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BUTTE INSPECTIONS


Chico, California 95928 
butteinspections@gmail.com
Inspector: John Schram III
NACHI ID Number: NACHI13033006

  

Summary

Summary
Client(s):  KL/JS10.1.13
Property address:  1234 Your Street, Chico, CA 95928
Inspection date:  Thursday, October 03, 2013

This report published on Sunday, January 26, 2014 1:27:25 AM PST

This report is the exclusive property of this inspection company and the client(s) listed in the report title. Use of this report by any unauthorized persons is prohibited.

Concerns are shown and sorted according to these types:
Concern typeSafetyPoses a safety hazard
Concern typeRepair/ReplaceRecommend repairing or replacing
Concern typeRepair/MaintainRecommend repair and/or maintenance
Concern typeMaintainRecommend ongoing maintenance
Concern typeEvaluateRecommend evaluation by a specialist
Concern typeCommentFor your information


General Information
1 - Structures built prior to the mid 1980s may contain lead and/or asbestos. Lead is commonly found in paint and in some plumbing components. The EPA does not recognize newer coats of paint as encapsulating older coats of lead-based paint. Asbestos is commonly found in various building materials such as insulation, siding, and/or floor and ceiling tiles. Laws were passed in 1978 to prohibit usage of lead and asbestos, but stocks of materials containing these substances remained in use for a number of years thereafter. Both lead and asbestos are known health hazards. Evaluating for the presence of lead and/or asbestos is beyond the scope of this inspection. Any mention of these materials in this report is made as a courtesy only, and meant to refer the client to a specialist. Consult with specialists as necessary, such as industrial hygienists, professional labs and/or abatement specialists for this type of evaluation. For information on lead, asbestos and other hazardous materials in homes, visit:
http://www.reporthost.com/?EPA
http://www.reporthost.com/?CPSC
http://www.reporthost.com/?CDC
Grounds
4 - Fungal rot was found in beams at one or more structures covering decks, patios and/or porches. Recommend that a qualified person repair as necessary. All rotten wood should be replaced.

Front porch support beam end exposed to weather
shows signs of rot. Should be trimmed and inspected
by Pest control specialist.
5 - One or more significantly-sized diseased or dead trees were found on the property grounds and may pose of risk of damaging building(s). Recommend that such trees be removed by a qualified tree service contractor or certified arborist.
Exterior and Foundation
7 - One or more precast concrete pier blocks were used to support posts or beams, and no poured-in-place concrete footing was visible below. Pier blocks resting directly on soil are prone to settlement. Recommend that a qualified contractor evaluate and repair as necessary and per standard building practices. For example, by pouring concrete footings below.
8 - Soil was in contact with or less than 4 inches from brick, stone or faux stone veneer. For most residential installations of this type of veneer, this is a conducive condition for wood-destroying organisms. Weep holes may be covered. Condensed water behind the veneer may not be able to escape, and moisture can accumulate in the wood structure behind. Recommend grading and/or removing soil as necessary to maintain a 4-inch clearance.
Crawl Space
9 - No insulation was installed under the floor above the crawl space. Recommend that a qualified person install insulation for better energy efficiency and per standard building practices. Typically this is R-19 rated fiberglass batt with the attached facing installed against the warm (floor) side.

House outdates codes for subfloor insulation. Added
insulation may be beneficial to energy saving.
Recommend consulting insulation specialist.
Roof
10 - Some composition shingles were missing. Leaks can occur as a result. This is a conducive condition for wood-destroying organisms. Recommend that a qualified contractor repair as necessary. For example, by replacing shingles.

Possibility of missing peak cap shingles missing at
HVAC unit. Consult roofing specialist.
Attic and Roof Structure
11 - One or more attic access hatches or doors were not insulated, or had substandard insulation. Recommend installing insulation as necessary and per current standards at hatches or doors for better energy efficiency. For more information, visit:
http://www.reporthost.com/?ATTACC
12 - The ceiling insulation in one or more areas of the attic was compacted or uneven. Heating and cooling costs may be higher due to reduced energy efficiency. Recommend that a qualified person repair, replace or install insulation as necessary and per standard building practices (typically R-38).

Additional insulation recommended for comfort and
energy savings. Consult insulation specialist.
Garage or Carport
13 - No photoelectric sensors were installed for one or more garage vehicle doors' automatic opener. These have been required on all automatic door openers since 1993 and improve safety by triggering the door's auto-reverse feature without need for the door to come in contact with the object, person or animal that is preventing the door from closing. Recommend that a qualified contractor install photoelectric sensors where missing for improved safety. For more information on garage door safety issues, visit:
http://www.reporthost.com/?GDPES
14 - One or more were found in the attached garage walls or ceilings. Current standard building practices call for wooden-framed ceilings and walls that divide the house and garage to provide limited fire-resistance rating to prevent the spread of fire from the garage to the house. Recommend that a qualified person repair per standard building practices. For example, by patching openings or holes, firestopping holes or gaps with fire-resistant caulking, and/or installing fire-resistant wall covering (e.g. Type X drywall). For more information, visit:
http://www.reporthost.com/?AGFR
15 - Appliances such as the water heater and/or furnace were subject to damage from vehicles because no protective barrier was installed in front of them. This is a potential safety hazard for fire and/or shock. A qualified contractor should install a barrier per standard building practices. For example, a steel post or specially made wood partition anchored in the concrete slab floor.
16 - Weatherstripping around or at the base of the door between the garage and the house was missing, damaged. House to garage doors should prevent fire and fumes from spreading from the garage to the house. Weatherstripping should form a seal around this door. This is a potential safety hazard. Recommend that a qualified person replace or install weatherstripping as necessary.

Door skirt was missing and doorstop rubber bead was
damaged, allowing vapor infiltration into the house.
Recommend door specialist repair/replace these items.
17 - One or more automatic door openers were inoperable. Recommend that a qualified contractor evaluate and repair or replace opener(s) as necessary.
18 - The control button or panel for operating one or more automatic garage vehicle door openers was loose. A qualified person should repair as necessary so buttons or control panels are securely attached to wall surfaces.
Electric
20 - One or more ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) circuit breakers in panel(s) # when tested. GFCI breakers reduce the chance of shock when using equipment in wet areas. This is a potential shock hazard. Recommend that a qualified electrician evaluate and repair as necessary.

Only GFCI is in garage at laundry sink. Recommend
qualified electrician consultation for update of system.
21 - One or more arc fault circuit interrupter (AFCI) circuit breakers in panel(s) # when tested. AFCI breakers reduce the risk of fire by protecting against overheated or arcing receptacles (outlets) or light fixtures. This is a potential fire hazard. Recommend that a qualified electrician evaluate and repair as necessary.
22 - Substandard wiring was found at the garage. For example, exposed wiring, loose wiring, exposed splices, missing or broken cover plates. This is a safety hazard. Recommend that a qualified electrician evaluate and repair as necessary and per standard building practices.

Refer to qualified electrician for garage wiring inspection/repair.
23 - One or more electric receptacles (outlets) at the kitchen, bathroom(s) had no visible ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection, or the inspector was unable to determine if GFCI protection was present. If not GFCI-protected, receptacles in wet areas pose a shock hazard. Recommend that a qualified electrician evaluate and install GFCI protection if necessary and per standard building practices. General guidelines for GFCI-protected receptacles include the following locations:For more information, visit:
http://www.reporthost.com/?GFCI
24 - Non-metallic sheathed wiring was installed at one or more locations, and was subject to damage such as on easily accessible wall or ceiling surfaces. The insulation can be damaged by objects coming in contact with it, resulting in exposed, energized wires. Also, copper conductors can break after being repeatedly moved or bent. This is a potential shock or fire hazard. Recommend that a qualified electrician repair per standard building practices. For example, by installing protective conduit or re-routing wires through walls or ceilings.
25 - Wire splices were exposed and were not contained in a covered junction box. This is a potential shock or fire hazard. Recommend that a qualified electrician repair per standard building practices. For example, by installing permanently mounted junction boxes with cover plates where needed to contain wiring splices.
26 - One or more cover plates for switches, receptacles (outlets) or junction boxes were missing or broken. These plates are intended to contain fire and prevent electric shock from occurring due to exposed wires. Recommend that a qualified person install cover plates where necessary.
27 - Branch circuit wiring installed in buildings built prior to the mid 1980s is typically rated for a maximum temperature of only 60 degrees Celsius. This includes non-metallic sheathed (Romex) wiring, and both BX and AC metal-clad flexible wiring. Knob and tube wiring, typically installed in homes built prior to 1950, may be rated for even lower maximum temperatures. Newer electric fixtures including lighting and fans typically require wiring rated for 90 degrees Celsius. Connecting newer fixtures to older, 60-degree-rated wiring is a potential fire hazard. Repairs for such conditions may involve replacing the last few feet of wiring to newer fixtures with new 90-degree-rated wire, and installing a junction box to join the old and new wiring.

It is beyond the scope of this inspection to determine if such incompatible components are installed, or to determine the extent to which they're installed. Based on the age of this building, the client should be aware of this safety hazard, both for existing fixtures and when planning to upgrade with newer fixtures. Consult with a qualified electrician for repairs as necessary.
28 - One or more electrical components including switches, receptacles appeared to be older than their intended service life. Such old components may pose a fire or shock hazard. Recommend consulting with a qualified electrician to determine which components should be replaced with newer, modern components.

Receptacles (plugs) and switches old and or covered with paint.
29 - One or more "plug-in" type carbon monoxide alarms were found. Because such CO alarms can be easily removed, recommend that the client verify that CO alarms haven't been removed upon taking occupancy. If removed, then recommend installing new CO alarms outside of each separate sleeping area in the immediate vicinity of the bedrooms on each level and in accordance with the manufacturer's recommendations. Note that some states and/or municipalities require CO alarms to be installed for new construction and/or for homes being sold. For more information, visit:
http://www.reporthost.com/?COALRM
30 - One or more receptacles (outlets) have been painted, and slots were clogged with paint. Recommend that a qualified electrician replace such receptacles as necessary.
Water Heater
32 - The hot water temperature was greater than 120 degrees Fahrenheit. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of scalding. The thermostat should be adjusted so the water temperature doesn't exceed 120 degrees. If the water heater is powered by electricity, a qualified person should perform the adjustment, since covers that expose energized equipment normally need to be removed. For more information on scalding dangers, visit:
http://www.reporthost.com/?SCALD
Heating, Ventilation and Air Condition (HVAC)
33 - The furnace did not respond to normal controls (thermostat). It appeared to be inoperable. The inspector was only able to perform a limited evaluation. If possible, consult with the property owner and/or review documentation on this system. Recommend that a qualified HVAC contractor evaluate and repair as necessary.
34 - The gas or oil-fired forced air furnace appeared to have been serviced within the last year based on information provided to the inspector or labeling on the equipment. If this is true, then routine servicing is not needed at this point. However a qualified HVAC contractor should inspect, clean, and service this system, and make repairs if necessary annually in the future. For more information visit:
http://www.reporthost.com/?ANFURINSP
Kitchen
36 - Cabinet hardware such as hinges, latches, closers, magnets or pulls were loose, missing or damaged at one or more cabinet drawers, doors or turntables. Recommend that a qualified person repair as necessary.
37 - The sink faucet was dripping. Recommend that a qualified person repair as necessary.
Bathrooms, Laundry and Sinks
38 - The exhaust fan at location(s) #B was noisy or vibrated excessively. Moisture may accumulate and result in mold, bacteria or fungal growth. Recommend that a qualified person clean, repair or replace fans as necessary.

Refer to qualified electrician to repair- replace powder
room fan.
39 - Recommend cleaning and sealing the grout in flooring at location(s) #A, B now and in the future as necessary to prevent staining and to improve waterproofing.
Interior, Doors and Windows
40 - Some interior door hardware needed . Recommend that a qualified person repair or replace as necessary.

Numerous doors were in need of repair/replacement.
(Too narrow or hinge bound)
41 - One or more windows that were designed to open and close were difficult to open and close. Recommend that a qualified person repair windows as necessary so they open and close easily.

Window left of front door glides worn out.
42 - One or more window screens were damaged or deteriorated. These window(s) may not provide ventilation during months when insects are active. Recommend replacing window screens as necessary.
43 - One or more interior doors wouldn't latch or were difficult to latch. Recommend that a qualified person repair as necessary. For example, by adjusting latch plates or locksets.
44 - Recommend cleaning and sealing grout in tile or stone flooring now and in the future as necessary to prevent staining and to improve waterproofing.