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Level Home Consultants

Website: http://www.reporthost.com/levelhome
Email: levelhomeconsultants@comcast.net
Phone: (317) 340-8404 · (317) 248-0552
FAX: (317) 248-0686
245 N Sigsbee St 
Indianapolis IN 46214-3885
Inspector: Steven Everhart
HI00500478

    

Property Inspection Report
Client(s): Carlos
Property address: 4714 Mounds Rd.
Anderson, IN
Inspection date: 5/25/2011
This report published on Friday, May 27, 2011 1:36:03 PM EDT

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This report is issued for the sole and exclusive use of the client listed above, and is an impartial opinion, which is not a warranty that the items listed within are defect free, or that latent or concealed defects may exist as of the date of this inspection, or which may have existed in the past or may exist in the future. The report is limited to the components of the property which were visible to the inspector on the date of the inspection and his opinion of their condition at the time of this inspection. The client has read and signed the attached contract which is part of this inspection report.

 
How to Read this Report
This report is organized by the property's functional areas.  Within each functional area, descriptive information is listed first and is shown in bold type.  Items of concern follow descriptive information.
Concerns are shown and sorted according to these types:
SafetyPoses a risk of injury or death 
Major DefectCorrection likely involves a significant expense 
Repair/ReplaceRecommend repairing or replacing 
Repair/MaintainRecommend repair and/or maintenance 
MaintainRecommend ongoing maintenance 
EvaluateRecommend evaluation by a specialist 
MonitorRecommend monitoring in the future 
CommentFor your information 

Wood Destroying Organism Concerns
Concerns relating to wood destroying organisms are shown as follows:
InfestationEvidence of infestation of wood destroying insects or organisms (Live or dead insect bodies, fungal growth, etc.) 

Click here for a glossary of building construction terms.  Contact your inspector if there are terms that you do not understand, or visit the glossary of construction terms at http://www.reporthost.com/glossary.asp

Table of Contents
General information
Exterior
Roof
Garage
Electric service
Heating and cooling
Well
Water heater
Fireplaces, woodstoves and chimneys
Plumbing and laundry
Kitchen
Bathrooms
Interior rooms
Basement
Attic
 
General information Return to table of contents
Report number: 11710
Structures inspected: House and attached garage
Type of building: Single family
Time started: 2pm
Time finished: 5pm
Inspection Fee: $375.00
Payment method: Check
Present during inspection: Client(s)
Occupied: Yes
Weather conditions: Cloudy
Temperature: Hot
Ground condition: Damp
Main entrance faces: North
Foundation type: Unfinished basement
The following items are excluded from this inspection: Private sewage disposal system, Security system, Shed, Low voltage outdoor lighting, Water softener system
The following items are excluded from this inspection: Security system, Irrigation system, Sauna, Low voltage outdoor lighting, Water softener system, Built-in sound system, Intercom system, Generator system, Sport court, Sea wall
 
Exterior Return to table of contents
Footing material: Not Visible
Foundation material: Poured in place concrete
Apparent wall structure: Wood frame
Wall covering: Wood panels, Stone veneer
Driveway material: Poured in place concrete, Gravel
Sidewalk material: Poured in place concrete
Exterior door material: Solid core steel
1) Safety, Repair/Replace, Evaluate - One or more outdoor electric receptacles appear to have no ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate to determine if GFCI protection exists, and if not, repairs should be made so that all outdoor receptacles within six feet six inches of ground level have GFCI protection. For example, install GFCI receptacles or circuit breaker(s) as needed.

Photo 13  
 

2) Safety, Repair/Replace - One or more retaining walls higher than three feet exist on this property and guardrails or barriers are missing or inadequate. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of falling. At a minimum, the client(s) should be aware of this hazard, especially when children are present. Ideally a qualified contractor should install adequate guardrails or make modifications to existing barriers as necessary above retaining walls higher than 3 feet to eliminate fall hazards. Dense shrubbery or vegetation may be acceptable as a barrier, but only when mature enough to be effective.

Minor cracks and/or deterioration were found in one or more retaining walls. Recommend repairing cracks with mortar, elastomeric sealant, or other suitable material to prevent water intrusion and further deterioration. The client(s) should monitor such walls in the future for continued deterioration (cracking, leaning, bowing, etc.). Repairs and/or replacement by a qualified contractor may be necessary in the future.


Photo 27  
 

3) Safety, Repair/Maintain - Several trees on the property are dead or dying.

Photo 28  

Photo 29  

4) Safety, Evaluate - There is a pipe out to the northwest that maybe part of a drainage system for some type of septic system. Water is visible in the bottom, but it couldn't be seen to move or flow. Recommend bring in a professional septic system company to properly evaluate the system.

Photo 44  
 

5) Repair/Replace, Evaluate - Siding is damaged and/or deteriorated in one or more areas. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs and/or replace siding as necessary to prevent water and vermin intrusion.

Photo 51  
 

6) Repair/Replace, Evaluate - Soffit boards are damaged or deteriorated in one or more areas. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary.

Photo 22  

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Photo 19  

Photo 33  

7) Repair/Replace - The perimeter grading slopes towards the structure in one or more areas. This can result in water accumulating around the structure's foundation, or in basements and crawl spaces if they exist. Accumulated water is a conducive condition to wood destroying insects and organisms. Wet soil may also cause the foundation to settle and possibly fail over time. Recommend grading soil so it slopes down and away from the structure with a slope of at least 5% (10% or better is optimal) for at least 6 feet.

Photo 12  

Photo 15  

Photo 27  
 

8) Repair/Replace - One or more downspouts are missing. This can result in water accumulating around the structure's foundation, or in basements and crawl spaces if they exist. Accumulated water is a conducive condition to wood destroying insects and organisms, and may also cause the foundation to settle and possibly fail over time. A qualified contractor should install downspout(s) where missing. Also recommend installing extensions such as splashblocks or tie-ins to underground drain lines as necessary to carry rainwater away from the house.

Photo 6  
 

9) Repair/Replace - One or more downspouts have no extensions, or have extensions that are ineffective. This can result in water accumulating around the structure's foundation, or in basements and crawl spaces if they exist. Accumulated water is a conducive condition to wood destroying insects and organisms, and may also cause the foundation to settle and possibly fail over time. Repairs should be made as necessary, such as installing or repositioning splash blocks, or installing and/or repairing tie-ins to underground drain lines, so rain water is carried at least several feet away from the structure to soil that slopes down and away from the structure.

Photo 11  

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Photo 14  

10) Repair/Maintain - The steps from the driveway to the front porch are beginning to break down.

Photo 31  
 

11) Maintain - Caulk is missing or deteriorated in some areas and should be replaced and/or applied where necessary. For more information on caulking, visit:
The Ins and Outs of Caulking.

Photo 17  

Photo 20  

12) - The window wells drain piping is clogged and needs to be cleaned out.

Photo 18  
 
 
Roof Return to table of contents
Roof inspection method: Traversed
Roof type: Gable
Roof covering: Asphalt or fiberglass composition shingles
Estimated age of roof: 16-20 years
Gutter & downspout material: Aluminum
Roof ventilation:
13) Major Defect, Evaluate - The roof surface material appears to be near the end of its service life and will likely need replacing in the near future, even with repairs. The client(s) should budget for a replacement roof surface, and may want to have a qualified roofing contractor evaluate and attempt to issue a "5 year roof certificate".
14) Repair/Replace, Evaluate - Roofing nails in one or more areas have loosened or backed out. Leaks may occur as a result. A qualified roofing contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary, such as reseating nails and applying sealant.

Photo 2  

Photo 3  

15) Repair/Maintain - There is no boot around the electrical masthead.

Photo 4  
 

16) Repair/Maintain - Gutters are partially filled with debris and need to be cleaned out.

Alot of the gutterspikes are working out. Gutterscrews should be installed to rehang the gutters.

Photo 1  

Photo 24  

Photo 7  

Photo 8  
 
Garage Return to table of contents

17) Safety, Repair/Replace, Evaluate - The auto-reverse mechanism on the vehicle door opener is inoperable or requires too much force to activate. This is a safety hazard, especially for small children. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary. For more information on garage door safety issues, visit:
http://www.cpsc.gov/cpscpub/pubs/523.html
http://www.ohdstl.com/safety.html

Photo 34  
 

18) Safety, Repair/Replace, Evaluate - One or more garage electric receptacles appear to have no ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate to determine if GFCI protection exists, and if not, repairs should be made so that all garage receptacles, except for one for use with a refrigerator or freezer, have GFCI protection. For example, install GFCI receptacles or circuit breaker(s) as needed.
19) Safety, Repair/Replace - The garage-house door poses a fire risk because it's not fire-rated (metal or solid-core construction). A qualified contractor should replace this door with a fire-rated door.
20) Safety, Repair/Replace - No infrared "photo eye" devices are installed for the vehicle door's electric door opener. They've been required on all vehicle door openers since 1993 and improve safety by triggering the vehicle door's auto-reverse feature without need for the door to come in contact with the object, person or animal that's preventing it from closing. Recommend considering having a qualified contractor install these devices for improved safety. For more information on garage door safety issues, visit:
http://www.cpsc.gov/cpscpub/pubs/523.html
http://www.ohdstl.com/safety.html

21) Repair/Replace - The weatherstrip around one or more exterior entry doors is missing and/or deteriorated. Weatherstrip should be installed where missing and/or replaced where deteriorated, and by a qualified contractor if necessary.
22) Repair/Maintain - The trim at the east side of the garage door has been damaged and should be repaired

Photo 30  
 

23) Comment - The ceiling has been patched from past leaks on several occasions

Photo 36  

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24) Comment - The ceiling of the storage area off of the garage has improperly installed insulation. Per manufacterers spec's the vapor barrier (paper) should be on the heat side of the situation.

Photo 35  
 
 
Electric service Return to table of contents
Primary service type: Overhead
Primary service overload protection type: Fuses
Service amperage (amps): 100
Service voltage (volts): 120/240
Service entrance conductor material: Copper
System ground:
Branch circuit wiring type: Non-metallic sheathed
Smoke detectors present: No
25) Safety, Repair/Replace, Evaluate - The drip loop(s) in the service entrance wires are substandard. A qualified electrician should evaluate and repair as necessary.

Photo 5  
 

26) Safety, Repair/Replace, Evaluate - Inadequate working space exists for the main service panel. Standard building practices require the following clearances:

  • An area 30 inches wide by 3 feet deep exists in front of the panel
  • The panel is at least 5 1/2 feet above the floor
  • There is at least 6 feet 6 inches of headroom in front of the panel
  • The wall below the panel is clear to the floor

    A qualified contractor and/or electrician should evaluate and make modifications as necessary.
    27) Safety, Repair/Replace, Evaluate - One or more overcurrent protection devices (circuit breakers or fuses) are "double tapped", where 2 or more wires are clamped in a terminal designed for only one wire. This is a safety hazard since the bolt or screw may tighten securely against one wire, but leave others loose. Arcing, sparks and fires may result. A qualified electrician should evaluate and repair as necessary.

    Photo 55  
     

    28) Safety, Repair/Replace - One or more pointed and/or too-long screws are used to fasten the cover to the main service panel. These types of screws are more likely to come into contact with wiring inside the panel than stock screws from the manufacturer, and can damage wiring insulation. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock and/or fire. Long and/or pointed crews should be replaced as necessary with the correct screws, and if necessary by a qualified electrician.

    Photo 57  
     

    29) Safety, Repair/Replace - Recommend changing to a breaker service panel for safety.

    Photo 56  
     

    30) Repair/Replace, Evaluate - The legend for overcurrent protection devices (breakers or fuses) in the main service panel is missing, unreadable or incomplete. Recommend installing, updating or correcting the legend as necessary so it's accurate. Evaluation by a qualified electrician may be necessary.
     
    Heating and cooling Return to table of contents
    Primary heating system energy source: Natural gas
    Primary heat system type: Radiant, Circulating pump
    Primary A/C energy source: N/A
    Distribution system: Metal pipe
    31) Safety, Repair/Maintain - The wiring for the controls for the pumps and thermostats is a wide open jungle. These should be protected to keep them from being damaged.

    Photo 77  
     

    32) Repair/Maintain - The boiler seemed to fire properly, however only the main level radiators produced heat. This would indicate that perhaps one of the circulating pumps isn't working properly. Recommend have the unit checked and serviced by a licensed HVAC tech.

    Photo 75  
     

    33) Evaluate - There is no central A/C in the home and would be fairly expensive to install.
     
    Well Return to table of contents
    Location of tank shut off valve: Basement
    34) Safety, Repair/Replace, Evaluate - The tank is located on top of a stack of misc. materials, which serve as an unstable base. Over time the tank and stack could shift, allowing the tank to drop to the floor, possibly bring plumbing connections and flooding the basement.
    35) Safety, Evaluate - The water is being tested for coliform bacteria, by a qualified lab. For more information, visit:
    http://www.wellowner.org

    36) Repair/Replace, Evaluate - The cycle time of the well pump is short. The pressure tank may be waterlogged. If the tank has a bladder it may be defective. The tank may need replacing or recharging. This system should be evaluated by a qualified well contractor and repaired as necessary.
     
    Water heater Return to table of contents
    Estimated age: 12 years
    Type: Tank
    Energy source: Natural gas
    Capacity (in gallons): 40
    37) Major Defect, Comment - The estimated useful life for most water heaters is 8 to 12 years. This water heater appears to be at this age or older and may need replacing at any time. Recommend budgeting for a replacement in the near future.
     
    Fireplaces, woodstoves and chimneys Return to table of contents
    Fireplace type: Masonry with metal liner
    Chimney type: Masonry
    38) Safety, Repair/Replace, Evaluate - A significant amount of creosote (1/8 inch or more) is visible in the fireplace flue. A qualified chimney service contractor should inspect, clean, and repair if necessary now and annually in the future.

    Photo 50  

    Photo 54  

    39) Safety, Repair/Replace - One or more chimney flue openings do not have a screen installed. Screens prevent the following:

  • Fire hazard from wood fire sparks and embers exiting flues
  • Wildlife (birds, rodents, raccoons, etc.) entering flues

    A qualified chimney service contractor should install screening where missing. Screens should have holes 1/4 inch or larger.

    Photo 9  

    Photo 10  

    40) Repair/Maintain, Comment - The fireplace has been operated at very intense tempatures, that have actually discolored and effected the glass doors and surrond.

    Photo 79  
     

    41) Monitor - Minor cracks, pitting and/or deterioration were found in some fireplace firebrick. However the bricks were not loose and appear to be serviceable. The clients should monitor the condition of the firebricks in the fireplace's firebox in the future. If significant deterioration occurs or if bricks become loose, then a qualified chimney service contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary.

    Photo 49  
     
     
    Plumbing and laundry Return to table of contents
    Location of main water shut-off valve: Basement
    Water service: Private
    Service pipe material: Polyethelene
    Supply pipe material: Copper
    Vent pipe material: Copper
    Waste pipe material: Galvanized steel
    42) Repair/Replace - No check valve is visible on the sump pump's discharge pipe. While not every installation requires a check valve, they are recommended where the discharge pipe is long, the vertical discharge is more than seven or eight feet, or the sump pump has a small pit. Check valves prevent water in the discharge pipe from flowing back down into the sump pit after the pump shuts off. Recommend having a qualified contractor install a check valve. For more information, visit:
    http://www.google.com/search?q=installing+a+sump+pump
    http://www.google.com/search?q=check+valve+required+for+sump+pump

    Photo 76  
     

    43) Repair/Maintain, Monitor - Stains were found in one or more sections of drain and/or waste pipes. Recommend monitoring these areas in the future, and if leaks are found to be actice, have a qualified plumber evaluate and repair as necessary. Alternatively, the client(s) may wish to have a qualified plumber evaluate now and repair if necessary.

    Photo 45  

    Photo 46  

    44) Comment - A sump pump is installed on the premises. This may indicate that water accumulates inside or below the structure. Recommend asking the property owners how often the sump pump operates and for how long at different times of the year. Also, the clients should be aware that the service life of most sump pumps is between five and seven years, and that the pump may need replacing soon depending on its age and how much it operates.
     
    Kitchen Return to table of contents

    45) Safety, Repair/Replace, Evaluate - One or more electric receptacles that serve countertop surfaces within six feet of a sink appear to have no ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate to determine if GFCI protection exists, and if not, repairs should be made so that all receptacles that serve countertop surfaces within six feet of sinks have GFCI protection. For example, install GFCI receptacles or circuit breaker(s) as needed.

    Photo 78  
     

    46) Repair/Maintain - The ceiling is damaged from probable past roof leaks

    Photo 58  
     

    47) Repair/Maintain - Caulk all backsplashes to the walls

    Photo 47  
     
     
    Bathrooms Return to table of contents

    48) Safety, Repair/Replace, Evaluate - One or more electric receptacles that serve countertop surfaces within six feet of a sink appear to have no ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate to determine if GFCI protection exists, and if not, repairs should be made so that all receptacles that serve countertop surfaces within six feet of sinks have GFCI protection. For example, install GFCI receptacles or circuit breaker(s) as needed.

    Photo 70  

    Photo 63  

    49) Repair/Replace, Evaluate - One or more sink drains have an active leak. For example, at pipe fittings and/or junctions between pipe and sink. A qualified plumber should evaluate and repair as necessary.

    Photo 65  

    Photo 68  

    50) Repair/Replace, Evaluate - Tile and/or grout in one or more showers is damaged and/or deteriorated. For example, deteriorated or missing grout, cracked, missing or loose tiles, etc. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair tile and/or grout as necessary.

    Photo 64  
     

    51) Repair/Replace - The cold water in the lower level bathroom doesn't work and should be repaired or replaced as necessary.

    Photo 38  
     

    52) Repair/Maintain - Caulk is missing and/or deteriorated at one or more bathtubs. For example, where the tub base meets the floor below, where the tub surround meets the tub, and/or around the base of the tub spout. Caulk should be replaced where deteriorated and/or applied where missing to prevent water intrusion and damage to wall and floor structures.

    Photo 71  

    Photo 72  

    53) Repair/Maintain - Caulk is missing and/or deteriorated where countertops meet backsplashes in wet areas, such as around sinks. Caulk should be replaced where deteriorated and/or applied where missing to prevent water damage.

    Photo 66  
     

    54) Repair/Maintain - The ceiling in the master bathroom is in poor condition possibly due to the lack of a good functional vent fan.

    Photo 67  
     
     
    Interior rooms Return to table of contents

    55) Safety, Repair/Replace, Evaluate - One or more sections of wiring that weren't properly terminated were found. This is a potential safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate and repair as necessary. Such as terminating the wire with wire nuts in a securely anchored, covered, properly sized junction box.

    Photo 52  

    Photo 62  

    Photo 73  
     

    56) Safety, Repair/Replace - One or more smoke alarms are damaged or missing from their mounting brackets, and an insufficient number of smoke alarms are installed. Damaged and/or missing smoke alarms should be replaced as necessary so a functioning one exists in each hallway leading to bedrooms, and in each bedroom. For more information, visit:
    http://www.cpsc.gov/cpscpub/pubs/5077.html

    Photo 74  
     

    57) Repair/Replace, Evaluate - Screen(s) in one or more windows are missing. The client(s) should ask the property owner(s) about this. Screens are often removed for window cleaning and they may be stored somewhere. If not, then recommend installing screens where missing.
    58) Repair/Replace, Evaluate - One or more doors bind in their jamb and cannot be closed and latched, or are difficult to open and close. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary. For example, adjusting jambs or trimming doors.
    59) Repair/Replace, Evaluate - Ther is a spot in the livingroom just south and east of the fireplace that is kind of spongy. It feels like the vinyl flooring is buckling slighty. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary.
    60) Repair/Replace - One or more windows that were built to open, will not open, or open only minimally due to their being painted shut, damaged and/or deteriorated in some way. Repairs should be made as necessary, and by a qualified contractor if necessary so windows open fully, and open and close easily.

    Photo 48  
     

    61) Repair/Maintain - Several of the ceilings throughout the house are damaged from past water intrusion.

    Photo 69  
     

    62) Repair/Maintain - There is a dehumidifier being used in the finished lower level. This would indicate higher moisture levels and the need for additional grading outside and cleaning out the window well drains.

    Photo 53  
     
     
    Basement Return to table of contents
    Insulation material underneath floor above: None visible
    Pier or support post material:
    Floor structure above: Solid wood joists
    63) Safety, Repair/Replace, Evaluate - Wire splices are exposed due to not being contained in a covered junction box. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock and fire. A qualified electrician should evaluate and make repairs as necessary. For example, install securely mounted junction boxes with cover plates where needed to contain wiring splices.

    Photo 39  
     

    64) Safety, Repair/Replace - Trip hazard(s) exist at stairs due to non-uniform riser heights. Standard building practices call for riser heights not to vary more than 3/8 inch on a flight of stairs. A qualified contractor should repair or replace stairs so all riser heights are within 3/8 inch of each other.
     
    Attic Return to table of contents
    Inspection method: Traversed
    Roof structure type: Rafters
    Ceiling structure: Ceiling beams
    Insulation material: Mineral wool loose fill, Mineral Wool roll/batt
    Insulation depth: 6"
    Insulation estimated R value: 19
    65) Repair/Replace - The ceiling insulation's R rating is significantly less than what's recommended for this area. Recommend having a qualified contractor install additional insulation as per standard building practices for better energy efficiency.
    66) Repair/Replace - Ceiling insulation is missing in some areas. Recommend installing insulation where missing for better energy efficiency.

    Photo 61  
     

    67) Repair/Replace - One or more exhaust fans have no duct and terminate in the attic. This is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects and organisms due to increased moisture levels in the attic from the exhaust air. A qualified contractor should install ducts and vent caps as necessary and as per standard building practices so exhaust air is vented outside. Better building practices call for R8 rated insulation on these ducts.
    68) Repair/Maintain - There is a whole house fan in attic that runs. However there is not enough venting to allow it to function properly to pull the vent flaps up and as such can not work properly.

    Photo 59  
     

    69) Comment - There are cans sitting on the insulation above the kitchen ceiling, presumably to catch water leaking in. All indications would be that these are very old and no longer functional

    Photo 60  
     

     
    Level Home Consultants - 317-340-8404 - Steven J. Everhart