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Inspection Services LLC

Website: http://www.reporthost.com/inspectionservices
Email: reed1095@gmail.com
Inspector's email: reed1095@gmail.com
Phone: (205) 344-1415 · (205) 759-1852
Inspector's phone: (205) 344-1415
1140 Germantown Road 
Tuscaloosa AL 35406
Inspector: Charles M Reed
Alabama Home Inspector License HI-1095

 

A Property Inspection Report by

Inspection Services LLC
1140 Germantown Road
Tuscaloosa, AL 35406
Aaron Reed (205) 344-2447 amreed2394@gmail.com
Mike Reed (205) 344-1415 reed1095@gmail.com

Client(s):  John Smith
Property address:  1234 Any Road
Tuscaloosa, AL 35401
Inspection date:  Saturday, September 01, 2007

This report published on Saturday, November 08, 2014 11:57:11 AM CST

This report is the exclusive property of Inspection Services LLC and the client(s) listed in the report title. Use of this report by any unauthorized persons is prohibited.
How to Read this Report
This report is organized by the property's functional areas.  Within each functional area, descriptive information is listed first and is shown in bold type.  Items of concern follow descriptive information. Concerns are shown and sorted according to these types:
Concern typeSafetyPoses a risk of injury or death
Concern typeRepair/ReplaceRecommend repairing or replacing
Concern typeRepair/MaintainRecommend repair and/or maintenance
Concern typeEvaluateRecommend evaluation by a specialist
Concern typeCommentFor your information

Click here for a glossary of building construction terms.Contact your inspector If there are terms that you do not understand, or visit the glossary of construction terms at http://www.reporthost.com/glossary.asp

Table of Contents
General information
Exterior
Roof
Attic
Electric service
Water heater
Heating and cooling
Plumbing and laundry
Crawl space
Kitchen
Bathrooms
Interior rooms


General information
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Report number: 071234
Inspector's name: Mike Reed
Structures inspected: 1234 Any Road, Tuscaloosa, AL 35406
Type of building: Single family
Age of building: 1940 (72 years)
Time started: 13:30
Time finished: 16:00
Inspection Fee: $375
Payment method: Invoiced
Present during inspection: Clients
Occupied: No
Weather conditions: Rain
Temperature: Warm 81 degrees
Ground condition: Damp
Front of structure faces: South
Main entrance faces: South
Foundation type: Crawlspace, Slab on grade
The following items are excluded from this inspection: Outbuildings
1) This property has one or more fuel burning appliances, and no carbon monoxide alarms are visible. This is a safety hazard. Recommend installing one or more carbon monoxide alarms as necessary and as per the manufacturer's instructions. For more information, visit http://www.cpsc.gov/CPSCPUB/PREREL/prhtml05/05017.html
2) Structures built prior to 1979 may contain lead-based paint and/or asbestos in various building materials such as insulation, siding, and/or floor and ceiling tiles. Both lead and asbestos are known health hazards. Evaluating for the presence of lead and/or asbestos is not included in this inspection. The client(s) should consult with specialists as necessary, such as industrial hygienists, professional labs and/or abatement contractors for this type of evaluation. For information on lead, asbestos and other hazardous materials in homes, visit these websites:


Exterior
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Footing material: Not visible
Foundation material: Concrete block
Apparent wall structure: Wood frame
Wall covering: Composition wood clapboard
Driveway material: Gravel
Sidewalk material: None
3) The outdoor electric receptacle on the carport appears to have no ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. However, when this house was originally constructed, GFCI-receptacles were not required.
4) Non-metallic sheathed wiring is routed in one or more areas so it is subject to damage, such as on wall or ceiling surfaces. The insulation can be damaged by objects coming in contact with it and/or it being repeatedly moved. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock and fire. Recommend evaluate and repair as necessary. For example, rewire using conduit, or re-routing through wall cavities.
Photo
Photo 4-1
 

5) Based on the appearance of the siding and the age of this structure, some, most or all of the exterior siding material may contain asbestos. The client(s) should be aware of this when considering repairs to or replacement of this siding, and consult with qualified testing labs and/or abatement contractors as necessary. For more information on asbestos in the home, visit:
http://www.cpsc.gov/cpscpub/pubs/453.html
6) Vegetation such as trees, shrubs and/or vines are in contact with or less than one foot from the structure's exterior. Vegetation can serve as a conduit for wood destroying insects and may retain moisture against the exterior after it rains. Vegetation should be pruned and/or removed as necessary to maintain a one foot clearance between it and the structure's exterior.


Roof
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Roof inspection method: Traversed
Roof type: Gable, Flat
Roof covering: Asphalt or fiberglass composition shingles, EPDM (ethylene-propylene-diene monomer)
Estimated age of roof: Fairly recent
Gutter & downspout material: Aluminum
Roof ventilation: Adequate
7) One or more composition shingles have raised, most likely due to nails that have loosened ("nail pops"). Leaks may occur as a result. A qualified roofing contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary, such as reseating nails.
Photo
Photo 7-1
 

8) Standing water was found on the flat roof. It should evaporate within 48 hours after it rains. If standing water remains after 48 hours, then the roof installation is likely substandard. A qualified roofing contractor should evaluate and repair if necessary to prevent prolonged standing water.
Photo
Photo 8-1
 

9) Two "rubber boot" flashings are in good condition but do not fit tightly around the vent pipe. This is allowing a path for water intrusion into the attic. Also, or deteriorated and may result in leaks or vermin intrusion. A qualified contractor should replace flashing where necessary.

Also, one of these plumbing vent pipes terminates less than six inches above the roof surface below. Debris may block openings, and may result in sewer gases entering living spaces. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary so vent pipes terminate at least six inches above roof surfaces.
Photo
Photo 9-1
Gap and less than 6" high
Photo
Photo 9-2

10)   One gutter downspout is clogged with debris and should be cleaned.
Photo
Photo 10-1
 


Attic
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Inspection method: Traversed
Roof structure type: Rafters
Ceiling structure: Ceiling beams
Insulation material: Fiberglass roll or batt
Insulation depth: Less than 4"
Insulation estimated R value: <R14
11) Paper facing on batt insulation is oriented towards open spaces, rather than against interior space surfaces. This occurs when newer, fiberglass batt insulation with paper facing on one side is installed backwards or upside down, or when older batt insulation wrapped on both sides with paper is installed. The paper facing is flammable. Newer insulation usually has a warning label indicating this on the facing.

For newer batt insulation with paper facing on one side only, the paper facing should be oriented towards interior spaces rather than exposed, open spaces. The existing insulation should be reinstalled or replaced.

For older batt insulation with paper facing on both sides, recommend that repairs be made as necessary to eliminate the exposed paper facing.

A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary, and as per standard building practices and the insulation manufacturer's recommendations to eliminate the fire hazard.

Also, the paper facing also acts as a vapor barrier, and if located away from the interior surfaces, can trap moisture from condensation in the cavity between the paper facing and the interior spaces. This is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects. The inspector was unable to evaluate the structure obscured by the insulation. When repairs are made, the exposed structure should be evaluated for damage by wood destroying insects and/or organisms, and repairs should be made if necessary.
12) The ceiling insulation's R rating is significantly less than what's recommended for this area. Recommend having a qualified contractor install additional insulation as per standard building practices for better energy efficiency.


Electric service
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Primary service type: Overhead
Primary service overload protection type: Circuit breakers
Service voltage (volts): 120/240
Location of main service switch: Carport
Location of sub panels: Kitchen closet
Location of main disconnect: No single main disconnect, use all breakers in main service panel
System ground: Not visible
Branch circuit wiring type: Non-metallic sheathed
Solid strand aluminum branch circuit wiring present: No
Smoke detectors present: Yes Only one (in kitchen) and it did not work
13) The service drop wires are less than eight feet above one or more sections of flat roof that can be walked on. This is a safety hazard for shock since people on the roof may come into contact with the service drop wires. The utility company and/or a qualified electrician should evaluate and repair as necessary.
Photo
Photo 13-1
Low clearance for service drop wires
 

14) Two overcurrent protection devices (circuit breakers) are "double tapped", where 2 or more wires are clamped in a terminal designed for only one wire. This is a safety hazard since the bolt or screw may tighten securely against one wire, but leave others loose. Arcing, sparks and fires may result. A qualified electrician should evaluate and repair as necessary.
Photo
Photo 14-1
Photo
Photo 14-2

15) Neutral and equipment ground conductors are combined at one or more sub-panels. This should only occur in the main service panel, and is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. Neutral conductors should be attached to a "floating" neutral bar not bonded to the panel, while grounding conductors should be attached to a separate grounding bar bonded to the sub panel. A qualified electrician should evaluate and repair as necessary.
Photo
Photo 15-1
 

16) The main service panel cover has broken hinges, and the dead front cover inside this panel is missing screws.
Photo
Photo 16-1
 


Water heater
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Estimated age: Looks nearly new
Type: Tank
Energy source: Natural gas
Capacity (in gallons): 40
Manufacturer: Rheem
Model: 21V40-38
Water temperature (degrees Fahrenheit): OK
17) The drain line is not connected for the temperature-pressure relief valve. This is a potential safety hazard due to the risk of scalding if someone is standing next to the water heater when the valve opens. A qualified plumber should install a drain line as per standard building practices. For example, extending to 6 inches from the floor, or routed so as to drain outside.
Photo
Photo 17-1
 

18) No water supply shut-off valve is visible for the water heater. A shut-off valve allows the supply to the water heater to be turned off when the water heater needs repair or replacement, while allowing the remainder of the plumbing system to be operable (toilets, sinks, etc.).


Heating and cooling
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Primary heating system energy source: Natural gas
Primary heat system type: Fan assisted, in-wall units and a floor furnace
Primary A/C energy source: Electric Window units
Distribution system: N/A
19) There are electric wall heaters in the living room and back left bedroom. Neither of these heaters would work - inspector found no tripped breakers or other obvious causes.
20) The floor furnace responded properly to the thermostat control and provided heat. The inspector checked for combustible gas above the furnace and found no problems.
21) Inspector checked all four window air conditioning units - all appeared to work properly.


Plumbing and laundry
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Water pressure (psi): 80
Location of main water shut-off valve: In ground next to street, front left
Location of main fuel shut-off: Right (east) side of house
Water service: Public
Service pipe material: Not visible
Supply pipe material: Polyethelene
Vent pipe material: Plastic, Galvanized steel
Drain pipe material: Plastic
Waste pipe material: Not visible
22) The electrical plug on the clothes washing machine is defective and should be replaced.


Crawl space
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Inspection method: Viewed from hatch Could not enter due to size of opening
Insulation material underneath floor above: None visible
Pier or support post material: Concrete block
Beam material: Built up wood
Floor structure above: Not visible
Vapor barrier present: Yes


Kitchen
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23) One or more open ground, three-pronged electric receptacles were found. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate and make repairs as necessary. For example, replacing receptacles or correcting wiring circuits.

Grounding type receptacles began being required in residential structures during the 1960s. Based on the age of this structure and the presence of 2-pronged receptacles in some areas of this structure, an acceptable repair may be to simply replace the ungrounded 3-pronged receptacles with 2-pronged receptacles. However the following appliances require grounding type receptacles:

This list is not exhaustive. Grounded circuits and receptacles should be installed in locations where such appliances will be used.
24) One or more electric receptacles that serve countertop surfaces within six feet of a sink appear to have no ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock.install GFCI receptacles or circuit breaker(s) as needed. This was not required when the house was built.
25) The dishwasher drain line is not configured with a "high loop" or "air gap". A high loop is created by routing the drain line up to the bottom surface of the counter top above, and securely fastening it to that surface. It is meant to prevent water from siphoning out of the dishwasher, and to prevent water from the sink drain or food disposal from entering the dishwasher. Some dishwashers have a built-in high loop where one is not required to be configured in the drain line. The clients should try to determine if a high loop is required for this brand and model of dishwasher (review installation instructions, etc.). If one is required, or it cannot be determined if one is not required, then a qualified contractor should install a high loop as per standard building practices.
Photo
Photo 25-1
No high loop in drain line
 

26) No range hood is installed over the range or cook top. Ventilation and/or lighting may be inadequate and moisture may accumulate indoors.
27) The refrigerator ice maker is in the "off" position. The inspector was unable to evaluate this component.
28) The inspector checked the following kitchen appliances:
Refrigerator/freezer
Range top burners
Range bake and broil features
Dishwasher

All these appliances seemed to function properly.


Bathrooms
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29) The ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) electric receptacle in the half bath did not trip when tested with a test instrument or via the test button. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate and repair as necessary.
Photo
Photo 29-1
 

30) The light/vent fixture in the half bath is missing the cover.


Interior rooms
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31) One or more open ground, three-pronged electric receptacles were found. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate and make repairs as necessary. For example, replacing receptacles or correcting wiring circuits.

Grounding type receptacles began being required in residential structures during the 1960s. Based on the age of this structure and the presence of 2-pronged receptacles in some areas of this structure, an acceptable repair may be to simply replace the ungrounded 3-pronged receptacles with 2-pronged receptacles. However the following appliances require grounding type receptacles:

This list is not exhaustive. Grounded circuits and receptacles should be installed in locations where such appliances will be used.
32) Two-pronged electric receptacles rather than three-pronged, grounded receptacles are installed in one or more interior rooms. They are considered to be unsafe by today's standards and limit the ability to use appliances that require a ground in these rooms. Examples of appliances that require grounded receptacles include:

This list is not exhaustive. A qualified electrician should evaluate and install grounded receptacles as per the client(s)' needs and standard building practices.
33) Recommend adding a smoke alarm in each bedroom.
34) The whole-house fan appeared to function properly, although it was covered in plastic.
35) All ceiling fans/lights appeared to function properly.


Inspection Services LLC