View as PDF

View summary

LogoWebsite: http://www.inspectalljax.com
Email: inspectalljax@gmail.com
Inspector's email: inspectall.marty@gmail.com
Phone: (904) 249-6523
Inspector's phone: (904) 502-2313
PO Box 54455 
Jacksonville FL 32245-4455
Inspector: Marty Lunsford

 

Property Inspection Report

Client(s):  John & Jane Doe
Property address:  1234 Ocean Blvd
Jacksonville, FL 32206
Inspection date:  Friday, January 01, 2016

This report published on Wednesday, June 08, 2016 3:25:41 PM EDT

This report is the exclusive property of this inspection company and the client(s) listed in the report title. Use of this report by any unauthorized persons is prohibited.
How to Read this Report
This report is organized by the property's functional areas.  Within each functional area, descriptive information is listed first and is shown in bold type.  Items of concern follow descriptive information. Concerns are shown and sorted according to these types:
Concern typeSafetyPoses a safety hazard
Concern typeRepair/ReplaceRecommend repairing or replacing
Concern typeRepair/MaintainRecommend repair and/or maintenance
Concern typeMinor DefectCorrection likely involves only a minor expense
Concern typeMaintainRecommend ongoing maintenance
Concern typeEvaluateRecommend evaluation by a specialist
Concern typeMonitorRecommend monitoring in the future
Concern typeCommentFor your information
Concern typeDamageDamage caused by wood destroying insects or organisms (Rot, carpenter ant galleries, etc.)
Concern typeConducive conditionsConditions conducive for wood destroying insects or organisms (Wood-soil contact, shrubs in contact with siding, roof or plumbing leaks, etc.)

Click here for a glossary of building construction terms.Contact your inspector If there are terms that you do not understand, or visit the glossary of construction terms at http://www.reporthost.com/glossary.asp

Table of Contents
General information
Exterior
Roof
Garage
Attic
Electric service
Water heater
Heating and cooling
Plumbing and laundry
Fireplaces, woodstoves and chimneys
Kitchen
Bathrooms
Interior rooms
Well


General information
Return to table of contents

Inspector: Marty Lunsford
Structures inspected: Main house
Type of building: Single family
Age of building: 35 Years
Total Length of Inspection & Report Writing: 4 Hours
Present during inspection: Client(s), Realtor(s)
Occupied: No
Weather conditions: Partly cloudy
Temperature: Warm
Ground condition: Damp
Foundation type: Slab on grade
The following items are excluded from this inspection: Private sewage disposal system, Central vacuum system

Exterior
Return to table of contents

Footing material: Poured in place concrete
Foundation material: Poured in place concrete
Apparent wall structure: Wood frame
Wall covering: Wood panels
Driveway material: Poured in place concrete, Gravel
Sidewalk material: Poured in place concrete
Exterior door material: Solid core wood, Solid core steel

1) One or more deck ledger boards are nailed to the structure rather than being attached by adequate fasteners. This poses a significant safety hazard since the ledger board(s) may separate from the structure, causing the deck(s) to collapse. A qualified contractor should install lag screws or bolts as per standard building practices to securely attach the ledger board(s) to the structure. For more information on installing deck ledger boards visit: http://www.hometime.com/Howto/projects/decks/deck_4.htm

And for more information on building safe decks in general, visit: http://www.thisoldhouse.com/toh/knowhow/exteriors/article/0,16417,212625,00.html
Photo
Photo 1-1
Photo
Photo 1-2
Photo
Photo 1-3
 

2) Conducive conditions Siding has minor damaged and/or deteriorated in one or more areas. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs and/or replace siding as necessary to prevent water and vermin intrusion. Areas located at front right and right rear.
Photo
Photo 2-1
Photo
Photo 2-2
Photo
Photo 2-3
 

3) One or more electric receptacles appear to have no power. Recommend asking the property owner(s) about this. Switches may need to be operated to make some receptacles energized. If necessary, a qualified electrician should evaluate and make repairs as necessary. Located at right rear of home.
Photo
Photo 3-1
 

4) DamageConducive conditions One or more wooden deck support posts are in contact with soil, and are rotten. This is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects and organisms. Standard building practices require that there be at least 6" of space between any wood and the soil below, even if the wood is treated. If possible, soil should be removed or graded so a 6" clearance is maintained. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary, such as replacing rotten posts, or trimming rotten post bases and installing concrete and metal post bases. If possible, soil should be removed or graded so a 6" clearance is maintained. Otherwise recommend installing borate based Impel rods to prevent rot.
Photo
Photo 4-1
 

5) Conducive conditions One or more wooden deck support posts are in contact with soil. This is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects and organisms. However no damage from wood destroying insects or organisms was found. Standard building practices require that there be at least 6" of space between any wood and the soil below, even if the wood is treated. If possible, soil should be removed or graded so a 6" clearance is maintained. Otherwise recommend installing borate based Impel rods to prevent rot.
Photo
Photo 5-1
Photo
Photo 5-2
Photo
Photo 5-3
Photo
Photo 5-4

6) Conducive conditions Wood beams, joists and/or support posts are too close to the soil in some areas. This is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects and organisms. Standard building practices require the following clearances to soil below:
  • 12 inches between beams and the soil below
  • 18 inches between joists and the soil below
  • 6 inches between support post bases and the soil below

Efforts should be made, such as grading and/or removing soil, to maintain these clearances. If this is not practical, then installing borate based Impel rods may help to prevent infestation and damage.
Photo
Photo 6-1
Photo
Photo 6-2
Photo
Photo 6-3
 

7) One or more light fixtures appear to be inoperable. Recommend further evaluation by replacing bulb(s) and/or consulting with the property owner(s). Repairs or replacement of the light fixture(s) by a qualified electrician may be necessary.
Photo
Photo 7-1
 

8) Minor cracks were found in the driveway. However they don't appear to be a structural concern and no trip hazards were found. No immediate action is recommended, but the client(s) may wish to have repairs made or have cracked sections replaced for aesthetic reasons.
Photo
Photo 8-1
Photo
Photo 8-2

9) General pictures of exterior.
Photo
Photo 9-1
Photo
Photo 9-2
Photo
Photo 9-3
Photo
Photo 9-4
Photo
Photo 9-5
Photo
Photo 9-6
Photo
Photo 9-7
Photo
Photo 9-8
Photo
Photo 9-9
Photo
Photo 9-10
Photo
Photo 9-11
 

Roof
Return to table of contents

Roof inspection method: Viewed from eaves on ladder
Roof type: Gable
Roof covering: Asphalt or fiberglass composition shingles
Estimated age of roof: 6-8 Years
Gutter & downspout material: Aluminum
Roof ventilation: Adequate

10) Conducive conditions One or more sections of flashing at the base of the chimney are deteriorated and/or substandard. Leaks may occur as a result. A qualified roofing contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary.
Photo
Photo 10-1
 

11) Conducive conditions Debris has accumulated in one or more gutters. This is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects since gutters may overflow and cause water to come in contact with the structure's exterior or make water accumulate around the foundation. Gutters should be cleaned now and as necessary in the future.
Photo
Photo 11-1
Photo
Photo 11-2

12) General pictures of roof area.
Photo
Photo 12-1
Photo
Photo 12-2
Photo
Photo 12-3
Photo
Photo 12-4
Photo
Photo 12-5
Photo
Photo 12-6
Photo
Photo 12-7
Photo
Photo 12-8
Photo
Photo 12-9
Photo
Photo 12-10
Photo
Photo 12-11
Photo
Photo 12-12
Photo
Photo 12-13
Photo
Photo 12-14
Photo
Photo 12-15
Photo
Photo 12-16
Photo
Photo 12-17
 

Garage
Return to table of contents


13) Appliances such as the water heater and/or furnace are subject to damage from vehicles because no protective barrier is installed in front of them. A qualified contractor should install an adequate barrier as per standard building practices (steel post anchored in concrete, wood partition, etc.).
Photo
Photo 13-1
 

14) One or more light fixtures appear to be inoperable. Recommend further evaluation by replacing bulb(s) and/or consulting with the property owner(s). Repairs or replacement of the light fixture(s) by a qualified electrician may be necessary.
Photo
Photo 14-1
 

15) Garage door opener appeared functional at time of inspection.
Photo
Photo 15-1
 

16) General pictures of garage.
Photo
Photo 16-1
Photo
Photo 16-2

Attic
Return to table of contents

Inspection method: Traversed
Roof structure type: Rafters
Ceiling structure: Ceiling beams
Insulation material: Fiberglass roll or batt
Insulation depth: 9 Inches
Insulation estimated R value: 27

17) Cover plate(s) are missing from one or more electric boxes, such as for receptacles, switches and/or junction boxes. They are intended to contain fire and prevent electric shock from exposed wires. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of fire and shock. Cover plates should be installed where missing.
Photo
Photo 17-1
 

18) Pull-down stairs are installed for the attic access. No insulation is installed above the stairs and no weatherstripping is installed around the hatch perimeter. To reduce air leakage, recommend installing weatherstripping and an insulated hatch cover. An example of one can be seen at http://www.batticdoor.com/

Interior air leaking into the attic results in heating and cooling losses, increased energy costs, and a possible increase in moisture levels in the attic due condensation forming on the underside of the roof sheathing during cold weather.
Photo
Photo 18-1
 

19) Stains were visible on the roof structure in one or more areas. These areas were dry at the time of the inspection. The stains may be caused by a past leak. Recommend asking the property owner(s) about past leaks. The client(s) should monitor these areas in the future, especially after heavy rains, to determine if active leaks exist. If leaks are found, a qualified roofing contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary.
Photo
Photo 19-1
 

20) General pictures of attic area.
Photo
Photo 20-1
Photo
Photo 20-2
Photo
Photo 20-3
Photo
Photo 20-4
Photo
Photo 20-5
Photo
Photo 20-6
Photo
Photo 20-7
Photo
Photo 20-8
Photo
Photo 20-9
Photo
Photo 20-10
Photo
Photo 20-11
Photo
Photo 20-12
Photo
Photo 20-13
Photo
Photo 20-14
Photo
Photo 20-15
 

21) General pictures of attic area with infrared shows insulation in good working order.
Photo
Photo 21-1
Photo
Photo 21-2
Photo
Photo 21-3
Photo
Photo 21-4
Photo
Photo 21-5
Photo
Photo 21-6
Photo
Photo 21-7
 

Electric service
Return to table of contents

Primary service type: Underground
Primary service overload protection type: Circuit breakers
Service amperage (amps): 200
Service voltage (volts): 120/240
Location of main service switch: Service panel in garage.
Location of main disconnect: Breaker at top of main service panel
Service entrance conductor material: Aluminum
System ground: Ground rod(s) in soil
Main disconnect rating (amps): 200
Branch circuit wiring type: Non-metallic sheathed
Solid strand aluminum branch circuit wiring present: No
Smoke detectors present: Yes

22) General picture of main disconnect and service panels.
Photo
Photo 22-1
Photo
Photo 22-2
Photo
Photo 22-3
Photo
Photo 22-4

23) No evidence of over heating at service panels with infrared.
Photo
Photo 23-1
Photo
Photo 23-2
Photo
Photo 23-3
Photo
Photo 23-4
Photo
Photo 23-5
Photo
Photo 23-6
Photo
Photo 23-7
 

Water heater
Return to table of contents

Estimated age: 9 Years
Type: Tank
Energy source: Electricity
Capacity (in gallons): 40
Manufacturer: General Electric
Model: GE40
Water temperature (degrees Fahrenheit): 116

24) The drain line to the water heater's temperature-pressure relief valve is undersized. This is a potential safety hazard due to the risk of explosion. This type of valve requires a minimum 3/4 inch diameter drain line. An undersized drain line can result in the water heater exploding if or when the valve opens due to restricted venting. A qualified plumber should replace the drain line with a correctly sized one as per standard building practices.
Photo
Photo 24-1
 

25) The water heater was checked and appears to be functional.
Photo
Photo 25-1
Photo
Photo 25-2

Heating and cooling
Return to table of contents

Estimated age: 9 Years
Primary heating system energy source: Electric
Primary heat system type: Heat pump
Primary A/C energy source: Electric
Primary Air conditioning type: Heat pump
Distribution system: Sheet metal ducts, Flexible ducts
Manufacturer: Trane
Filter location: In return air duct below furnace
Last service date: Unknown

26) Air handler filter(s) should be checked monthly in the future and replaced or washed as necessary.
Photo
Photo 26-1
Photo
Photo 26-2

27) The heating and air conditioning systems were checked and appears to be functional at the time of the inspection.
Photo
Photo 27-1
Photo
Photo 27-2
Photo
Photo 27-3
Photo
Photo 27-4

28) HVAC heat mode with infrared for both units.
Photo
Photo 28-1
Photo
Photo 28-2
Photo
Photo 28-3
Photo
Photo 28-4
Photo
Photo 28-5
Photo
Photo 28-6
Photo
Photo 28-7
Photo
Photo 28-8

29) HVAC cool mode with infrared for both units.
Photo
Photo 29-1
Photo
Photo 29-2
Photo
Photo 29-3
Photo
Photo 29-4
Photo
Photo 29-5
Photo
Photo 29-6
Photo
Photo 29-7
Photo
Photo 29-8

Plumbing and laundry
Return to table of contents

Water pressure (psi): 53psi
Location of main water shut-off valve: Exterior left side wall.
Location of main water meter: Well
Visible fuel storage systems: None
Water service: Private
Service pipe material: Not visible
Supply pipe material: Copper, CPVC
Vent pipe material: Plastic
Drain pipe material: Plastic
Waste pipe material: Plastic

30) The clothes dryer is equipped with a vinyl or foil, accordion-type, flexible exhaust duct. The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission considers these types of ducts to be unsafe, and a fire hazard. These types of ducts can trap lint and are susceptible to kinks or crushing, which can greatly reduce the air flow. This duct should be replaced with a rigid or corrugated semi-rigid metal duct, and by a qualified contractor if necessary. Most clothes dryer manufacturers specify the use of a rigid or corrugated semi-rigid metal duct. For more information on dryer safety issues, see http://www.reporthost.com/?DRYERLNG
Photo
Photo 30-1
 

31) Recommend having the septic tank inspected. Recommend having the tank pumped if it was last pumped more than 3 years ago.

32) Location of main water shut off.
Photo
Photo 32-1
 

33) General picture of water pressure quage.
Photo
Photo 33-1
 

Fireplaces, woodstoves and chimneys
Return to table of contents

Fireplace type: Metal prefabricated
Chimney type: Metal

34) All solid fuel burning appliances (woodstoves and fireplaces, etc.) should be inspected annually by a qualified chimney service contractor, cleaned and repaired as necessary.
Photo
Photo 34-1
Photo
Photo 34-2

Kitchen
Return to table of contents


35) One or more electric receptacles that serve countertop surfaces within six feet of a sink appear to have no ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate to determine if GFCI protection exists, and if not, repairs should be made so that all receptacles that serve countertop surfaces within six feet of sinks have GFCI protection. For example, install GFCI receptacles or circuit breaker(s) as needed.
Photo
Photo 35-1
Photo
Photo 35-2

36) The microwave oven's turntable appears to be inoperable. A qualified appliance technician should evaluate and repair as necessary.
Photo
Photo 36-1
 

37) Conducive conditions Caulk is missing and/or deteriorated where countertops meet backsplashes in wet areas, such as around sinks. Caulk should be replaced where deteriorated and/or applied where missing to prevent water damage.
Photo
Photo 37-1
 

38) The dishwasher was checked and appears to be functional.
Photo
Photo 38-1
 

39) The refrigerator was checked and appears to be functional.
Photo
Photo 39-1
 

40) The microwave was checked and appears to be functional.
Photo
Photo 40-1
 

41) The range/oven was checked and appears to be functional.
Photo
Photo 41-1
Photo
Photo 41-2
Photo
Photo 41-3
Photo
Photo 41-4
Photo
Photo 41-5
 

42) Food disposal appeared functional at time of inspection.
Photo
Photo 42-1
 

43) General pictures of kitchen.
Photo
Photo 43-1
Photo
Photo 43-2

Bathrooms
Return to table of contents


44) The bathroom faucets were checked and appear to be functional.

45) The bathroom sinks were checked and appear to be functional.

46) The toilets were inspected and appear to be functional.

47) The bathtub(s) were checked and appear to be functional.

48) The shower(s) were checked and appear to be functional.

49) General pictures of bathrooms.
Photo
Photo 49-1
Photo
Photo 49-2
Photo
Photo 49-3
Photo
Photo 49-4
Photo
Photo 49-5
Photo
Photo 49-6
Photo
Photo 49-7
Photo
Photo 49-8

Interior rooms
Return to table of contents


50) Based on the age of this structure and the appearance of existing smoke alarms, the alarms may be older than 5 years old. According to National Fire Protection Association, aging smoke alarms don't operate as efficiently and often are the source for nuisance alarms. Older smoke alarms are estimated to have a 30% probability of failure within the first 10 years. Newer smoke alarms do better, but should be replaced periodically as required by the manufacturer. Unless you know that the smoke alarms are new, replacing them when moving into a new residence is also recommended by NFPA. For more information, visit this article: NFPA urges replacing home smoke alarms after 10 years.
Photo
Photo 50-1
 

51) One or more entry doors have deadbolts installed with no handle, and require a key to open them from both sides. This can be a safety hazard in the event of a fire when the key is not available. The door cannot be used as an exit then, causing entrapment. Key-only deadbolts should be replaced with deadbolts that have a handle on the inside on entry doors in rooms with no other adequate egress nearby.
Photo
Photo 51-1
 

52) Conducive conditions Tile, stone and/or grout flooring is damaged and/or deteriorated in one or more areas. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary. For example, replacing broken tiles and deteriorated grout, and resealing grout.
Photo
Photo 52-1
Photo
Photo 52-2

53) One or more sliding glass doors are screwed shut. Doors could not be opened and are excluded from the inspection.
Photo
Photo 53-1
 

54) One or more light fixtures appear to be inoperable. Recommend further evaluation by replacing bulb(s) and/or consulting with the property owner(s). Repairs or replacement of the light fixture(s) by a qualified electrician may be necessary.
Photo
Photo 54-1
Photo
Photo 54-2

55) Stains were found in one or more ceiling areas. However, no elevated levels of moisture were found. The stain(s) may be due to past roof and/or plumbing leaks. Recommend asking the property owner(s) about this, and monitoring the stained area(s) in the future, especially after heavy or prolonged rain. If elevated moisture is found in the future, a qualified contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary.
Photo
Photo 55-1
Photo
Photo 55-2

56) Electric storm shutters installed on the sliding doors appeared functional at time of inspection.
Photo
Photo 56-1
Photo
Photo 56-2
Photo
Photo 56-3
 

57) Windows,doors,electrical outlets that were evaluated appeared to be functional at time of inspection.

58) General pictures of interior rooms.
Photo
Photo 58-1
Photo
Photo 58-2
Photo
Photo 58-3
Photo
Photo 58-4
Photo
Photo 58-5
Photo
Photo 58-6
Photo
Photo 58-7
 

Well
Return to table of contents

Location of tank shut off valve: Right side of tank

59) The estimated useful life for most well pumps is 15 to 20 years. Based on information provided to the inspector, or evidence found during the inspection, the well pump may be approaching this age and may need replacing at any time. Recommend budgeting for a replacement in the near future.
Photo
Photo 59-1
Photo
Photo 59-2

INSPECTOR INFORMATION:



Marty Lunsford

ASHI Certified Inspector #248679
Cell # 904-502-2313

American Society of Home Inspectors