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Northeast Inspections, Inc.

Website: http://www.reporthost.com/northeast
Email: analong@optonline.net
Phone: (516) 884-5703 · (516) 612-4284
FAX: (516) 612-4284
P. O. Box. 0620 
Lynbrook, NY, 11563-0620
Inspector: Luis Bigit
NYS#16000040042

PROPERTY INSPECTION REPORT.
Client(s): John Smith (Sample report)
Property address: 94131 13th avenue, NY, 11417.
Inspection date: 5/10/2009
This report published on Friday, March 26, 2010 2:20:34 PM EDT

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This report is the exclusive property of this inspection company and the client(s) listed in the report title. Use of this report by any unauthorized persons is prohibited.

NOTE:
This inspector attempted to inspect for insect infestation and or structural soundness of the wood beams, but due to the fact that approx. 95% of structural beams are covered by building materials (drywall, wood paneling, acoustic ceiling tiles), the inspector was not able to determine a general condition of the wood beams, or level of infestation (if any).

The inspector noted NO evidence of past intrusion of insect infestation, NO beam damage, and NO evidence of professional treatment, in some of the beams viewed. It is recommended for the client to hire a professional Termite exterminator, to inspect, test, and treat as necessary, for any Termites or other insects.

Based on the observations, age of this house, and existing conditions at the time of the inspection, NO major structural problem was noted and assumed with the main house (we noted a structural issue in the attic area (1 gable stud was cracked.). Most wood beams observed appeared intact. Some wood beams in the basement had some minor water damage.

The general housekeeping, maintenance, and management of this house are fair.

 
How to Read this Report
This report is organized by the property's functional areas.  Within each functional area, descriptive information is listed first and is shown in bold type.  Items of concern follow descriptive information.
Concerns are shown and sorted according to these types:
SafetyPoses a risk of injury or death 
Major DefectCorrection likely involves a significant expense 
Repair/ReplaceRecommend repairing or replacing 
Repair/MaintainRecommend repair and/or maintenance 
Minor DefectCorrection likely involves only a minor expense 
MaintainRecommend ongoing maintenance 
EvaluateRecommend evaluation by a specialist 
MonitorRecommend monitoring in the future 
CommentFor your information 

Structural Pest Inspection Concerns
Concerns relating to the structural pest inspection are shown as follows:
InfestationEvidence of infestation of wood destroying insects or organisms (Live or dead insect bodies, fungal growth, etc.) 
DamageDamage caused by wood destroying insects or organisms (Rot, carpenter ant galleries, etc.) 
Conducive conditionsConditions conducive for wood destroying insects or organisms (Wood-soil contact, shrubs in contact with siding, roof or plumbing leaks, etc.) 

Click here for a glossary of building construction terms.  Contact your inspector if there are terms that you do not understand, or visit the glossary of construction terms at http://www.reporthost.com/glossary.asp

Table of Contents
General information
Exterior
Roof
Attic
Electric service
Water heater
Heating and cooling
Plumbing and laundry
Fireplaces, wood stoves and chimneys
Basement
Kitchen
Bathrooms
Interior rooms
 
General information Return to table of contents
Report number: HI051009PS
Structures inspected: Main house only.
Type of building: Duplex
Property owner's name: N/a.
Time started: 8:00 AM
Time finished: 10:30 AM
Inspection Fee: $450.00
Payment method: Cash
Present during inspection: Client(s), Realtor(s)
Occupied: No
Weather conditions: Clear
Temperature: Warm
Ground condition: Damp
Front of structure faces: South
Main entrance faces: South
Foundation type: Finished basement
The following items are excluded from this inspection: Private sewage disposal system, Security system, Irrigation system, Swimming pool, Hot tub, Private well, Shed, Playground equipment, Sauna, Low voltage outdoor lighting, Central vacuum system, Water filtration system, Water softener system, Built-in sound system, Intercom system, Generator system, Sport court, Sea wall, Outbuildings
1) Structures built prior to 1979 may contain lead-based paint and/or asbestos in various building materials such as insulation, siding, and/or floor and ceiling tiles. Both lead and asbestos are known health hazards. Evaluating for the presence of lead and/or asbestos is not included in this inspection. The client(s) should consult with specialists as necessary, such as industrial hygienists, professional labs and/or abatement contractors for this type of evaluation. For information on lead, asbestos and other hazardous materials in homes, visit these websites:
  • The Environmental Protection Association (http://www.epa.gov)
  • The Consumer Products Safety Commission (http://www.cpsc.gov)
  • The Center for Disease Control (http://www.cdc.gov)
    2) The natural gas service was turned off. As a result, some appliances such as water heater(s), forced air furnace(s), gas fireplace(s), stove(s), range(s) and/or gas supply lines weren't fully evaluated. The inspector was unable to test for gas leaks.
     
    Exterior Return to table of contents
    Footing material: Poured in place concrete
    Foundation material: Concrete block
    Apparent wall structure: Wood frame
    Wall covering: Metal
    Driveway material: Poured in place concrete
    Sidewalk material: Poured in place concrete
    Exterior door material: Solid core wood
    3) The deck may become unstable in one or more areas due to lack of diagonal and metal bracing between wood cross members. This is a safety hazard since severe movement may cause the deck to collapse. The client may wish to have a qualified contractor evaluate and make repairs as necessary.
    4) One or more deck ledger boards are nailed to the structure rather than being attached by adequate fasteners. This poses a significant safety hazard since the ledger board(s) may separate from the structure, causing the deck(s) to collapse. A qualified contractor should install lag screws or bolts as per standard building practices to securely attach the ledger board(s) to the structure. For more information on installing deck ledger boards visit: http://www.hometime.com/Howto/projects/decks/deck_4.htm

    And for more information on building safe decks in general, visit: http://www.thisoldhouse.com/toh/knowhow/exteriors/article/0,16417,212625,00.html

    5) One or more flights of stairs with more than two risers have no handrail installed (for the rear deck). This is a safety hazard. A qualified contractor should install graspable handrails that your hand can completely encircle at stairs where missing, and as per standard building practices.
    6) Perimeter pavement slopes towards structure in one or more areas. This can result in water accumulating around the structure's foundation, or in basements and crawl spaces if they exist. Accumulated water is a conducive condition to wood destroying insects and organisms. Recommend having a qualified contractor make repairs as necessary so perimeter pavement slopes down and away from the structure.
    7) Landscaping in the rear yard is very poor. The client may wish to have a qualified contractor, make necessary repairs.
    8) There are many gaps in soffit boards, which should be repaired by a qualified contractor.
    9) Rot was found in one or more areas on fascia boards. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary, replacing all rotten wood.
    10) One or more gutters are poorly sloped so that significant amounts of water accumulate in them rather than draining through the downspouts. This can cause gutters to overflow, especially when organic debris such as leaves or needles have accumulated in them. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary, such as correcting the slope in gutters or installing additional downspouts and extensions if necessary.
    11) Siding is damaged and/or deteriorated in one or more areas. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs and/or replace siding as necessary to prevent water and vermin intrusion.
    12) Cracks, and deterioration, were found in one retaining wall (next to front entrance stoop steps). A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair or replace wall(s) as necessary.
    13) The driveway has significant cracks and/or deterioration in one or more areas. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair or replace driveway sections as necessary.
    14) One or more rear yard drains appear to be inadequate and may not keep water away from the structure or prevent water from ponding. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary, such as replacing and/or installing additional drains.
    15) Sidewalks and/or patios have significant cracks and/or deterioration in one or more areas. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair or replace sidewalk and/or patio sections as necessary.
    16) One or more areas of the grounds around the structure have significantly soggy soil, standing water or indications of accumulated water at times (sediment, dead grass, etc.). Recommend consulting with a qualified contractor who specializes in drainage, to determine if or what repairs are needed to provide adequate drainage. Possible repairs may involve grading soil, or installing, repairing and/or replacing underground drains.
    17) Fascia boards are damaged or deteriorated in one or more areas. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary.
    18) One or more electric receptacles appear to have no power (GFCI at front yard). Recommend asking the property owner(s) about this. Switches may need to be operated to make some receptacles energized. If necessary, a qualified electrician should evaluate and make repairs as necessary.
    19) One or more light fixtures are damaged and/or deteriorated. A qualified electrician should evaluate and repair or replace light fixtures where necessary.
    20) Water supply pipes are routed outside and are subject to freezing. The client(s) should ask the property owner(s) if inside shut-off valves exist for these supply pipes. If unable to determine if shut-off valve(s) exist, or if none do, then a qualified plumber should evaluate and install interior shut-off valves as necessary to prevent pipes from freezing and bursting.
    21) One or more downspouts are missing. This can result in water accumulating around the structure's foundation, or in basements and crawl spaces if they exist. Accumulated water is a conducive condition to wood destroying insects and organisms, and may also cause the foundation to settle and possibly fail over time. A qualified contractor should install downspout(s) where missing. Also recommend installing extensions such as splash blocks or tie-ins to underground drain lines as necessary to carry rainwater away from the house.
    22) One or more downspouts have no extensions, or have extensions that are ineffective. This can result in water accumulating around the structure's foundation, or in basements and crawl spaces if they exist. Accumulated water is a conducive condition to wood destroying insects and organisms, and may also cause the foundation to settle and possibly fail over time. Repairs should be made as necessary, such as installing or repositioning splash blocks, or installing and/or repairing tie-ins to underground drain lines, so rain water is carried at least several feet away from the structure to soil that slopes down and away from the structure.
    23) One or more gutters are missing. This can result in water accumulating around the structure's foundation, or in basements and crawl spaces if they exist. Accumulated water is a conducive condition to wood destroying insects and organisms, and may also cause the foundation to settle and possibly fail over time. A qualified contractor should install gutters and downspouts where missing. Also, extensions such as splash blocks or tie-ins to underground drain lines should be installed as necessary to carry rain water away from the house.
    24) One or more gutters are damaged. This can result in water accumulating around the structure's foundation, or in basements and crawl spaces if they exist. Accumulated water is a conducive condition to wood destroying insects and organisms, and may also cause the foundation to settle and possibly fail over time. A qualified contractor should replace or repair gutters where necessary.
    25) Siding is incomplete or missing in one or more areas. A qualified contractor should install siding where missing to prevent water and vermin intrusion.
    26) Soffits at one or more cantilever or overhang sections are unvented. This can result in moisture accumulation in floor cavities and rot. A qualified contractor should install screened vents in soffits where missing and as per standard building practices.
    27) Gaps exist at one or more openings around the exterior, such as those where outside faucets, exhaust lines, and/or gas supply pipes penetrate the exterior. Gaps should be sealed as necessary to prevent moisture intrusion and entry by vermin.
    28) One or more outside faucets are missing handles. Recommend installing handles where missing.
    29) The cracked stone top at the front entrance steps, should be replaced, to avoid further deterioration.
    30) There is a damaged outdoor lamp, which should be repaired (Dome base is broken).
    31) One or more minor cracks (1/8 inch or less) were found in the foundation. These don't appear to be a structural concern, but recommend sealing them to prevent water infiltration and monitoring them in the future. Numerous products exist to seal such cracks including:
  • Hydraulic cement. Requires chiseling a channel in the crack to apply. See http://www.quickrete.com/catalog/HydraulicWater-StopCement.html for an example.
  • Resilient caulks (easy to apply). See http://www.quickrete.com/catalog/GrayConcreteRepair.html for an example.
  • Epoxy sealants (both a waterproof and structural repair). See http://www.mountaingrout.com/ for examples of these products.
    32) There are extensive accumulations of garbage and debris in the rear yard. The client should request to have these removed.
    33) Cracks between the concrete driveway, and foundation walls must be sealed, to reduce the potential for water penetration into the basement.
    34) The front entrance door screen is ripped, and should be replaced.
    35) One or more sections of foundation and/or exterior walls are excluded from this inspection due to lack of access from vegetation, debris and/or stored items.
    36) This house contains improper exterior insulation, which reduces the house's ability to maintain adequate temperature in the inside.
    The client may wish to consult with an energy expert for further recommendations.
     
    Roof Return to table of contents
    Roof inspection method: Viewed from ground with binoculars, Viewed from windows
    Roof type: Gable
    Roof covering: Asphalt or fiberglass composition shingles
    Estimated age of roof: 1 year
    Gutter & downspout material: Aluminum
    Roof ventilation: Inadequate
    37) This asphalt or fiberglass composition roof surface has two or more layers of roofing materials. When this roof is replaced, recommend a complete "tear off", where all existing layers of roofing are removed before installing new roofing materials. For 20-year rated composition shingles, additional layers of material reduce the new roof material's lifespan as follows:

  • 16-20 years - First roof
  • 12-16 years - Second layer on existing roof

    Removing existing roofing materials will significantly increase the cost of the next roof.
    38) Because of the roof covering type and/or the configuration of the roof, the inspector was unable to traverse the roof and wasn't able to fully evaluate the entire roof.
     
    Attic Return to table of contents
    Inspection method: Partially traversed
    Roof structure type: Rafters
    Ceiling structure: Ceiling beams
    Insulation material: None visible
    Insulation depth: N/a.
    Insulation estimated R value: N/a.
    39) Wire splices are exposed due to not being contained in a covered junction box. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock and fire. A qualified electrician should evaluate and make repairs as necessary. For example, install securely mounted junction boxes with cover plates where needed to contain wiring splices.
    40) Cover plate(s) are missing from one or more electric boxes, such as for receptacles, switches and/or junction boxes. They are intended to contain fire and prevent electric shock from exposed wires. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of fire and shock. Cover plates should be installed where missing.
    41) There is a cracked beam in the middle of the ceiling of the attic area. This beam should be replaced, by a qualified contractor.
    42) Pull-down stairs are installed for the attic access. No insulation is installed above the stairs and no weatherstripping is installed around the hatch perimeter. To reduce air leakage, recommend installing weatherstripping and an insulated hatch cover. An example of one can be seen at http://www.batticdoor.com/

    Interior air leaking into the attic results in heating and cooling losses, increased energy costs, and a possible increase in moisture levels in the attic due condensation forming on the underside of the roof sheathing during cold weather.

    43) There were large gaps in the soffit boards through-out the attic area. These gaps must be sealed, as it protects from birds nesting or insect/vermin intrusion.
    44) There is bird nesting in the attic of this house. The client may wish to have these nests properly removed.
    45) Some attic areas were inaccessible due to lack of permanently installed walkways, the possibility of damage to insulation, low height and/or stored items. These areas are excluded from this inspection.
    46) There is partial insulation in the attic area.
     
    Electric service Return to table of contents
    Primary service type: Overhead
    Primary service overload protection type: Circuit breakers
    Service amperage (amps): 125
    Service voltage (volts): 120/240
    Location of main service switch: Basement.
    Location of sub panels: Second floor.
    Location of main disconnect: Breaker at top of main service panel
    Service entrance conductor material: Copper
    System ground: Cold water supply pipes
    Main disconnect rating (amps): 125
    Branch circuit wiring type: (BX) Armor clad
    Solid strand aluminum branch circuit wiring present: No
    Smoke detectors present: No
    47) Low voltage interior lighting was found during the inspection. This is considered to be a specialty system. Only a cursory evaluation of this lighting was performed during the inspection. For a full evaluation, the client(s) should hire a qualified electrician.
     
    Water heater Return to table of contents
    Estimated age: 10 years
    Type: Tank
    Energy source: Natural gas
    Capacity (in gallons): 50
    Manufacturer: General Electric
    Model: Smartwater.
    Water temperature (degrees Fahrenheit): Unknown.
    Manufacturer: Smart Water
    Model: GG50T06AVG00
    48) No drain line is installed for the temperature-pressure relief valve. This is a potential safety hazard due to the risk of scalding if someone is standing next to the water heater when the valve opens. A qualified plumber should install a drain line as per standard building practices. For example, extending to 6 inches from the floor, or routed so as to drain outside.
    49) The estimated useful life for most water heaters is 8 to 12 years. This water heater appears to be approaching this age and may need replacing at any time. Recommend budgeting for a replacement in the near future.
    50) The water heater was turned off at the time of the inspection. For example, circuit breaker turned off, gas supply turned off or pilot light turned off. The inspector was unable to fully evaluate the water heater.
     
    Heating and cooling Return to table of contents
    Estimated age: 20 years
    Primary heating system energy source: Natural gas
    Primary heat system type: Forced air
    Primary A/C energy source: N/A
    Primary Air conditioning type: N/A
    Distribution system: Sheet metal ducts, Flexible ducts
    Manufacturer: N/a.
    Model: N/a.
    Filter location: N/a.
    Last service date: Unknown.
    51) Significant amounts of debris, dirt and/or dust are visible in one or more sections of supply and/or return air ducts. This can be a health hazard, especially for those with allergies or respiratory problems. The Environmental Protection Association (EPA) recommends considering having ducts professionally cleaned when "ducts are clogged with excessive amounts of dust and debris and/or particles are actually released into the home from your supply registers". At a minimum, the visible debris should be thoroughly cleaned. Recommend having a qualified contractor clean the ducts. For more information on duct cleaning in relation to indoor air quality, visit: http://www.epa.gov/iaq/pubs/airduct.html
    52) The last service date of this system appears to be more than one year ago, or the inspector was unable to determine the last service date. The client(s) should ask the property owner(s) when it was last serviced. If unable to determine the last service date, or if this system was serviced more than one year ago, a qualified heating and cooling contractor should inspect, clean, and service this system, and make repairs if necessary. For safety reasons, and because this system is fueled by gas or oil, this servicing should be performed annually in the future. For more information visit: http://www.cpsc.gov/CPSCPUB/PREREL/prhtml05/05017.html
    53) The estimated useful life for most forced air furnaces is 15 to 20 years. This furnace appears to be approaching this age and may need replacing at any time. Recommend budgeting for a replacement in the near future.
    54) The furnace did not respond when its controls were operated. This system was not fully evaluated. The client(s) should consult with the property owner(s) as to how it operates and have a qualified heating and cooling contractor evaluate and make repairs if necessary.
    55) The furnace was shut off at the time of the inspection. For example, the gas supply was shut off, the pilot light was out, and/or the electric supply was turned off. As a result, the inspector was unable to fully evaluate this unit.
     
    Plumbing and laundry Return to table of contents
    Water pressure (psi): 80 PSI
    Location of main water shut-off valve: Basement.
    Location of main water meter: Basement.
    Location of main fuel shut-off: Basement.
    Visible fuel storage systems: Basement.
    Water service: Public
    Service pipe material: Copper
    Supply pipe material: Copper
    Vent pipe material: Plastic, Galvanized steel
    Drain pipe material: Plastic, Cast iron
    Waste pipe material: Cast iron
    56) Copper water supply pipes in homes built prior to 1986 may be joined with solder that contains lead. Lead is a known health hazard, especially for children. Laws were passed in 1985 prohibiting the use of lead in solder, but prior to that solder normally contained about 50 percent lead. The client(s) should be aware of this, especially if children will be living in this structure. Evaluating for the presence of lead in this structure is not included in this inspection. The client(s) should consider having a qualified lab test for lead, and if necessary take steps to reduce or remove lead from the water supply. Various solutions such as these may be advised:

  • Flush water taps or faucets. Do not drink water that has been sitting in the plumbing lines for more than six hours.
  • Install appropriate filters at points of use.
  • Use only cold water for cooking and drinking. Hot water dissolves lead more quickly than cold water.
  • Use bottled or distilled water.
  • Treat well water to make it less corrosive.
  • Have a qualified plumbing contractor replace supply pipes and/or plumbing components as necessary.

    For more information visit:
    http://www.cpsc.gov/CPSCPUB/PUBS/5056.html
    http://www.epa.gov/safewater/lead/index.html
    57) There is a disconnected exhaust vent pipe in the attic area, which poses a health hazard. This pipe must be repaired by a qualified contractor.
    58)   There are no washing and drying machines or laundry sink in this house.
     
    Fireplaces, wood stoves and chimneys Return to table of contents
    Fireplace type: None.
    Wood stove type: None.
    Chimney type: None.
    59)   There is no chimney in this house.
     
    Basement Return to table of contents
    Insulation material underneath floor above: None visible
    Pier or support post material: Bearing wall
    Beam material: Solid wood
    Floor structure above: Solid wood joists
    60) One or more flights of stairs with more than two risers have no handrail installed. This is a safety hazard. A qualified contractor should install graspable handrails that your hand can completely encircle at stairs where missing, and as per standard building practices.
    61) The clean out traps in the basement, are buried under soil in an access hole in the ground. This trap must be made visible and accessible, and a proper protective cover for the well top should also be installed (to reduce the potential for liability hazards.).
    62) Cover plate(s) are missing from one or more electric boxes, such as for receptacles, switches and/or junction boxes. They are intended to contain fire and prevent electric shock from exposed wires. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of fire and shock. Cover plates should be installed where missing.
    63) Materials that may be Asbestos (which is cancer causing material), were found in the basement pipes, as insulating material.
    The client may wish to have these materials tested by an Asbestos contractor, and have it removed or encapsulated.

    64) Evidence of prior water intrusion was found in one or more sections of the basement. For example, water stains and/or efflorescence on the foundation or floor, water stains at bases of support posts, etc. Accumulated water is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects and organisms and should not be present in the basement. The client(s) should review any disclosure statements available and ask the property owner(s) about past accumulation of water in the basement. The basement should be monitored in the future for accumulated water, especially after heavy and/or prolonged periods of rain. If water is found to accumulate, a qualified contractor who specializes in drainage issues should evaluate and repair as necessary. Typical repairs for preventing water from accumulating in the basement include:

  • Repairing, installing or improving rain run-off systems (gutters, downspouts and extensions or drain lines)
  • Improving perimeter grading
  • Repairing, installing or improving underground footing and/or curtain drains

    Ideally, water should not enter the basement, but if water must be controlled after it enters the basement, then typical repairs include installing sump pump(s) or interior perimeter drains.
    65) Standing water and/or wet areas were found in one or more sections of the basement. Accumulated water is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects and organisms and should not be present in the basement. A qualified contractor who specializes in drainage issues should evaluate and repair as necessary. Typical repairs for preventing water from accumulating in the basement include:

  • Repairing, installing or improving rain run-off systems (gutters, downspouts and extensions or drain lines)
  • Improving perimeter grading
  • Repairing, installing or improving underground footing and/or curtain drains

    Ideally, water should not enter the basement, but if water must be controlled after it enters the basement, then typical repairs include installing sump pump(s) or interior perimeter drains.
    66) One or more electric receptacles appear to have no power. Recommend asking the property owner(s) about this. Switches may need to be operated to make some receptacles energized. If necessary, a qualified electrician should evaluate and make repairs as necessary.
    67) The main water, and gas meters, have been concealed behind dry walls.
    These meters must be made accessible in case of emergencies, and access panels should be installed.

    68) There is an unfinished bathroom in the basement. The client may wish to have it completed by a qualified contractor.
     
    Kitchen Return to table of contents

    69) The range can tip forward, and no anti-tip bracket appears to be installed. This is a safety hazard since the range may tip forward when weight is applied to the open door, such as when a small child climbs on it, or if heavy objects are dropped on it. Anti-tip brackets have been sold with all free standing ranges since 1985. An anti-tip bracket should be installed to eliminate this safety hazard. For more information, visit http://www.hgtv.com/hgtv/remodeling/article/0,1797,HGTV_3659_2017492,00.html
    70) The range can tip forward, and no anti-tip bracket appears to be installed. This is a safety hazard since the range may tip forward when weight is applied to the open door, such as when a small child climbs on it, or if heavy objects are dropped on it. Anti-tip brackets have been sold with all free standing ranges since 1985. An anti-tip bracket should be installed to eliminate this safety hazard. For more information, visit http://www.hgtv.com/hgtv/remodeling/article/0,1797,HGTV_3659_2017492,00.html
    71) One or more sink drains have an active leak. For example, at pipe fittings and/or junctions between pipe and sink. A qualified plumber should evaluate and repair as necessary.
    72) One or more electric receptacles appear to have no power. Recommend asking the property owner(s) about this. Switches may need to be operated to make some receptacles energized. If necessary, a qualified electrician should evaluate and make repairs as necessary.
    73) One or more sink drains have substandard repairs, such as tape, sealant and/or non-standard components. A qualified plumber should evaluate and repair as necessary.
    74) One or more cabinets and/or drawers are damaged and/or deteriorated. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair or replace cabinets and/or components as necessary.
    75) The range hood fan vents into the kitchen rather than outdoors. Ventilation may be inadequate and moisture may accumulate indoors. Recommend having a qualified contractor make modifications as necessary as per standard building practices so the range hood fan vents outdoors.
    76) One or more filters are missing from the range hood exhaust system. Filters should be replaced as necessary.
    77) The sink sprayer at the kitchen sink is inoperable or defective. It should be replaced, and by a qualified plumber if necessary.
    78) One or more sink drains use flexible drain pipe. This type of drain pipe is more likely to clog than smooth wall pipe. Recommend having a qualified plumber replace this pipe with standard plumbing components (smooth wall pipe) to prevent clogged drains.
    79) One or more faucet handles are loose or missing and should be repaired or replaced as necessary.
    80) No range hood is installed over the range or cook top. Ventilation and/or lighting may be inadequate and moisture may accumulate indoors. Recommend having a qualified contractor install a vented and lighted range hood, with the exhaust fan configured so as to vent outdoors.
    81) Caulk is missing and/or deteriorated where counter tops meet back splashes in wet areas, such as around sinks. Caulk should be replaced where deteriorated and/or applied where missing to prevent water damage.
    82) One or more kitchen appliances appear to be near, at, or beyond their intended service life of 10 to 15 years. Recommend budgeting for replacements as necessary.
    83) There are some missing appliances like refrigerators in the kitchen areas.
     
    Bathrooms Return to table of contents

    84) One or more ground fault circuit interrupter protection devices were defective. Because one GFCI device may in turn provide GFCI protection for other electric receptacles on the same circuit, the inspector was unable to determine if all electric receptacles that serve counter top surfaces within six feet of sinks are protected with a GFCI device. If they are not, a safety hazard due to the risk of shock exists. After repairs are made to the defective GFCI device(s), a qualified electrician should evaluate, determine if all receptacles that serve counter top surfaces within six feet of sinks are protected by GFCI devices, and make repairs if necessary.
    85) Mold growth was noted in the caulking around the bathtub areas. This poses a health hazard, and mold should be removed.
    86) One or more faucets leak by handle(s) or at their base when turned on. A qualified plumber should evaluate and repair as necessary.
    87) One or more bathrooms with a shower do not have an exhaust fan installed. Moisture accumulation will occur and may damage the structure. Even if the bathroom has a window that opens, it likely does not provide adequate ventilation, especially during cold weather when the window is closed. A qualified contractor should install exhaust fans as per standard building practices where missing in bathrooms with showers.
    88) One or more faucet handles are loose or missing and should be repaired or replaced as necessary.
    89) Caulk is missing and/or deteriorated at one or more bathtubs. For example, where the tub base meets the floor below, where the tub surround meets the tub, and/or around the base of the tub spout. Caulk should be replaced where deteriorated and/or applied where missing to prevent water intrusion and damage to wall and floor structures.
    90) Caulk is missing and/or deteriorated at one or more showers. For example, where the shower base meets the floor below and/or around the shower surround. Caulk should be replaced where deteriorated and/or applied where missing to prevent water intrusion and damage to wall and floor structures.
    91) Caulk is missing and/or deteriorated where counter tops meet back splashes in wet areas, such as around sinks. Caulk should be replaced where deteriorated and/or applied where missing to prevent water damage.
    92) The enamel coating on one or more sinks is damaged and/or deteriorated. For example, chipped or worn, and/or rust on some exposed steel. However, no leaks were found due to the deterioration. The client(s) should evaluate to determine if the sinks should be replaced.
     
    Interior rooms Return to table of contents

    93) One or more electric receptacles have reverse-polarity wiring, where the hot and neutral wires are reversed. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate and make repairs as necessary.
    94) Evidence of "heavy" rodent infestation was found in one or more areas. The Center for Disease Control (CDC) defines this as more than 20 feces per square foot. Rodent infestation may be a safety hazard due to the risk of contracting Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome (HPS). HPS is a rare (only 20-50 cases per year in the United states) but deadly (40% mortality rate) disease transmitted by infected rodents through urine, droppings, or saliva. Humans can contract the disease when they breathe in aerosolized virus. For example, from sweeping up rodent droppings.

    Because this infestation is "heavy", recommend that the clients consult with a qualified pest control operator for extermination services. Also recommend consulting with a qualified, licensed abatement contractor or industrial hygienist for clean up of rodent waste and nesting materials. For more information on eradication, clean up and prevention of rodent infestations, read the CDC's Clean Up, Trap Up, Seal Up article.

    95) No smoke alarms are visible. This is a safety hazard. A qualified electrician should install smoke alarms as per standard building practices (functioning one exists in hallways leading to bedrooms, and in each bedroom, etc.). For more information, visit http://www.cpsc.gov/cpscpub/pubs/5077.html
    96) Cover plate(s) are missing from one or more electric boxes, such as for receptacles, switches and/or junction boxes. They are intended to contain fire and prevent electric shock from exposed wires. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of fire and shock. Cover plates should be installed where missing.
    97) Cover plate(s) are broken at one or more electric boxes, such as for receptacles, switches and/or junction boxes. They are intended to contain fire and prevent electric shock from exposed wires. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of fire and shock. Cover plates should be replaced where necessary.
    98) The doorbell appears to be inoperable. Recommend having a qualified electrician evaluate and repair as necessary.
    99) Screen(s) in one or more windows are missing. The client(s) should ask the property owner(s) about this. Screens are often removed for window cleaning and they may be stored somewhere. If not, then recommend installing screens where missing.
    100) One or more air supply registers are missing. The air flow cannot be controlled as a result. Registers should be installed where missing.
    101) One or more interior doors are damaged and/or deteriorated and should be repaired or replaced by a qualified contractor.
    102) One or more lock sets are loose and should be tightened, repaired and or replaced as necessary.
    103) One or more lock sets are damaged and/or deteriorated. Lock sets should be replaced as necessary.
    104) Carpeting in one or more rooms is soiled and/or stained. Recommend having carpeting professionally cleaned as necessary.
    105) Some exterior windows through out the house have been upgraded,
     

    Photo 1  
    Exterior front.

    Photo 2  
    Missing window flashing and damaged aluminum siding.

    Photo 3  
    Foundation wall cracks.

    Photo 4  
    Missing valve handle.

    Photo 5  
    Damaged entrance lamp.

    Photo 6  
    Cracks in retaining wall at front stoop.

    Photo 7  
    Hole in rear yard.

    Photo 8  
    Damaged locks.

    Photo 9  
    Upstairs bathroom.

    Photo 10  
    Second floor kitchen.

    Photo 11  
    Mold in caulking around tub.

    Photo 12  
    Leaky faucet.

    Photo 13  
    Cracked caulking at backsplash in bathroom.

    Photo 14  
    Plumbing leaks under sinks.

    Photo 15  
    Disconnected water hose for sprayer under kitchen sink.

    Photo 16  
    Missing caulking at backsplash.

    Photo 17  
    Sub-panel on second floor.

    Photo 18  
    Soiled carpeting.

    Photo 19  
    Missing filters under exhaust hood.

    Photo 20  
    Damaged door.

    Photo 21  
    Missing cover plates.

    Photo 22  
    Substandard electrical wiring. Fire and shock hazards.

    Photo 23  
    Substandard electrical wiring. Fire and shock hazards.

    Photo 24  
    Holes and large gaps in the soffit boards.

    Photo 25  
    Bird nesting in the attic.

    Photo 26  
    Cracked gable stud in the attic area.

    Photo 27  
    Large gaps in surrounding walls of attic.

    Photo 28  
    Disconnected exhaust in attic (health hazard).

    Photo 29  
    First floor kitchen.

    Photo 30  
    Damaged cabinetry.

    Photo 31  
    Missing handle for sink faucet.

    Photo 32  
    Substandard plumbing.

    Photo 33  
    Mouse droppings.

    Photo 34  
    Deteriorated caulking around tubs.

    Photo 35  
    Missing register cover at grade level.

    Photo 36  
    First floor kitchen.

    Photo 37  
    Improperly sealed and guarded penetrations in exterior walls.

    Photo 38  
    Missing handrailing.

    Photo 39  
    No access to clean-out trap, and improper acces hatch (liability hazard).

    Photo 40  
    Main circuit breaker panel.

    Photo 41  
    Water penetration at foundation walls.

    Photo 42  
    Improper access to utilities.

    Photo 43  
    Unfinished bathroom in the basement area with loose tiles.

    Photo 44  
    Improper access to water main.

    Photo 45  
    Water penetration near the furnace.

    Photo 46  
    Hot water heater with improper drain line.

    Photo 47  
    Gas furnace.

    Photo 48  
    Asbestos material.

    Photo 49  
    Cracked and missing sections of concrete.

    Photo 50  
    Missing hand rail at deck area.

    Photo 51  
    Improper drain at rear yard.

    Photo 52  
    No lag bolts for rear deck.

    Photo 53  
    Extensive accumulations of garbage and debris.

    Photo 54  
    Damaged fascia boards, and missing gutter system.

    Photo 55  
    3 layers of roofing.

    Photo 56  
    New top layer of roofing.

    Photo 57  
    Stored items next to foundation walls.

    Photo 58  
    Cracks in driveway.

    Photo 59  
    Improper insulation material.

    Photo 60  
    Gaps at foundation walls with concrete flooring.

    Photo 61  
    Large gaps at eaves, soffits and facia boards.

    Photo 62  
    First floor.

    Photo 63  
    Broken screen at front entrance door.

    Photo 64  
    Broken door bell.

    Photo 65  

    Photo 66  
    Cracked stone top for stoop steps.

     
    FINAL NOTE:
    THE HOME INSPECTION, THE INSPECTION AGREEMENT, AND THE INSPECTION REPORT, DO NOT CONSTITUTE A HOME WARRANTY, AN INSURANCE POLICY, OR A GUARANTEE OF ANY KIND; NOR DO THEY SUBSTITUTE FOR ANY DISCLOSURE STATEMENT AS MAY BE REQUIRED BY LAW.
    There are no warranties made against, roof leaks, wet basement, mechanical breakdown, or insect infestation. The report is not a listing of repairs that need to be made. Therefore, you agree NOT to hold us responsible for future failure and repair, or for the non-discovery of any patent or latent defects in materials, workmanship, or other conditions on the property, which may occur or become evident after the inspection date: nor for any alleged non-disclosure of conditions, which are concealed from view, that are the express responsibility of the seller of the property. You agree to assume all risk for conditions, which are concealed from view or inaccessible to us at the time of the inspection.