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LogoWebsite: http://www.inspectallservices.com
Email: inspections@inspectallservices.com
Inspector's email: inspectall.marty@gmail.com
Phone: (770) 483-2808
Inspector's phone: (404) 502-2156
575 Sigman Rd NE  
Conyers, GA 30013
Inspector: Marty Lunsford

 

Duplex Inspection Report

Client(s):  John Doe (sample only)
Property address:  1234 /1236 Green St
Atlanta, GA 30000
Inspection date:  Thursday, January 01, 2015

This report published on Monday, September 21, 2015 8:17:41 AM EDT

This report is the exclusive property of the inspection company and the client(s) listed in the report title. Use of this report by any unauthorized persons is prohibited. The client(s) must read and agree to the terms and conditions of the contract agreement at the bottom of the report.
How to Read this Report
This report is organized by the property's functional areas.  Within each functional area, descriptive information is listed first and is shown in bold type.  Items of concern follow descriptive information. Concerns are shown and sorted according to these types:
Concern typeSafetyPoses a risk of injury or death
Concern typeMajor DefectCorrection likely involves a significant expense
Concern typeRepair/ReplaceRecommend repairing or replacing
Concern typeRepair/MaintainRecommend repair and/or maintenance
Concern typeMinor DefectCorrection likely involves only a minor expense
Concern typeMaintainRecommend ongoing maintenance
Concern typeEvaluateRecommend evaluation by a specialist
Concern typeMonitorRecommend monitoring in the future
Concern typeCommentFor your information
Concern typeInfestationEvidence of infestation of wood destroying insects or organisms (Live or dead insect bodies, fungal growth, etc.)
Concern typeDamageDamage caused by wood destroying insects or organisms (Rot, carpenter ant galleries, etc.)
Concern typeConducive conditionsConditions conducive for wood destroying insects or organisms (Wood-soil contact, shrubs in contact with siding, roof or plumbing leaks, etc.)

Click here for a glossary of building construction terms.Contact your inspector If there are terms that you do not understand, or visit the glossary of construction terms at http://www.reporthost.com/glossary.asp

Table of Contents
General information
Exterior
Roof
Attic
Electric service
Water heaters
Heating and cooling
Plumbing and laundry
Crawl space
Kitchen
Bathrooms
Interior rooms


General information
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Account #: 202461
Inspector: Marty Lunsford
Structures inspected: Main house
Type of building: Duplex
Age of building: 27 Years
Time started: 11:15
Total Length of Inspection & Report Writing: 6 Hours
Payment method: Credit Card
Occupied: No
Weather conditions: Partly cloudy
Temperature: Hot
Ground condition: Wet
Foundation type: Crawlspace
The following items are excluded from this inspection: Security system

1) This property has one or more fuel burning appliances, and no carbon monoxide alarms are visible. This is a safety hazard. Recommend installing one or more carbon monoxide alarms as necessary and as per the manufacturer's instructions. For more information, visit http://www.cpsc.gov/CPSCPUB/PREREL/prhtml05/05017.html

2) The natural gas service was turned off. As a result, some appliances such as water heater(s), forced air furnace(s), gas fireplace(s), stove(s), range(s) and/or gas supply lines weren't fully evaluated. The inspector was unable to test for gas leaks.
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Exterior
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Footing material: Poured in place concrete
Foundation material: Concrete block
Apparent wall structure: Wood frame
Wall covering: Composition wood clapboard, Cement-based clapboard
Driveway material: Poured in place concrete
Sidewalk material: Poured in place concrete
Exterior door material: Solid core steel

3) Damage Rot was found in one or more deck boards. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary, replacing all rotten wood.
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4) The deck is unstable in one or more areas due to lack of diagonal bracing. This is a safety hazard since severe movement may cause the deck to collapse. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary.

5) One or more outdoor electric receptacles appear to have no ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate to determine if GFCI protection exists, and if not, repairs should be made so that all outdoor receptacles within six feet six inches of ground level have GFCI protection. For example, install GFCI receptacles or circuit breaker(s) as needed.

6) One or more light fixtures are loose or installed in a substandard way. A qualified contractor or electrician should evaluate and make repairs as necessary so light fixtures are securely mounted and installed in accordance with the manufacturer's installation instructions.
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7) Conducive conditions Flashing is missing from above one or more deck ledger boards. This can cause moisture to accumulate between the ledger board(s) and the structure. Rot may result in this area and cause the ledger board fasteners to fail. The deck may separate from the structure in this event and poses a significant safety hazard. A qualified contractor should install flashing above ledger board(s) where necessary. For more information on installing deck ledger boards visit: http://www.hometime.com/Howto/projects/decks/deck_4.htm

And for more information on building safe decks in general, visit: http://www.thisoldhouse.com/toh/knowhow/exteriors/article/0,16417,212625,00.html

8) One or more flights of stairs with more than two risers have no handrail installed. This is a safety hazard. A qualified contractor should install graspable handrails that your hand can completely encircle at stairs where missing, and as per standard building practices.
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9) Gaps larger than four inches were found in one or more guardrails. This is a safety hazard, especially for small children. A qualified contractor should make modifications as necessary so gaps in guardrails do not exceed four inches. For example, installing additional balusters or railing components.
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10) One or more wall-mounted exterior light fixtures have wiring that's subject to water intrusion due to caulk not being installed around the light fixture's back plate. Caulk should be applied around the perimeter of back plates where missing. A gap should be left at the bottom for condensation to drain out.
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11) Conducive conditions This property is clad with composition wood fiber siding. Many brands of this type of siding by different manufacturers are known to deteriorate and/or fail prematurely due to moisture penetration. Failure is typically visible in the form of swelling, cracking and delamination, especially at the bottom edges. Class action lawsuits have been filed or are being filed against most manufacturers of this material.

Much or all of the siding on this structure has failed and should be replaced. A qualified contractor should evaluate and replace siding as necessary.

For more information, visit:
Failing LP Siding Help Page
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12) Conducive conditions The exterior finish over the entire structure is failing. A qualified painting contractor should prep (pressure wash, scrape, sand, prime caulk, etc.) and repaint or restain the entire structure as per standard building practices.

13) Damage Rot was found in one or more areas on trim boards. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary, replacing all rotten wood.
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14) Damage Rot was found at the base of the stair stringers. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary. All rotten wood should be replaced or removed and soil should be graded and/or removed if necessary to maintain at least a 6" gap between wood and soil.
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15) The driveway has significant cracks and/or deterioration in one or more areas. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair or replace driveway sections as necessary.
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16) DamageConducive conditions One or more wooden deck support posts are in contact with soil, and are rotten. This is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects and organisms. Standard building practices require that there be at least 6" of space between any wood and the soil below, even if the wood is treated. If possible, soil should be removed or graded so a 6" clearance is maintained. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary, such as replacing rotten posts, or trimming rotten post bases and installing concrete and metal post bases. If possible, soil should be removed or graded so a 6" clearance is maintained. Otherwise recommend installing borate based Impel rods to prevent rot.
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17) Conducive conditions One or more gutters are loose or detached. This can result in water accumulating around the structure's foundation, or in basements and crawl spaces if they exist. Accumulated water is a conducive condition to wood destroying insects and organisms, and may also cause the foundation to settle and possibly fail over time. Repairs should be made as necessary so gutters are securely anchored and functional.
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18) Conducive conditions One or more downspouts have no extensions, or have extensions that are ineffective. This can result in water accumulating around the structure's foundation, or in basements and crawl spaces if they exist. Accumulated water is a conducive condition to wood destroying insects and organisms, and may also cause the foundation to settle and possibly fail over time. Repairs should be made as necessary, such as installing or repositioning splash blocks, or installing and/or repairing tie-ins to underground drain lines, so rain water is carried at least several feet away from the structure to soil that slopes down and away from the structure.
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19) One or more crawl space vent screens are damaged and/or deteriorated. Animals such as vermin or pets may enter the crawl space and nest, die and/or leave feces and urine. A qualified contractor should replace damaged or deteriorated screens where necessary using screen material such as "hardware cloth" with 1/4 inch minimum gaps.

20) Gaps exist at one or more openings around the exterior, such as those where outside faucets, refrigerant lines, and/or gas supply pipes penetrate the exterior. Gaps should be sealed as necessary to prevent moisture intrusion and entry by vermin.
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21) One or more outside faucets aren't anchored securely to the structure's exterior. Fasteners should be installed or replaced as necessary so faucets are securely anchored to prevent stress on plumbing supply lines and possible leaks.
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22) One or more moderate cracks (1/8 inch to 3/4 inch) were found in the foundation. These may be a structural concern, or an indication that settlement is ongoing. The client(s) should consider hiring qualified contractors and/or engineers as necessary for further evaluation. Such contractors may include:
  • Foundation repair contractors who may prescribe repairs, and will give cost estimates for prescribed repairs
  • Masonry contractors who repair and/or replace brick veneer
  • Geotechnical engineers who attempt to determine if settlement is ongoing, and what the cause of the settlement is
  • Structural engineers who determine if repairs are necessary, and prescribe those repairs

  • At a minimum, recommend sealing cracks to prevent water infiltration. Numerous products exist to seal such cracks including:
  • Hydraulic cement. Requires chiseling a channel in the crack to apply. See http://www.quickrete.com/catalog/HydraulicWater-StopCement.html for an example.
  • Resilient caulks (easy to apply). See http://www.quickrete.com/catalog/GrayConcreteRepair.html for an example.
  • Epoxy sealants (both a waterproof and structural repair). See http://www.mountaingrout.com/ for examples of these products.
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23) Conducive conditions One or more minor cracks (1/8 inch or less) were found in the foundation. These don't appear to be a structural concern, but recommend sealing them to prevent water infiltration and monitoring them in the future. Numerous products exist to seal such cracks including:
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24) One or more mail boxes are damaged or missing. Recommend a qualified contractor make the necessary repairs.
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25) Conducive conditions Trees and/or shrubs are in contact with or are close to the roof edge(s) in one or more areas. Damage to the roof may result, especially during high winds. Vegetation can also act as a conduit for wood destroying insects. Vegetation should be pruned back and/or removed as necessary to prevent damage and infestation by wood destroying insects.
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26) Stains were found in one or more areas on soffit boards, but no elevated moisture levels were found and the wood appears to be in good condition. Based on the appearance of the roof, these stains may be from past leaks. Recommend monitoring these areas in the future. If moisture is observed, a qualified contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary.
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27) Minor cracks were found in one or more sidewalk or patio sections. However they don't appear to be a structural concern and no trip hazards were found. No immediate action is recommended, but the client(s) may wish to have repairs made or have cracked sections replaced for aesthetic reasons.
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28) General pictures of exterior.
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Roof
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Roof inspection method: Viewed from ground with binoculars
Roof type: Gable
Roof covering: Asphalt or fiberglass composition shingles
Estimated age of roof: 26 Years
Gutter & downspout material: Galvanized steel
Roof ventilation: Adequate

29) Conducive conditions The roof surface material is beyond or at the end of its service life and needs replacing now. The client(s) should consult with a qualified roofing contractor to determine replacement options and costs.
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30) Conducive conditions Debris has accumulated in one or more gutters. This is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects since gutters may overflow and cause water to come in contact with the structure's exterior or make water accumulate around the foundation. Gutters should be cleaned now and as necessary in the future.

31) General pictures of roof area.
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Attic
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Inspection method: Traversed
Roof structure type: Trusses
Ceiling structure: Trusses
Insulation material: Fiberglass loose fill
Insulation depth: 4 Inches
Insulation estimated R value: R12

32) Evidence of "heavy" rodent infestation was found in one or more areas. The Center for Disease Control (CDC) defines this as more than 20 feces per square foot. Rodent infestation may be a safety hazard due to the risk of contracting Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome (HPS). HPS is a rare (only 20-50 cases per year in the United states) but deadly (40% mortality rate) disease transmitted by infected rodents through urine, droppings, or saliva. Humans can contract the disease when they breathe in aerosolized virus. For example, from sweeping up rodent droppings.

Because this infestation is "heavy", the client(s) may wish to consult with our pest management division for eliminating the infestation and/or to provide rodent exclusion and repair estimates. For more information on eradication, clean up and prevention of rodent infestations, read the CDC's Clean Up, Trap Up, Seal Up article.
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33) Conducive conditions One or more exhaust fan ducts are broken and/or have fallen down, or somehow terminate in the attic. This is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects and organisms due to increased moisture levels in the attic from the exhaust air. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make permanent repairs as necessary and as per standard building practices, so all exhaust air is vented outside.
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34) The ceiling insulation's R rating is significantly less than what's recommended for this area. Recommend having a qualified contractor install additional insulation as per standard building practices for better energy efficiency.
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35) General pictures of attic area.
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36) General pictures of the attic using infrared.
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Electric service
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Primary service type: Underground
Primary service overload protection type: Circuit breakers
Service amperage (amps): 2 X 100
Service voltage (volts): 120
Location of main disconnect: Breaker at top of main service panel
Service entrance conductor material: Aluminum
System ground: Ground rod(s) in soil
Main disconnect rating (amps): 2 X 100
Branch circuit wiring type: Non-metallic sheathed
Solid strand aluminum branch circuit wiring present: No
Smoke detectors present: Yes

37) The main service panel cover couldn't be removed due to accumulation of paint and/or wall finishing materials. This panel wasn't fully evaluated. Repairs should be made so the cover can come off easily.
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38) General picture of service panel.
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39) General pictures of the main service panel using infrared.
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Water heaters
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Estimated age: Richmond 17 Years, Hotpoint 4 Years
Type: Tank
Energy source: Natural gas
Capacity (in gallons): 40
Manufacturer: Hotpoint, Richmond

40) Scorch marks are visible on the water heater cabinet above the combustion chamber opening. This may be a sign of improper venting, an improperly positioned burner, or other problems. A qualified plumber should evaluate and repair if necessary. Richmond Unit.
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41) Conducive conditions A water heater is installed over finished living spaces and has no catch pan and drain installed. Recommend having a qualified contractor install a catch pan and drain to prevent water damage to finished interior spaces below if/when the water heater develops a leak or is drained.

42) The estimated useful life for most water heaters is 8 to 12 years. This water heater appears to be at this age or older and may need replacing at any time. Recommend budgeting for a replacement in the near future. Richmond Unit.

43) The water heater was turned off at the time of the inspection. For example, circuit breaker turned off, gas supply turned off or pilot light turned off. The inspector was unable to fully evaluate the water heater.
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Heating and cooling
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Estimated age: 8 Years
Primary heating system energy source: Natural gas
Primary heat system type: Forced air
Primary A/C energy source: Electric
Primary Air conditioning type: Split system
Distribution system: Flexible ducts
Manufacturer: Duncane
Filter location: Behind return air grill
Last service date: Unkown

44) The air conditioning system did not respond when its controls were operated. This system was not fully evaluated. The client(s) should consult with the property owner(s) as to how it operates and have a qualified heating and cooling contractor evaluate and make repairs if necessary.
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45) The furnace was shut off at the time of the inspection. For example, the gas supply was shut off, the pilot light was out, and/or the electric supply was turned off. As a result, the inspector was unable to fully evaluate this unit.
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Plumbing and laundry
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Water pressure (psi): 80
Location of main water shut-off valve: In the crawl space.
Location of main water meter: In the front yard.
Location of main fuel shut-off: Exterior of home.
Visible fuel storage systems: None Noted.
Water service: Public
Service pipe material: Not visible
Supply pipe material: Copper
Vent pipe material: Plastic
Drain pipe material: Plastic
Waste pipe material: Plastic

46) No ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection device is visible for the sump pump electric supply. A qualified electrician should determine if a GFCI protection device (receptacle or circuit breaker) exists for the sump pump and install one if missing to reduce the danger of electric shock.
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47) Conducive conditions The sump pump appeared to be inoperable. This is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects and organisms due to the risk of water accumulation. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary.
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48) No expansion tank is installed on this structure's water supply system. Expansion tanks are recommended when a property is on a public water supply system and the property's water system is "closed" via a pressure reducing valve (PRV), check valve, or backflow preventer. No room for expansion of water exists in this type of system. Thermal expansion occurs when water is heated during non-use periods. In a closed system with no provision for expansion, its effects may include:
  • Backflow into the water main
  • Damage to water heater connections, gas water heater flue tubes and pumps serving washers and dishwashers
  • Leaking faucets
  • "Weeping" of water through the water heater temperature-pressure relief (TPR) valve
  • Noisy water hammer in the pipes.

Expansion tanks can eliminate these problems by giving water a place to go when thermal expansion occurs. When a water heating cycle ends, or when any fixture is opened within the system, the impact of thermal expansion is reduced, and water drains out of the expansion tank back into the system. Recommend having a qualified plumber install an expansion tank as per standard building practices.
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49) Conducive conditions Stains were found in one or more sections of drain and/or waste pipes. Recommend monitoring these areas in the future, and if leaks are found, have a qualified plumber evaluate and repair as necessary. Alternatively, the client(s) may wish to have a qualified plumber evaluate now and repair if necessary.
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50) Location of main water shut off.
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51) Location of main gas shut off.
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52) General picture of water pressure test.
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Crawl space
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Inspection method: Traversed
Insulation material underneath floor above: None visible
Pier or support post material: Concrete
Beam material: Solid wood
Floor structure above: Solid wood joists
Vapor barrier present: Yes

53) DamageConducive conditions One or more floor joists are rotten. Sagging and/or bouncing floors may result. In extreme circumstances, floors may collapse. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary.
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54) Wire splices are exposed due to not being contained in a covered junction box. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock and fire. A qualified electrician should evaluate and make repairs as necessary. For example, install securely mounted junction boxes with cover plates where needed to contain wiring splices.
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55) InfestationDamage One or more rim joist are rotten through completely. Sagging and/or bouncing floors may result. In extreme circumstances, floors may collapse. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary.
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56) No insulation is installed under the floor in the crawl space. Recommend that a qualified contractor install R19 or better (6" thick fiberglass batt) insulation under the floor for better energy efficiency.

57) Conducive conditions Standing water was found in one or more sections of the crawl space. Accumulated water is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects and organisms and should not be present in the crawl space. A qualified contractor who specializes in drainage issues should evaluate and repair as necessary. Typical repairs for preventing water from accumulating in crawl spaces include:
  • Repairing, installing or improving rain run-off systems (gutters, downspouts and extensions or drain lines)
  • Improving perimeter grading
  • Repairing, installing or improving underground footing and/or curtain drains

Ideally, water should not enter crawl spaces, but if water must be controlled after it enters the crawl space, then typical repairs include installing trenches, drains and/or sump pump(s) in the crawl space.
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58) DamageConducive conditions Stains and elevated levels of moisture were found in one or more sub floor areas. The stain(s) appear to be due to plumbing leaks. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary.
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59) Conducive conditions The vapor barrier needs repair. Exposed soil was found in some areas. This is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects and organisms due to the likelihood of water evaporating into the structure from the soil. Please contact our pest management division for more information regarding the installation of an approved vapor barrier.

60) General pictures of crawl space area.
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Kitchen
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61) One or more electric receptacles that serve countertop surfaces within six feet of a sink appear to have no ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate to determine if GFCI protection exists, and if not, repairs should be made so that all receptacles that serve countertop surfaces within six feet of sinks have GFCI protection. For example, install GFCI receptacles or circuit breaker(s) as needed.
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62) The range can tip forward, and no anti-tip bracket appears to be installed. This is a safety hazard since the range may tip forward when weight is applied to the open door, such as when a small child climbs on it, or if heavy objects are dropped on it. Anti-tip brackets have been sold with all free standing ranges since 1985. An anti-tip bracket should be installed to eliminate this safety hazard. For more information, visit http://www.hgtv.com/hgtv/remodeling/article/0,1797,HGTV_3659_2017492,00.html

63) The oven and/or broiler door handle(s) are loose and/or missing. Repairs should be made as necessary, and by a qualified appliance technician if necessary, such as tightening or replacing handles. Both Units.
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64) Conducive conditions Tile, stone and/or grout flooring is damaged and/or deteriorated in one or more areas. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary. For example, replacing broken tiles and deteriorated grout, and resealing grout.
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65) The refrigerator appears to be inoperable. The client(s) should ask the property owner(s) about this, and if necessary, the refrigerator should be replaced, or a qualified appliance technician should evaluate and repair. Unit 1136.
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66) The range hood fan is noisy or vibrates excessively. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair or replace the fan or range hood as necessary.
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67) The oven bake function appears to be inoperable. The client(s) should ask the property owner(s) about this, and if necessary, a qualified appliance technician should evaluate and repair as necessary. Unit 1134.

68) One or more stove top burners are inoperable. A qualified appliance technician should evaluate and repair as necessary. Unit 1136.
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69) One or more cabinets and/or drawers are damaged and/or deteriorated. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair or replace cabinets and/or components as necessary.
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70) One or more vent fans are loose from the cabinet. Recommend a qualified contractor make the necessary repairs.
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71) Water damage was found in the shelving or cabinet components below one or more sinks. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary.
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72) The light in range hood is inoperable. Recommend replacing light bulb(s) or having repairs made by a qualified contractor as necessary.
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73) One or more kitchen appliances appear to be near, at, or beyond their intended service life of 10 to 15 years. Recommend budgeting for replacements as necessary.

74) The refrigerator was checked and appears to be functional. Unit 1134.
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75) The range/oven was checked and appears to be functional.
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76) General pictures of kitchen.
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Bathrooms
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77) One or more electric receptacles that serve countertop surfaces within six feet of a sink appear to have no ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate to determine if GFCI protection exists, and if not, repairs should be made so that all receptacles that serve countertop surfaces within six feet of sinks have GFCI protection. For example, install GFCI receptacles or circuit breaker(s) as needed.
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78) Conducive conditions One or more toilets are loose. A qualified contractor should remove the toilet(s) for further evaluation and repairs if necessary. A new wax ring should be installed and toilet(s) should be securely anchored to the floor to prevent movement and leaking.
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79) Conducive conditions Vinyl flooring in one or more "wet" areas is damaged and/or deteriorated. The wooden subfloor below may be damaged by water intrusion. A qualified contractor should evaluate and replace or repair the damaged flooring.
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80) One or more shower heads are missing. A qualified plumber should evaluate and repair as necessary.
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81) One or more light fixtures are damaged and/or deteriorated. A qualified electrician should evaluate and repair or replace light fixtures where necessary.
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82) One or more cabinets and/or drawers are damaged and/or deteriorated. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair or replace cabinets and/or components as necessary.
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83) One or more sink stopper mechanisms are missing, or need adjustment or repair. Stopper mechanisms should be installed where missing and/or repairs should be made so sink stoppers open and close easily.

84) Conducive conditions Caulk is missing or deteriorated along the base of one or more showers, where flooring meets the shower. It should be replaced where deteriorated and/or applied where missing to prevent water intrusion and damage to the floor structure.
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85) The enamel coating on one or more sinks is damaged and/or deteriorated. For example, chipped or worn, and/or rust on some exposed steel. However, no leaks were found due to the deterioration. The client(s) should evaluate to determine if the sinks should be replaced.
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86) The bathroom faucets were checked and appear to be functional.

87) The bathroom sinks were checked and appear to be functional.

88) The toilets were inspected and appear to be functional.

89) The bathtub(s) were checked and appear to be functional.

90) The shower(s) were checked and appear to be functional.

91) General pictures of bathrooms.
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Interior rooms
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92) One or more light fixtures are loose or installed in a substandard way. A qualified contractor or electrician should evaluate and make repairs as necessary so light fixtures are securely mounted and installed in accordance with the manufacturer's installation instructions.
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93) One or more pieces of drywall are missing under the stairs. This is a fire hazard as the framing of the stairs are exposed. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary.
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94) Based on the age of this structure and the appearance of existing smoke alarms, the alarms may be older than 5 years old. According to National Fire Protection Association, aging smoke alarms don't operate as efficiently and often are the source for nuisance alarms. Older smoke alarms are estimated to have a 30% probability of failure within the first 10 years. Newer smoke alarms do better, but should be replaced periodically as required by the manufacturer. Unless you know that the smoke alarms are new, replacing them when moving into a new residence is also recommended by NFPA. For more information, visit this article: NFPA urges replacing home smoke alarms after 10 years.

95) One or more smoke alarms are damaged, deteriorated and/or missing from their mounting brackets. Damaged and/or missing smoke alarms should be replaced as necessary so a functioning one exists in each hallway leading to bedrooms, and in each bedroom. For more information, visit http://www.cpsc.gov/cpscpub/pubs/5077.html
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96) Handrail(s) at some stairs are loose. This is a safety hazard. A qualified contractor should make repairs as necessary. For example, installing new fasteners and/or hardware so handrails are securely attached.
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97) Cover plate(s) are missing from one or more electric boxes, such as for receptacles, switches and/or junction boxes. They are intended to contain fire and prevent electric shock from exposed wires. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of fire and shock. Cover plates should be installed where missing.
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98) Batteries in all the smoke alarms should be replaced after taking occupancy, and annually in the future. "Chirping" noises emitted from smoke alarms typically indicate that batteries need replacing. For more information, visit http://www.cpsc.gov/cpscpub/pubs/5077.html

99) Conducive conditions Tile, stone and/or grout flooring is damaged and/or deteriorated in one or more areas. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary. For example, replacing broken tiles and deteriorated grout, and resealing grout.
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100) The doorbell appears to be inoperable. Recommend having a qualified electrician evaluate and repair as necessary.
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101) Seals between double-pane glass in one or more windows appear to have failed based on condensation or stains between the panes of glass. A qualified contractor should evaluate and replace glass where necessary.

The client(s) should be aware that evidence of broken seals may be more or less visible from one day to the next depending on the temperature, humidity, sunlight, etc. Windows or glass doors other than those that the inspector identified may also have failed seals and need glass replaced too.
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102) Screen(s) in one or more windows are missing. The client(s) should ask the property owner(s) about this. Screens are often removed for window cleaning and they may be stored somewhere. If not, then recommend installing screens where missing.

103) One or more doors bind in their jamb and cannot be closed and latched, or are difficult to open and close. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary. For example, adjusting jambs or trimming doors.
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104) Floors in one or more areas are not level. Significant repairs may be needed to make floors level, such as repairs to the foundation. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary.
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105) Squeaking or creaking noises occur when walking on one or more sections of flooring. This is usually caused by substandard construction practices where the subfloor decking is not adequately fastened to the framing below. For example, not enough glue was used and/or nails were used rather than screws. In most cases, this is only an annoyance rather than a structural problem. Various solutions such as Squeeeeek No More and Counter Snap fasteners exist to correct this. Repairs to eliminate the squeaks or creaks may be more or less difficult depending on the floor covering, and the access to the underside of the subfloor. Recommend having a qualified contractor evaluate and repair as necessary.
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106) The doorbell button is loose or damaged. It should be repaired or replaced as necessary, and by a qualified contractor if necessary.
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107) Minor cracks were found in ceilings in one or more areas. They do not appear to be a structural concern, but the client(s) may wish to repair these for aesthetic reasons.
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108) Glass in one or more windows is broken. A qualified contractor should replace glass where necessary.
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109) One or more doors will not latch when closed. Repairs should be made as necessary, and by a qualified contractor if necessary. For example, aligning strike plates with latch bolts and/or replacing locksets.
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110) One or more locksets are damaged and/or deteriorated. Locksets should be replaced as necessary.
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111) The weatherstrip around one or more exterior entry doors is missing and/or deteriorated. Weatherstrip should be installed where missing and/or replaced where deteriorated, and by a qualified contractor if necessary.
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112) One or more light fixtures appear to be inoperable. Recommend further evaluation by replacing bulb(s) and/or consulting with the property owner(s). Repairs or replacement of the light fixture(s) by a qualified electrician may be necessary.
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113) Minor cracks were found in walls in one or more areas. They do not appear to be a structural concern, but the client(s) may wish to repair these for aesthetic reasons.
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114) General pictures of interior rooms.
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INSPECTOR INFORMATION:



Marty Lunsford

ASHI Certified Inspector #248679
Cell # 404.502.2156

American Society of Home Inspectors