Lake Area Home Inspections, Inc.


Inspector's email: lakeareainspections@yahoo.com
Inspector's phone: (386) 336-1420
5661 Silver Sands Cir 
Keystone Heights FL 32656-8129
Inspector: Jeffery Collins
Florida HI1811

 

Home Inspection Report
Client(s): Randy Ferhenbacher
Property address:
256 west 68th Street
Jacksonville, Florida
Inspection date: 12/22/2012
This report published on Saturday, December 22, 2012 10:38:03 PM MST

View report summary

This report is the exclusive property of this inspection company and the client(s) listed in the report title. Use of this report by any unauthorized persons is prohibited.

 
How to Read this Report
This report is organized by the property's functional areas.  Within each functional area, descriptive information is listed first and is shown in bold type.  Items of concern follow descriptive information.
Concerns are shown and sorted according to these types:
SafetyPoses a risk of injury or death 
Major DefectCorrection likely involves a significant expense 
Repair/ReplaceRecommend repairing or replacing 
Repair/MaintainRecommend repair and/or maintenance 
Minor DefectCorrection likely involves only a minor expense 
MaintainRecommend ongoing maintenance 
EvaluateRecommend evaluation by a specialist 
MonitorRecommend monitoring in the future 
CommentFor your information 

Click here for a glossary of building construction terms. Contact your inspector if there are terms that you do not understand, or visit the glossary of construction terms at http://www.reporthost.com/glossary.asp

Table of Contents
General information
Exterior
Roof
Garage
Attic
Electric service
Water heater
Heating and cooling
Plumbing and laundry
Fireplaces, woodstoves and chimneys
Crawl space
Kitchen
Bathrooms
Interior rooms
 
General information Return to table of contents
Report number: 120005
Inspector's name: Jeffery Collins
Structures inspected: Home and Garage
Type of building: Single family
Time started: 11:45 am
Time finished: 2:40pm
Inspection Fee: 300
Payment method: Invoiced
Present during inspection: Realtor(s)
Occupied: Yes
Weather conditions: Clear
Temperature: Cold
Ground condition: Dry
Front of structure faces: North
Main entrance faces: North
Foundation type: Crawlspace
1)   1. All new buyers should replace the batteries in all smoke detectors.
2. All exterior door locks should be changed for the security of the home.
3. All appliances should be closely watched during their intitial operation to ensure that they are functioning properly.
 
Exterior Return to table of contents
Footing material: Not visible
Foundation material: Brick
Apparent wall structure: Wood frame
Wall covering: Wood shingles, Brick veneer
Driveway material: Poured in place concrete
Sidewalk material: Brick
Exterior door material: Wood panel
Door- water damage: Exterior Door Frame
2) 1. One or more trip hazards were found in sidewalk and/or patio sections due to cracks, settlement and/or heaving.
2. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair or replace sidewalk and/or patio sections as necessary to eliminate trip hazards.
3. Walks were covered in leaves preventing a completed assessment of their condition.

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3) One or more large trees on the property may be likely to fall on the structure, and are a potential safety hazard. Recommend consulting with a qualified arborist to determine if tree(s) need to be removed and/or pruned.
The two large trees in the front yard pose a risk to the home and the neighbors home. There are some signs of decay that should be checked out by a licensed tree surgeon.

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4) One or more outside faucets are missing backflow prevention devices. These devices reduce the likelihood of polluted or contaminated water entering the potable water supply. This condition can occur when an outside faucet is left in the "on" position with a hose connected and the sprayer head turned off. When pressure in the system fluctuates, water can be drawn back into the water supply pipes from the house. If a chemical sprayer is being used with the hose, those chemicals can enter the water supply pipes.

Recommend installing backflow prevention devices on all exterior hose bibs where missing. They are available at most home improvement stores and are easily installed. For more information, visit:
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/AE113

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5) Siding is damaged and/or deteriorated in one or more areas. The siding on the rear of the home (Second Story) has some minor water damage. Due to gaps at each seam this siding is ineffective to protect the area beneath from the weather. Gaps should be sealed and any damaged area repaired and properly sealed/painted.

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6) Minor cracks were found in one or more sections of brick veneer. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary, such as repointing mortar to prevent water intrusion and further deterioration in the future.
Tuck pointing the two areas by the front door and then monitoring the area is recomended.

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7) Rot was found in one or more areas on fascia boards. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary.

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8) Water supply pipes are routed outside and are subject to freezing. The client(s) should ask the property owner(s) if inside shut-off valves exist for these supply pipes. If unable to determine if shut-off valve(s) exist, or if none do, then a qualified plumber should evaluate and install interior shut-off valves as necessary to prevent pipes from freezing and bursting.

Some of these piipes are located under the home. In extreme cold these could freeze as well as those outside the home.

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9) The rear exterior door has water damage on either the door or the frame or both.

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10) 1. One or more landscaping timbers are rotten or damaged by wood destroying insects.
2. Landscaping timbers should be replaced as necessary.

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11) One or more crawl space vent screens are blocked by soil, debris, insulation, stored items or removable panels. This restricts ventilation in the crawl space and may result in increased levels of moisture inside. Materials or items blocking vents should be removed.

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12) One or more crawl space vent screens are missing. Animals such as vermin or pets may enter the crawl space and nest, die and/or leave feces and urine. A qualified contractor should install screens where missing using screen material such as "hardware cloth" with 1/4 inch minimum gaps.

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13) One or more soffit vent screens are missing and/or deteriorated. Birds and vermin may enter the attic because of this. Screens should be replaced or repaired where necessary, or installed where missing.

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14) Vegetation such as trees, shrubs and/or vines are in contact with or less than one foot from the structure's exterior. Vegetation can serve as a conduit for wood destroying insects and may retain moisture against the exterior after it rains. Vegetation should be pruned and/or removed as necessary to maintain a one foot clearance between it and the structure's exterior.

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15) Caulk is missing or deteriorated in some areas and should be replaced and/or applied where necessary. For more information on caulking, visit:
The Ins and Outs of Caulking.

All windows, doors, and trim need to be caulked and painted.

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16) The exterior finish in some areas is failing. A qualified contractor should prep (pressure wash, scrape, sand, prime caulk, etc.) and repaint or restain areas as needed and as per standard building practices.

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17) Stains were found in one or more areas on soffit boards, but no elevated moisture levels were found and the wood appears to be in good condition. Based on the appearance of the roof, these stains may be from past leaks. Recommend monitoring these areas in the future. If moisture is observed, a qualified contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary.
At the time of roof replacement all soffit and fascia should be repaired and painted to preserve the wood from further damage.

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18)   Some window sills have been partially repaired and others have severe wood rot. A contractor should evaluate each sill to see if the repairs made are adequate, the rot can be repaired with a filler or if the whole sill has to be replaced. It is the inspectors opinion that at least the two sill on the east side of the home on the second floor will have to be replaced.

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19)   The windows in this home are an old style which is highly inefficient. Some of the windows do not open properly or will not stay open. The repairs to these windows may be difficult due to the non availability of the parts. Full replacement of these windows with a weather proof energy efficient window will greatly improve the efficiency of this home.

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20)   A large gap at the top of the brick on the east side of the home needs to be filled to prevent animals such as birds or squirrels from entering the wall space or attic.

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21)   The chimney has been caulked partially and may indicate a past problem with a leak. This area should be caulked completely.

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22)   There are some pipes in the back yard that do not seem to have a purpose. Possibly old sprinkler system. Ask owner if they can expain the purpose of these pipes.

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Roof Return to table of contents
Roof inspection method: Traversed
Roof type: Gable
Roof covering: Asphalt or fiberglass composition shingles
Estimated age of roof: 20 years
Gutter & downspout material: Aluminum
Roof ventilation: Adequate
23) One or more plumbing vent pipes are blocked. Sewer gases may enter living spaces as a result. At the time of roof replacement this Capped vent should be evaluated to see if it should be removed.

Note: In some cases the plumbing system may not be complete, and removing plastic caps may result in water intrusion. If there's any doubt as to whether the plumbing system is complete, a qualified plumber should evaluate and make repairs as necessary before removing the caps.

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24) The roof surface material appears to be near the end of its service life and will likely need replacing in the near future, even with repairs. The client(s) should budget for a replacement roof surface, and may want to have a qualified roofing contractor evaluate and attempt to issue a "5 year roof certificate".

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25) One or more sections of roof flashing are deteriorated and/or rusted. Leaks may occur as a result. A qualified roofing contractor should evaluate and replace flashing where necessary.

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26) One or more composition shingles are damaged, deteriorated and/or missing, and should be replaced. Leaks may occur as a result. A qualified roofing contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary.

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27) Debris has accumulated in one or more gutters. This is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects since gutters may overflow and cause water to come in contact with the structure's exterior or make water accumulate around the foundation. Gutters should be cleaned now and as necessary in the future.

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28)   This home has a chimney that is apparently unused. Due to the age of the home this was probably used for a gas furnace and is no longer needed. If this is the case the chimney could be removed to below the roof level when the roof is replaced.

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Garage Return to table of contents

29) One or more exterior entrance doors are damaged and/or deteriorated and should be repaired or replaced by a qualified contractor.

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30)   Dryer vent cover is missing. Replace with new cover to prevent small animals from getting trapped.

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31)   Garage roof has a excessive amount of granual loss from the shingles. This roof is at the end of its life.

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Attic Return to table of contents
Inspection method: Traversed
Roof structure type: Trusses
Ceiling structure: Trusses
Insulation material: Fiberglass loose fill, Fiberglass roll or batt
Insulation depth:
32) Recessed "can" lights are installed in the ceiling below the attic. The inspector was unable to find a label or markings that indicated if these lights are designed to be in contact with insulation, and one or more lights are in contact with insulation. This is a possible fire hazard. Further evaluation should be performed, by a qualified contractor if necessary, to determine if these lights are rated for contact with insulation. If they aren't, or if their rating can't be determined, insulation should be moved, and wells or barriers should be installed or repaired as necessary to keep the insulation away from these lights.

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33) One or more sections of wiring that weren't terminated were found. This is a potential safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate and repair as necessary. For example, cutting the wire to length and terminating the wire with wire nuts in a securely anchored, covered, properly sized junction box.

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34) Ceiling insulation is uneven in some areas. An actual determination of the R-value of the insulation is not possible due to the irregular placement. The proper placement of the insulation will increase the homes energy efficiency.

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35) One or more exhaust fans have no duct and terminate in the attic. This is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects and organisms due to increased moisture levels in the attic from the exhaust air. A qualified contractor should install ducts and vent caps as necessary and as per standard building practices so exhaust air is vented outside. Better building practices call for R8 rated insulation on these ducts.
36) Screens are missing and/or deteriorated at one or more soffit, gable, and/or ridge vents. Birds and vermin may enter the attic because of this. Screens should be replaced or repaired where necessary, or installed where missing.

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37) Stains were visible on the roof structure in one or more areas. These areas were dry at the time of the inspection. The stains may be caused by a past leak. Recommend asking the property owner(s) about past leaks. The client(s) should monitor these areas in the future, especially after heavy rains, to determine if active leaks exist. If leaks are found, a qualified roofing contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary.

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Electric service Return to table of contents
Primary service type: Overhead
Primary service overload protection type: Circuit breakers
Service amperage (amps): 200
Service voltage (volts): 120/240
Location of main service switch: at meter
Location of main disconnect: at meter
Service entrance conductor material: Aluminum
Main disconnect rating (amps): 200
Branch circuit wiring type: Copper, Aluminum multi-strand
Smoke detectors present: Yes on second floor only
38) Breaker cover at the meter was not removed due to heavy corrosion on the cover.

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39)   Due to the age of this home there are some 2 prong outlets still remaining. These should be replaced with three prong grounded outlets and wired accordingly.

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Water heater Return to table of contents
Estimated age: 13 years
Type: Tank
Energy source: Electricity
Capacity (in gallons): 40
Manufacturer: Kenmore
Model: 153.316252
Water temperature (degrees Fahrenheit): 70
40) Substandard wiring was found for the water heater's power supply. Exposed non-metallic sheathed (Romex) wiring is used and is subject to damage. Both the insulation and conductors can be damaged by repeated movement or contact with objects such as stored items. This is a safety hazard for both fire and shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate and repair as necessary. Typically, flexible conduit with bushings is used in this application.

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41) The estimated useful life for most water heaters is 8 to 12 years. This water heater appears to be at this age or older and may need replacing at any time. Recommend budgeting for a replacement in the near future.

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42) The water heater was turned off at the time of the inspection. For example, circuit breaker turned off. The inspector was unable to fully evaluate the water heater. This is probably due to the owners being out of town. Buyer should contact owner and ask if there are any problems known. The system appeared to be functional otherwise.

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Heating and cooling Return to table of contents
Estimated age: 17 years
Primary heating system energy source: Electric
Primary heat system type: Heat pump
Manufacturer: Carrier
Model: 38yda48300
Primary Air conditioning type: Heat pump
Distribution system: Metal pipe
Primary A/C energy source: Electric
Manufacturer: Carrier
Filter location: Behind return air grill
43) Significant amounts of debris, dirt and/or dust are visible in one or more sections of supply and/or return air ducts. This can be a health hazard, especially for those with allergies or respiratory problems. The Environmental Protection Association (EPA) recommends considering having ducts professionally cleaned when "ducts are clogged with excessive amounts of dust and debris and/or particles are actually released into the home from your supply registers". At a minimum, the visible debris should be thoroughly cleaned. Recommend having a qualified contractor clean the ducts. For more information on duct cleaning in relation to indoor air quality, visit:
http://www.epa.gov/iaq/pubs/airduct.html

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44) The last service date of this system appears to be more than one year ago, or the inspector was unable to determine the last service date. The client(s) should ask the property owner(s) when it was last serviced. If unable to determine the last service date, or if this system was serviced more than one year ago, a qualified heating and cooling contractor should inspect, clean, and service this system, and make repairs if necessary. This servicing should be performed annually in the future.
45) Return air box Should be sealed. Open wall areas allow return air to be drawn from unconditioned areas such as the attic which decreases the efficiency of the unit.

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Plumbing and laundry Return to table of contents
Location of main water shut-off valve: at meter
Location of main water meter: front yard
Water service: Public
Service pipe material: Copper, Galvanized steel
Supply pipe material: Galvanized steel, CPVC
Vent pipe material: Plastic, Cast iron
Drain pipe material: Plastic, Cast iron
Waste pipe material: Plastic, Cast iron
Model #: 110.24872300
46) Neither the clothes washer nor dryer were operated or evaluated. They are excluded from this inspection.
 
Fireplaces, woodstoves and chimneys Return to table of contents
Fireplace type: Masonry
Chimney type: Masonry
47) A significant amount of creosote (1/8 inch or more) is visible in the fireplace flue. A qualified chimney service contractor should inspect, clean, and repair if necessary now and annually in the future.

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48) One or more fireplace or woodstove hearths are less than 18 inches deep. This is a fire hazard. At a minimum, non-combustible hearth pad(s) should be installed. Ideally the hearth(s) should be modified as necessary or installed by a qualified contractor so they are at least 18" deep.

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49) One or more chimney flue openings do not have a screen installed. Screens prevent the following:
  • Fire hazard from wood fire sparks and embers exiting flues
  • Wildlife (birds, rodents, raccoons, etc.) entering flues

    A qualified chimney service contractor should install screening where missing. Screens should have holes 1/4 inch or larger.

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    50)   Gaps in masonry may allow smoke and heat to get in between liner and masonry. A qualified fireplace contractor should evaluate this fireplace before it is used and repairs made as necessary.

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    Crawl space Return to table of contents
    Inspection method: Traversed
    Insulation material underneath floor above: None visible
    Pier or support post material: Masonry
    Beam material: Solid wood
    Floor structure above: Solid wood joists
    Vapor barrier present: No
    51) Wire splices are exposed due to not being contained in a covered junction box. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock and fire. A qualified electrician should evaluate and make repairs as necessary. For example, install securely mounted junction boxes with cover plates where needed to contain wiring splices.

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    52) Cover plate(s) are missing from one or more electric boxes, such as for receptacles, switches and/or junction boxes. They are intended to contain fire and prevent electric shock from exposed wires. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of fire and shock. Cover plates should be installed where missing.

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    53) No insulation is installed under the floor in the crawl space. Recommend that a qualified contractor install R19 or better (6" thick fiberglass batt) insulation under the floor for better energy efficiency.
    54) One or more crawl space vent screens are blocked by soil, debris, insulation, stored items or removable panels. This restricts ventilation in the crawl space and may result in increased levels of moisture inside. Materials or items blocking vents should be removed.

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    55) No vapor barrier is installed. This is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects and organisms due to the likelihood of water evaporating into the structure from the soil. A qualified contractor should install a vapor barrier. Standard building practices require the following:
  • The soil below the vapor barrier should be smooth and free from sharp objects.
  • Seams should overlap a minimum of 12 inches.
  • The vapor barrier should lap up onto the foundation side walls.

    Better building practices require that:
  • Seams and protrusions should be sealed with a pressure sensitive tape.
  • The vapor barrier should be caulked and attached tightly to the foundation side walls. For example, with furring strips and masonry nails.
    56) Water supply pipes are uninsulated. Recommend insulating pipes as necessary for better energy efficiency and to prevent water pipes from freezing.
    57)   One joist was wrapped in 1" material that is not of a structural nature. This is where a wall may have been at some time in the past. It appears that the joist that has been covered has some slight damage of some kind. It could only be viewed by small gaps which limited the verification of the damage. Recommend informing WDO inspector of this area.

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    Kitchen Return to table of contents
    Dishwasher: Serviceable
    Dishwasher Manufacturer: Frigidaire
    Dishwasher Model #: FDB2410LDS2
    Refridgerator Manufacturer: Whirl pool
    Refridgerator Model #: GB25HDXT000
    Microwave Manufacturer: Samsung
    Microwave Model #: SMH9151W
    Range manufacturer: General Electric
    Range Model #: J B400D P4WW
     
    Bathrooms Return to table of contents

    58) Tile and/or grout in one or more showers is damaged and/or deteriorated. For example, deteriorated or missing grout, cracked, missing or loose tiles, etc. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair tile and/or grout as necessary.

    Grount in the second story master bath is missing. This could lead to water damage and should be repaired soon.

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    59) One or more handles are missing from water shut-off valves. Handles should be replaced where missing.

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    60) Caulk is missing or deteriorated around the base of one or more bathtub spouts/handles. It should be replaced where deteriorated and/or applied where missing to prevent water intrusion and damage to wall structures.

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    61)   Second story guest bath had dry water stains visible from hatch in first floor pantry. This appeared to be old and may be prior to remodel.

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    Interior rooms Return to table of contents

    62) There was one open ground, three-pronged electric receptacles were found. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate and make repairs as necessary. For example, replacing receptacles or correcting wiring circuits.

    Grounding type receptacles began being required in residential structures during the 1960s. Based on the age of this structure and the presence of 2-pronged receptacles in some areas of this structure, an acceptable repair may be to simply replace the ungrounded 3-pronged receptacles with 2-pronged receptacles. However the following appliances require grounding type receptacles:
  • Computer hardware
  • Refrigerators
  • Freezers
  • Air conditioners
  • Clothes washers
  • Clothes dryers
  • Dishwashers
  • Kitchen food waste disposers
  • Information technology equipment
  • Sump pumps
  • Electrical aquarium equipment
  • Hand-held motor-operated tools
  • Stationary and fixed motor-operated tools
  • Light industrial motor-operated tools
  • Hedge clippers
  • Lawn mowers

    This list is not exhaustive. Grounded circuits and receptacles should be installed in locations where such appliances will be used.

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    63) An insufficient number of smoke alarms are installed. Additional smoke alarms should be installed as necessary so a functioning one exists in each hallway leading to bedrooms, and in each bedroom. For more information, visit http://www.cpsc.gov/cpscpub/pubs/5077.html

    There was no smoke detectors on bottom floor.

    64) Screen(s) in one or more windows are missing. The client(s) should ask the property owner(s) about this. Screens are often removed for window cleaning and they may be stored somewhere. If not, then recommend installing screens where missing.

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    65) Lock mechanisms on one or more windows are missing and/or damaged so that they are inoperable. Repairs should be made by a qualified contractor or service technician so that windows lock and unlock easily.

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    66) Glass in one or more windows is broken. A qualified contractor should replace glass where necessary.

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    67) The whole-house fan was inoperable during the inspection. The client(s) should consult with the property owner(s) as to how it operates, or have a qualified contractor evaluate and repair if necessary.

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    68)   Door leading to the kitchen from the dining room is missing.

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    This inspection was conducted as a typical non-invasive home inspection. In some cases a more invasive inspection may be necessary on specific elements. An item may not have been noted on this inspection due to concealment either intentional or non-intentional.
    This is inspection in no way indicates the structure or component meets current building codes, although it may have met the current codes at the time of construction. Because of this, any recommendations should be considered to meet the needs of the clients.This report should be considered a snapshot in time. All conditions in this report were the condition that was present at the time of the inspection.