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Interstate Property Inspections

Website: http://www.interstatepropertyinspections.com
Email: info@interstatepropertyinspections.com
Phone: (585) 721-7770
37 Alhambra Drive 
Rochester, New York 14622-3157 
 
 

Inspector: James Peralta
NYS Home Inspector License #16000002892

   

Property Inspection Report
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Client(s): Sample Report
Property address: 123456 Main St
Smalltown, New York
Inspection date: 6/23/2010
This report published on Sunday, April 24, 2011 8:34:01 PM EDT

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This report is the exclusive property of this inspection company and the client(s) listed in the report title. Use of this report by any unauthorized persons is prohibited.

Interstate Property Inspections abides by the Standards of Practice issued by New York State. To view these standards, please visit: http://www.dos.state.ny.us/lcns/professions/homeinspector/Homeinspectionstandards.htm.

Areas of the property subject to non-invasive visual inspection are:
* overall structural condition and basement
* electrical, plumbing, water heater, heating and cooling systems
* kitchen / bathroom fixtures such as faucets, toilets, etc
* general exterior components, such as roofing,siding, gutter, chimney, grading
* general interior components, including walls, floors, ceilings, stairs, insulation

The scope of the inspection and report is a limited visual inspection of the general systems and components of the home, to identify any system or component listed in the report which may be in need of immediate major repair. Some items are checked randomly to represent other like items in the home, such as electrical outlets, windows, and doors.

It is understood and agreed between both parties that this inspection will be of readily accessible areas of the building and is limited to visual observations of apparent conditions existing only at the time of the inspection. Latent and concealed defects and deficiencies are excluded from the inspection. Equipment, items, and systems will not be dismantled for inspection. The inspector will not turn on or activate any system which is not presently operating. Examples include pilot lights, shut-off valves, shut down electrical breakers, unplugged eguipment, etc.

This is not a home warranty, guarantee, insurance policy or substitute for real estate transfer disclosure which my be required by law. Your inspector is a home inspection generalist and is not acting as an licensed engineer or expert in any craft or trade.

Maintenance and other items may be discussed, but they are not part of our inspection. The report is not a compliance inspection or certification for past or present governmental codes or regulations of any kind.

 
How to Read this Report
This report is organized by the property's functional areas.  Within each functional area, descriptive information is listed first and is shown in bold type.  Items of concern follow descriptive information.
Concerns are shown and sorted according to these types:
SafetyPoses a risk of injury or death 
Major DefectCorrection likely involves a significant expense 
Repair/ReplaceRecommend repairing or replacing 
Repair/MaintainRecommend repair and/or maintenance 
MaintainRecommend ongoing maintenance 
EvaluateRecommend evaluation by a specialist 
MonitorRecommend monitoring in the future 
CommentFor your information 

Click here for a glossary of building construction terms.  Contact your inspector if there are terms that you do not understand, or visit the glossary of construction terms at http://www.reporthost.com/glossary.asp

Table of Contents
General information
Exterior
Roof
Attic
Electric service
Water heater
Heating and cooling
Plumbing and laundry
Basement
Kitchen
Bathrooms
Interior rooms
 
General information Return to table of contents
Type of building: Single family
Age of building: 80+ yrs
Time started: 12:55pm
Time finished: 2:20PM
Present during inspection: Realtor(s) Seller
Occupied: No
Weather conditions: Clear
Temperature: Warm
Front of structure faces: East
Foundation type: Unfinished basement
The following items are excluded from this inspection: Security system
1) This property has one or more fuel burning appliances, and no carbon monoxide alarms are visible. This is a safety hazard. Recommend installing one or more carbon monoxide alarms as necessary and as per the manufacturer's instructions. For more information, visit http://www.cpsc.gov/CPSCPUB/PREREL/prhtml05/05017.html
2) Structures built prior to 1979 may contain lead-based paint and/or asbestos in various building materials such as insulation, siding, and/or floor and ceiling tiles. Both lead and asbestos are known health hazards. Evaluating for the presence of lead and/or asbestos is not included in this inspection.
 
Exterior Return to table of contents
Footing material: Not visible
Foundation material: Concrete block, Stone
Apparent wall structure: Wood frame
Wall covering: Wood clapboard, Wood shingles
Driveway material: Asphalt
Sidewalk material: Poured in place concrete
Exterior door material: Solid core steel
3) Handrail(s) at some stairs are loose. This is a safety hazard. A qualified contractor should make repairs as necessary. For example, installing new fasteners and/or hardware so handrails are securely attached.

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4) One or more major cracks (more than 3/4 inch wide) were found in the foundation. These appear to be a structural concern, and may indicate that settlement is ongoing. The client(s) are strongly advised to hire qualified contractors and/or engineers as necessary for further evaluation. Such contractors may include:

  • Foundation repair contractors who may prescribe repairs, and will give cost estimates for prescribed repairs
  • Masonry contractors who repair and/or replace brick veneer
  • Geotechnical engineers who attempt to determine if settlement is ongoing, and what the cause of the settlement is
  • Structural engineers who determine if repairs are necessary, and prescribe those repairs

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    Foundation block is protruding (side view)

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    Foundation block is protruding (front view)

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    5) Soffit ventilation is missing. Inadequate soffit ventilation could cause ice buidlup, deteriorate the roof sheathing, or cause roof covering to deteriorate prematurely. Recommend adding soffit ventilation
    6) The exterior finish in many areas is failing. A qualified contractor should prep (pressure wash, scrape, sand, prime caulk, etc.) and repaint or restain areas as needed and as per standard building practices.

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    7) The driveway has significant deterioration . A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair or replace driveway sections as necessary.

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    8) Sidewalks and/or patios have significant cracks and/or deterioration in one or more areas. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair or replace sidewalk and/or patio sections as necessary.

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    9) Siding is deteriorated in one or more areas. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs and/or replace siding as necessary to prevent water and vermin intrusion.

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    10) One or more downspouts have no extensions, or have extensions that are ineffective. This can result in water accumulating around the structure's foundation, or in basements and crawl spaces if they exist. Accumulated water is a conducive condition to wood destroying insects and organisms, and may also cause the foundation to settle and possibly fail over time. Repairs should be made as necessary, such as installing or repositioning splash blocks, or installing and/or repairing tie-ins to underground drain lines, so rain water is carried at least several feet away from the structure to soil that slopes down and away from the structure.

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    11) One or more gutters are damaged. This can result in water accumulating around the structure's foundation, or in basements and crawl spaces if they exist. Accumulated water is a conducive condition to wood destroying insects and organisms, and may also cause the foundation to settle and possibly fail over time. A qualified contractor should replace or repair gutters where necessary.

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    12)   Front porch - although new decking material has been installed on top of the old flooring, there is evidence of deteriorated wood below the new flooring material. A qualified contractor should examine substruture and make recommendations as to various remedies.

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    Roof Return to table of contents
    Roof inspection method: Viewed from eaves on ladder
    Roof type: Gable
    Roof covering: Asphalt or fiberglass composition shingles
    Estimated age of roof: 12-15 yrs
    Gutter & downspout material: Aluminum
    Roof ventilation: Inadequate
    13) This asphalt or fiberglass composition roof surface has two or more layers of roofing materials. When this roof is replaced, recommend a complete "tear off", where all existing layers of roofing are removed before installing new roofing materials. For 20-year rated composition shingles, additional layers of material reduce the new roof material's lifespan as follows:

  • 16-20 years - First roof
  • 12-16 years - Second layer on existing roof

    Removing existing roofing materials will significantly increase the cost of the next roof.

    Also, the roof structure below the surface is "skip sheathed" where batten boards rather than sheets of plywood support the roof surface. Installing a composition fiberglass or asphalt roof in the future will require the additional expense of installing sheathing, such as plywood or oriented strand board (OSB) over the batten boards.
    14) The siding on one or more exterior walls above lower roof sections is in contact with or has less than a one inch gap between it and the roof surface below. A gap of at least one inch is recommended so water isn't wicked up into the siding from the shingles below, and also to provide room for additional layers of roofing materials when the current roof surface fails. Recommend having a qualified contractor make repairs as necessary, such as trimming siding, so at least a one inch gap exists between the siding and the roofing below where necessary.

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    15) Because of the roof covering type and/or the configuration of the roof, the inspector was unable to traverse the roof and wasn't able to fully evaluate the entire roof.

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    Attic Return to table of contents
    Inspection method: Traversed
    Roof structure type: Rafters
    Ceiling structure: Not visible
    16)  

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    Electric service Return to table of contents
    Primary service type: Overhead
    Primary service overload protection type: Circuit breakers
    Service amperage (amps): 100
    Service voltage (volts): 120/240
    Location of main disconnect: Breaker at top of main service panel
    Service entrance conductor material: Aluminum
    System ground: Cold water supply pipes
    Main disconnect rating (amps): 100
    Branch circuit wiring type: Non-metallic sheathed
    Solid strand aluminum branch circuit wiring present: No
    Smoke detectors present: Yes
    17)  

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    Water heater Return to table of contents
    Estimated age: 13 yrs
    Type: Tank
    Energy source: Natural gas
    Capacity (in gallons): 40
    Manufacturer: A.O. Smith
    18) The estimated useful life for most water heaters is 8 to 12 years. This water heater appears to be at this age or older and may need replacing at any time. Recommend budgeting for a replacement in the near future.

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    Heating and cooling Return to table of contents
    Estimated age: 32 yrs
    Primary heating system energy source: Natural gas
    Primary heat system type: Forced air
    Primary A/C energy source: N/A
    Distribution system: Sheet metal ducts, Metal pipe
    Manufacturer: Luxaire
    Filter location: In return air duct below furnace
    Last service date: 1998
    19) What appears to be asbestos is visible on some ductwork. It is significantly deteriorated in some areas, and if it is asbestos, it may pose a health hazard and require abatement. Recommend having this material tested at a qualified lab. If the material is found to contain asbestos, recommend consulting with a qualified asbestos abatement contractor or industrial hygienist. For information on asbestos hazards in the home, visit:
    http://www.cpsc.gov/CPSCPUB/PUBS/453.html

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    20) The last service date of this system appears to beseveral years ago, or the inspector was unable to determine the last service date. The client(s) should ask the property owner(s) when it was last serviced. If unable to determine the last service date, or if this system was serviced more than one year ago, a qualified heating and cooling contractor should inspect, clean, and service this system, and make repairs if necessary. For safety reasons, and because this system is fueled by gas or oil, this servicing should be performed annually in the future. For more information visit:
    http://www.cpsc.gov/CPSCPUB/PREREL/prhtml05/05017.html

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    21) The estimated useful life for most forced air furnaces is 15 to 20 years. This furnace appears to be at this age or older and may need replacing at any time. Recommend budgeting for a replacement in the near future.

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    Plumbing and laundry Return to table of contents
    Water service: Public
    Service pipe material: Copper
    Supply pipe material: Copper
    Vent pipe material: Cast iron
    Drain pipe material: Cast iron
    Waste pipe material: Cast iron
    22) Copper water supply pipes in homes built prior to 1986 may be joined with solder that contains lead. Lead is a known health hazard, especially for children. Laws were passed in 1985 prohibiting the use of lead in solder, but prior to that solder normally contained about 50 percent lead. The client(s) should be aware of this, especially if children will be living in this structure. Evaluating for the presence of lead in this structure is not included in this inspection. The client(s) should consider having a qualified lab test for lead, and if necessary take steps to reduce or remove lead from the water supply. Various solutions such as these may be advised:

  • Flush water taps or faucets. Do not drink water that has been sitting in the plumbing lines for more than six hours.
  • Install appropriate filters at points of use.
  • Use only cold water for cooking and drinking. Hot water dissolves lead more quickly than cold water.
  • Use bottled or distilled water.
  • Treat well water to make it less corrosive.
  • Have a qualified plumbing contractor replace supply pipes and/or plumbing components as necessary.

    For more information visit:
    http://www.cpsc.gov/CPSCPUB/PUBS/5056.html
    http://www.epa.gov/safewater/lead/index.html
    23)  

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    Basement Return to table of contents
    Insulation material underneath floor above: None visible
    Pier or support post material: Steel
    Beam material: Built up wood
    Floor structure above: Solid wood joists
    24) Evidence of prior water intrusion was found in one or more sections of the basement. For example, water stains and/or efflorescence on the foundation or floor, water stains at bases of support posts, etc.

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    25) Standing water and/or wet areas were found in one or more sections of the basement. Accumulated water is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects and organisms and should not be present in the basement. A qualified contractor who specializes in drainage issues should evaluate and repair as necessary. Typical repairs for preventing water from accumulating in the basement include:

  • Repairing, installing or improving rain run-off systems (gutters, downspouts and extensions or drain lines)
  • Improving perimeter grading
  • Repairing, installing or improving underground footing and/or curtain drains

    Ideally, water should not enter the basement, but if water must be controlled after it enters the basement, then typical repairs include installing sump pump(s) or interior perimeter drains.

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    26)  

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    Basement

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    Basement
     
    Kitchen Return to table of contents

    27) Water damage was found in the shelving or cabinet components below the sink. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary.

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    28) Vinyl flooring is damaged and/or deteriorated in one or more areas. A qualified contractor should replace or repair the damaged flooring.

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    29)  

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    Bathrooms Return to table of contents

    30) Exhaust fan is visibly clogged with debris, and provides inadequate air flow. Moisture may accumulate as a result. A qualified contractor should evaluate and replace the fan or make repairs as necessary.

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    31) There is no floor covering in bathroom.

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    32) The enamel coating on the bathtub is damaged and/or deteriorated. For example, chipped or worn, and/or rust on some exposed steel. However, no leaks were found due to the deterioration. The client(s) should evaluate to determine if the bathtub(s) should be refinished or replaced.

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    Interior rooms Return to table of contents

    33) One or more open ground receptacles were found. Grounding type receptacles were first required in residential structures during the 1960s. Based on the age of this structure, they were not available or required at construction. Repairs should be made by correcting wiring circuits as necessary so all receptacles are grounded as per standard building practices.
    34) This structure was built prior to 1979 and may contain lead paint. Laws were enacted in 1978 in the US preventing the use of lead paint in residential structures. Lead is a known safety hazard, especially to children but also to adults. Numerous areas of the paint found in and around this structure are in poor condition (peeling, flaking, etc.). Recommend consulting with a qualified lead inspector to determine the safest and most cost-effective action to take regarding the paint. Testing and/or abatement may be necessary.
    35) Batteries in all the smoke alarms should be replaced after taking occupancy, and annually in the future. "Chirping" noises emitted from smoke alarms typically indicate that batteries need replacing. For more information, visit:
    http://www.cpsc.gov/cpscpub/pubs/5077.html

    36) Minor cracks were found in ceilings in one or more areas. They do not appear to be a structural concern, but the client(s) may wish to repair these for aesthetic reasons.
    37) Minor cracks were found in walls in one or more areas. They do not appear to be a structural concern, but the client(s) may wish to repair these for aesthetic reasons.

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    Thank you for choosing Interstate Property Inspections Inc to perform your property inspection.

    We hope our service provided you with the information you needed to make an informed decision on this home.

    If you have any questions or concerns, please call us @ 585-721-7770