more areas. Damage to the roof may result, especially during high winds. Vegetation can also act as a conduit for wood destroying insects. Vegetation should be pruned back and/or removed as necessary to prevent damage and infestation by wood destroying insects.
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Exterior
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Footing material: Not Visible
Foundation material: Concrete block
Apparent wall structure: Wood frame
Wall covering: Brick veneer
Driveway material: Poured in place concrete aggregate
Sidewalk material: Poured in place concrete
Exterior door material: Hollow core wood
3) Safety, Repair/Replace, Evaluate - One or more outdoor electric receptacles appear to have no ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate to determine if GFCI protection exists, and if not, repairs should be made so that all outdoor receptacles within six feet six inches of ground level have GFCI protection. For example, install GFCI receptacles or circuit breaker(s) as needed.
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4) Safety, Repair/Replace - Waterproof cover(s) over one or more electric receptacles are damaged, improperly installed or broken. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock and fire. Damaged covers should be replaced where necessary.
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5) Safety, Minor Defect - One or more wall-mounted exterior light fixtures have wiring that's subject to water intrusion due to caulk not being installed around the light fixture's back plate. Caulk should be applied around the perimeter of back plates where missing. A gap should be left at the bottom for condensation to drain out.
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6) Repair/Replace, Evaluate - One or more driveway drains appear to be clogged. Water may accumulate at the structure or in low spots as a result. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary.
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7) Repair/Replace, Evaluate - Minor cracks were found in one or more sections of brick veneer. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary, such as repointing mortar to prevent water intrusion and further deterioration in the future.
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8) Repair/Replace - One or more downspouts have no extensions, or have extensions that are ineffective. This can result in water accumulating around the structure's foundation, or in basements and crawl spaces if they exist. Accumulated water is a conducive condition to wood destroying insects and organisms, and may also cause the foundation to settle and possibly fail over time. Repairs should be made as necessary, such as installing or repositioning splash blocks, or installing and/or repairing tie-ins to underground drain lines, so rain water is carried at least several feet away from the structure to soil that slopes down and away from the structure.
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9) Repair/Replace - One or more gutters are leaking. This can result in water accumulating around the structure's foundation, or in basements and crawl spaces if they exist. Accumulated water is a conducive condition to wood destroying insects and organisms, and may also cause the foundation to settle and possibly fail over time. A qualified contractor should install gutters and downspouts where missing. Also, extensions such as splashblocks or tie-ins to underground drain lines should be installed as necessary to carry rain water away from the house.
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10) Repair/Replace - One or more crawlspace vents are below or near grade with no well to prevent rainwater from entering. This can lead to water entering and accumulating in the crawl space, and is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects and organisms. A qualified contractor should install wells where necessary.
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11) Repair/Replace - Gaps exist at one or more openings around the exterior, such as those where outside faucets, refrigerant lines, and/or gas supply pipes penetrate the exterior. Gaps should be sealed as necessary to prevent moisture intrusion and entry by vermin.
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Photo 11-1
 

12) Repair/Maintain - Gutters are full of debris and need to be cleaned out.
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13) Repair/Maintain - Vegetation such as trees, shrubs and/or vines are in contact with or less than one foot from the structure's exterior. Vegetation can serve as a conduit for wood destroying insects and may retain moisture against the exterior after it rains. Vegetation should be pruned and/or removed as necessary to maintain a one foot clearance between it and the structure's exterior.
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14) Repair/Maintain - The side door stoop foundation and brick are breaking up
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15) Repair/Maintain - Rear patio steps have settled and sloped heavily. This could be a hazard if wet or icy.
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16) Repair/Maintain - Stepping stones are very uneven and need to be level to eliminate trip hazards
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Garage
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17) Safety, Repair/Replace, Evaluate - The auto-reverse mechanism on the vehicle door opener is inoperable or requires too much force to activate. This is a safety hazard, especially for small children. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary. For more information on garage door safety issues, visit:
http://www.cpsc.gov/cpscpub/pubs/523.html
http://www.ohdstl.com/safety.html
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Photo 17-1
 

18) Safety, Repair/Replace, Evaluate - The pull-down attic stairs in the attached garage ceiling aren't fire-rated. This ceiling should have a one-hour fire rating to slow or prevent the spread of fire from the attached garage to attic spaces above the living areas. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make modifications to these stairs as necessary so they have a one hour fire rating. Other options include removing them or replacing them with commercially made, fire-rated stairs. Examples of possible solutions include:

http://www.calvertusa.com/
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Photo 18-1
 

19) Safety, Repair/Replace, Evaluate - One or more sets of stairs are wobbly and don't close properly. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary, such as installing additional supports and/or diagonal bracing.
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Photo 19-1
 

20) Safety, Repair/Replace, Evaluate - One or more garage electric receptacles appear to have no ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate to determine if GFCI protection exists, and if not, repairs should be made so that all garage receptacles, except for one for use with a refrigerator or freezer, have GFCI protection. For example, install GFCI receptacles or circuit breaker(s) as needed.
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21) Safety, Repair/Replace, Evaluate - Non-metallic sheathed wiring is routed in one or more areas so it is subject to damage, such as on wall or ceiling surfaces. The insulation can be damaged by objects coming in contact with it and/or it being repeatedly moved. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock and fire. A qualified electrician should evaluate and repair as necessary. For example, rewire using conduit, or re-routing through wall cavities.
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22) Safety, Repair/Replace, Evaluate - Extension cords are being used as permanent wiring in one or more areas. They should only be used for portable equipment on a temporary basis. Using extension cords as permanent wiring poses a fire and shock hazard, and is an indication that wiring is inadequate and should be updated. Extension cords may be undersized. Connections may not be secure, resulting in power fluctuations, damage to equipment, and sparks that could start a fire. Extension cords should be removed as necessary, or a qualified electrician should evaluate and make repairs as necessary. For example, install additional circuits and/or electric receptacles.
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23) Safety, Repair/Replace - The garage-house door poses a fire risk because it's not fire-rated (metal or solid-core construction). A qualified contractor should replace this door with a fire-rated door.
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24) Safety, Repair/Replace - Weatherstrip around or at the bottom of the garage-house door is missing. It should be installed where missing and as necessary to prevent vehicle fumes from entering living spaces.
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25) Safety, Repair/Maintain - There is an on off switch on the front side of the fireplace block area that is still hot
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26) Repair/Maintain - There are holes in the weatherstripping of the OH garage door
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27) Repair/Maintain - The ceiling is cracked at the east end of the fireplace block
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28) Comment - Much of the garage, including areas around the interior perimeter and in the center are excluded from this inspection due to lack of access from stored items.
Electric service
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Primary service type: Overhead
Primary service overload protection type: Circuit breakers
Service amperage (amps): 200
Service voltage (volts): 120/240
Service entrance conductor material: Copper
System ground: Ground rod(s) in soil
Branch circuit wiring type: Non-metallic sheathed
Smoke detectors present: No
29) Safety, Repair/Replace, Evaluate - One or more overcurrent protection devices (circuit breakers or fuses) are "double tapped", where 2 or more wires are clamped in a terminal designed for only one wire. This is a safety hazard since the bolt or screw may tighten securely against one wire, but leave others loose. Arcing, sparks and fires may result. A qualified electrician should evaluate and repair as necessary.
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30) Safety, Minor Defect - One or more screws are missing from the main service panel cover and should be replaced. Because energized wiring may exist behind the holes with the missing screws, recommend that a qualified, licensed electrician replace these screws, or that care be taken to ensure that the new screws do not come in contact with wiring inside the panel when they are installed. Stock screws from the panel manufacturer should be used, or their equivalent.
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31) Repair/Maintain - An outlet along side the main panel is loose on the wall.
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Heating and cooling
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Estimated age: 12
Primary heating system energy source: Electric
Primary heat system type: Forced air, Baseboard, Radiant
Primary A/C energy source: Electric
Primary Air conditioning type: Split system
Distribution system: Sheet metal ducts
Filter location: In Crawlspace
Last service date: 4-21-14
32) Major Defect, Repair/Maintain, Comment - The estimated useful life for most forced air furnaces is 15 to 20 years. This furnace appears to be approaching this age and may need replacing at any time. Recommend budgeting for a replacement in the near future.

Recommend having HVAC unit serviced. According to the tag on the outside it is suppose to be an electric furnace with AC. Couldn't get unit to generate heat.
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33) Major Defect, Comment - The estimated useful life for air conditioning compressors is 8 to 15 years. This unit appears to be approaching this age and may need replacing at any time. Recommend budgeting for a replacement in the near future.
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34) Repair/Replace, Evaluate - The outside condensing unit is not level. Damage may occur if it is more than ten degrees off from level. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary, such as replacing the pad that the condensing unit is installed on.
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35) Maintain - Air handler filter(s) should be checked monthly in the future and replaced or washed as necessary.
Water heater
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Estimated age: 3
Type: Tank
Energy source: Electricity
Capacity (in gallons): 50
Fireplaces, woodstoves and chimneys
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Fireplace type: Masonry
Chimney type: Masonry
36) Safety, Repair/Replace, Evaluate - One or more gaps exist between the fireplace face and the fire box. This is a fire hazard since heat from fires may reach wood wall cavities surrounding the fireplace. A qualified chimney service contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary.
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37) Safety, Repair/Replace, Evaluate - Fire bricks in one or more fireplace fireboxes are loose and/or significantly deteriorated or pitted. This is a fire hazard. A qualified chimney service contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary.
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38) Safety, Repair/Maintain - A hole in the side of the chimney in the garage needs to be filled in properly
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39) Evaluate, Monitor - The block wall on the back side of the fireplace ( in the garage ) is cracked.
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40) Comment - All solid fuel burning appliances (woodstoves and fireplaces, etc.) should be inspected annually by a qualified chimney service contractor, cleaned and repaired as necessary.
Kitchen
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41) Safety, Repair/Replace, Evaluate - Substandard wiring was found for the under-sink food disposal. Unprotected solid-strand, non-metallic sheathed (Romex) wiring is used. The insulation can be damaged by objects coming in contact with it and/or it being repeatedly moved. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock and fire. Armored (BX) cable, or a flexible appliance cord with a plug end and electric outlet should be used. A qualified electrician should evaluate and repair as necessary.
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42) Safety, Repair/Replace, Evaluate - One or more electric receptacles that serve countertop surfaces within six feet of a sink appear to have no ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate to determine if GFCI protection exists, and if not, repairs should be made so that all receptacles that serve countertop surfaces within six feet of sinks have GFCI protection. For example, install GFCI receptacles or circuit breaker(s) as needed.
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43) Repair/Replace, Evaluate - The dishwasher drain line is not configured with a "high loop" or "air gap". A high loop is created by routing the drain line up to the bottom surface of the counter top above, and securely fastening it to that surface. It is meant to prevent water from siphoning out of the dishwasher, and to prevent water from the sink drain or food disposal from entering the dishwasher. Some dishwashers have a built-in high loop where one is not required to be configured in the drain line. The clients should try to determine if a high loop is required for this brand and model of dishwasher (review installation instructions, etc.). If one is required, or it cannot be determined if one is not required, then a qualified contractor should install a high loop as per standard building practices.

Also, no "air gap" is installed. Air gaps are another device meant to prevent water from the sink drain or food disposal from entering the dishwasher. These are required in some municipalities for new construction and when remodeling. The client(s) should consult with a qualified contractor to determine if an air gap should be installed.
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44) Repair/Replace - There is a loose dead wire hanging down along side of the vent fan
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45) Repair/Replace - The range hood fan vents into the attic rather than outdoors. Ventilation may be inadequate and moisture may accumulate. Recommend having a qualified contractor make modifications as necessary as per standard building practices so the range hood fan vents outdoors.
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Bathrooms
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46) Safety, Repair/Replace, Evaluate - One or more electric receptacles that serve countertop surfaces within six feet of a sink appear to have no ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate to determine if GFCI protection exists, and if not, repairs should be made so that all receptacles that serve countertop surfaces within six feet of sinks have GFCI protection. For example, install GFCI receptacles or circuit breaker(s) as needed.
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47) Repair/Maintain - Caulk is missing and/or deteriorated where countertops meet backsplashes in wet areas, such as around sinks. Caulk should be replaced where deteriorated and/or applied where missing to prevent water damage.
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48) Repair/Maintain - One GFCI is in place but doesn't trip with the tester
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Interior rooms
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49) Safety, Repair/Replace, Evaluate - Few electric receptacles and two-pronged receptacles rather than three-pronged, grounded receptacles are installed in one or more interior rooms. This can result in "octopus" wiring with extension cords. Two-prong receptacles are considered unsafe by today's standards, and limit the ability to use appliances that require a ground in these rooms. This is a safety hazard for both fire and shock. Examples of appliances that require grounded receptacles include:

This list is not exhaustive. A qualified electrician should evaluate and install additional receptacles and grounded receptacles as per the client(s)' needs and standard building practices.
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50) Safety, Repair/Replace, Evaluate - One or more open ground, three-pronged electric receptacles were found. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate and make repairs as necessary. For example, replacing receptacles or correcting wiring circuits.

Grounding type receptacles began being required in residential structures during the 1960s. Based on the age of this structure and the presence of 2-pronged receptacles in some areas of this structure, an acceptable repair may be to simply replace the ungrounded 3-pronged receptacles with 2-pronged receptacles. However the following appliances require grounding type receptacles:

This list is not exhaustive. Grounded circuits and receptacles should be installed in locations where such appliances will be used.
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51) Safety, Repair/Replace - An insufficient number of smoke alarms are installed. Additional smoke alarms should be installed as necessary so a functioning one exists in each hallway leading to bedrooms, and in each bedroom. For more information, visit http://www.cpsc.gov/cpscpub/pubs/5077.html
52) Safety, Repair/Replace - Lamp holders or light fixtures with fully or partially exposed bulbs are installed in one or more closets. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of fire. Flammable stored items may come into contact with hot bulbs, and hot fragments from broken bulbs may fall on combustible materials. Standard building practices require closet lighting to use fluorescent light fixtures, or to use fully enclosed incandescent fixtures. Installing a compact fluorescent lamp in a lamp holder is not an acceptable practice. A qualified electrician should replace closet lights as necessary and as per standard building practices.
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53) Safety, Repair/Replace - One or more exterior entrance doors are of hollow-core construction rather than solid core. This may represent a security hazard since these doors are easily broken. Hollow-core, exterior entrance doors should be replaced with solid core doors by a qualified contractor.
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54) Safety, Repair/Replace - One or more entry doors have deadbolts installed with no handle, and require a key to open them from both sides. This can be a safety hazard in the event of a fire when the key is not available. The door cannot be used as an exit then, causing entrapment. Key-only deadbolts should be replaced with deadbolts that have a handle on the inside on entry doors in rooms with no other adequate egress nearby.
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55) Repair/Replace, Evaluate - The sash spring mechanism(s) in one or more windows are broken or loose. A qualified contractor or service technician should evaluate and make repairs as necessary so the window(s) operate as intended (open easily, stay open without support, close easily, etc.).
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56) Repair/Replace, Evaluate - One or more doors bind in their jamb and cannot be closed and latched, or are difficult to open and close. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary. For example, adjusting jambs or trimming doors.
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57) Repair/Replace - Bypass doors guides are missing and doors need to be adjusted up off the carpet.
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58) Repair/Replace - The weatherstrip around one or more exterior entry doors is missing and/or deteriorated. Weatherstrip should be installed where missing and/or replaced where deteriorated, and by a qualified contractor if necessary.
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59) Repair/Replace - Screens in one or more sliding doors are torn or have holes in them. Screens should be replaced where necessary.
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60) Repair/Replace - One or more exterior entrance doors are damaged and/or deteriorated and should be repaired or replaced by a qualified contractor.
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Attic
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Inspection method: Partially traversed
Roof structure type: Rafters
Ceiling structure: Ceiling beams
Insulation material: Fiberglass roll or batt, Cellulose loose fill
61) Safety, Repair/Replace, Evaluate - Paper facing on batt insulation is oriented towards open spaces, rather than against interior space surfaces. This occurs when newer, fiberglass batt insulation with paper facing on one side is installed backwards or upside down, or when older batt insulation wrapped on both sides with paper is installed. The paper facing is flammable. Newer insulation usually has a warning label indicating this on the facing.

For newer batt insulation with paper facing on one side only, the paper facing should be oriented towards interior spaces rather than exposed, open spaces. The existing insulation should be reinstalled or replaced.

For older batt insulation with paper facing on both sides, recommend that repairs be made as necessary to eliminate the exposed paper facing.

A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary, and as per standard building practices and the insulation manufacturer's recommendations to eliminate the fire hazard.

Also, the paper facing also acts as a vapor barrier, and if located away from the interior surfaces, can trap moisture from condensation in the cavity between the paper facing and the interior spaces. This is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects. The inspector was unable to evaluate the structure obscured by the insulation. When repairs are made, the exposed structure should be evaluated for damage by wood destroying insects and/or organisms, and repairs should be made if necessary.
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62) Safety, Repair/Replace, Evaluate - Some wiring is loose, unsupported, or inadequately supported. Standard building practices require non-metallic sheathed wiring to be trimmed to length, attached to runners or to solid backing with fasteners at intervals of 4-1/2 ft. or less. Fasteners should be installed within 12 inches of all enclosures. A qualified, licensed electrician should evaluate and repair as necessary. For example, trim wire to length and/or install staples as needed.
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63) Repair/Replace - The ceiling insulation's R rating is significantly less than what's recommended for this area. Recommend having a qualified contractor install additional insulation as per standard building practices for better energy efficiency.
64) Repair/Replace - Ceiling insulation is uneven in some areas. This is likely due to someone having walked on or through the insulation. Recommend installing additional insulation where necessary to restore the original R rating.
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Crawl space
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Inspection method: Partially traversed
Insulation material underneath floor above: Fiberglass roll or batt
Pier or support post material: Bearing wall
Beam material: Built up wood
Floor structure above: Solid wood joists
Vapor barrier present: Yes
65) Safety, Repair/Maintain - Some mold was evident on the floor joist in the crawlspace.
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66) Repair/Replace, Evaluate, Monitor - Evidence of prior water intrusion was found in one or more sections of the crawl space. For example, sediment stains on the vapor barrier or foundation, and/or efflorescence on the foundation. Accumulated water is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects and organisms and should not be present in the crawl space. The client(s) should review any disclosure statements available and ask the property owner(s) about past accumulation of water in the crawl space. The crawl space should be monitored in the future for accumulated water, especially after heavy and/or prolonged periods of rain. If water is found to accumulate, a qualified contractor who specializes in drainage issues should evaluate and repair as necessary. Typical repairs for preventing water from accumulating in crawl spaces include:

Ideally, water should not enter crawl spaces, but if water must be controlled after it enters the crawl space, then typical repairs include installing trenches, gravity drains and/or sump pump(s) in the crawl space.
67) Repair/Replace, Evaluate - Standing water was found in one or more sections of the crawl space. Accumulated water is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects and organisms and should not be present in the crawl space. A qualified contractor who specializes in drainage issues should evaluate and repair as necessary. Typical repairs for preventing water from accumulating in crawl spaces include:

Ideally, water should not enter crawl spaces, but if water must be controlled after it enters the crawl space, then typical repairs include installing trenches, drains and/or sump pump(s) in the crawl space.
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68) Repair/Replace - The vapor barrier needs repair. Exposed soil was found in some areas. This is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects and organisms due to the likelihood of water evaporating into the structure from the soil. A qualified contractor should make repairs as necessary so no exposed soil exists. Standard building practices require the following:
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69) Repair/Maintain - The outside access hole to the crawlspace is a hodge podge of methods to close the opening.
70) Comment - The area under the rear addition was not accessible
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We are proud of our service, and trust that you will be happy with the quality of our report. We have made every effort to provide you with an accurate assessment of the condition of the property and it's components and to alert you to any significant defects or adverse conditions. However we may not have tested every outlet, and opened every window and door, or identified every problem. Also because our inspection is essentially visual, latent defects could exist. We can not see inside walls. Therefore, you should not regard our inspection as a guarantee or warranty. It is simply a report on the general condition of a property at a given point in time. As a homeowner you should expect problems to occur. Roofs will leak, basements may have water problems, and systems may fail without warning. We can not predict future events. For these reasons, you should keep a comprehensive insurance policy current.
This report was written exclusively for our client. It is not transferable to other people. The report is only supplemental to a sellers disclosure.
Thank You for taking time to read this report, and call us if you have any questions. We are always attempting to improve the quality of our service and our report.
Level Home Consultants - 317-340-8404 - Steven J. Everhart Signature