Level Home Consultants


245 N Sigsbee St 
Indianapolis IN 46214-3885
Inspector: Steven Everhart
HI00500478

  

Property Inspection Report
Client(s):  Chader
Property address:  6321 W. SR 252
Edunburgh, IN
Inspection date:  Friday, April 12, 2013

This report published on Saturday, April 13, 2013 11:03:52 PM EDT

View report summary

This report is issued for the sole and exclusive use of the client listed above, and is an impartial opinion, which is not a warranty that the items listed within are defect free, or that latent or concealed defects may exist as of the date of this inspection, or which may have existed in the past or may exist in the future. The report is limited to the components of the property which were visible to the inspector on the date of the inspection and his opinion of their condition at the time of this inspection. The client has read and signed the attached contract which is part of this inspection report.

 
How to Read this Report
This report is organized by the property's functional areas.  Within each functional area, descriptive information is listed first and is shown in bold type.  Items of concern follow descriptive information.
Concerns are shown and sorted according to these types:
SafetyPoses a risk of injury or death 
Major DefectCorrection likely involves a significant expense 
Repair/ReplaceRecommend repairing or replacing 
Repair/MaintainRecommend repair and/or maintenance 
Minor DefectCorrection likely involves only a minor expense 
MaintainRecommend ongoing maintenance 
EvaluateRecommend evaluation by a specialist 
MonitorRecommend monitoring in the future 
CommentFor your information 

Wood Destroying Organism Concerns
Concerns relating to wood destroying organisms are shown as follows:
InfestationEvidence of infestation of wood destroying insects or organisms (Live or dead insect bodies, fungal growth, etc.) 

Click here for a glossary of building construction terms.Contact your inspector If there are terms that you do not understand, or visit the glossary of construction terms at http://www.reporthost.com/glossary.asp

Table of Contents
General information
Exterior
Roof
Fireplaces, woodstoves and chimneys
Garage
Electric service
Heating and cooling
Well
Water heater
Kitchen
Bathrooms
Interior rooms
Basement
Crawl space
Attic
 
General information Return to table of contents
Report number: 13435
Structures inspected: House - Detached Pole Barn
Type of building: Single family
Age of building: 40
Time started: 9am
Time finished: Noon
Inspection Fee: 375.00
Payment method: Cash
Present during inspection: Client(s), Property owner(s)
Occupied: Yes
Weather conditions: Partly cloudy
Temperature: Cool
Ground condition: Damp
Main entrance faces: North
Foundation type: Unfinished basement, Crawlspace
The following items are excluded from this inspection: Low voltage outdoor lighting, Water softener system
1) Safety, Repair/Replace - This property has one or more fuel burning appliances, and no carbon monoxide alarms are visible. This is a safety hazard. Recommend installing one or more carbon monoxide alarms as necessary and as per the manufacturer's instructions. For more information, visit http://www.cpsc.gov/CPSCPUB/PREREL/prhtml05/05017.html
 
Exterior Return to table of contents
Footing material: Poured in place concrete
Foundation material: Concrete block
Apparent wall structure: Wood frame
Wall covering: Wood clapboard, Stone veneer
Driveway material: Gravel
Sidewalk material: Poured in place concrete
2) Safety, Repair/Replace, Evaluate - One or more trip hazards were found in sidewalk and/or patio sections due to cracks, settlement and/or heaving. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair or replace sidewalk and/or patio sections as necessary to eliminate trip hazards.

Photo 57  
 

3) Safety, Repair/Replace, Evaluate - The deck is unstable in one or more areas due to lack of diagonal bracing. This is a safety hazard since severe movement may cause the deck to collapse. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary.

Photo 43  

Photo 145  

4) Safety, Repair/Replace, Evaluate - One or more outdoor electric receptacles appear to have no ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate to determine if GFCI protection exists, and if not, repairs should be made so that all outdoor receptacles within six feet six inches of ground level have GFCI protection. For example, install GFCI receptacles or circuit breaker(s) as needed.

Photo 35  
 

5) Safety, Repair/Replace - One or more retaining walls higher than three feet exist on this property and guardrails or barriers are missing or inadequate. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of falling. At a minimum, the client(s) should be aware of this hazard, especially when children are present. Ideally a qualified contractor should install adequate guardrails or make modifications to existing barriers as necessary above retaining walls higher than 3 feet to eliminate fall hazards. Dense shrubbery or vegetation may be acceptable as a barrier, but only when mature enough to be effective.

Photo 43  
 

6) Safety, Repair/Maintain - The gap between the decks and the house is very large.
The decks are unstable and should be reworked or torn down and rebuilt.

Photo 41  

Photo 145  

7) Safety, Minor Defect - One or more wall-mounted exterior light fixtures have wiring that's subject to water intrusion due to caulk not being installed around the light fixture's back plate. Caulk should be applied around the perimeter of back plates where missing. A gap should be left at the bottom for condensation to drain out.

Photo 3  

Photo 4  

8) Major Defect, Repair/Replace, Evaluate - Major cracks or areas of deterioration were found in one or more sections of brick veneer. These are likely caused by significant movement of the foundation and/or walls. The client(s) are strongly advised to hire qualified contractors and/or engineers as necessary for further evaluation. Such contractors may include:
  • Foundation repair contractors who may prescribe repairs, and will give cost estimates for prescribed repairs
  • Masonry contractors who repair and/or replace brick veneer
  • Geotechnical engineers who attempt to determine if settlement is ongoing, and what the cause of the settlement is
  • Structural engineers who determine if repairs are necessary, and prescribe those repairs

    Photo 32  

    Photo 33  

    9) Major Defect, Maintain - The exterior finish over the entire structure is failing. A qualified painting contractor should prep (pressure wash, scrape, sand, prime caulk, etc.) and repaint or restain the entire structure as per standard building practices.

    Photo 5  

    Photo 6  

    10) Repair/Replace, Evaluate - Sidewalks and/or patios have significant cracks and/or deterioration in one or more areas. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair or replace sidewalk and/or patio sections as necessary.

    Photo 21  

    Photo 56  

    Photo 57  

    Photo 24  

    11) Repair/Replace, Evaluate - Rot was found in one or more areas on soffit boards. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary, replacing all rotten wood.

    Photo 29  

    Photo 36  

    Photo 44  

    Photo 45  

    Photo 10  

    Photo 38  

    12) Repair/Replace, Evaluate - Rot was found in one or more areas on fascia boards. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary, replacing all rotten wood.

    Photo 5  

    Photo 6  

    Photo 37  
     

    13) Repair/Replace - The perimeter grading slopes towards the structure in one or more areas. This can result in water accumulating around the structure's foundation, or in basements and crawl spaces if they exist. Accumulated water is a conducive condition to wood destroying insects and organisms. Wet soil may also cause the foundation to settle and possibly fail over time. Recommend grading soil so it slopes down and away from the structure with a slope of at least 5% (10% or better is optimal) for at least 6 feet.

    Photo 7  

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    Photo 31  

    Photo 53  

    14) Repair/Replace - Gaps exist at one or more openings around the exterior, such as those where outside faucets, refrigerant lines, and/or gas supply pipes penetrate the exterior. Gaps should be sealed as necessary to prevent moisture intrusion and entry by vermin.

    Photo 47  

    Photo 49  

    15) Repair/Maintain, Evaluate - One or more moderate cracks (1/8 inch to 3/4 inch) were found in the foundation. These may be a structural concern, or an indication that settlement is ongoing. The client(s) should consider hiring qualified contractors and/or engineers as necessary for further evaluation. Such contractors may include:
  • Foundation repair contractors who may prescribe repairs, and will give cost estimates for prescribed repairs
  • Masonry contractors who repair and/or replace brick veneer
  • Geotechnical engineers who attempt to determine if settlement is ongoing, and what the cause of the settlement is
  • Structural engineers who determine if repairs are necessary, and prescribe those repairs

    At a minimum, recommend sealing cracks to prevent water infiltration. Numerous products exist to seal such cracks including:
  • Hydraulic cement. Requires chiseling a channel in the crack to apply.
  • Resilient caulks (easy to apply).
  • Epoxy sealants (both a waterproof and structural repair).

    Photo 8  

    Photo 23  

    16) Repair/Maintain - Alot of trims around doors and windows is rotting or poorly done

    Photo 25  

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    Photo 40  

    Photo 50  

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    Photo 42  
     
    Roof Return to table of contents
    Roof inspection method: Traversed
    Roof type: Gable
    Roof covering: Asphalt or fiberglass composition shingles
    Estimated age of roof: 15
    Gutter & downspout material: Aluminum
    Roof ventilation: Inadequate
    17) Repair/Replace, Evaluate - One or more sections of flashing at the base of the chimney are deteriorated and/or substandard. Leaks may occur as a result. A qualified roofing contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary.

    Counterflashing is missing at the base of one or more chimneys. Leaks may occur as a result. A qualified roofing or chimney service contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary.

    Photo 11  

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    Photo 15  

    Photo 17  

    Photo 19  

    Photo 20  

    18) Repair/Replace, Evaluate - One or more composition shingles have raised, most likely due to nails that have loosened. Leaks may occur as a result. A qualified roofing contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary, such as reseating nails.

    Photo 146  

    Photo 147  

    19) Repair/Replace - One or more "rubber boot" flashings are lifting at the base or are improperly installed so that water or vermin intrusion may occur. A qualified contractor should make repairs as necessary, such as permanently fastening down the lifted edge(s), or reinstalling flashings.

    Photo 16  
     
     
    Fireplaces, woodstoves and chimneys Return to table of contents
    Fireplace type: Masonry
    Chimney type: Masonry
    20) Safety, Major Defect, Repair/Replace, Evaluate - Holes, cracks, gaps and/or significant amounts of rust, corrosion or deterioration were found in one or more metal fireplace liners. This may be a safety hazard for fire, and for combustion fumes entering living spaces. A qualified chimney service contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary.

    Photo 99  
     

    21) Safety, Major Defect, Repair/Replace, Evaluate - The masonry chimney is significantly deteriorated and requires major repairs, such as rebuilding, replacing bricks, and/or replacing the crown or concrete caps at ledges. Recommend having a qualified chimney service contractor or mason evaluate chimney and repair as necessary. Because of this damage, also recommend that the chimney service contractor perform a Level 2 inspection as per the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) guidelines.

    Photo 18  

    Photo 20  

    Photo 21  
     

    22) Safety, Repair/Replace, Evaluate - One or more gaps exist between the fireplace face and the fire box. This is a fire hazard since heat from fires may reach wood wall cavities surrounding the fireplace. A qualified chimney service contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary.

    Photo 96  

    Photo 97  

    Photo 122  

    Photo 123  

    23) Safety, Repair/Replace, Evaluate - Fire bricks in one or more fireplace fireboxes are loose and/or significantly deteriorated or pitted. This is a fire hazard. A qualified chimney service contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary.

    Photo 98  

    Photo 121  

    24) Safety, Repair/Replace, Evaluate - The inspector was unable to determine if the woodstove and flue are installed safely, and in accordance with the manufacturers' specifications. The manufacturer's information label(s) were illegible and/or missing. Recommend having a qualified stove and/or chimney service contractor evaluate to determine if the woodstove and flue are in installed in accordance with the manufacturers' specifications, and make repairs and/or modifications if necessary.

    Photo 73  
     

    25) Safety, Repair/Replace - One or more chimney flues do not have a screened cover installed. Screened covers prevent the following:
  • Fire hazard from wood fire sparks and embers exiting flues
  • Wildlife (birds, rodents, raccoons, etc.) entering flues
  • Rainwater entering flues and mixing with combustion deposits, creating caustic chemicals which can corrode flues
  • Rainwater entering flues and causing damage to terracotta flue tiles from freeze-thaw cycles

    A qualified chimney service contractor should install screened cover(s) where missing. Screens should have holes 1/4 inch or larger.

    Photo 14  

    Photo 18  

    Photo 39  

    Photo 12  

    26) Repair/Replace, Evaluate - No damper is visible in one or more fireplaces. This can result in increased energy costs due to unconditioned air entering living spaces, or due to conditioned air exiting living spaces through the chimney. A qualified chimney service contractor should evaluate and make modifications as necessary, such as installing a closeable damper.

    Photo 95  
     

    27) Repair/Replace, Evaluate - The masonry chimney crown is deteriorated (cracked or broken) and needs repairs or replacement. The crown is meant to keep water off of the chimney structure. The chimney can be damaged by wet masonry going through freeze-thaw cycles. A properly constructed chimney crown should:
  • Be constructed using either pre-cast concrete slabs, cast-in-place steel reinforced concrete, solid stone, or metal
  • Be sloped down from the flue a minimum of 3 inches of fall per foot of run
  • Extend a minimum of 2-1/2 inches beyond the face of the chimney on all sides
  • Not directly contact the flue liner (if installed), and this gap should be filled with flexible caulk
  • Have flashing installed between the bottom of the crown and the top of the brick chimney

    A qualified chimney service contractor or mason should evaluate and repair or replace the crown as necessary.

    Photo 12  

    Photo 18  

    Photo 21  
     

    28) Repair/Replace - The face brick of the livingroom fireplace is cracked and as settle quite abit.

    Photo 100  

    Photo 101  

    29) Comment - All solid fuel burning appliances (woodstoves and fireplaces, etc.) should be inspected annually by a qualified chimney service contractor, cleaned and repaired as necessary.
     
    Garage Return to table of contents

    30) Safety, Repair/Replace, Evaluate - One or more open ground, three-pronged electric receptacles were found. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate and make repairs as necessary. For example, replacing receptacles or correcting wiring circuits.

    Grounding type receptacles began being required in residential structures during the 1960s. Based on the age of this structure and the presence of 2-pronged receptacles in some areas of this structure, an acceptable repair may be to simply replace the ungrounded 3-pronged receptacles with 2-pronged receptacles. However the following appliances require grounding type receptacles:
  • Computer hardware
  • Refrigerators
  • Freezers
  • Air conditioners
  • Clothes washers
  • Clothes dryers
  • Dishwashers
  • Kitchen food waste disposers
  • Information technology equipment
  • Sump pumps
  • Electrical aquarium equipment
  • Hand-held motor-operated tools
  • Stationary and fixed motor-operated tools
  • Light industrial motor-operated tools
  • Hedge clippers
  • Lawn mowers

    This list is not exhaustive. Grounded circuits and receptacles should be installed in locations where such appliances will be used.

    Photo 58  

    Photo 59  

    31) Safety, Repair/Replace, Evaluate - One or more electric receptacles and/or the boxes they are installed in are loose and/or not securely anchored. Wire conductors may be damaged due to repeated movement and/or tension on wires, or insulation may be damaged. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock and fire. A qualified electrician should evaluate and repair as necessary.

    Photo 60  
     

    32) Safety, Repair/Replace, Evaluate - One or more garage electric receptacles appear to have no ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate to determine if GFCI protection exists, and if not, repairs should be made so that all garage receptacles, except for one for use with a refrigerator or freezer, have GFCI protection. For example, install GFCI receptacles or circuit breaker(s) as needed.
    33) Safety, Repair/Replace, Evaluate - Wire splices are exposed due to not being contained in a covered junction box. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock and fire. A qualified electrician should evaluate and make repairs as necessary. For example, install securely mounted junction boxes with cover plates where needed to contain wiring splices.
    34) Safety, Minor Defect - Cover plate(s) are missing from one or more electric boxes, such as for receptacles, switches and/or junction boxes. They are intended to contain fire and prevent electric shock from exposed wires. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of fire and shock. Cover plates should be installed where missing.
    35) Repair/Replace - The garage vehicle door is damaged or deteriorated. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair or replace the door as necessary.
    36) Repair/Replace - One or more exterior entrance doors are damaged and/or deteriorated and should be repaired or replaced by a qualified contractor.

    Photo 61  

    Photo 63  

    37) Repair/Maintain - Some of the siding is loose on the exterior of the pole barn.

    Photo 62  
     

    38) Comment - Most areas inside the garage, including the perimeter, areas in the center, and one or more vehicle doors were obscured by stored items and/or debris and couldn't be fully evaluated.
     
    Electric service Return to table of contents
    Primary service type: Underground
    Primary service overload protection type: Circuit breakers
    Service amperage (amps):
    Service voltage (volts): 120/240
    Branch circuit wiring type: Non-metallic sheathed
    39) Safety, Repair/Replace, Evaluate - Significant amounts of contaminants or foreign material such as drywall texture or paint were found in the main service panel. No approved method exists for cleaning contaminants from panel interiors or components such as bus or terminal bars. The panel and/or components inside may need replacing. A qualified electrician should evaluate and repair or replace components as necessary.

    Photo 86  
     

    40) Safety, Repair/Replace, Evaluate - One or more overcurrent protection devices (circuit breakers or fuses) are "double tapped", where 2 or more wires are clamped in a terminal designed for only one wire. This is a safety hazard since the bolt or screw may tighten securely against one wire, but leave others loose. Arcing, sparks and fires may result. A qualified electrician should evaluate and repair as necessary.

    Photo 87  

    Photo 88  

    Photo 89  
     
     
    Heating and cooling Return to table of contents
    Estimated age: 40
    Primary heating system energy source: Oil
    Primary heat system type: Forced air
    Primary A/C energy source: Electric
    Primary Air conditioning type: Split system
    Distribution system: Sheet metal ducts
    41) Safety, Repair/Replace, Evaluate - The oil furnace or boiler flames are not orange or yellowish-white, or are sooty. The oil burner may need adjustment and/or nozzle(s) may be clogged. A qualified heating contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary.
    42) Safety, Repair/Replace, Evaluate - Copper oil supply lines are exposed and subject to damage. Leaks may occur as a result. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary so oil supply lines are not subject to damage.
    43) Safety, Repair/Maintain, Evaluate - The last service date of this system appears to be more than one year ago, or the inspector was unable to determine the last service date. The client(s) should ask the property owner(s) when it was last serviced. If unable to determine the last service date, or if this system was serviced more than one year ago, a qualified heating and cooling contractor should inspect, clean, and service this system, and make repairs if necessary. For safety reasons, and because this system is fueled by gas or oil, this servicing should be performed annually in the future. For more information visit:
    http://www.cpsc.gov/CPSCPUB/PREREL/prhtml05/05017.html

    Photo 80  
     

    44) Major Defect, Comment - The estimated useful life for most forced air furnaces is 15 to 20 years. This furnace appears to be at this age or older and may need replacing at any time. Recommend budgeting for a replacement in the near future.
    45) Major Defect, Comment - The estimated useful life for air conditioning compressors is 8 to 15 years. This unit appears to have exceeded this age and may need replacing at any time. Recommend budgeting for a replacement in the near future.
    46) Repair/Replace - Insulation for the outside condensing unit's refrigerant lines is damaged, deteriorated and/or missing in one or more areas. This may result in reduced efficiency and increased energy costs. A qualified heating and cooling contractor should replace insulation as necessary.

    Photo 48  
     

    47) Repair/Maintain - The cooling fins on the outdoor condensing unit's evaporator coils are dirty. This may result in reduced efficiency and higher energy costs. A qualified heating and cooling contractor should clean the evaporator coils as necessary.

    Photo 46  
     

    48) Maintain - Air handler filter(s) are dirty and should be replaced now. They should be checked monthly in the future and replaced as necessary.
    49) Evaluate - The oil tank is buried underground in the back yard.
    50) Comment - The outdoor air temperature was below 60 degrees Fahrenheit during the inspection. Because of this, the inspector was unable to operate and fully evaluate the cooling system.
     
    Well Return to table of contents

    51) Safety, Repair/Replace - The well casing is buried under the ground. This is a potential source for contamination of the well water if debris enters the well casing. The casing should at least 12" above grade and the surrounding soil should be graded with a positive slope, down and away from the well casing,
    52) Repair/Replace, Evaluate - The cycle time of the well pump is too short. The pressure tank may be waterlogged. If the tank has a bladder it may be defective. The tank may need replacing or recharging. This system should be evaluated by a qualified well contractor and repaired as necessary.
    53) Repair/Replace, Evaluate - The pressure tank appears to be waterlogged. If the tank has a bladder it may be defective. The tank may need replacing or recharging. This system should be evaluated by a qualified plumber or well contractor and repaired as necessary.
     
    Water heater Return to table of contents
    Estimated age: 6
    Type: Tank
    Energy source: Electricity
    Capacity (in gallons): 50
    54) Safety, Repair/Replace - No drain line is installed for the temperature-pressure relief valve. This is a potential safety hazard due to the risk of scalding if someone is standing next to the water heater when the valve opens. A qualified plumber should install a drain line as per standard building practices. For example, extending to 6 inches from the floor, or routed so as to drain outside.

    Photo 71  
     
     
    Kitchen Return to table of contents

    55) Safety, Repair/Replace, Evaluate - One or more open ground, three-pronged electric receptacles were found. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate and make repairs as necessary. For example, replacing receptacles or correcting wiring circuits.

    Grounding type receptacles began being required in residential structures during the 1960s. Based on the age of this structure and the presence of 2-pronged receptacles in some areas of this structure, an acceptable repair may be to simply replace the ungrounded 3-pronged receptacles with 2-pronged receptacles. However the following appliances require grounding type receptacles:
  • Computer hardware
  • Refrigerators
  • Freezers
  • Air conditioners
  • Clothes washers
  • Clothes dryers
  • Dishwashers
  • Kitchen food waste disposers
  • Information technology equipment
  • Sump pumps
  • Electrical aquarium equipment
  • Hand-held motor-operated tools
  • Stationary and fixed motor-operated tools
  • Light industrial motor-operated tools
  • Hedge clippers
  • Lawn mowers

    This list is not exhaustive. Grounded circuits and receptacles should be installed in locations where such appliances will be used.

    Photo 107  
     

    56) Safety, Repair/Replace, Evaluate - One or more electric receptacles that serve countertop surfaces within six feet of a sink appear to have no ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate to determine if GFCI protection exists, and if not, repairs should be made so that all receptacles that serve countertop surfaces within six feet of sinks have GFCI protection. For example, install GFCI receptacles or circuit breaker(s) as needed.

    Photo 112  
     

    57) Safety, Repair/Maintain - Alot of mouse droppings were found in one of the upper cabinets

    Photo 108  
     

    58) Repair/Replace, Evaluate - The dishwasher drain line is not configured with a "high loop" or "air gap". A high loop is created by routing the drain line up to the bottom surface of the counter top above, and securely fastening it to that surface. It is meant to prevent water from siphoning out of the dishwasher, and to prevent water from the sink drain or food disposal from entering the dishwasher. Some dishwashers have a built-in high loop where one is not required to be configured in the drain line. The clients should try to determine if a high loop is required for this brand and model of dishwasher (review installation instructions, etc.). If one is required, or it cannot be determined if one is not required, then a qualified contractor should install a high loop as per standard building practices.

    Also, no "air gap" is installed. Air gaps are another device meant to prevent water from the sink drain or food disposal from entering the dishwasher. These are required in some municipalities for new construction and when remodeling. The client(s) should consult with a qualified contractor to determine if an air gap should be installed.

    Photo 110  
     

    59) Repair/Replace, Evaluate - The under-sink food disposal is inoperable. A qualified plumber or contractor should evaluate and repair or replace the food disposal as necessary.
    60) Repair/Maintain - Caulk is missing and/or deteriorated where countertops meet backsplashes in wet areas, such as around sinks. Caulk should be replaced where deteriorated and/or applied where missing to prevent water damage.
    61) Evaluate - Minor damage and/or deterioration was found at countertops in one or more areas. The client(s) should evaluate and consider having repairs made, and/or countertops replaced where necessary.

    Photo 109  

    Photo 111  
     
    Bathrooms Return to table of contents

    62) Safety, Repair/Replace, Evaluate - One or more ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) electric receptacles did not trip when tested with the inspector's test instrument. These devices should trip when tested with a test instrument in addition to tripping via the test buttons on the receptacles. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate and repair as necessary.

    Photo 130  
     

    63) Repair/Replace, Evaluate - One or more exhaust fans is extremely old and provides inadequate air flow. Moisture may accumulate as a result. A qualified contractor should evaluate and replace the fan or make repairs as necessary.

    Photo 114  
     

    64) Repair/Replace, Evaluate - Tile and/or grout around one or more bathtubs is unfinished, damaged or deteriorated. For example, deteriorated or missing grout, cracked, missing or loose tiles, etc. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair tile and/or grout as necessary.

    Photo 124  

    Photo 125  

    65) Repair/Replace, Evaluate - One or more cabinets and/or drawers are damaged and/or deteriorated. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair or replace cabinets and/or components as necessary.

    Photo 119  

    Photo 128  

    66) Repair/Replace - One or more bathrooms with a shower do not have an exhaust fan installed. Moisture accumulation will occur and may damage the structure. Even if the bathroom has a window that opens, it likely does not provide adequate ventilation, especially during cold weather when the window is closed. A qualified contractor should install exhaust fans as per standard building practices where missing in bathrooms with showers.
    67) Repair/Replace - One or more sinks are clogged or drain slowly. Drain(s) should be cleared as necessary, and by a qualified plumber if necessary.

    Photo 127  
     

    68) Repair/Maintain - Caulk is missing and/or deteriorated at one or more showers/bathtubs. For example, where the tub base meets the floor below, where the tub surround meets the tub, and/or around the base of the tub spout. Caulk should be replaced where deteriorated and/or applied where missing to prevent water intrusion and damage to wall and floor structures.

    Photo 115  

    Photo 116  

    Photo 117  

    Photo 118  

    69) Repair/Maintain - Caulk is missing and/or deteriorated where countertops meet backsplashes in wet areas, such as around sinks. Caulk should be replaced where deteriorated and/or applied where missing to prevent water damage.

    Photo 120  
     

    70) Repair/Maintain - Jetted tub doesn't appear to work.

    Photo 126  
     
     
    Interior rooms Return to table of contents

    71) Safety, Repair/Replace, Evaluate - One or more open ground, three-pronged electric receptacles were found. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate and make repairs as necessary. For example, replacing receptacles or correcting wiring circuits.

    Grounding type receptacles began being required in residential structures during the 1960s. Based on the age of this structure and the presence of 2-pronged receptacles in some areas of this structure, an acceptable repair may be to simply replace the ungrounded 3-pronged receptacles with 2-pronged receptacles. However the following appliances require grounding type receptacles:
  • Computer hardware
  • Refrigerators
  • Freezers
  • Air conditioners
  • Clothes washers
  • Clothes dryers
  • Dishwashers
  • Kitchen food waste disposers
  • Information technology equipment
  • Sump pumps
  • Electrical aquarium equipment
  • Hand-held motor-operated tools
  • Stationary and fixed motor-operated tools
  • Light industrial motor-operated tools
  • Hedge clippers
  • Lawn mowers

    This list is not exhaustive. Grounded circuits and receptacles should be installed in locations where such appliances will be used.

    Photo 104  

    Photo 130  

    72) Safety, Repair/Replace, Evaluate - The light fixture in one or more long hallways is controlled by a single switch at one end. This is a safety hazard due to inadequate lighting. The light should be controlled by three-way switches near each end of the hallway so it can be easily operated at both ends. A qualified electrician should evaluate and make repairs as necessary.
    73) Safety, Repair/Replace - No smoke alarms are visible. This is a safety hazard. A qualified electrician should install smoke alarms as per standard building practices (functioning one exists in hallways leading to bedrooms, and in each bedroom, etc.). For more information, visit:
    http://www.cpsc.gov/cpscpub/pubs/5077.html

    74) Safety, Repair/Replace - Trip hazard(s) exist at stairs due to non-uniform riser heights. Standard building practices call for riser heights not to vary more than 3/8 inch on a flight of stairs. A qualified contractor should repair or replace stairs so all riser heights are within 3/8 inch of each other.
    75) Repair/Replace, Evaluate - Screen(s) in one or more windows are missing. The client(s) should ask the property owner(s) about this. Screens are often removed for window cleaning and they may be stored somewhere. If not, then recommend installing screens where missing.
    76) Repair/Replace - Lock mechanisms on one or more windows are missing and/or damaged so that they are inoperable. Repairs should be made by a qualified contractor or service technician so that windows lock and unlock easily.

    Photo 102  
     

    77) Repair/Replace - One or more doors will not latch when closed. Repairs should be made as necessary, and by a qualified contractor if necessary. For example, aligning strike plates with latch bolts and/or replacing locksets.
    78) Repair/Replace - One or more exterior entrance doors are damaged and/or deteriorated and should be repaired or replaced by a qualified contractor.

    Photo 40  

    Photo 42  

    Photo 93  

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    Photo 105  
     

    79) Repair/Replace - The front door won't open due to ceremic tile laid right up against it.

    Photo 103  
     

    80) Repair/Replace - Thermoseal is bad on one of the windows

    Photo 129  
     

    81) Repair/Replace - There are alot of switches who's function is unknown

    Photo 106  

    Photo 113  

    82) Evaluate - One or more light fixtures appear to be inoperable. Recommend further evaluation by replacing bulb(s) and/or consulting with the property owner(s). Repairs or replacement of the light fixture(s) by a qualified electrician may be necessary.
     
    Basement Return to table of contents
    Insulation material underneath floor above: None visible
    Beam material: Solid wood
    Floor structure above: Solid wood joists
    83) Safety, Repair/Replace, Evaluate - One or more sets of stairs are wobbly. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary, such as installing additional supports and/or diagonal bracing.
    84) Safety, Repair/Replace, Evaluate - Non-metallic sheathed wiring is routed in one or more areas so it is subject to damage, such as on wall or ceiling surfaces. The insulation can be damaged by objects coming in contact with it and/or it being repeatedly moved. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock and fire. A qualified electrician should evaluate and repair as necessary. For example, rewire using conduit, or re-routing through wall cavities.

    Photo 82  
     

    85) Safety, Repair/Replace, Evaluate - One or more sections of wiring that weren't terminated were found. This is a potential safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate and repair as necessary. For example, cutting the wire to length and terminating the wire with wire nuts in a securely anchored, covered, properly sized junction box.

    Photo 66  

    Photo 74  

    Photo 82  

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    Photo 92  
     

    86) Safety, Repair/Replace, Evaluate - Wire splices are exposed due to not being contained in a covered junction box. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock and fire. A qualified electrician should evaluate and make repairs as necessary. For example, install securely mounted junction boxes with cover plates where needed to contain wiring splices.

    Photo 70  

    Photo 76  

    Photo 79  

    Photo 81  

    87) Safety, Repair/Replace, Evaluate - Extension cords are being used as permanent wiring in one or more areas. They should only be used for portable equipment on a temporary basis. Using extension cords as permanent wiring poses a fire and shock hazard, and is an indication that wiring is inadequate and should be updated. Extension cords may be undersized. Connections may not be secure, resulting in power fluctuations, damage to equipment, and sparks that could start a fire. Extension cords should be removed as necessary, or a qualified electrician should evaluate and make repairs as necessary. For example, install additional circuits and/or electric receptacles.
    88) Safety, Repair/Replace, Comment - Trip hazard(s) exist at stairs due to non-uniform riser heights. Standard building practices call for riser heights not to vary more than 3/8 inch on a flight of stairs. At a minimum, the client(s) should be aware of this hazard, especially when guests who are not familiar with the stairs are present. Ideally a qualified contractor should evaluate and repair or replace stairs so all riser heights are within 3/8 inch of each other.
    89) Safety, Repair/Replace - Floor joist has been cut and is very weakened. Needs to have a joist sistered along side.

    Photo 81  
     

    90) Safety, Repair/Maintain - 220 outlet is hanging loose against a block wall and a 110 as well

    Photo 72  

    Photo 75  

    91) Safety, Repair/Maintain - A amin panel entry hole is open into the panel box

    Photo 65  
     

    92) Repair/Replace, Evaluate, Monitor - Evidence of prior water intrusion was found in one or more sections of the basement. For example, water stains and/or efflorescence on the foundation or floor, water stains at bases of support posts, etc. Accumulated water is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects and organisms and should not be present in the basement. The client(s) should review any disclosure statements available and ask the property owner(s) about past accumulation of water in the basement. The basement should be monitored in the future for accumulated water, especially after heavy and/or prolonged periods of rain. If water is found to accumulate, a qualified contractor who specializes in drainage issues should evaluate and repair as necessary. Typical repairs for preventing water from accumulating in the basement include:
  • Repairing, installing or improving rain run-off systems (gutters, downspouts and extensions or drain lines)
  • Improving perimeter grading
  • Repairing, installing or improving underground footing and/or curtain drains

    Ideally, water should not enter the basement, but if water must be controlled after it enters the basement, then typical repairs include installing sump pump(s) or interior perimeter drains.

    Photo 84  

    Photo 85  

    93) Repair/Replace - One or more exterior entrance doors are damaged and/or deteriorated and should be repaired or replaced by a qualified contractor.

    The weatherstrip around one or more exterior entry doors is missing and/or deteriorated. Weatherstrip should be installed where missing and/or replaced where deteriorated, and by a qualified contractor if necessary.

    Photo 68  

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    94) Repair/Replace - One of the basement windows is broken

    Photo 34  
     

    95) Monitor - Minor step cracks in the foundation.

    Photo 83  
     

    96) Monitor - Misc. Termite damage in Basement

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    97) - The top row of blocks has rolled and has developed a horizontal crack. this indicates that the wall is out of plumb and is being push by hydrostatic pressure

    Photo 77  

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    Crawl space Return to table of contents
    Inspection method: Viewed from hatch
    Pier or support post material: Masonry
    Beam material: Solid wood
    Floor structure above: Solid wood joists
    Vapor barrier present: No
    98) Safety, Repair/Replace, Evaluate - Wire splices are exposed due to not being contained in a covered junction box. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock and fire. A qualified electrician should evaluate and make repairs as necessary. For example, install securely mounted junction boxes with cover plates where needed to contain wiring splices.

    Photo 64  
     

    99) Repair/Replace - No vapor barrier is installed. This is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects and organisms due to the likelihood of water evaporating into the structure from the soil. A qualified contractor should install a vapor barrier. Standard building practices require the following:
  • The soil below the vapor barrier should be smooth and free from sharp objects.
  • Seams should overlap a minimum of 12 inches.
  • The vapor barrier should lap up onto the foundation side walls.

    Better building practices require that:
  • Seams and protrusions should be sealed with a pressure sensitive tape.
  • The vapor barrier should be caulked and attached tightly to the foundation side walls. For example, with furring strips and masonry nails.
     
    Attic Return to table of contents
    Inspection method: Traversed
    Roof structure type: Rafters
    Ceiling structure: Ceiling beams
    Insulation material: Fiberglass roll or batt, Cellulose loose fill
    Insulation depth: 4"
    Insulation estimated R value: 12
    100) Safety, Repair/Replace, Evaluate - One or more sections of wiring that weren't terminated were found. This is a potential safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate and repair as necessary. For example, cutting the wire to length and terminating the wire with wire nuts in a securely anchored, covered, properly sized junction box.

    Photo 134  
     

    101) Safety, Repair/Replace, Evaluate - Wire splices are exposed due to not being contained in a junction box. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock and fire. A qualified electrician should evaluate and make repairs as necessary. For example, install securely mounted junction boxes with cover plates where needed to contain wiring splices.

    Photo 131  

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    102) Safety, Repair/Replace, Evaluate - Evidence of "light to moderate" rodent infestation was found in one or more areas. The Center for Disease Control (CDC) defines this as less than 20 feces per square foot. Rodent infestation may be a safety hazard due to the risk of contracting Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome (HPS). HPS is a rare (only 20-50 cases per year in the United states) but deadly (40% mortality rate) disease transmitted by infected rodents through urine, droppings, or saliva. Humans can contract the disease when they breathe in aerosolized virus. For example, from sweeping up rodent droppings.

    Recommend following guidelines in the CDC's Clean Up, Trap Up, Seal Up article for eradicating rodents, cleaning up their waste and nesting materials, and preventing future infestations. While Hantavirus is believed to survive less than one week in droppings and urine, specific precautions should be taken during clean up. The client(s) may wish to consult with a qualified, licensed pest control operator for eliminating the infestation. A qualified licensed abatement contractor or industrial hygienist could be contacted for clean up. If the infestation was minimal, clean up of rodent waste and nesting materials in non-living spaces (crawl spaces and attics) may not be necessary, or may be performed for aesthetic reasons only (odor and appearance).

    103) Safety, Minor Defect - Cover plate(s) are missing from one or more electric boxes, such as for receptacles, switches and/or junction boxes. They are intended to contain fire and prevent electric shock from exposed wires. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of fire and shock. Cover plates should be installed where missing.

    Photo 133  

    Photo 135  

    104) Repair/Replace, Evaluate - Ventilation is substandard in the attic. Inadequate attic ventilation may result in high attic and roof surface temperatures, reduce the life of the roof covering materials and increase cooling costs. High levels of moisture are also likely, and can be a conducive condition for wood destroying insects and organisms. Standard building practices require one square foot of vent area for 150 to 200 square feet of attic space. Vents should be evenly distributed between soffits, ridges and at corners to promote air circulation. A qualified contractor should evaluate and install vents as per standard building practices.
    105) Repair/Replace - The ceiling insulation's R rating is significantly less than what's recommended for this area. Recommend having a qualified contractor install additional insulation as per standard building practices for better energy efficiency.

    Photo 136  

    Photo 137  

    106) Repair/Replace - Ceiling insulation is missing in some areas. Recommend installing insulation where missing for better energy efficiency.

    Photo 140  

    Photo 141  

    Photo 142  
     

    107) Repair/Replace - One or more exhaust fans have no duct and terminate in the attic. This is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects and organisms due to increased moisture levels in the attic from the exhaust air. A qualified contractor should install ducts and vent caps as necessary and as per standard building practices so exhaust air is vented outside. Better building practices call for R8 rated insulation on these ducts.

    Photo 143  

    Photo 144  

    108) Minor Defect - No insulation is installed over the attic access hatch. Recommend installing insulation above hatch for better energy efficiency.
     
    We are proud of our service, and trust that you will be happy with the quality of our report. We have made every effort to provide you with an accurate assessment of the condition of the property and it's components and to alert you to any significant defects or adverse conditions. However we may not have tested every outlet, and opened every window and door, or identified every problem. Also because our inspection is essentially visual, latent defects could exist. We can not see inside walls. Therefore, you should not regard our inspection as a guarantee or warranty. It is simply a report on the general condition of a property at a given point in time. As a homeowner you should expect problems to occur. Roofs will leak, basements may have water problems, and systems may fail without warning. We can not predict future events. For these reasons, you should keep a comprehensive insurance policy current.
    This report was written exclusively for our client. It is not transferable to other people. The report is only supplemental to a sellers disclosure.
    Thank You for taking time to read this report, and call us if you have any questions. We are always attempting to improve the quality of our service and our report.
    Level Home Consultants - 317-340-8404 - Steven J. Everhart