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JRS Inspections


Email: jrsinspections@hotmail.com
Inspector's email: jrsinspections@hotmail.com
Phone: (208) 691-7479
Inspector's phone: (208) 691-7479
2421 Partridge Loop 
Post Falls, ID 83854
Inspector: Jimmy Shelly

  

Property Inspection Report
Client(s): Aaron Davis
Property address: 503 S. 14th St
Coeur d'Alene, ID
83814
Inspection date: 6/1/2011
This report published on Thursday, August 16, 2012 2:27:51 PM PDT

View report summary

This report is the exclusive property of this inspection company and the client(s) listed in the report title. Use of this report by any unauthorized persons is prohibited.

 
How to Read this Report
This report is organized by the property's functional areas.  Within each functional area, descriptive information is listed first and is shown in bold type.  Items of concern follow descriptive information.
Concerns are shown and sorted according to these types:
SafetyPoses a risk of injury or death 
Major DefectCorrection likely involves a significant expense 
Repair/ReplaceRecommend repairing or replacing 
Repair/MaintainRecommend repair and/or maintenance 
Minor DefectCorrection likely involves only a minor expense 
MaintainRecommend ongoing maintenance 
EvaluateRecommend evaluation by a specialist 
CommentFor your information 

Click here for a glossary of building construction terms. Contact your inspector if there are terms that you do not understand, or visit the glossary of construction terms at http://www.reporthost.com/glossary.asp

Table of Contents
General information
Exterior
Roof
Electric service
Water heater
Heating and cooling
Plumbing and laundry
Fireplaces, woodstoves and chimneys
Kitchen
Bathrooms
Interior rooms
 
General information Return to table of contents
Report number: 060111-01
Inspector: James Shelly
Type of building: Single family
Age of building: 33 Years
Time started: 10:30
Time finished: 1:00
Inspection Fee: Donation
Occupied: No
Weather conditions: Partly cloudy
Temperature: Cool
Ground condition: Damp
Front of structure faces: East
Main entrance faces: East
Foundation type: Finished basement
1) Structures built prior to 1979 may contain lead-based paint and/or asbestos in various building materials such as insulation, siding, and/or floor and ceiling tiles. Both lead and asbestos are known health hazards. Evaluating for the presence of lead and/or asbestos is not included in this inspection. The client(s) should consult with specialists as necessary, such as industrial hygienists, professional labs and/or abatement contractors for this type of evaluation. For information on lead, asbestos and other hazardous materials in homes, visit these websites:
  • The Environmental Protection Association (http://www.epa.gov)
  • The Consumer Products Safety Commission (http://www.cpsc.gov)
  • The Center for Disease Control (http://www.cdc.gov)
     
    Exterior Return to table of contents
    Foundation material: Poured in place concrete
    Apparent wall structure: Wood frame
    Driveway material: Poured in place concrete
    Sidewalk material: Poured in place concrete
    Exterior door material: Glass panel
    2) One or more large trees on the property may be likely to fall on the structure, and are a potential safety hazard. Recommend consulting with a qualified arborist to determine if tree(s) need to be removed and/or pruned.

    Photo 3  
    Right view of home

    Photo 4  
    Left view of home

    3) One or more flights of stairs with more than two risers have no handrail installed. This is a safety hazard. A qualified contractor should install graspable handrails that your hand can completely encircle at stairs where missing, and as per standard building practices.

    Stairs are missing at rear of deck-Need stairs and rails reinstalled

    Siding is damaged where stairs were

    Photo 6  
    Missing steps at rear of deck

    Photo 21  
    Damage to siding where stairs were removed

    4) One or more outside faucets are missing backflow prevention devices. These devices reduce the likelihood of polluted or contaminated water entering the potable water supply. This condition can occur when an outside faucet is left in the "on" position with a hose connected and the sprayer head turned off. When pressure in the system fluctuates, water can be drawn back into the water supply pipes from the house. If a chemical sprayer is being used with the hose, those chemicals can enter the water supply pipes.

    Recommend installing backflow prevention devices on all exterior hose bibs where missing. They are available at most home improvement stores and are easily installed. For more information, visit: http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/BODY_AE079


    There are too few outside water faucets- The only one is located inside the garage

    Photo 22  
    No Anti siphon on garage faucet used for exterior
     

    5) Window well on the left side of the home is uncovered and poses a risk of falling and tripping.

    Photo 62  
    Window well on left side potential hazard when not covered.
     

    6) Rot was found at the base of the stair stringers. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary. All rotten wood should be replaced or removed and soil should be graded and/or removed if necessary to maintain at least a 6" gap between wood and soil.

    Watch the bottom of the front stairs for rot -

    .

    Photo 8  
    Stringer and front panel touching ground and starting to rot
     

    7) One or more large trees are very close the foundation. Tree roots can cause significant structural damage to foundations. Recommend having a qualified tree service contractor or arborist remove trees as necessary to prevent damage to the structure's foundation.

    Photo 14  
    Large tree near foundation

    Photo 51  
    Rear left of house

    8) One or more downspouts are missing. This can result in water accumulating around the structure's foundation, or in basements and crawl spaces if they exist. Accumulated water is a conducive condition to wood destroying insects and organisms, and may also cause the foundation to settle and possibly fail over time. A qualified contractor should install downspout(s) where missing. Also recommend installing extensions such as splashblocks or tie-ins to underground drain lines as necessary to carry rainwater away from the house.
    9) One or more gutters are missing. This can result in water accumulating around the structure's foundation, or in basements and crawl spaces if they exist. Accumulated water is a conducive condition to wood destroying insects and organisms, and may also cause the foundation to settle and possibly fail over time. A qualified contractor should install gutters and downspouts where missing. Also, extensions such as splashblocks or tie-ins to underground drain lines should be installed as necessary to carry rain water away from the house.

    Photo 2  
    Front view of home
     

    10) One or more end caps are missing on gutters. This can result in water accumulating around the structure's foundation, or in basements and crawl spaces if they exist. Accumulated water is a conducive condition to wood destroying insects and organisms, and may also cause the foundation to settle and possibly fail over time. End caps should be replaced where missing.

    Photo 19  
    End cap missing on gutter
     

    11) Trees and/or shrubs are in contact with or are close to the roof edge(s) in one or more areas. Damage to the roof may result, especially during high winds. Vegetation can also act as a conduit for wood destroying insects. Vegetation should be pruned back and/or removed as necessary to prevent damage and infestation by wood destroying insects.

    Photo 12  
    Trees in contact with roof

    Photo 13  
    Trees in contact with roof

    12) The finish on the deck(s) and railing(s) is worn and/or deteriorated. Recommend cleaning and refinishing as necessary.

    Photo 20  
    Deck and railing needs paint
     
     
    Roof Return to table of contents
    Roof inspection method: Viewed from eaves on ladder
    Roof covering: Asphalt or fiberglass composition shingles
    Estimated age of roof: 15-20 years
    Gutter & downspout material:
    Roof ventilation: Unable to determine (no access to attic spaces)
    13) The roof surface material appears to be near the end of its service life and will likely need replacing in the near future, even with repairs. The client(s) should budget for a replacement roof surface, and may want to have a qualified roofing contractor evaluate and attempt to issue a "5 year roof certificate".

    Photo 15  
    Roof layers
     

    14) This asphalt or fiberglass composition roof surface has two or more layers of roofing materials. When this roof is replaced, recommend a complete "tear off", where all existing layers of roofing are removed before installing new roofing materials. For 20-year rated composition shingles, additional layers of material reduce the new roof material's lifespan as follows:
  • 16-20 years - First roof
  • 12-16 years - Second layer on existing roof

    Removing existing roofing materials will significantly increase the cost of the next roof.

    There are three layers in most places

    Photo 15  
    Roof layers
     

    15) Debris has accumulated in one or more gutters. This is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects since gutters may overflow and cause water to come in contact with the structure's exterior or make water accumulate around the foundation. Gutters should be cleaned now and as necessary in the future.

    Photo 16  
    Gutter needs cleaned
     

    16) Debris such as leaves, needles, seeds, etc. have accumulated on the roof. This is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects and organisms since water may not flow easily off the roof, and may enter gaps in the roof surface. Leaks may occur as a result. Debris should be cleaned from the roof now and as necessary in the future.

    Photo 23  
    Roof above dining area
     

    17) Moss is growing on the roof. As a result, shingles may lift or be damaged. Leaks may result and/or the roof surface may fail prematurely. This is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects and organisms. Efforts should be taken to kill the moss during its growing season (wet months). Typically zinc-based chemicals are used for this, and must be applied periodically. For information on various moss treatment products and their pros and cons, visit http://bryophytes.science.oregonstate.edu/page24.htm

    Photo 9  
    Front roof view w/ moss

    Photo 10  
    Right upper view of roof

    18) Trees are overhanging roof and are within 10 feet of roof vertically. This is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects and organisms since organic debris such as leaves or needles are more likely to accumulate on the roof surface. Accumulated debris may cause water to enter gaps in the roof surface and leak into attic and/or interior spaces. Trees should be pruned so they are at least 10 feet above roof, or don't overhang the roof.

    Photo 13  
    Trees in contact with roof
     

    19) Trees and/or shrubs are in contact with or are close to the roof edge(s) in one or more areas. Damage to the roof may result, especially during high winds. Vegetation can also act as a conduit for wood destroying insects. Vegetation should be pruned back and/or removed as necessary to prevent damage and infestation by wood destroying insects.

    Photo 12  
    Trees in contact with roof
     

    20) The roof was partially obscured by accumulated debris and couldn't be fully evaluated.

    Photo 9  
    Front roof view w/ moss

    Photo 10  
    Right upper view of roof

    Photo 11  
    Garage roof

    Photo 23  
    Roof above dining area
     
    Electric service Return to table of contents
    Primary service type: Overhead
    Primary service overload protection type: Circuit breakers
    Service amperage (amps): 200
    Service voltage (volts): 120/240
    Location of main service switch: Rear of home inside gate
    Location of sub panels: Basement west wall
    Location of main disconnect: Breaker at bottom of main service panel
    Service entrance conductor material: Aluminum
    Solid strand aluminum branch circuit wiring present: No
     
    Water heater Return to table of contents
    Estimated age: 17 years 10 months
    Type: Tank
    Energy source: Natural gas
    Capacity (in gallons): 40
    Manufacturer: A.O. Smith
    Model: FPD 40 222
    Water temperature (degrees Fahrenheit): 150
    21) The estimated useful life for most water heaters is 8 to 12 years. This water heater appears to be at this age or older and may need replacing at any time. Recommend budgeting for a replacement in the near future.

    .

    22) A water heater is installed over finished living spaces and has no catch pan and drain installed. Recommend having a qualified contractor install a catch pan and drain to prevent water damage to finished interior spaces below if/when the water heater develops a leak or is drained.

    Photo 25  
    View of water heater
     

    23) The water heater when heating make a popping noise on the inside of the unit. Recommend having the heater evaluated be a plumbing professional
    24) Based on the capacity of the water heater, the number of bedrooms in this structure and the number of occupants expected to live in this structure, this water heater may be undersized. The clients should consult with a qualified plumbing contractor or water heater distributor for more information, and may wish to upgrade the size of the water heater.

    The size of the water heater should be a 50 gallon for the number of bedrooms and bathrooms

    Photo 26  
    Information tag on water heater
     
     
    Heating and cooling Return to table of contents
    Estimated age: 17 years 9 months
    Primary heating system energy source: Natural gas
    Primary heat system type: Forced air
    Primary A/C energy source: N/A
    Primary Air conditioning type: N/A
    Distribution system: Sheet metal ducts
    Manufacturer: Trane
    Model: XL 90
    Filter location: At the base of the furnace
    Last service date: 1994
    25) The last service date of this system appears to be more than one year ago, or the inspector was unable to determine the last service date. The client(s) should ask the property owner(s) when it was last serviced. If unable to determine the last service date, or if this system was serviced more than one year ago, a qualified heating and cooling contractor should inspect, clean, and service this system, and make repairs if necessary. For safety reasons, and because this system is fueled by gas or oil, this servicing should be performed annually in the future. For more information visit: http://www.cpsc.gov/CPSCPUB/PREREL/prhtml05/05017.html

    Photo 27  
    View of furnace

    Photo 28  
    Information tag on furnace

    26) Air handler filter(s) are dirty and should be replaced now. They should be checked monthly in the future and replaced as necessary.
    27) The estimated useful life for most forced air furnaces is 15 to 20 years. This furnace appears to be at this age or older and may need replacing at any time. Recommend budgeting for a replacement in the near future.

    Photo 28  
    Information tag on furnace
     
     
    Plumbing and laundry Return to table of contents
    Water pressure (psi): 50
    Location of main water shut-off valve: In basement bathroom
    Location of main fuel shut-off: Left side of house
    Water service: Public
    28) Copper water supply pipes in homes built prior to 1986 may be joined with solder that contains lead. Lead is a known health hazard, especially for children. Laws were passed in 1985 prohibiting the use of lead in solder, but prior to that solder normally contained about 50 percent lead. The client(s) should be aware of this, especially if children will be living in this structure. Evaluating for the presence of lead in this structure is not included in this inspection. The client(s) should consider having a qualified lab test for lead, and if necessary take steps to reduce or remove lead from the water supply. Various solutions such as these may be advised:
  • Flush water taps or faucets. Do not drink water that has been sitting in the plumbing lines for more than six hours.
  • Install appropriate filters at points of use.
  • Use only cold water for cooking and drinking. Hot water dissolves lead more quickly than cold water.
  • Use bottled or distilled water.
  • Treat well water to make it less corrosive.
  • Have a qualified plumbing contractor replace supply pipes and/or plumbing components as necessary.

    For more information visit:
    http://www.cpsc.gov/CPSCPUB/PUBS/5056.html
    http://www.epa.gov/safewater/lead/index.html
     
    Fireplaces, woodstoves and chimneys Return to table of contents
    Woodstove type: Metal
    Chimney type: Metal
     
    Kitchen Return to table of contents

    29) The under-sink food disposal is noisy. A qualified plumber or contractor should evaluate and repair or replace the food disposal as necessary.
     
    Bathrooms Return to table of contents

    30) One or more faucet handles are loose or missing and should be repaired or replaced as necessary.

    Photo 31  
    Loose Hot/Cold handle on upstairs shower
     

    31) Hardware such as hinges, latches or pulls are loose and/or missing on one or more cabinets. Repairs should be made and/or hardware should be replaced as necessary, and by a qualified contractor if necessary.

    Photo 33  
    Loose fixture on lower level bathroom cabinet
     

    32) Caulk is missing or deteriorated along the base of one or more bathtubs, where flooring meets the tub. It should be replaced where deteriorated and/or applied where missing to prevent water intrusion and damage to the floor structure.

    Photo 30  
    Caulk needs re applied
     
     
    Interior rooms Return to table of contents

    33) One or more flights of stairs with more than two risers have no handrail installed. This is a safety hazard. A qualified contractor should install graspable handrails that your hand can completely encircle at stairs where missing, and as per standard building practices.

    Photo 32  
    No Handrail on stairwell
     

    34) One or more doors bind in their jamb and cannot be closed and latched, or are difficult to open and close. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary. For example, adjusting jambs or trimming doors.

    Rear storm door won't latch and will need evaluated.

    Photo 52  
    Rear storm door does not shut
     

    35) The doorbell button is loose or damaged. It should be repaired or replaced as necessary, and by a qualified contractor if necessary.

    Buttons are not very responsive, but work when pushed hard.

    Rear door bell receptical is missing

    Photo 54  
    Missing door bell terminal
     

    36)   Stairs in the enclosed rear porch are missing the stair floor covering and pose a tripping hazard

    Photo 53  
    Missing stair floor covering and tile are seperating
     
     

    Photo 1  
    Address verification

    Photo 5  
    Rear view from alley

    Photo 7  
    Rotten timbers at right side walk

    Photo 17  
    Rear driveway pad cracked

    Photo 18  
    Rear patio minor cracking

    Photo 24  
    Electrical panel wiring view

    Photo 29  
    Floor at the bottom of stairs to upper level-Loose boards under carpet

    Photo 34  
    Basement view

    Photo 35  
    Basement view

    Photo 36  
    View of basement furnace room

    Photo 37  
    basement bedroom

    Photo 38  
    Basement bedroom

    Photo 39  
    Basement bathroom

    Photo 40  
    Basement bathroom

    Photo 41  
    Basement stairwell

    Photo 42  
    Living room

    Photo 43  
    Living room

    Photo 44  
    Front door and stove

    Photo 45  
    Stairwell and closet going upstairs

    Photo 47  
    Kitchen view

    Photo 48  
    Dining room view

    Photo 49  
    Garage

    Photo 50  
    Garage

    Photo 55  
    Upstairs view

    Photo 56  
    Upstairs master bedroom

    Photo 57  
    Upstairs master bedroom

    Photo 58  
    Upstairs master bedroom

    Photo 59  
    Upstairs master Bathroom

    Photo 60  
    Upstairs 2nd bedroom

    Photo 61  
    Upstairs 2nd bedroom

     
    Thank you and good luck.